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Date Range From
1880
Date Range To
1890
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20170002000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1880
Date Range To
1890
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
103.2
Width
5
Description
BEADED BELT WITH A GEOMETRIC PATTERN SET AGAINST A GREEN BEADED BACKGROUND. PATTERN ALTERNATES BETWEEN TWO MIRRORED BLACK, YELLOW, BLUE TRIANGLES WITH THEIR BASES AT EITHER WIDTH END OF THE BELT MEETING IN THE CENTER AT THEIR POINTS AND LARGE RED AND BLUE WITH A GREEN CENTERED TRIANGLES WITH THEIR BASE AT ONE WIDTH END AND THEIR POINTS EXTENDED TO THE OPPOSING END. BEADS ARE SEWN INTO A COTTON, CANVAS FABRIC. TWO ANIMAL HIDE TIES (EACH A DIFFERENT LENGTH FROM 6.2 TO 11.8) ON EACH END AT EACH CORNER OF BELT. BACK SIDE IS RAW FABRIC WITH SEAM AT CENTER CONNECTING THE TWO HALVES. ENDS ARE HEMMED WITH TIES SEWN TO THE OUTSIDE. CONDITION: SEVERE DISCOLOURATION TO FABRIC BACKING AND SEVERE WEAR TO ANIMAL HIDE TIES. MANY LOSS THREADS OVER ENTIRE SURFACE OF BACK. BEADS AND BEADING IN EXCELLENT CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
INDIGENOUS
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
UPON THE DONATION OF THIS BELT TO THE GALT MUSEUM, THE DONOR – PATRICIA LYNCH-STAUNTON – EXPLAINED THAT THIS BELT BELONGED TO ALFRED HARDWICH LYNCH-STAUNTON, WHO SERVED IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN FORT MACLEOD. HE RANCHED IN THE LUNDBRECK AREA AND SUPPLIED HORSES TO THE MOUNTIES. THE DONOR SAID THAT SHE HAD “NO KNOWLEDGE OF HOW [ALFRED HARDWICK] CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE BELT. A NOTE ON THE INITIAL DOCUMENTATION ATTRIBUTES THE DATE OF THIS BELT TO CA. 1880-1890. THE ACTING CURATOR OF THE NATIVE NORTH AMERICAN DEPARTMENT OF THE GLENBOW, JOANNE SCHMIDT, AGREED WITH THE DONOR’S BELIEF THAT THE BELT WAS BLACKFOOT. THROUGH THE COMPARISON OF THE BEADED MOCCASINS AND BELTS IN THE GLENBOW’S COLLECTION WITH THIS BELT, SCHMIDT EXPLAINED THAT THE DESIGN ON THE BELT WAS MOSTLY FOUND ON THOSE FROM SIKSIKA, BUT SHE HAS ALSO SEEN THE DESIGN IN PIIKANI AND KAINAI BEADWORK THOUGH THERE ARE NOT MANY EXAMPLES IN THE COLLECTION. ALSO BY USING THE GLENBOW’S COLLECTION AS A POINT OF REFERENCE, THE CURATOR BELIEVES THAT THE BELT IS SIMILAR TO APPEARANCE TO THOSE OF THE CENTURY TO EARLY 20TH-CENTURY MUSEUM HOLDINGS. SCHMIDT ALSO PROVIDED AN EXPLANATION OF THE DESIGN FROM THE CANADIAN MUSEUM OF HISTORY. IT STATES, “ONE OF THE EARLIEST DESIGNES USED WAS ‘MIISTA-TSIKA-TUKSIIN,’ OR MOUNTAIN DESIGN. OTHER DESIGNS INCLUDED SQUARES, DIAMONDS, BARS, SLOTTED BARS AND STRIPES… TODAY SUCH DESIGNS ARE CALLED ‘MAAH-TOOHM-MOOWA-KA-NA-SKSIN,’ OR FIRST DESIGNS.” IT WAS FURTHER EXPLAINED THAT A COMPLICATING FACTOR IN IDENTIFYING THE BELT’S ORIGINS IS THE FACT THAT THE BLACKFOOT TENDED TO USE WHITE OR BLUE AS THE BACKGROUND COLOUR, NOT GREEN AS IS PRESENTED IN THE LYNCH-STAUNTON DONATION. ON 19 JANUARY 2017, MUSEUM STAFF FURTHER CONSULTED WITH RYAN HEAVY HEAD, FORMER DIRECTOR OF KAINAI STUDIES AT RED CROW COMMUNITY COLLEGE, REGARDING THE BELT’S DESIGN. HE EXPLAINED, “THE GREEN BACKGROUND IS ATYPICAL OF BLACKFOOT BEADWORK, WHICH IS NORMALLY BLUE. THE ‘MOUNTAIN DESIGN’ [DISPLAYED ON THE BELT] IS A COMMON MOTIF IN BLACKFOOT BEADWORK, BUT AGAIN THE COLOURS ARE NOT TYPICAL IN THIS EXAMPLE.” RYAN SPECULATED THAT DURING THE TIME OF DISEASE (WHEN THIS BELT APPEARS TO HAVE ORIGINATED) THERE WAS SOME DISRUPTION IN TRADITIONAL LIFE AND THAT COULD BE REFLECTED IN THE COLOUR CHOICES. ALTERNATIVELY, THE BELT MAY HAVE BEEN MADE BY THE GROS VENTRES FROM NORTHEAST MONTANA. THE DONOR, PATRICIA LYNCH-STAUNTON, IS THE GREAT-GRANDDAUGHTER OF ALFRED HARDWICK LYNCH-STAUNTON. THIS BELT WAS PASSED DOWN THROUGH THE FAMILY, FIRST FROM A. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON, THEN TO THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, F. C. LYNCH-STAUNTON, THEN TO HER FATHER, A. G. LYNCH-STAUNTON, FINALLY TO THE DONOR WHO BROUGHT IT TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THE “A. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON FAMILY HISTORY” WRITTEN FOR THE MUSEUM USING ONLINE SOURCES, THE GLENBOW ARCHIVES, AND THE BOOK TITLED “HISTORY OF THE EARLY DAYS OF PINCHER CREEK AND SOUTHERN MOUNTAINS OF ALBERTA.” “ALFRED HARDWICK LYNCH-STAUNTON (1860-1932) WAS BORN IN HAMILTON, ON AND CAME TO FORT MACLEOD IN 1877 TO JOIN THE NWMP. ACCORDING TO THE PINCHER CREEK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, HE WAS SENT TO ESTABLISH A HORSE BREEDING FARM AT PINCHER CREEK IN 1878. AFTER RETIRING FROM THE NWMP IN 1880, LYNCH-STAUNTON STATED THE FIRST CATTLE RANCH IN THE PINCHER CREEK AREA WITH JAMES BRUNEAU AND ISSAC MAY, AND LATER HOMESTEADED WEST OF TOWN. ALONG WITH HIS RANCH, LYNCH-STAUNTON MARRIED SARAH MARY BLAKE (1864-1933) IN 1890 AND THEY HAVE FIVE CHILDREN: VICTORIA, FRANDA, FRANCIS, JOHN, AND D’ARCY… A.H.’S BROTHER RICHARD LYNCH-STAUNTON (1867-1961) CAME AS FAR WEST AS MEDICINE HAT IN 1883 WITH HIS FATHER, F. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON, WHO WAS IN CHARGE OF THE SURVEY PARTY. RICHARD CAME WEST AGAIN, TO PINCHER CREEK, IN 1885 OR 1886. IN ABOUT 1900, HE ACQUIRED LAND NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ON TODD CREEEK, WHICH BECAME THE ANTELOPE BUTTE RANCH. RICHARD AND A. H. WERE IN PARTNERSHIP FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS IN CATTLE-RANCHING AND, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, WITH THE BUTCHER SHOP. IN 1901, RICHARD MARRIED ISABELLE MARY WILSON (1868-1971), AND THEIR SON FRANK LYNCH-STAUNTON (1905-1990), ALBERTA’S 11TH LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR FROM 1979 TO 1985. LYNCH-STAUNTON DESCENDANTS CONTINUE TO RANCH IN THE LUNDBRECK/PINCHER CREEK AREA.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING CORRESPONDENCE WITH DONOR AND PEOPLE CITED IN ABOVE HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P20170002000
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BUTTON
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180014002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BUTTON
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Diameter
2.7
Description
A: SILVER-COLOURED METAL BUTTON. SHIELD OF ALBERTA EMBOSSED ON THE CENTER OF THE BUTTON. “ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE” EMBOSSED AROUND THE CREST. SHINY FINISH. THE BACK OF THE BUTTON IS BRASS IN COLOUR. AROUND THE CENTRE OF THE BACK “W. SCULLY MONTREAL” IS MACHINE ENGRAVED. THERE IS A LOOP FOR A PIN FASTENER LOOSELY ATTACHED TO THE BACK B: TWO-PRONGED BRASS PIN WITH A CIRCULAR LOOP ON ONE END AND THE TWO ENDS ON THE PIN EXTENDING OUT INTO A V-SHAPE ON THE OTHER. PIN IS 3.2 CM IN LENGTH AND AT THE WIDEST POINT THE PRONGS ARE 1.1 CM APART. CONDITION: SLIGHT SCRATCHING ON THE FRONT AND BACK SURFACES OF THE BUTTON. BRASS BACK IS SLIGHTLY TARNISHED. METAL OF PIN IN SLIGHTLY DISCOLOURED.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS BUTTON BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN. ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY PROVIDED WITH A BUCHANAN A. P. P.-RELATED DONATION MADE BY JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN 2002 (P20020090). IT STATES, "BORN IN GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, WHERE BUCHANAN BEGAN REGULAR SCHOOLING AT THE AGE OF 4, WHICH ENABLED HIM TO COMPLETE HIS HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HIS PARENTS MOVED THE FAMILY TO CANADA IN MAY 1914. THE FAMILY SETTLED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WHERE EDWARD FOUND A JOB PLUS ENROLLED IN NIGHT CLASSES AT THE EDMONTON TECHNICAL SCHOOL TAKING ENGLISH, CANADIAN HISTORY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MANUAL TRAINING IN WOODWORKING. IN FEBRUARY 1917, THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS ORGANIZED. ED JOINED IN MAY OF 1920." AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. DESCRIBING HER FATHER’S CAREER, BUCHANAN BEGAN, “[MY DAD] JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL…AS A ROOKIE – RIGHT AT THE START – HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. AND IT WASN’T LONG UNTIL HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE REAL POLICING. WHEN THE CRAZY PROHIBITION WAS BROUGHT IN, THAT WAS A REAL PAIN FOR THE POLICE. IT WAS [A MOVEMENT] PUSHED BY THESE DO-GOODERS, WHO DIDN’T REALIZE WHAT THEY WERE DOING. DAD WAS VERY UPSET TALKING ABOUT THAT. EVEN WHEN HE WAS JUST A YOUNG FELLOW, [HE WAS] FINDING YOUNG, GOOD FARM BOYS BLIND OR DEAD OVER A FENCE, BECAUSE THEY HAD A PROBLEM WITH THE PROHIBITION AND GETTING MOONSHINE THAT WASN’T MATURE OR SOMETHING, [WHICH] WAS POISONOUS.” “IN 1921 HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON,” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL. HE THEN GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE AND HE WAS GOING TO GO THERE, BUT THEN IN 1922 THEY GOT MARRIED [SO HE DID NOT GO TO GRAND PRAIRIE] FORTUNATELY, THE A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. DID, SO HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED. [AFTER MY PARENTS’ MARRIAGE] THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD, WHERE HE WAS ON HIS OWN [AT THE POSTING]. FROM THERE, HE DID A LOT OF WORK GOING BACK AND FORTH.” “BRAINARD [WAS] A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION… THEY BUILT DAD A LOG CABIN DOWN THERE FOR THE HOUSE WITH HIS NEW WIFE AND [SOON AFTER THEY WERE] EXPECTING THEIR FIRST CHILD. [THE CABIN HAD] ONE BIG ROOM WITH CURTAINS HERE AND THERE, AND HE DIDN’T HAVE A PRISON THERE. WHEN HE TOOK IN A PRISONER, THAT’S WHEN HE NEEDED THE OREGON BOOT AND THE BALL AND CHAIN BECAUSE HE HAD A BIG BOLT ON THE FLOOR NEAR HIS OFFICE. THAT’S WHERE THE GUY HAD TO SIT, CHAINED, UNTIL [MY FATHER] COULD TAKE HIM ON INTO EDMONTON…EVEN IN THE A.P.P. TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON. [HE WOULD BE] BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE],” BUCHANAN EXPLAINED EXPANDING ON HOW HER FATHER’S WORK TOOK HIM “BACK AND FORTH.” “THEN THEY CLOSED THAT [BRAINAR POST] DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY – A LITTLE VILLAGE – AND HE WAS THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. [HE WAS THERE] WHEN 1932 CAME ALONG AND THEN HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P… AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. [FROM THERE] HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT, WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO [COVER]. AND THERE AGAIN, WE HAD A NICE, BIG WHITE HOUSE AND A JAIL THIS TIME… THE JAIL OFFICE AND THE COURTROOM AND EVERYTHING WAS CONNECTED [TO THE HOUSE]. YOU JUST GO DOWN THE HALL AND OPEN THE DOOR AND THERE YOU GO, AND THERE’S TWO JAILS IN THERE. [THERE] HE WAS GETTING ROOKIES COMING OUT FROM EDMONTON TO TRAIN UNDER HIM… [I WAS BORN IN] ’30 [AND] NOW IN ’34, I REMEMBER GOING THERE [TO WESTLOCK].” SPEAKING ABOUT THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P. IN 1932 AND THE ABSORPTION OF SOME OF ITS MEMBERS INTO THE R. C. M P., BUCHANAN EXPLAINED, “[A. P. P. OFFICERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY [WERE RANKED] INTO THREE CATEGORIES. [FIRST, THERE WERE THE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE; THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P. THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEN THERE WERE THE ONES THAT COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY [INTO THE FORCE FOR THE TRIAL PERIOD]. THEY COULD [BE ACCEPTED] FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY AGAIN [FOR FULL-TIME]. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE, [WHO] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE…IT IS IMPORTANT [TO REMEMBER], THOSE A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT. THEY WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” WHEN ANSWERING HOW HER FATHER ENDED UP WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE, BUCHANAN SAID, “[AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P.], ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER [OF THE R. C. M. P.] HANCOCK (WILLIAM FREDERICK WATKINS “BILL” HANCOCK) KNEW DAD REALLY WELL. [PREVIOUSLY, HANCOCK] WAS THE [ACTING COMMISSIONER] FOR THE ALBERTA [PROVINCIAL POLICE]. [HANCOCK] CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, ‘BUCK – DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’A LOT – I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT, BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT. YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?’” AS A RESULT, EDWARD BUCHANAN WAS RELOCATED TO THE R. C. M. P.’S LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT IN 1944. JEAN BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “DAD’S PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, VERY FIRMLY. AND THE STAFF [IN LETHBRIDGE] ENDED UP LOVING HIM. THE SECRETARIES AND EVERYTHING, THEY WERE CRYING WHEN HE LEFT. AND I GOT LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON… BUT [IN TERMS OF] THE SITUATION [WHICH ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK WAS REFERRING TO], NO, HE WAS FINE. HE NEVER HAD ANY TROUBLE. HE JUST FIRMLY, QUIETLY DEALT WITH EVERYTHING AND EVERYTHING WAS FINE. I NEVER SAW HIM STRESSED OUT. ALWAYS COOL, LAID BACK.” “[WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE], WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET SOUTH. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. BUT WE HAD [SOME] TROUBLE BECAUSE DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US. HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE [THAT WAS] READY, SO WHEN WE CAME DOWN [WE] STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. AND THEN I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE – LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS. ANYWAY, I GOT THROUGH GRADE TWELVE AND THAT’S ALRIGHT.” “[ANOTHER THING HE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR HERE IN LETHBRIDGE] WAS TO OVERSEE THE PRISONER OF WAR (POW) CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POWS IN THE RESPECT THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. THEY WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY, BUT THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY. THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. [MY DAD] RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT… AND THEN THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK ON THE [FARMS], BECAUSE THERE WAS A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS… BUT, OF COURSE, I KNEW ABOUT THE CRUELTY OF SOME OF THE HARD-CORE NAZIS THAT WERE IN THERE. THE TROUBLE WAS THERE WASN’T ENOUGH FORCE POLICE TO GO IN THERE SAFELY. THEY COULDN’T EVEN GET IN THE POW CAMP AND THE CIVIL GUARDS WERE THE ONLY ONES THAT WERE AVAILABLE, BUT THEY DIDN’T EVEN DARE GO IN HALF THE TIME. IT WAS REALLY SOMETHING. THERE WERE SOME GUYS IN THERE THAT WERE REALLY, REALLY MEAN…” “AND OH YES, A FEW [MEN DID TRY TO ESCAPE THE CAMP],” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT THEY DIDN’T GET VERY FAR. THEY NEVER GOT AWAY. I’VE GOT RECORDS OF ONES THAT WERE CAUGHT. THEY STOLE SOMEBODY’S CAR. SOME OF THEM GOT A REGULAR SENTENCE FOR BREAKING ONE OF OUR LAWS.” BUCHANAN CONFIRMS THAT HER FATHER RETIRED FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN 1950 WHILE IN LETHBRIDGE. AFTER RETIREMENT, SHE EXPLAINED, “[HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON, HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS… BUT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE WITH HIS RECORD, SO THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA…HE THEN WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN OR SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS…” EDWARD BUCHANAN “SORT OF” RETIRED FROM THAT ROLE IN THE 1970S, HIS DAUGHTER EXPLAINED. HE CONTINUED WORKING IN SOME CAPACITIES UNTIL HIS PASSING IN 1998. “[I RECEIVED MY DAD’S R. C. M. P. POSSESSIONS, BECAUSE HE] KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER IT AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM… HE LIVED TO BE NINETY-EIGHT AND I DON’T THINK HE EVER THREW ANYTHING OUT SINCE HE WAS IN HIS TWENTIES.” ACCORDING TO EDWARD E. “BUCK” BUCHANAN’S OBITUARY, HE PASSED AWAY IN IN EDMONTON IN 1998. HIS WIFE’S NAME WAS CHRISTENE BUCHANAN AND TOGETHER THEY HAD FIVE CHILDREN – EDWARD, ROBERT, JEAN, WILLIAM, AND ROSE-MARIE. THE OBITUARY STATES HE SERVED 31 YEARS IN THE R.C.M.P, AND 15 YEARS AS THE SUPERINTENDENT OF CORRECTIONS FOR ALBERTA. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20180014002
Acquisition Date
2018-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MAHJONG SET
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20150028000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MAHJONG SET
Date
1987
Materials
PLASTIC
No. Pieces
159
Height
9.6
Length
23
Width
23
Description
A – G: 7 STANDARD 6-SIDED DICE. 6 OF THE DICE HAVE BLACK DOTS ON A WHITE BACKGROUND, EXCEPT RED DOTS FOR THE ONE AND THE FOUR ON ALL DICE. THE SEVENTH DIE IS THE SAME AS THE FIRST SIX BUT WITH BROWN DOTS INSTEAD OF BLACK. THE DICE ARE 1.4 CM CUBED WITH ROUNDED EDGES. GOOD CONDITION: NORMAL WEAR FROM USE. H-I: A DIRECTIONAL PIECE CUBE (LIKE A DIE) AND A HOLDER. THERE ARE RED CHINESE CHARACTERS ON 4 OF THE 6 SIDES OF THE WHITE CUBE. THE DIE IS 1.2 CM CUBED. THE PIECE’S CIRCULAR HOLDER HAS A RED TOP AND A WHITE BASE WITH A CUBE INSERT IN THE CENTER OF THE TOP THAT FITS THE DIRECTIONAL PIECE. THE HOLDER IS IN FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. IT IS WELL WORN AND THE EDGES ARE YELLOWING. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION WITH SOME WEAR TO THE CHARACTERS AND THE CORNERS OF THE DIE. J-BBBBBBB: MAHJONG GAME SET. 144 TILES PLUS 4 BLANK SPARES (148 TILES TOTAL). THERE ARE 108 SIMPLE TILES (OF THE 3 SUITS: DOTS, BAMBOO, AND CHARACTERS), THERE ARE 28 HONOURS TILES (16 WINDS AND 16 DRAGONS), AND THERE ARE TWO SETS OF BONUS TILES (FLOWERS AND SEASONS) EACH WITH 4 TILES IN THE SET. EACH TILE IS 3.5 X 2.8 X 2.1 CM. VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION WITH SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE TILES. CCCCCCC – DDDDDDD: GREEN RUBBERMAID PLASTIC CONTAINER WITH A WHITE PLASTIC LID FOR THE MAHJONG SET’S CASE. THE BOTTOM OF THE CONTAINER READS “RUBBERMAID 4 QUARTS” “J-3204”. THE DIMENSIONS OF THE CONTAINER ARE 23 X 23 X 9.6 CM. THE DIMENSIONS OF THE LID ARE 23 X 24.5 X 1.5 CM. GOOD CONDITION. THE OVERALL SURFACE OF BOTH THE CONTAINER AND THE LID ARE SCRATCHED. ON THE LID, THE TOP COATING OF PLASTIC IS PEELING OFF. THERE IS ADHESIVE TAPE RESIDUE IN ONE CORNER.
Subjects
GAME
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
LEISURE
History
ON NOVEMBER 10, 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RICHARD LOO AT THE GALT MUSEUM REGARDING A MAHJONG SET HE WAS DONATING TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MAHJONG IS A TILE-BASED GAME THAT ORIGINATED IN CHINA. LOO RECALLS ACQUIRING THE SET APPROXIMATELY 30 OR 40 YEARS AGO. HE SAID HE GOT THEM, “WHEN I WENT BACK TO HONG KONG. LET’S SEE – ’87. I WENT TO HONG KONG IN ’87. I BOUGHT SEVERAL [MAHJONG] SETS… TO GIVE TO THE KIDS IF THEY WERE INTERESTED. HERE, THEY ARE NOT AVAILABLE – NOT IN THIS CITY. YOU CAN GET IT IN CALGARY, BUT, IF I BROUGHT IT BACK FROM CHINA, IT’S A BETTER DEAL FOR ME… I STILL HAVE A COUPLE OF SETS AT HOME. I GIVE SOME TO MY FRIENDS; SOME TO THE KIDS.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS USE OF GAME SET, LOO EXPLAINED, “I USE IT NOT TOO MANY TIMES… THEY COME IN A CASE – LIKE A BRIEFCASE - JUST FLIMSY STUFF. IF IT WAS USED SO LONG, IT WOULD JUST GO IN PIECES. SO I PUT IT INTO CONTAINERS – KEEPS A BETTER SHAPE, THAT’S ALL.” HE EXPLAINS THAT THE GAME IS PLAYED, “MOSTLY AT HOME. TO FOOL AROUND; JUST TO KILL TIME,” AND THAT THE SET DONATED WAS A PERSONAL SET THAT HAS ALWAYS BEEN AT LOO’S HOUSE. “THERE ARE SO MANY DIFFERENT STYLES OF PLAY. WHEN I CAME, IN THOSE DAYS, WE PLAYED A DIFFERENT WAY, AND AFTER YOU STAYED FOR A LITTLE WHILE, THEY PLAYED A DIFFERENT WAY… YOU PLAY THIS GAME MORE GENERALLY FOR ENTERTAINMENT, KILLING TIME; THE PURPOSE IS NOT TO MAKE MONEY… SEE, I REMEMBER THOSE DAYS, WHEN I WAS YOUNG – JUST A KID THOSE DAYS, IN THE OLD COUNTRY, OLD DAYS. IN THE NEW YEAR, I SAW FOUR OLDER GENTLEMEN PLAY THESE GAMES, BUT I DON’T UNDERSTAND…. WE CALL IT OLD STYLE. NOBODY IS INTERESTED IN PLAYING OLD STYLE ANYMORE. [IT IS] QUITE COMPLICATED... THEY PLAY THIS ONE, JUST LIKE YOU PLAY RUMMY, BUT YOU HAVE TO USE YOUR HEAD A LITTLE BIT. SOMETIMES YOU’VE GOT LUCK TOO." LOO SAYS HE DOES NOT MISS PLAYING THE GAME, “FOR MY AGE, NO. RIGHT NOW, NOT INTERESTED - [I'VE] GOT OTHER THINGS TO DO. YOU PLAY FOR SO LONG, AND THEN, [YOU ARE] NOT INTERESTED ANYMORE. WE USED TO PLAY THIS ON NEW YEAR’S EVE, TILL THE NEXT MORNING. [WE WOULD] START ON NEW YEAR’S EVE TILL TOMORROW MORNING, 6 OR 7 O’CLOCK. NOT ANYMORE. WE PLAYED AT ALBERT’S PLACE, BOW ON TONG…” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ABOUT RICHARD LOO HAS BEEN TAKEN FROM THE ARTIFACT RECORDS P20110031*: LOO ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1953, HAVING LEFT THE MAINLAND OF CHINA IN 1949. LOO'S GRANDFATHER HAD MOVED TO CANADA IN EITHER LATE 1800S OR THE EARLY 1900S AND HAD HAD TO PAY THE HEAD TAX. HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED AS A COOK IN RESTAURANTS, EITHER IN LETHBRIDGE OR IN TABER (ACCORDING TO LOO, HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED THROUGH THE WAR YEARS IN TABER). LOO’S GRANDFATHER HAD PLANNED ON MOVING BACK TO CHINA WHEN HE RETIRED, BUT THEN THE COMMUNISTS TOOK OVER, AND HE ELECTED TO STAY. AT THAT TIME, HE INVITED LOO TO MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE AS WELL. LOO LEFT HONG KONG, AFTER LIVING THERE FOR 8 MONTHS, ON A FRIDAY AFTERNOON AT 2PM LOCAL TIME. HE ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE SUNDAY AFTERNOON. HE WAS LUCKY IN THAT HE WAS ABLE TO GET HIS FLIGHTS ON SALE. NORMALLY A TICKET FROM HONG KONG TO VANCOUVER WOULD HAVE COST $700, BUT LOO WAS ABLE TO SECURE A FLIGHT FOR ONLY $500. HE ALSO INDICATED THAT HIS FLIGHT TO LETHBRIDGE WAS ONLY $39.95. ON RECALLING HIS FIRST TIME IN LETHBRIDGE, LOO RECOUNTED THE FOLLOWING STORY: “SO, BY THE TIME I GOT TO THE AIRPORT, I DIDN’T KNOW HOW TO SAY [ANYTHING]. DIDN’T KNOW – MAYBE COULD SAY ‘GOOD MORNING’ – THAT’S ALL I COULD SAY, JUST HOW TO SAY ‘HELLO.' IN THE MEANTIME, THE FELLOW AT THE AIRPORT MUST HAVE KNOWN ZEKE, YOU KNOW ZEKE QUAN [OWNER OF] THE LOTUS INN [RESTAURANT], AND HE PHONED HIM UP. HE SAYS, ‘ZEKE.’ I DIDN’T KNOW WHAT HE WAS TALKING ABOUT – NOTHING. AND THEN HE SAYS, ‘HEY, THIS IS A CHINA BOY HERE. WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO WITH HIM?’ SO, ZEKE SAYS, ‘OH, JUST TAKE HIM TO CHINATOWN AND DUMP HIM.’ NOW, I DIDN’T KNOW THOSE, NOT UNTIL LATER ON. ZEKE’S SON GO TO SAME SCHOOL I DID – CENTRAL SCHOOL.” LOO INITIALLY LIVED IN THE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY BUILDING FOR SEVERAL YEARS, OCCUPYING A ROOM THAT HAD BEEN RECENTLY VACATED BY ANOTHER MAN NAMED LOO WHO HAD GONE TO WORK IN PICTURE BUTTE. LOO RECALLED THAT THE SOCIETY WAS A GOOD PLACE TO FEEL A SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND THAT IT WAS A WELCOMING PLACE FOR NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS, A PLACE WHERE THEY WEREN’T DISCRIMINATED AGAINST. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION
Catalogue Number
P20150028000
Acquisition Date
2015-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
No. Pieces
1
Height
107
Diameter
54.5
Description
WOODEN SPINNING WHEEL COATED WITH RED WOOD VARNISH. THE BOBBIN IS APPROX. 11.5CM IN LENGTH AND APPROX. 9CM IN DIAMETER. THERE IS SOME HANDSPUN, WHITE YARN REMAINING ON THE BOBBIN, IN ADDITION TO A SMALL AMOUNT OF GREEN YARN. THE SPINNING WHEEL IS FULLY ASSEMBLED. ON EITHER SIDE OF THE FLYER THERE ARE 10 METAL HOOKS. ON THE LEFT SIDE ONE OF THE 10 HOOKS IS PARTIALLY BROKEN OFF. ON THE FRONT MAIDEN, A WHITE STRING IS TIED AROUND A FRONT KNOB WITH A METAL WIRE BENT LIKE A HOOK (POSSIBLY TO PULL YARN THROUGH THE METAL ORIFICE ATTACHED TO FLYER). LONG SECTION OF RED YARN LOOPED AROUND THE SPINNING WHEEL (MAY BE DRIVE BAND). TREADLE IS TIED TO THE FOOTMAN WITH A DARK GREY, FLAT STRING THAT IS 5MM IN WIDTH. GOOD CONDITION. TREADLE IS WELL WORN WITH VARNISH WORN OFF AND METAL NAIL HEADS EXPOSED.
Subjects
TEXTILEWORKING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS ACQUIRED THIS SPINNING WHEEL FROM HER MOTHER AT THE SAME TIME SHE ACQUIRED THE RUG (P20160003006-GA). SHE EXPLAINS: “I ASKED HER IF I COULD USE THE SPINNING WHEEL – SHE TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN. AND SHE ALSO TAUGHT ME HOW TO WEAVE, ACTUALLY MY GRANDMOTHER DID THAT MORE SO THAN MY MOTHER. AND I BELONG TO THE WEAVERS’ GUILD, SO I THOUGHT THAT I BETTER DO SOME SPINNING. AND I DID SOME, SO THAT’S WHY I’VE GOT IT HERE AND MOTHER SAID NOT TO BOTHER BRINGING IT BECAUSE SHE WASN’T GOING TO DO ANYMORE SPINNING. SHE HAD LOTS AND LOTS OF YARN THAT SHE DID. SO IT’S BEEN SITTING HERE; IT WAS IN THE BASEMENT.” THE WHEEL WAS MADE FOR ELIZABETH KONKIN WHEN SHE WAS A CHILD IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS EXPLAINED THAT: “… [THE SPINNING WHEEL] WAS MADE ESPECIALLY FOR HER. SHE WAS VERY YOUNG. AND THAT IS THE CADILLAC OF SPINNING WHEELS… BECAUSE SHE KNEW WHO THE SPINNERS WERE, WHO THE SPINNING WHEEL CARPENTERS WERE. AND THERE WAS ONE PARTICULAR MAN AND HER MOTHER SAID, ‘WE’LL GO TO THAT ONE.’ AND THEN IN TURN, IN PAYMENT, SHE WOVE HIM ENOUGH MATERIAL TO MAKE A SUIT – A LINEN ONE… [T]HEY DIDN’T LIVE IN CASTELLAR, THEY LIVED IN ANOTHER PLACE. IT’S CALLED - IN RUSSIAN IT IS CALLED OOTISCHENIA. IT’S WHERE THE BIG – ONE OF THE BIG DAMS IS. IF YOU EVER GO ON THAT ROAD, THERE’LL BE DAMS – I THINK ABOUT 3 HUGE ONES… NEAR CASTELLAR, YEAH.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE TIME THE WHEEL WAS BUILT FOR HER MOTHER, MORRIS ANSWERED: “… [S]HE GOT IT LONG BEFORE [HER MARRIAGE].” SHE EXPLAINED THAT PRIOR TO MARRYING, GIRLS WOULD PUT TOGETHER TROUSSEAUS “AND THEY MAKE ALL KINDS OF FANCY THINGS WHICH THEY NEVER USE.” MORRIS RECALLS THE SPINNING WHEEL BEING USED WITHIN HER FAMILY’S HOME IN SHOULDICE AND IN THE LEAN-TO AREA IN THEIR HOME AT VAUXHALL: ‘WELL I THINK [THE SKILL IS] IN THE GENES ACTUALLY. BECAUSE MOST FAMILIES WOVE, AND THEY CERTAINLY SPUN, AS FAR AS I REMEMBER. I KNOW EVERY FALL THE LOOM WOULD COME OUT AND WE WERE LIVING WITH MY GRANDPARENTS ON MY DAD’S [SIDE]. WE LIVED UPSTAIRS, AND EVERY WINTER THEY’D HAUL THAT HUGE LOOM INTO THE BATHHOUSE – THE STEAM BATHHOUSE – BECAUSE THERE WAS NO ROOM ANYWHERE ELSE. AND THEY – THE LADIES SET IT UP AND IN THE SUMMERTIME. THEY TORE THE RAGS FOR THE RUGS, OR SPUN THEM. [FOR] WHATEVER THEY WERE GOING TO MAKE. MY MOM WAS SPINNING WHEN I WAS OLD. [S]HE USED MAKE MITTENS AND SOCKS FOR THE KIDS FOR MY CHILDREN AND SO WHEN SHE DIED THERE WAS A WHOLE STACK OF THESE MITTENS AND SOCKS AND I’VE BEEN GIVING IT TO MY GRAND[KIDS AND] MY GREAT GRANDKIDS” MORRIS ALSO USED THIS SPINNING WHEEL MANY TIMES HERSELF. SHE SAID, “IT WAS VERY EASY TO SPIN AND WHEN YOU TRY SOMEBODY ELSE’S SPINNING WHEEL YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE RIGHT AWAY. IT’S LIKE DRIVING A CADILLAC AND THEN DRIVING AN OLD FORD. IT’S JUST, IT’S SMOOTH. OUR SON, I TOLD YOU HE WAS VERY CLEVER, HE TRIED SPINNING AND HE SAID IT WAS JUST A VERY, VERY GOOD SPINNING WHEEL. WHEN I WAS IN THE GUILD I TRIED DOING [WHAT] MY MOTHER TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN FINE THREAD AND I WANTED HEAVY THREAD BECAUSE NOW [THEY'RE] MAKING THESE WALL HANGINGS. THEY USE THREAD AS THICK AS TWO FINGERS SO I DID THAT AND I DYED IT. I WENT OUT AND CREATED MY OWN DYES. THAT WAS FUN AND THEN I HAVE A SAMPLER OF ALL THE DYES I MADE… I STOPPED SPINNING SHORTLY BEFORE I STOPPED WEAVING… I LOVED WEAVING. FIRST OF ALL I LEARNED HOW TO EMBROIDER. I LIKED THAT THEN I LEARNED HOW CROCHET, I LIKED THAT. THEN I LEARNED HOW TO KNIT AND THAT WAS TOPS. THEN ONE DAY I WAS VISITING MY FRIEND, FRANCES, AND SHE WAS GOING TO THE BOWMAN AND I SAID, 'WHERE ARE YOU GOING?' SHE SAID 'I’M GOING THERE TO WEAVE.' I SAID, 'I DIDN’T KNOW YOU COULD WEAVE?' SHE SAID, 'OH YES,' AND I SAID ‘IS IT HARD?' SHE SAID, ‘NO,” SO I WENT THERE AND I SAW THE THINGS SHE WOVE. THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL AND SO I JOINED THE GROUP AND THEN OF COURSE I WANTED TO HAVE SOME OF THE STUFF I HAD SPUN MYSELF AND DYED MYSELF AND NOBODY ELSE WANTED. THEN I DECIDED, ‘ALRIGHT, I’VE WOVEN ALL THESE THINGS, WOVE MYSELF A SUIT, LONG SKIRT YOU NAME IT. PLACE MATS GALORE. THIS LITTLE RUNNER,’ AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH THE REST BECAUSE NOBODY WANTS HOMESPUN STUFF. THEY WANT TO GO TO WALMART OR SOME PLACE AND BUY SOMETHING READYMADE,’ SO I GAVE UP SPINNING AND WEAVING… I STOPPED AFTER I MADE MY SUIT. THAT MUST HAVE BEEN ABOUT TWENTY YEARS AGO, EASILY.” MORRIS’ MOTHER WOULD WEAVE IN SHOULDICE, BUT “[I]N VAUXHALL, NO, SHE WASN’T [WEAVING]. SHE DIDN’T HAVE A LOOM.” MORRIS SAID IN SHOULDICE, “I LEARNED HOW TO THROW THE SHUTTLE BACK AND FORTH TO WEAVE RUGS BECAUSE I USED TO SIT THERE WATCHING MY GRANDMOTHER AND SHE LET ME DO THAT, AND THEN YOU SEE WHEN I GOT SO INTERESTED IN WEAVING THAT I BOUGHT A LOOM, SITTING DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. I’VE BEEN TRYING TO SELL IT EVER SINCE AND NOBODY WANTS IT. I OFFERED TO GIVE IT FOR FREE AND NOBODY WANTS IT BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE SPACE FOR IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1949
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1949
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Length
26
Width
7.8
Description
HANDMADE, WOODEN SOUP LADLE. FINISHED WITH WOOD VARNISH. IT HAS A SKINNY HANDLE THAT IS APPROX. 1 CM IN WIDTH. A HOLE HAS BEEN DRILLED AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. GOOD CONDITION. SEVERE STAINING/DARKENING AT THE BOWL OF THE SPOON. WOOD VARNISH IS CHIPPING ON OVERALL SURFACE OF THE SPOON.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
DOMESTIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS WAS ATTACHED TO THIS ARTIFACT AT THE TIME OF DONATION. IT EXPLAINED THAT THIS LADLE WAS HAND CARVED BY WILLIAM KONKIN C.1940. IN THE INTERVIEW MORRIS EXPLAINS: “OKAY THE LADLES ARE ALWAYS USED FOR LIFTING UP SOUP AND ANYTHING ELSE THAT HAPPENS TO BE A LIQUID. IT’S EASIER. THIS IS A SMALL ONE SO THEY WERE SMALLER HELPINGS OR WHATEVER IT WAS THAT YOU WERE DOING... THAT’S THE LAST ONE HE MADE.” OF THIS LADLE, MORRIS REMEMBERS: “OH JUST THAT WE ATE SOUP AND BORSCH WITH IT.” WILLIAM KONKIN MADE MANY ITEMS USED BY THE FAMILY AND CONSTRUCTED THE FAMILY HOMES OF VAUXHALL AND LETHBRIDGE. MORRIS STATES, ”SEE MY DAD WAS VERY GIFTED, I ONLY NOW APPRECIATING HIM.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003003
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41
Width
36
Description
HANDMADE BAG MADE OF 3 SECTIONS OF STRIPS OF ABOUT 5 INCHES (APPROX. 13 CM) EACH. IT IS RED WITH BLUE, YELLOW, GREEN, AND RAW MATERIAL ACCENTS. THE TRIM AT THE TOP OF THE BAG IS BLUE WITH A HANDLE OF THE SAME FABRIC ON EITHER SIDE. THERE IS A STRIP OF RAW, NOT PATTERNED FABRIC AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAG. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAG HAVE THE SAME ARRANGEMENT OF PATTERNED STRIPS. THERE IS ONE SEAM CONNECTING THE FRONT AND THE BACK OF THE BAG ON BOTH SIDES. THE INSIDE IS UNLINED. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SOME STITCHING COMING LOOSE AT VARIOUS POINTS OF THE PATTERNING.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A STATEMENT WRITTEN BY MORRIS ATTACHED TO THE BAG STATES THAT THE MATERIAL OF THE BAG ORIGINATES FROM THE 1870S. THE STATEMENT READS: “THIS BAG WAS HAND WOVEN IN STRIPS [THAT WERE USED] TO SEW ON THE BOTTOM OF PETTICOATS. THE GIRLS AT THAT TIME HAD TO HAVE A TROUSEUA [SIC] TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE AFTER MARRIAGE THERE WOULD BE NO TIME TO MAKE CLOTHES SO WHAT THEY MADE WAS STURDY. THEY STARTED ON THEIR TROUSEUS [SIC] AS SOON AS THEY COULD HOLD A NEEDLE. WHEN IT WAS HAYING TIME THE GIRLS WENT OUT INTO THE FIELD TO RAKE THE HAY. THEY WORE PETTICOATS OF LINEN TO WHICH THESE BANDS WERE SEWN. THE LONG SKIRTS WERE PICKED UP AT THE SIDES AND TUCKED INTO THE WAISTBANDS SO THAT THE BOTTOMS OF THE PETTICOATS WERE ON DISPLAY.” “THESE BANDS WERE ORIGINALLY MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER’S WHO CAME OUT OF RUSSIA WITH THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT IN 1899. THEY WERE PASSED ON TO MY MOTHER, ELIZABETH KONKIN, WHO MADE THEM INTO A BAG IN THE 1940S” THE STRIPS THAT MAKE UP THE BAG SERVED A UTILITARIAN PURPOSE WHEN SEWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PETTICOATS. IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS EXPLAINS: “… THESE STRIPS ARE VERY STRONG. THEY’RE LIKE CANVAS. THEY WERE SEWN ONTO THE BOTTOM OF THE LADY’S PETTICOATS AND THEY WORE A SKIRT ON TOP OF THE PETTICOATS. THESE STRIPS LASTED A LIFETIME, IN FACT MORE THAN ONE LIFETIME BECAUSE I’VE GOT THEM NOW. THEY WOULD TUCK THE SKIRTS INTO THEIR WAISTBAND ON THE SIDE SO THEIR PETTICOATS SHOWED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO PRESERVE THEIR SKIRTS NOT TO GET CAUGHT IN THE GRAIN. THE GIRLS LIKED TO WEAR THEM TO SHOW OFF BECAUSE THE BOYS WERE THERE AND THEY ALWAYS WORE THEIR VERY BEST SUNDAY CLOTHES WHEN THEY WENT CUTTING WHEAT OR GRAIN." “[THE FABRIC] CAME FROM RUSSIA. WITH THE AREA WHERE THEY CAME FROM IS NOW GEORGIA AND THEY LIVED ABOUT SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE TURKISH BORDER, THE PRESENT DAY TURKISH BORDER… [THE DOUKHOBORS] CAME TO CANADA IN 1897 AND 1899.” MORRIS EXPLAINS THAT SURPLUS FABRIC WOULD HAVE BEEN BROUGHT TO CANADA FROM RUSSIA BY HER MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER FOR FUTURE USE AND TO AID THE GIRLS IN MAKING THEIR TROUSSEAUS: “THE TROUSSEAU THE GIRLS MADE HAD TO LAST THEM A LIFETIME BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T HAVE TIME BUT RAISING CHILDREN TO SEWING THINGS. SEWING MACHINES WERE UNKNOWN THEN.” THE BANDS OF FABRIC THAT MAKE UP THE BAG WOULD HAVE BEEN REMAINS NEVER USED FROM ELIZABETH KONKIN’S TROUSSEAU. SHE HAND WOVE THE BAG WHILE SHE WAS LIVING IN SHOULDICE. THE BAG WAS USED BY MORRIS’ MOTHER TO STORE HER KNITTING SUPPLIES. WHEN MORRIS ACQUIRED THE BAG IN THE 1990S, IT MAINTAINED A SIMILAR PURPOSE: “WELL I USED TO CARRY MY STUFF FOR THE WEAVER’S GUILD BUT NOW I DON’T USE IT FOR ANYTHING. IT’S VERY HANDY YOU KNOW IT DOESN’T WEAR OUT.” THERE WAS ONLY ONE BAG MADE OUT OF THESE REMNANTS BY MORRIS’ MOTHER. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, DYE
Catalogue Number
P20160003006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1929
Materials
WOOL, DYE
No. Pieces
1
Length
182.5
Width
117.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN RUG MADE FROM HAND-DYED, HANDSPUN WOOL. THERE IS A 3-4 CM WIDE BLACK BORDER AROUND ALL LENGTHS OF THE RUG, WITH FRINGE ON THE SHORT ENDS. INSIDE THE BLACK BORDER IS A SINGLE WOVEN BORDER OF LIGHT BLUE WOOL. INSIDE OF THIS BORDER IS A PATTERN SET ON A DARK BURGUNDY-COLOURED BACKGROUND. THERE IS A BLUE FLOWER IN THE CENTER OF THE RUG. ON ONE END THE DATE “1924” IS WOVEN IN RAW-COLOURED WOOL. THE “9” HAS BEEN WOVEN UPSIDE DOWN. ON THE OPPOSITE END OF THE RUG, THE INITIALS “ ” FOR THE NAME LISAVETA PETROVNA WISHLOW, ARE WOVEN IN LIGHT BLUE. THERE ARE 20 HARPS COLOURED EITHER BLUE, ORANGE, PINK, OR YELLOW AROUND ALL LENGTHS OF THE RUG. UNDER THE HARPS IS A GREEN VINE PATTERN AND A RED DECORATIVE BORDER. THE DESIGN ELEMENTS ARE LAID OUT SYMMETRICALLY OVER THE RUG AND CONSIST OF FLOWERS, DUCKS, AND BUTTERFLIES. VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION. SLIGHT WEAR TO THE WOOL FROM USE.
Subjects
FLOOR COVERING
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. THIS RUG WAS HAND-WOVEN BY ELIZABETH KONKIN IN 1924. THE RUG WAS USED AS A WALL COVER IN THE WINTER AND ACTED AS AN INSULATOR. LATER IT WAS USED ON THE FLOOR AT CHRISTMASTIME. IT WAS INHERITED BY MORRIS PRIOR TO THE PASSING OF HER MOTHER: “I CAME INTO POSSESSION [OF IT] FROM MY MOTHER. SHE DIED IN 2003 AND I GOT THE RUG SLIGHTLY BEFORE THEN AND YES THAT WOULD BE ABOUT THE TIME… I HAVE NO OTHER SIBLINGS AND SO OBVIOUSLY EVERYTHING SHE MADE WOULD GO TO ME. MY SON SAID HE WOULD LIKE TO HAVE THE RUG, BUT CHANGED HIS MIND. HIS WIFE WAS NOT KEEN ON HAVING IT, SO I HAD TO DO SOMETHING WITH IT. TO ME IT IS A VERY BEAUTIFUL RUG AND I WANTED IT SOME PLACE WHERE IT WON’T GET TRASHED BY DOGS OR ANIMALS.” AFTER ACQUIRING THE RUG, MORRIS PLACED IT ON THE FLOOR OF HER HOME IN LETHBRIDGE: “THE LINO [ON THE FLOOR] STARTED TO WEAR OUT AND I THOUGHT YOU CAN’T PUT A RUG LIKE THAT ON ANOTHER LINO. IT JUST DOESN’T GO. BUT I DO LIKE HARDWOOD SO WE HAD HARDWOOD PUT THROUGHOUT THE BEDROOMS. THE LAST ROOM IS MY OFFICE, FIRST OF ALL, I HAD THE RUG IN THIS BEDROOM AND THEN IT WASN’T VERY CONVENIENT TO CLEAN BECAUSE THERE WASN’T THAT MUCH SPACE SO I PUT IT IN MY OFFICE WHERE I LOVED IT, BUT I KEPT STUMBLING OVER IT. I THOUGHT I MIGHT BREAK A LEG IF I DO THIS SO I BETTER GET RID OF IT… THE HARDWOOD WAS PUT IN BEFORE THE GST WENT IN. I DIDN’T HAVE THE RUG THEN BUT I THOUGHT THAT I WOULD BE GETTING THE RUG AND SO I WOULD HAVE IT HARDWOOD… WAS IT 1995? ANYWAY BEFORE GST WENT IN.” THE RUG HAD BEEN PRESENT THROUGHOUT MORRIS’ LIFE – FROM TIME SPENT ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY IN SHOULDICE, ALBERTA TO LIFE ON A FARM OUTSIDE OF VAUXHALL, ALBERTA: “I CAN REMEMBER WHEN I WAS BORN. THE RUG WAS IN MY PARENT’S HOME. WE LIVED ON A DOUKHOBOR COLONY, WE HAD MUD PLASTERED WALLS AND OUR HOUSE WAS WELL BUILT. MY DAD BUILT IT. SOME OF THE HOUSES ONLY HAD ONE LAYER OF WOOD AND THEY WERE VERY COLD, HOWEVER OUR BEDROOMS HAD WALLS ON THE NORTH SIDE. IN WINTER THEY GOT CHILLY, SO EVERY WINTER THEY WOULD NAIL UP THIS RUG UP AGAINST THE WALL. IT STAYED THERE FOR THE WINTER. FOR SUMMER IT CAME DOWN, I DON’T [KNOW] WHERE SHE STORED IT, I THINK POSSIBLY IN ONE OF THE BIGGER TRUNKS AND THEN TOOK IT OUT… THIS HOME [WHERE THE RUG WAS PLACED], IT’S OUTSIDE OF VAUXHALL. WE LEFT THE COLONY, MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND MOVED THE HOUSE. THE HOUSE WAS EXPANDED AND THEN WE LIVED IN THAT HOUSE. I LEFT HOME AND MY PARENTS HAD A HOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE WHICH DAD BUILT ALSO AND HE SOLD THE FARM. THEY ASKED IF WE WANTED TO GO AND WE DIDN’T. SO THEY SOLD THE FARM AND THERE WAS A BEAUTIFUL POND WHERE WE SWAM AND BOATED AND WE HAD LOTS OF TREES AROUND THE HOUSE. IT WAS ABOUT AN ACREAGE IF NOT MORE AND WHEN HE SOLD IT THE NEW OWNERS, VERY FRUGAL PEOPLE, [THEY] BURNT DOWN THE HOUSE, THE STEAM BATHROOM, THE GARAGE, THE WORKS. NOW MIND THEY WERE OLD STATE BY NOW AND THEY PLOWED [IT ALL INTO] IN THE POND BECAUSE THEY WANTED TO MAKE MONEY FROM THE GRAIN [FIELDS], SO WHEN I WENT THERE A COUPLE OF YEARS LATER, [I WAS] SURPRISED EVERYTHING WAS GONE, SO THAT WAS THAT." THE RUG MAY HAVE BEEN WOVEN BY MORRIS’ MOTHER ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY IN SHOULDICE OR DURING THE WINTER SPENT IN COWLEY: “… IT COULD HAVE BEEN WOVEN IN COWLEY BECAUSE THEY STAYED IN COWLEY FOR THE WINTER BUT I CAN’T BE TOO SURE. IT ALSO COULD HAVE BEEN MADE ON THE COLONY… TWENTY MILES EAST OF MOSSLEIGH.” ELIZABETH KONKIN WAS MARRIED IN 1927, SO THE INITIALS WOVEN ON THE RUG ARE OF HER MAIDEN NAME: “THAT’S AN “L” [ ] THAT’S LISAVETA (SIC.) BUT HER NAME IS YALALISAVETA (SIC.) BUT SHE PUT DOWN LISAVETA. PETROVNA THAT’S A “P” [ ] THAT’S DAUGHTER OF PETRO AND WISHLOW [ ] THAT WAS HER MAIDEN NAME. ... [AFTER MAKING THE RUG] THERE WAS SOME WARP LEFT OVER. … WARP IS THE STUFF THAT RUNS DOWN AND WEFT IS WHAT YOU PUT IN BETWEEN WITH A SHUTTLE BUT THIS WASN’T PUT IN WITH A SHUTTLE. EACH INDIVIDUAL THREAD WAS KNOTTED. IT’S LIKE DIFFAGHAN (SIC.) - A SWEDISH METHOD - AND THAT’S HOW IT WAS DONE. IF THERE WAS SOME LEFT OVER AND HER MOM INSISTED THAT SHE DO ANOTHER RUG. WELL SHE DIDN’T WANT TO DO IT. SHE SAYS “YOU MAKE IT FOR YOUR BROTHER.” SHE FELT HIS WIFE SHOULD DO HER OWN HOPE CHEST BUT SHE DID AND THE INTERESTING THING IS THAT HIS RUG THEY USED IT ON THE FLOOR. MY MOTHER DIDN’T USE THIS ONE ON THE FLOOR EXCEPT AT CHRISTMAS TIME SO THE WISHLOW FAMILY WHO HAD THE OTHER RUG, THE MOTHER WASN’T TOO KEENLY INTERESTED IN IT. THEY HAD IT IN THE LIVING ROOM AND THEN IT WENT UP FOR SALE TO A PLACE THAT WAS OWNED BY A MAN NAMED, HIS LAST NAME WAS EWASHEN (SIC.) …THAT’S [THE RUG’S] TWIN, YES.” MORRIS THEN GOES ON TO DESCRIBE SOME OF THE OTHER PATTERNING FOUND ON THE RUG: “OKAY THOSE ARE HARPS. SHE HAD PATTERNS TO GET THEM FROM OTHER WEAVERS AND THEN SHE’D TRACE THEM OUT. I DON’T KNOW WHAT SHE USED TO TRACE THEM ON THE WARP [WITH] AND THEN SHE’D WEAVE AWAY WITH THE THREAD THAT WERE THE WEFT. SHE PUT THE DESIGNS HERSELF ONTO THE RUG” THE RUG WAS BROUGHT TO LETHBRIDGE WHEN ELIZABETH AND WILLIAM KONKIN RETIRED THERE: “I WAS TEACHING SCHOOL IN COALDALE WHEN THEY MOVED AND DAD MADE THE HOUSE IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE… THE HOUSE IS NICELY BUILT AND IT’S WARM, IT’S COMFORTABLE SO THERE’S NO USE PUTTING IT UP ON THE WALL. EVERY CHRISTMAS SHE’D TAKE IT OUT AND WE’D ROLL AROUND ON THIS RUG AND SHE WOULD HANG IT UP AFTER THE NEW YEAR SO I SAID TO HER ‘WHY DON’T YOU PUT IT ON THE FLOOR?’ AND SHE SAID, 'WELL I DON’T WANT TO MESS IT UP.' HOWEVER, I SAID, 'WELL I’M GOING TO PUT IT ON THE FLOOR,' SO THAT’S WHERE IT WAS UNTIL I STARTED STUMBLING OVER IT.” AMONG THE OTHER ARTIFACTS DONATED BY MORRIS THAT WERE OWNED BY HER MOTHER, THE RUG WAS A SIGNIFIER OF THE HARD WORK REQUIRED WITHIN THE DOUKHOBOR LIFESTYLE: “[THE BLANKET AND THE SPINNING WHEEL] MEANT A LOT WELL AFTER THE WAR AND THINGS WERE CHEAP. THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO WEAVE THEIR OWN STUFF. PRIOR TO THAT, NOT IN MY MOTHER’S TIME EVEN BEFORE THAT MY GRANDMOTHER’S TIME, EVERY GIRL HAD TO WEAVE A TROUSSEAU FOR HERSELF TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE SHE STARTED HAVING CHILDREN AND SHE WOULDN’T HAVE THE TIME TO DO IT. THERE WERE THINGS THAT WERE ANCIENT THAT WERE USED AND USED UNTIL THEY DIED HOWEVER, IN MY MOTHER’S DAY THEY KNITTED THEIR OWN SOCKS, THEY MADE THEIR OWN QUILTS. THE MEN DID THE BUILDING AND THEY LIVED OFF THE GARDENS BECAUSE THEY WERE VEGETARIANS SO THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT MEAT. THEY BOUGHT EGGS FROM THE NEIGHBOURS WHO WERE FARMERS. THE INTERESTING THING THERE WAS THAT THEY WEREN’T SUPPOSED TO EAT MEAT AND I ATE MEAT WHEN I WAS CLOSE TO TWENTY. WHEN I TELL MY VEGETARIAN RELATIVES WHAT ABOUT YOUR SHOES AND YOU’VE GOT LEATHER, COWHIDE WHATEVER AND THEY COULDN’T COME UP WITH AN ANSWER SO… THEY REPRESENTED HARD WORK THAT’S, THIS TAKES A LONG TIME WHEN YOU THINK OF EVERY KNOT THAT HAD TO BE TIED AND IT WAS PART OF HER TROUSSEAU. THE SPINNING WHEEL MEANT A LOT BECAUSE YOU HAD TO SPIN THE WOOL SO.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003006
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Length
17.5
Diameter
17.5
Description
BLACK AND SILVER GLAZED, CERAMIC VASE WITH RED AND GOLD DESIGNS PAINTED ON OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE VASE. ONE DESIGN SHOWCASES A CRANE FLYING TOWARDS A TREE BRANCH, WHILE THE OTHER SHOWCASES TWO CRANES PERCHED ON A LARGE TREE BRANCH BENEATH A RED DISC/MOON. “MADE IN JAPAN” IS STAMPED INTO BASE OF VASE. CONDITION: THE LIP OF THE VASE HAS A 4.3 CM CHIP AND IS MISSING 7.6 CM ALONG TOP EDGE. LOOSE OF PAINT AND OVERALL FINISH OF DESIGN. SLIGHT CHIPPING AROUND BASE.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
FURNISHINGS
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THAT THIS VASE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” THIS VASE WAS VISIBLE THROUGHOUT MRS. NISHIYAMA’S CHILDHOOD. SHE EXPLAINED, “[THE VASE] WAS MORE AN EVERYDAY THING.” IT WAS PLACED BY THE DOOR OF THE FARM HOUSE. AND “[THE] ONLY THING THAT WAS IN THERE WAS [MY MOTHER’S] UMBRELLA.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S HAIR ORNAMENTS AND COMB ALSO DONATED WITH THE VASE (P20160042002-004). THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
No. Pieces
2
Height
29.5
Width
15
Description
A: HANDMADE DOLL. THE “ESKIMO” DOLL IS MADE WITH LIGHT BLUE, FELT-LIKE FABRIC WITH WHITE FABRIC ACCENTS. THE FACE IS MADE OUT OF A LIGHTER FABRIC THAT IS PEACH-COLOURED. THE FACIAL DETAILS ARE HAND PAINTED. THE DOLL HAS BLUE EYES, EYEBROWS, NOSTRILS, RED LIPS, AND ROSY CHEEKS. THE LIGHT BLUE FABRIC THAT MAKES UP THE MAJORITY OF THE DOLL’S BODY IS ENCOMPASSING THE DOLL’S FACE LIKE A HOOD. THE DOLL’S TORSO IS COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. TWO HEART-SHAPED ARMS, MADE OF THE SAME MATERIAL, ARE ATTACHED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE BODY. THE DOLLS UPPER LEG AND FEET ARE COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. FROM THE KNEES TO THE ANKLES, A LIGHTER, WHITE FABRIC IS COVERING THE LEGS. B: DOLL SKIRT. AROUND THE DOLL’S WAIST IS A DETACHABLE SKIRT MADE OF THE SAME FABRIC AND A WHITE WAISTBAND. POOR CONDITION. ALL FABRIC IS WELL-WORN AND THREADBARE IN MULTIPLE PLACES. THE DOLL’S RED STUFFING IS VISIBLE THROUGH PARTS OF THE FABRIC. THERE IS DISCOLORATION (YELLOWING) OVERALL. THE STUFFING IS NOT EVENLY DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT THE DOLL. THE SEAMS AT THE ARMS ARE FRAGILE. THE PAINT FOR THE DOLL’S FACE IS SEVERELY FADED.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
LEISURE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THE FAMILY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. THIS DOLL BELONGED TO MORRIS AS A CHILD. SHE EXPLAINS, “THIS CAME FROM A GREAT AUNT WHO CAME TO VISIT US AND SHE ALWAYS BROUGHT GIFTS AND THIS ONE WAS MINE AND I LOVED THIS DOLL… I REMEMBER PLAYING WITH IT, IT WAS SOFT AND CUDDLY WHEN I HAD IT… MY DAUGHTER WENT THROUGH IT AND MY GRANDDAUGHTER AND THEN I PUT A STOP TO IT BEFORE THEY ATE IT UP OR DID SOMETHING… THEY LOVED IT AND THEY, YOU KNOW LITTLE KIDS, THEY’RE CARELESS SO I’LL KEEP IT...” IN A PHONE CALL WITH COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK ON OCTOBER 24, 2017, MORRIS SAID SHE RECIEVED THE DOLL FROM HER GREAT AUNT WHO HAD BROUGHT IT FROM VISITING BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS PLAYED WITH THE DOLL AS A CHILD, AS DID MORRIS' CHILDREN. THE DOLL WAS LOVED BY MULTIPLE GENERATIONS IN MORRIS' FAMILY AS HER GRANDCHILDREN AND GREAT GRANDCHILDREN WOULD ALSO PLAY WITH THE DOLL WHEN THEY CAME TO VISIT. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1925
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, COTTON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1925
Materials
GLASS, COTTON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Length
39
Width
17.7
Description
A. BEADED HANDBAG WITH BROWN TORTOISESHELL TRIM AND CLASP ALONG TOP OPENING. BAG HAS BLACK BEADS COVERING EXTERIOR WITH RED, PINK, GREEN AND YELLOW BEADED STARBURST PATTERN; BAG HAS BEADED FRINGE WITH BLACK, YELLOW AND GREEN BEADS. BAG HANDLE IS NAVY BLUE COTTON WITH BLACK BEADS COVERING EXTERIOR; HANDLE ATTACHES TO TRIM ALONG OPENING WITH BROWN TORTOISESHELL RINGS. BAG CLASP HAS BROWN TORTOISESHELL BUTTON AT TOP OF BROWN TORTOISESHELL TRIM ALONG OPENING; INSIDE OF BAG IS LINED WITH WHITE, BLUE AND GREEN FLORAL-PATTERNED COTTON FABRIC WITH POCKET SEWN INTO LINING FOR HOLDING MIRROR. OUTER BEADING IS EXTREMELY DELICATE AND FRAGILE; INSIDE OF BAG IS SOILED ON TORTOISESHELL TRIM; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. MIRROR, 6 CM LONG X 6.2 CM WIDE. SQUARE POCKET MIRROR SET IN CREAM SYNTHETIC LEATHER CASE; MIRROR BACKING COVERED IN WHITE, BLUE AND GREEN FLORAL-PATTERNED COTTON FABRIC THAT MATCHES INSIDE OF HANDBAG. CORNER OF MIRROR HAS SEWN LOOP OF BACKING FABRIC. FABRIC ON MIRROR IS DISCOLORED [DARKENED]; MIRROR SURFACE IS SOILED AND STAINED; MIRROR SURFACE HAS SCRATCH ALONG EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 12, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED KERR WRIGHT REGARDING HER DONATION OF A HANDBAG AND DRESS FROM THE 1920S. WRIGHT ACQUIRED THE OBJECTS FROM HER MOTHER UPON HER PASSING. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO WRIGHT’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, CLARA SAXON, PRIOR TO HER DEATH IN 1924. ON THE HANDBAG, WRIGHT ELABORATED, “I THINK THAT THAT HANDBAG WOULD BE SOMETHING THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN A TREASURE BECAUSE IT WAS SO INTRICATE, AND IT WOULD HAVE COST A LITTLE BIT MORE THAN WHAT [MY GRANDPARENTS’ SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS WAS. I THINK THAT PROBABLY WAS SOMETHING THAT WAS VERY SPECIAL TO [CLARA].” WRIGHT RECALLED HER FAMILY’S HISTORY AND THE CIRCUMSTANCES THAT LED TO WRIGHT’S MOTHER ACQUIRING THE OBJECTS, STATING, ““1924. [MY] MOM [LILY WRIGHT] WAS BORN ON SEPTEMBER 29 [1924] AND CLARA PASSED AWAY…ON NOVEMBER 22 [1924].” “[MY MOTHER WAS] SIX WEEKS OLD AND HER MOTHER DIED. THERE WAS NEVER ANY QUESTION THAT HER GRANDPARENTS AUTOMATICALLY [LOOKED] AFTER HER. I REALLY DON’T KNOW TOO MUCH ABOUT CLARA’S HUSBAND [HENRY SAXON]. I KNEW HIS NAME BUT HE PASSED AWAY WHEN MY MOTHER WAS ABOUT 8. OCCASIONALLY HE WOULD COME TO VISIT BUT NOT [OFTEN].” “[MY] MOTHER HAD ALWAYS SAID THAT THE DOCTORS DIDN’T KNOW WHAT SHE DIED FROM. BOTH OF HER PARENTS WERE DIABETICS AND MY GUESS WOULD HAVE TO BE GESTATION DIABETES. I DON’T BELIEVE THERE WAS ANY KIND OF INFECTION FROM WHAT ANYBODY HAD BEEN ABLE TO TELL…[SHE WAS TAKEN] TO THE DOCTOR RIGHT AWAY AND THEY SAID, “ OH, WHO KNOWS?” SHE LEFT AND DIED. HER SISTER NEVER DID KNOW WHAT SHE DIED OF EITHER AND THEY’RE ALSO DIABETIC NOW.” “[CLARA] LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN SHE PASSED…IT WAS MY GUESS THAT HER AND JOHN WERE MARRIED IN ST. MARY’S ANGLICAN CHURCH UP ON THE NORTH SIDE.” “[I GOT THESE PIECES] THROUGH MY MOTHER [LILY WRIGHT]. SHE HAD THEM PUT AWAY. HER GRANDPARENTS WHO RAISED HER KEPT A FEW THINGS LIKE THIS AND THEY WERE ALWAYS IN THE TRUNK DOWNSTAIRS. WHEN WE HAD TO CLEAN OUT MOM’S PLACE WHEN SHE WENT IN TO A NURSING HOME, MY SISTER AND I WENT “DO YOU WANT THIS, DO YOU WANT THIS? I SAID, THAT WAS CLARA’S, I WANT THAT. THAT’S HOW IT CAME INTO MY OWNERSHIP AND I’VE BEEN CARRYING IT AROUND FOR ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS.” “[THESE ARE OBJECTS] THAT I FELT SHE WOULD HAVE APPRECIATED THAT THEY MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, TO HANG ON TO AND STILL HAVE SOMETHING OF HERS…[THEY WERE IN] AN OLD STEAMER TRUNK, AN OLD METAL TRUNK AND I THINK PROBABLY AROUND THE TIME [MY MOTHER] AND DAD GOT MARRIED [’46…I’M PRETTY SURE THAT [MOM] HAD GOT [THE TRUNK] AS A SECONDARY HOPE CHEST. IT HAD CLARA’S WEDDING GOWN, HER SHOES…IT MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY MOTHER] SO SHE [HAD] THEM. [THERE WERE] A FEW ORNAMENTS AND GADGETS THAT MOM HAD PICKED UP OVER THE YEARS AND THERE REALLY WASN’T TOO MUCH OF CLARA’S BECAUSE SHE WAS ONLY 22 WHEN SHE PASSED.” “[THE TRUNK] WAS DOWNSTAIRS UNDER THE STAIRS AND IT WAS ONE TRUNK THAT SHE HAD ALWAYS ASKED US NOT TO GO IN. I WAS A PRECOCIOUS CHILD AND BEING TOLD THAT I COULDN’T GO NEAR THE STUFF, I DID ANYWAY. WHEN THEY WERE ON THE FARM, CLARA’S FATHER LIVED WITH MY MOM AND DAD, MYSELF AND MY SISTER UNTIL I WAS FOUR. [MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER] PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS FOUR. HE LIVED IN THE FARMHOUSE BASEMENT, AND I DIDN’T LIKE THAT HE WAS DOWN THERE BY HIMSELF ALL THE TIME, SO I’D SNEAK DOWN THERE. I HAD GRAMPA JOHN’S PERMISSION TO LOOK THROUGH THAT STUFF BUT MY MOTHER DIDN’T KNOW.” “I IMAGINE IT WAS [MY GREAT GRANDFATHER] THAT TOLD ME [ABOUT CLARA]. EVENTUALLY MOTHER DID TELL ME THAT CLARA’S STUFF WAS IN THAT TRUNK.” “PROBABLY ABOUT ONCE A YEAR, I’D JUST TAKE [THE OBJECTS OUT] AND LOOK AT [THEM]. IT’S BEEN A BIG DEBATE WHETHER I WOULD GO AHEAD AND FIND SOMEBODY THAT COULD RESTORE THE PURSE OR WHETHER I SHOULD JUST PASS IT ALONG. I’M NOT A WEALTHY PERSON, SO I THOUGHT THIS WOULD BE A BETTER HOME FOR IT RATHER THAN INVESTING A BUNCH OF MONEY IN SOMETHING THAT WOULD COME HERE EVENTUALLY ANYWAY.” “[THESE OBJECTS] ARE SOMETHING THAT I KNEW DIDN’T BELONG IN THE GARBAGE. I GUESS IT WAS TO GET SOME KIND OF CONNECTION WITH MY PAST. I NEVER KNEW [CLARA]. MY MOTHER, SHE NEVER KNEW HER MOTHER. IT WAS JUST REASON THAT I HUNG ON TO THEM. NOW THAT I’M DOWNSIZING, HAVING TO LIVE IN A SMALLER PLACE, I HAVE TO LET GO OF A LOT OF STUFF. THIS IS A GOOD HOME FOR [THEM]. THAT HANDBAG WAS JUST SO SPECIAL.” IN AN EMAIL FROM WRIGHT TO MACLEAN, WRIGHT ELABORATES ON THE HISTORY OF CLARA SAXON. CLARA WAS BORN CLARA MELLING IN WIGAN, LACASHIRE, ENGLAND IN DECEMBER 1902 TO ISABELLA (SMITH) MELLING AND JOHN MELLING. IN 1912, THE MELLING FAMILY EMIGRATED TO CANADA. CLARA’S SISTER, LILY MELLING, MARRIED ANDY ALLISON. CLARA MARRIED HENRY SAXON ON NOVEMBER 21, 1923, AND HAD ONE DAUGHTER, LILY (WRIGHT) SAXON BORN SEPTEMBER 29, 1924. CLARA WENT TO A MOVIE WITH HER SISTER ON NOVEMBER 18, 1924 AND FELL ILL. SHE PASSED AWAY OF AN UNDETERMINED CAUSE. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES FROM NOVEMBER 20, 1924 AND DECEMBER 3, 1924, CONFIRM THAT THE CAUSE OF DEATH WAS NEVER DETERMINED. A POST-MORTEM WAS CONDUCTED AND STOMACH CONTENTS SENT TO EDMONTON, ALBERTA FOR ANALYSIS. IN A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 3, 1924, THE JURY FORMED TO ENQUIRE INTO THE DEATH OF CLARA SAXON RULED CAUSE OF DEATH UNKNOWN AFTER THE POST-MORTEM AND ANALYSIS OF STOMACH CONTENTS FOUND NO ABNORMALITIES, AND THE JURY WAS ADJOURNED. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180003001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180003001
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"GALT HOSPITAL" "LUCY R. HATCH"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GOLD PLATE, ENAMEL
Catalogue Number
P20140049026
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"GALT HOSPITAL" "LUCY R. HATCH"
Date
1913
Materials
METAL, GOLD PLATE, ENAMEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.6
Diameter
2.1
Description
ROUND PIN, GOLD PLATED WITH GREEN ENAMEL BORDER AND RED ENAMEL CROSS AT CENTRE. TEXT AROUND BORDER READS “GALT HOSPITAL – LETHBRIDGE ALBERTA” AND TEXT ON A GREEN ENAMEL BANNER UNDER THE CROSS READS “FESTINA LENTE”. ENGRAVED TEXT ON THE BACK SIDE READS “LUCY R. HATCH – 1935” AND A MAKER’S MARK AND 10K STAMP IS VISIBLE AT BOTTOM. STRAIGHT PIN WITH ROTATING CLASP IS SAUTERED HORIZONTALLY ALONG BACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
THIS GRADUATION PIN IS MARKED “LUCY R. HATCH.” ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES FROM THE 1960S AND 70S AND GALT ARCHIVES RECORD 19760225055, LUCY HATCH WAS BORN IN TIMBER, MONTANA IN 1890 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1910 TO BEGIN NURSES TRAINING. SHE WAS ONE OF THREE FIRST GRADUATES OF THE GSN IN DECEMBER 1913, ALONG WITH LILLIAN DONALDSON AND ELIZABETH PATTESON. HATCH NURSED IN THE GALT HOSPITAL FOR EIGHT YEARS, BRIEFLY MOVED TO NEW YORK, AND RETURNED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA TO WORK IN THE COALHURST HOSPITAL. HATCH MARRIED JAMES MCINNIS IN 1922 AND REJOINED THE GALT HOSPITAL THAT YEAR AS FLOOR SUPERVISOR. SHE WENT ON TO FOUND THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION IN 1945, SERVING AS ITS HONOURARY PRESIDENT UNTIL HER DEATH IN 1955. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049026
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BERBER SHOE EDUKAN
Date Range From
2009
Date Range To
2015
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, THREAD, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20160011000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BERBER SHOE EDUKAN
Date Range From
2009
Date Range To
2015
Materials
LEATHER, THREAD, RUBBER
No. Pieces
2
Length
28.5
Description
PAIR OF DARK BROWN LEATHER SHOES. TWO PANELS OF LEATHER MAKE UP EACH SHOE (ONE FRONT PIECE AND ONE PIECE FOR THE HEEL). THE LEATHER IS STITCHED TOGETHER WITH A STIFF, LIGHT-COLOURED THREAD. THERE IS A LIGHT BROWN, LEATHER THREAD FOR THE TRIM OF THE SHOE THAT GOES AROUND TO CONNECT THE TWO LEATHER PIECES THAT MAKE UP THE SHOE. THE INSOLE IS A LIGHT-COLOURED LEATHER. THE BACK OF THE HEEL IS HIGHER THAN THE REST OF THE SHOE AND IS FOLDED DOWN INSIDE THE SHOE. LIGHT BROWN BOTTOM SOLE WITH BLACK RUBBER LINING THE TOP OF THE SOLE. GOOD CONDITION. ON BOTH SHOES THERE IS LIGHT SCUFFING NEAR THE TOES. THE SOLES ARE WORN FROM WEAR, ESPECIALLY NEAR THE TOES AND HEELS. ON THE LEFT SHOE VARNISH COATING IS UNEVEN. THERE IS A SMALL OF BUILD-UP OF THE VARNISH AT THE BACK HEEL. AT THE FRONT TOE, THERE IS A PIECE OF THE BLACK SECTION OF THE SOLE COMING OUT. ON THE RIGHT SHOE, THERE IS WEAR OF THE BROWN VARNISH AT THE TOP OF THE TOE. VARNISH AT THE BACK HEEL IS UNEVEN AT HEEL. INSOLE IS CRACKING SLIGHTLY. BOTTOM SECTION OF SOLE IS LIFTING OFF THE SHOE AND THERE IS A SHINY SUBSTANCE ON VARIOUS PLACES OF THE SOLE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THESE SHOES WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AFTER BEING FEATURED IN THE GALT’S EXHIBITION TITLED, "CHANGING PLACES: IMMIGRATION & DIVERSITY," THAT RAN FROM OCTOBER 31, 2015 TO JANUARY 17, 2016. THE DONOR, JAWAD ABOUCHA, WAS INTERVIEWED BY CURATOR WENDY AITKENS, ON JUNE 4, 2015 IN PREPARATION FOR THAT EXHIBITION. ANOTHER INTERVIEW WITH ABOUCHA WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON APRIL 26, 2016 DURING THE ACQUISITION PROCESS. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS A COMBINATION OF QUOTATIONS BY ABOUCHA EXTRACTED FROM BOTH INTERVIEWS: “I’M FROM MOROCCO AND MORE PRECISELY FROM SOUTHERN MOROCCO I WAS BORN IN A CITY CALLED TIZNIT… IT’S A CITY PROBABLY AS SMALL AS LETHBRIDGE. IT IS WHERE I WAS BORN AND RAISED… I WOULD SAY I BOUGHT [THESE SHOES] IN THE YEAR 2009… I LIVED IN FRANCE FOR FOUR YEARS SO THAT’S WHERE I BOUGHT THEM WHEN I WENT TO MOROCCO TO VISIT FAMILY… I JUST GO HOME ONCE EVERY TWO YEARS AND THEN IN MOROCCO I LIKE TO BUY THINGS THAT WOULD REMEMBER ME OF MOROCCO AND ONE OF THE THINGS I LIKE TO BUY IS SLIPPERS THAT I CAN WEAR INDOORS… I KEPT THEM [IN FRANCE AND WHEN I] MOVED TO CANADA [I] BROUGHT THEM WITH ME… … [I]N THE WINTER TIME I CAN WEAR THEM INDOORS, BUT IN THE SUMMERTIME I CAN WEAR LIKE WHEN I’M IN BACKYARD FOR EXAMPLE. I THINK WHEN I BROUGHT THEM HERE [IN] AUGUST LAST YEAR I THINK I WAS USING THEM PROBABLY IN THE SUMMERTIME.” “[THE SHOES ARE] CALLED EDUKAN FROM SOUTHERN MOROCCO… PEOPLE MOSTLY WEAR THE SHOES WHEN IT’S SUNNY OUTSIDE AND BEAUTIFUL AND THEN YOU CAN JUST WEAR THESE ONES… [THE SHOES] SYMBOLIZE SOMETHING OF MY CULTURAL BACKGROUND… I THINK IT IS THE SHAPE AND THEY’RE ALSO MADE OF, I THINK, IT’S ANIMAL SKIN… THEY’RE MADE IN MOROCCO BUT ESPECIALLY THEY SYMBOLIZE MY BACKGROUND BECAUSE THEY’RE MADE IN SOUTHERN MOROCCO AND THEY’RE [ALSO] CALLED BERBER SHOES AND PEOPLE DO WEAR THEM LIKE IN THE MOUNTAINS. I DON’T KNOW FOR HOW MANY CENTURIES PEOPLE USE TO MAKE THESE SHOES BUT WHEN YOU GO TO SMALL CITIES OR IN THE MOUNTAINS THERE ARE PEOPLE WHO MAKE THESE SHOES LIKE BY HAND. I PICKED UP THIS COLOUR WHEN I BOUGHT THEM BECAUSE I THINK THIS COLOUR DOESN’T GET CHANGED VERY QUICK WHEN THERE IS DIRT AND STUFF. THESE SHOES IN MOROCCO SYMBOLIZE THE BERBER CULTURE… I HAVE THE OTHER PICTURE IN MY MIND THAT PEOPLE MAKING [THEM] BY HAND AND THE WAY THEY CUT THE SKIN AND MAKE IT AND THEY PAINT IT AND THEY PUT THE GLUE. THAT’S THE WHOLE WORK OF THESE PEOPLE [WHO ARE] MAKING THESE SORT OF SHOES [AND] I THINK ABOUT IT.” ABOUCHA FURTHER DISCUSSES THE PURCHASE OF THE SHOES IN MOROCCO, INCLUDING THEIR COST: “I WOULD SAY AROUND IN CANADIAN MONEY IT WOULD PROBABLY BE FIFTEEN DOLLARS, WHICH IS NOT TOO EXPENSIVE BACK HOME BUT IT IS A VERY REASONABLE PRICE FOR THEM... MOSTLY SOME [VENDORS] ONLY SELL SHOES BUT IT’S A LOT OF DIFFERENT KINDS, COLOUR[S] FOR MALE OF FEMALES AND THERE IS DIFFERENT TYPES AND I LIKE THE WAY THEY ARRANGE THEM TOGETHER IN FRONT OF THE STORE. PEOPLE WHO SELL THESE SHOES, LIKE DIFFERENT MERCHANTS, THEY ALL GATHER IN ONE PART OF WHAT WE CALL BACK HOME “A SOUK” WHICH IS A NAME FOR THE TRADITIONAL MARKET… BACK HOME WE CAN ALWAYS TAKE THESE ONES AND REPAIR THEM FOR VERY CHEAP AND MOST PEOPLE DO THAT. I HAD THE OPTION ACTUALLY TO TAKE THEM BACK HOME AND REPAIR THEM AND BRING THEM BACK BUT AT THE PRICE OF FIFTEEN DOLLARS, [IT] IS NOT SO MUCH, I CAN BUY A PAIR OF NEW ONES THAT KEEP ME FOR FIVE MORE YEARS SO I DONATE THESE ONES TO GALT MUSEUM.” ABOUCHA GOES ON TO TALK ABOUT THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE SHOES BEING FROM HIS BIRTH COUNTRY AS HE LIVES ABROAD: “I LEFT MOROCCO WHEN I WAS TWENTY-ONE AND I’M THIRTY YEARS OLD NOW. I’VE BEEN LIVING ABROAD FOR NINE YEARS. I STILL HAVE A LOT OF FAMILY MEMBERS LIVING IN MOROCCO… MY MOM, FATHER-IN-LAW, MY SISTER, MY YOUNGER BROTHER, MY GRANDPARENTS, MY UNCLES, THAT’S ON MY DAD’S SIDE [ARE STILL IN MOROCCO]. ON MY MOM’S SIDE, ALL MY UNCLES ARE LIVING IN FRANCE. MY OLDER BROTHER ALSO LIVES IN FRANCE… I STILL SPEAK THE LANGUAGE, STILL HAVE LOTS OF MEMORIES AND STORIES OF CHILDHOOD AND ADULTHOOD AND SOME OF UNIVERSITY SO I SPENT QUITE A LOT OF TIME IN MOROCCO. IT’S A COUNTRY WHERE I WAS BORN AND RAISED. SO I HAVE SOME THINGS THAT ONCE IN A WHILE WHEN I LOOK AT IT, [AND THEY] REMIND ME OF WHERE I COME FROM… [I] REMEMBER WHERE I COME FROM WHEN I SEE [THE SHOES]. I THINK OF BACK HOME, I THINK OF WHERE I WAS RAISED AND THE PEOPLE WHO MADE THEM AND THE FAMILY MEMBERS THAT WEAR THEM ESPECIALLY MY GRANDFATHER. HE WEARS THEM LOTS, AND I’M VERY CLOSE TO HIM.” AT THE TIME OF THE INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN, ABOUCHA HAD BEEN IN CANADA FOR ABOUT FOUR AND A HALF YEARS: “I DIDN’T IMMIGRATE TO CANADA STRAIGHT FROM MOROCCO. I ALSO LIVED IN FRANCE FOR 4 YEARS WHILE I DID PART OF MY STUDIES THERE. WHEN I WAS IN MOROCCO I WENT TO THE UNIVERSITY IN ANOTHER CITY CALLED AGADIR. THERE IS NO UNIVERSITY IN TIZNIT. SO I HAD TO MOVE TO AGADIR AND I DID MY BACHELOR’S IN CHEMISTRY. AND THEN LOTS OF PEOPLE IN MOROCCO GO TO ANOTHER PLACE TO FINISH THEIR STUDIES. THEY USUALLY CHOOSE TO GO TO FRANCE BECAUSE WE ALSO LEARN FRENCH. SO I DECIDED TO GO AND HAVE AN EXPERIENCE SOMEWHERE ELSE AND GET A DEGREE AND PRACTICE MY FRENCH. I WENT TO FRANCE, THAT WAS IN 2007, AND I LIVED THERE FOR 4 YEARS AND I GOT MY MASTER’S IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES. I WORKED FOR A BIT AND THEN AFTER LIVING THERE FOR 4 YEARS I THOUGHT I PROBABLY NEEDED TO GO SOMEWHERE ELSE... AND ONE OF THE REASONS I MOVED TO CANADA WAS BECAUSE I USED TO HAVE A REALLY GOOD ENGLISH TEACHER IN MOROCCO. I LIKED ENGLISH AND I ALWAYS WANTED TO GO TO AN ENGLISH-SPEAKING COUNTRY, SO I DECIDED TO GO TO CANADA. I [CONSIDERED] OTHER PLACES BUT I KNEW ABOUT CANADA AND I COULD USE MY QUALIFICATIONS SO I CAME HERE AND GAVE IT A TRY AND THAT’S WHAT I DID… I APPLIED FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCY BEFORE I MOVED TO CANADA, WHILE I WAS IN FRANCE I GOT IT SO I MOVED TO STRAIGHT TO CANADA. I AM WHAT IS CALLED A PERMANENT RESIDENT AND I THINK THAT USED TO BE CALLED A LANDED IMMIGRANT BEFORE… I CAME TO MONTREAL FIRST BECAUSE I HAVE SOME FRIENDS WHO LIVE THERE. I LIVED THERE FOR A COUPLE OF MONTHS… AND THEN I DECIDED TO MOVE TO ALBERTA BECAUSE THERE WERE JOBS HERE AND I KNEW I WOULD PRACTICE MY ENGLISH HERE [TOO]. I MOVED HERE [IN] ABOUT FEBRUARY 2012.” “… I MOVED [TO LETHBRIDGE] ON MY OWN BECAUSE I GOT USED TO BEING BY MYSELF AND I HAD THAT EXPERIENCE LIKE IN FRANCE. I WASN’T SCARED OF MOVING HERE WITHOUT ANYBODY… I LIKE THAT ADVENTURE. I AM VERY ORGANIZED WHEN IT COMES TO MOVING TO A NEW PLACE. I DO LOTS OF RESEARCH AND THEN I GET ORGANIZED. I TAKE MY TIME TO MAKE A DECISION. I JUST ASSUME IT AND I GO AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS... I AM WORKING IN POWER ENGINEERING. I DID CHEMISTRY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES BUT WHEN I MOVED HERE, WHILE TRYING TO GET MY DESIGNATIONS, I CHOOSE TO GO ANOTHER FIELD WHICH WAS SOMEWHAT BETTER RELATED TO WHAT I DID BEFORE WHICH IS POWER ENGINEERING. I’M WORKING NOW AS A POWER ENGINEER – STILL TAKING COURSES. I ALWAYS LIKE TO LEARN. I HAD LOTS OF UPS AND DOWNS WHEN I MOVED HERE WITH JOBS. IT WAS HARD TO GET A JOB IN THE BEGINNING BUT NOW IT’S GETTING BETTER... IT’S VERY DIFFERENT HERE IN CANADA… THERE ARE A LOT OF PROFESSIONAL REGULATIONS HERE SO YOU HAVE TO PROBABLY GO AND WRITE SOME MORE EXAMINATIONS AND GET YOUR QUALIFICATIONS RECOGNIZED BEFORE YOU CAN LOOK FOR A JOB. THAT'S ONE OF THE PROBLEMS, A LOT OF IMMIGRANTS HAVE TO FACE THAT. [BUT] THERE ARE LOTS OF SERVICES HERE FOR IMMIGRANTS AND THEY HELP PEOPLE WRITING RESUMES AND COVER LETTERS, GETTING THEIR QUALIFICATIONS RECOGNIZED. THERE IS A SERVICE HERE CALLED “FLEXIBILITY” AND THEY HELPED ME A LOT… I MET A MARGARET LISTER [AT FLEXIBILITY], AND SHE HELPED ME A LOT. SHE GOT ME IN CONTACT WITH PEOPLE, WITH EMPLOYERS. SHE HELPED ME LOTS WITH MY RESUME, MY COVER LETTER…” “I THINK LETHBRIDGE IS A VERY EXCEPTIONAL PLACE. IT WAS NOT EASY TO MEET PEOPLE HERE FOR ME… IT’S A DIFFERENT COMMUNITY. I’VE LIVED IN DIFFERENT CITIES. I’VE LIVED IN CALGARY AND MONTREAL AND DIFFERENT PLACES BEFORE. I USED TO LIVE IN SMALL CITIES OR TOWNS LIKE THIS BUT ALSO ONE OF THE THINGS I NOTICE IN LETHBRIDGE, IT CAN BE CONSERVATIVE A BIT. AND I WAS NOT USED TO THAT AND IT WAS ALSO A CHALLENGE LIVING IN A CITY LIKE THIS. BUT WE CAN ALWAYS MEET PEOPLE WITH WHOM WE CAN SHARE SAME VALUES. IT TAKES SOME TIME, YES... I WAS USED TO HAVING LOTS OF FRIENDS AND WHEN I MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE, I THINK IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I REALIZED IT WAS HARD TO MEET FRIENDS. THAT WAS THE CASE NOT ONLY FOR ME BUT ALSO FOR THE PEOPLE FROM THE COUNTRY. I ALSO THINK IT IS A GOOD THING THAT THIS IS A UNIVERSITY TOWN. SO THERE’S LOTS OF STUDENTS AND I CAN MEET DIFFERENT PEOPLE BUT IT WAS DEFINITELY HARD IN THE BEGINNING. IT TOOK ME ALMOST 2 YEARS JUST TO MEET FRIENDS AND HAVE SOME CONTACTS… I DIDN’T REALLY HAVE A PROBLEM WITH COMMUNICATING WITH PEOPLE HERE. DEFINITELY, WHEN I JUST MOVED HERE MY ENGLISH WAS NOT AS GOOD AS IT IS NOW. AND THAT’S ONE OF MY GOALS IN MOVING TO ALBERTA AND NOW IT’S GOOD. IT’S GOOD. HAVING FRIENDS ALSO HELPS.” “EVERY WEEK I MEET PEOPLE COMING FROM A DIFFERENT PLACE – BC OR ONTARIO OR OVERSEAS. I THINK THE POPULATION IS CHANGING. I THINK THERE IS MORE AND MORE [PEOPLE] FROM DIFFERENT PLACES COMING TO CALGARY OR TO LETHBRIDGE AND THAT HAS AN IMPACT ON THE BALANCE. IT IS ALSO GOOD FOR DIVERSITY [IN] THE PROVINCE…[THERE ARE] AT LEAST 10 PEOPLE HERE FROM MOROCCO. MOST OF THE PEOPLE FROM MOROCCO LIVE IN MONTREAL BECAUSE THEY SPEAK FRENCH, SO IT IS ALSO WHY THEY CHOOSE TO GO TO QUEBEC INSTEAD OF COMING TO ALBERTA… WHEN IT COMES TO LETHBRIDGE [DIVERSITY] HELPS THEM DEFINITELY BECAUSE THERE’S NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE COMING FROM DIFFERENT PLACES WHEN IT COMES TO LETHBRIDGE. BUT IT’S CHANGING BECAUSE PEOPLE GET TO KNOW OTHER CULTURES. [IT] BRINGS PEOPLE TOGETHER [TO] GET TO KNOW OTHERS – THAT ALSO HELPS WITH STEREOTYPES - IMMIGRANTS, PEOPLE COMING FROM A DIFFERENT RELIGION, RACE. IT HELPS PEOPLE GETTING TO KNOW THE WORLD – LIKE WITHOUT HAVING TO GO ABROAD.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE EXISTANCE OF MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT MUSLIM BELIEFS IN LETHBRIDGE, ABOUCHA RESPONDED, “THERE IS STILL [MISCONCEPTIONS]. I THINKS IT HAS SOMETHING TO DO WITH THE MEDIA. THAT’S ONE OF THE REASONS WHY I MENTIONED THAT AS MORE PEOPLE ARE COMING HERE, [IT] IS GOING TO CHANGE THE WAY PEOPLE HERE SEE IMMIGRANTS. BUT THERE ARE STILL THOSE STEREOTYPES. BUT I ALSO BELIEVE THERE ARE NOT ONLY STEREOTYPES ABOUT MUSLIMS, BUT THERE ARE STEREOTYPES ABOUT ALL ETHNICITIES AND ALL RELIGIONS. IT IS, I THINK, IT IS PART OF THE REALITY IN THE WORLD.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20160011000
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150022002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
2010
Materials
NYLON, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
43
Width
8.9
Description
WHITE ARMBAND WITH DIAGONAL STRIPES OF LIGHT BLUE, MEDIUM BLUE ON ONE SIDE AND GREEN ON THE OTHER END. IN CENTRE OF ARMBAND IS A SILK-SCREEN OF THE VANCOUVER 2010 OLPYMICS: "TORCH RELAY/RELAIS DE LA FLAMME - VANCOUVER 2010 - PRESENTED BY/PRESENTE PAR COCA-COLA, RBC, CANADA". FASTENS WITH BLACK VELCRO, WITH A LARGER LOOP SECTION (MEASURES 10.2CM WHILE THE HOOK SECTION IS ONLY 4CM). ON REVERSE OF HOOK SECTION IS ANOTHER SILK-SCREEN: "HUDSON'S BAY CO." WITH HBC COAT OF ARMS.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
SPORTS
History
THIS ARMBAND RELATES TO THE 2010 OLYMPICS IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, ANINE VONKEMAN, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JUNE 2015, ANINE SAID I “WAS HONOURED TO BE ACCEPTED AS A VOLUNTEER, A MEDIA HANDLER VOLUNTEER, ALONG WITH BOB COONEY FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE COMMUNICATIONS AT THE TIME, WHO I REALLY RESPECT AND HE’S RESPECTED BY THE LOCAL MEDIA. AND SO HE AND I WORKED TOGETHER TO BE THE MEDIA HANDLERS FOR THE TORCH RELAY, WHICH IS A HUGE EVENT ... FROM A LOGISTICAL POINT OF VIEW AND IN TERMS OF DEALING WITH MEDIA IN THAT WAY. LIKE WE DO MEDIA PREVIEWS OF OUR EXHIBITS AND THEY’RE JUST TINY COMPARED TO WHAT AN UNDERTAKING THIS IS, BECAUSE IT WAS TELEVISED NATIONALLY AND ALL OF THAT AND ALL THE INFRASTRUCTURE THAT WAS SET UP FOR THE CELEBRATION AT HENDERSON LAKE.” THE ARMBAND ALLOWED ANINE ENTRY TO THE MEDIA PIT AND VOLUNTEER TENT AT HENDERSON LAKE. ANINE CONTINUED, SAYING THAT SHE WAS “EXCITED ABOUT BEING PART OF THE TORCH RELAY AND BECAUSE THE OLYMPICS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE AND SPORTS EVENTS IN GENERAL, DUTCH PEOPLE GO A LITTLE NUTS. SO, YOU KNOW, TO BE ABLE TO BE A PART OF THAT AND ALSO TO DEAL WITH THE MEDIA IN THAT WAY, WHICH WAS A BIG DEAL, WAS KIND OF REALLY INTERESTING.” ANINE KEPT THE ARMBAND, SAYING “IT’S AN IMPORTANT REMINDER OF BEING PART OF THAT. AND IT WAS AN IMPORTANT EVENT IN LETHBRIDGE TO BE ON THE TORCH RELAY ROUTE FOR THE OLYMPIC FLAME.” ANINE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1967 AND EMIGRATED TO CANADA WITH HER PARENTS (WIM AND TRUDY) AND TWO BROTHERS (ALWIN AND HERWIN) IN NOVEMBER 1981, FOLLOWING A FAMILY VACATION TO CANADA IN 1979. HER FAMILY SETTLED IN THE PICTURE BUTTE AREA TO FARM. HER FATHER HELPED TO ESTABLISH THE DUTCH-CANADIAN CLUB AND THE GALT 8 MINE SOCIETY. ANINE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1986 TO ATTEND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE (U OF L) AND STARTED WORKING AT SAAG IN 1992, TWO WEEKS AFTER GRADUATING FROM THE U OF L. SHE BEGAN AS THE PUBLIC PROGRAMS COORDINATOR AND “WAS DOING MEDIA STUFF, VOLUNTEER COORDINATION, SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATION AND STARTED THE ART AUCTION.” BY 2004 ANINE WAS WORKING AT THE GALT AS MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND SEE P20150005000 FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE VONKEMAN FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20150022002
Acquisition Date
2015-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
OBSIDIAN CORE
Date Range From
4000BP
Date Range To
1700
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
OBSIDIAN
Catalogue Number
P20150027000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
OBSIDIAN CORE
Date Range From
4000BP
Date Range To
1700
Materials
OBSIDIAN
No. Pieces
1
Height
8.5
Length
32.7
Width
24.7
Description
SHINY, BLACK OBSIDIAN ROCK. VARIOUS GROOVES AND FLAKE SCARS ON THE OVERALL SURFACE OF THE ROCK.
Subjects
MASONRY & STONEWORKING T&E
INDIGENOUS
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
ARCHAEOLOGY
History
THIS OBSIDIAN ROCK WAS DONATED ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2015 BY NANCY BIGGERS IN MEMORY OF HER LATE PARENTS, BOYD AND MARY BIGGERS. IT WAS LOCATED ON THE FAMILY FARM BY BOYD BIGGERS. ACCORDING TO A STATEMENT GIVEN BY NANCY AT THE TIME OF DONATION, "... FARMERS NEED TO CLEAR THEIR LAND OF ... ROCKS IN ORDER TO PLANT AND HARVEST THEIR FIELDS. BOYD WAS DOING THIS ONE DAY (IN THE EARLY 1980S) AND CAME ACROSS A BEAUTIFUL SHINY BLACK ROCK. HE WAS IMPRESSED BY [ITS] COLOURING AND THE VARIOUS GROOVES, SO RATHER THAN THROWING IT ON TO THE PILE WITH THE OTHER ROCKS, HE DECIDED TO TAKE IT HOME. ... MARY, BEING A SCHOOL TEACHER, TOLD HIM THAT IT APPEARED TO BE OBSIDIAN, WHICH THE ABORIGINALS USED TO MAKE ARROWHEADS AND TOOLS. MARY RETIRED FROM TEACHING IN 1986 AND THUS BOYD DECIDED TO SELL THE FARM. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE ... [AND] THE OBSIDIAN CAME WITH THEM ... AS IT WAS A REMINDER OF THEIR FARM LIFE. IT WAS USED AS A DECORATIVE PIECE IN BOTH OF THE HOMES IN WHICH THEY LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE." ON SEPTEMBER 8, 2015, ARCHEOLOGIST, NEIL MIRAU, OF ARROW ARCHAEOLOGY LIMITED STATED VIA EMAIL THAT THE ROCK HAD BEEN BROUGHT TO THE AREA BY HUMANS AND THAT IT WAS RELATIVELY EASY TO DETERMINE THE SOURCE OF THE OBSIDIAN FROM ITS GENERAL APPEARANCE. HE WAS ALMOST CERTAIN THAT THIS PIECE OF OBSIDIAN CAME FROM THE OBSIDIAN CLIFFS IN WHAT IS NOW YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WYOMING. HE WROTE, “OBSIDIAN DOES NOT OCCUR NATURALLY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND REALLY THE ONLY WAY FOR IT TO GET HERE, ESPECIALLY THIS TYPE OF ROCK IS TO BE CARRIED BY HUMANS. OBSIDIAN ... WAS PRIZED BY PAST CULTURES AND IT MAKES VERY ATTRACTIVE AND VERY SHARP TOOLS AND PROJECTILE POINTS. THIS PARTICULAR PIECE HAS FLAKE SCARS SHOWING THAT IT WAS WORKED BY HUMANS. IT WAS LIKELY, GIVEN ITS ‘VALUE,’ CARRIED BY ITS OWNER TO FLAKE PIECES OFF EVERY ONCE IN AWHILE TO MAKE A NEW TOOL. OBSIDIAN IS ONE OF THE RARE TYPES OF STONE THAT IS CURATED BY PAST HUMANS, THAT IS, ALTHOUGH HEAVY, THEY WOULD HAVE CARRIED IT WITH THEM TO MAKE TOOLS WITH.” HE ALSO WROTE THAT OBSIDIAN FROM WYOMING THAT HAS BEEN FOUND IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA HAS ARRIVED “EITHER THROUGH TRADE OR BY LONG DISTANCE TRAVEL OF PEOPLE FROM HERE TO THERE AND RETURN," AND THAT THERE IS EVIDENCE OF BOTH METHODS. MIRAU INFERS THAT IT COULD HAVE BEEN DROPPED THERE THREE OR FOUR CENTURIES AGO, OR MANY THOUSANDS OF YEARS AGO. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPY OF THE NANCY BIGGER’S INFORMATION, EMAIL TRANSCRIPTS, MAPS OF THE LOCATION OF THE BIGGERS’ FARM WHERE ARTIFACT WAS FOUND, AND A PHOTOGRAPH OF BOYD AND MARY BIGGERS.
Catalogue Number
P20150027000
Acquisition Date
2015-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150013006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Height
53.5
Length
33.2
Width
25.5
Description
CREAM AND BLUE PLAID, TERRY CLOTH BIB. BOTTOM HALF OF BIB HAS A 9.5CM BLUE STRIPE. IN THE CENTRE OF THE STRIPE ARE THE WORDS "GOOD BOY" WITH FLOWERS ON EITHER SIDE. BIB TIES AROUND NECK WITH TWO ATTACHED CREAM COLOURED TIES. MEASUREMENTS OF BIB FROM TIE TIP TO BOTTOM IS 53.5CM, WHILE BIB ITSELF IS ONLY 33.2CM. SOME STAINING ON BIB, ESPECIALLY IN THE CENTRE, ABOVE 'GOOD BOY'.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS BIB BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013006
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20150038001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Materials
COTTON, SILK, LEATHER
No. Pieces
8
Length
61.0
Width
87.5
Description
KALOCSA/KALOCSAI STYLE OF HUNGARIAN DRESS. .1: BLOUSE. IVORY COLOURED, SHORT SLEEVED, SLIGHTLY SQUARE NECKLINE, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE DETAILS. BLOUSE CLOSES WITH FOUR METAL SNAPS AT SHOULDER, TWO SNAPS ON EITHER SIDE OF NECKLINE. SLIGHT A-LINE SHAPE TO BLOUSE. FLOWER SHAPED CROCHETED LACE DETAILING AT CUFFS AND AROUND NECKLINE. EACH OF THE LACE FLOWERS HAS FIVE PETALS ALONG SLEEVE CUFF. CROCHET LACE DETAILING AT NECKLINE IS SMALLER AND FLOWERS ONLY HAVE FOUR PETALS. COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY AT FRONT OF NECKLINE AND JUST ABOVE SLEEVE CUFFS. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. L: 61.0CM W: 87.5CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT YELLOWING AROUND NECKLINE AND AT ARMPITS. SEAM HAS LET LOOSE UNDER WEARER’S RIGHT ARM. VERY SMALL DARK BROWN STAIN ON BACK, BELOW WEARER’S RIGHT ARM. .2: UNDER SKIRT. IVORY COLOURED, APPROXIMATELY KNEE LENGTH, WITH MACHINE-MADE LACE DETAILING ALONG HEM. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH TWO VERY LONG IVORY COLOURED TWILL TAPE TIES. GATHERED AT WAIST BAND, CREATING A FULL SKIRT. TWO PIECE SKIRT WITH SEAMS AT FRONT AND BACK. TIES ARE EACH APPROXIMATELY 137.0 CM LONG. L: 60.8CM W: 145.0CM (AT HEM) OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. DARK GREY LINE APPROXIMATELY 21.5 CM DOWN FROM WAISTBAND CIRCLES THE ENTIRE SKIRT. .3: OVER SKIRT. BURGUNDY, HEAVY, SILKY MATERIAL WITH A REPEATING SQUARE PATTERN WOVEN INTO THE FABRIC (PATTERN CONSISTS OF FOUR VERY SMALL SQUARES, WHICH MAKE UP A SLIGHTLY LARGE SQUARE, REPEATED IN A VERTICLE STRIPE). ACCORDION PLEATS MAKE FOR A VERY FULL SKIRT. THERE IS A 9.5 CM STRIP OF MACHINE-MADE, IVORY LACE APPROXIMATELY 18.7 CM UP FROM THE HEM. INSIDE OF SKIRT IS LINED WITH A PINK FLORAL PATTERNED SILKY FABRIC, APPROXIMATELY 18.0 CM UP FROM THE HEM. THIS PINK FLORAL PATTERNED MATERIAL IS ALSO VISIBLE FOR 2.4 CM ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE SKIRT AT THE HEM. SKIRT CLOSES AT WAIST WITH LONG BURGUNDY BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 120.1 CM LONG, THE SECOND IS 135.5 CM LONG. WIDTH OF SKIRT IS MEASURED ALONG HEM. THE SKIRT IS 46.0 CM WIDE WITH THE PLEATS PRESSED CLOSELY TOGETHER. SKIRT IS 203.0 CM WIDE WHEN THE PLEATS ARE FLATTENED. L: 65.5CM W: 203.0CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. LACE HAS YELLOWED CONSIDERABLY. .4: VEST. IVORY COLOURED, CROPPED VEST, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE DETAILS CLOSES AT FRONT WITH 6 SILVER COLOURED METAL SNAPS. FLOWER SHAPED CROCHET LACE DETAILING AROUND THE WHOLE VEST, EXCEPT AT THE CLOSURE, WHERE THERE IS DETAILING ON THE WEARER’S RIGHT SIDE ONLY. EACH OF THE LACE FLOWERS HAS FIVE PETALS. LARGE COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY ALL OVER VEST. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. VEST MAY HAVE BEEN MADE BIGGER AT ONE POINT: THERE IS A STRIP OF WHITER MATERIAL UNDER BOTH ARMS, EACH STRIP IS APPROXIMATELY 3.0CM WIDE, AT THE SIDE SEAMS. L: 47.5CM W: 57.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .5: APRON. IVORY COLOURED, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE AND CUTWORK LACE DETAILING AROUND EDGE. SIDES AND BOTTOM OF APRON HAVE BOTH CUTWORK AND CROCHETED LACE DETAILING. THE CUTWORK LACE DETAILING IS COMPOSED OF TWO DIFFERENT FLOWERS, IN A REPEATING PATTERN. EACH OF THESE LARGE FLOWERS IS APPROXIMATELY 7.0 CM IN DIAMETER. BETWEEN THE LARGE FLOWERS ARE SQUARE SHAPED SECTIONS OF CROCHETED LACE. JUST INSIDE THE LACE DETAILING ARE 10 SECTIONS OF EMBROIDERED FLOWERS, MADE UP OF FIVE PAIRS OF FLOWERS. THE MAIN PORTION OF THE APRON IS ALSO EMBROIDERED, SHOWING FLOWERS INCLUDING TWO-TONED RED ROSES, TWO-TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO-TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO-TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. THERE ARE ALSO GROUPS OF PEPPERS OR POSSIBLY CARROTS (THEY ARE RED AND ORANGE). LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. WAIST TIES EACH HAVE A SMALL SECTION OF EMBROIDERY AND CROCHETED LACE. L: 56.0CM W: 119.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .6: CAP. IVORY COLOURED, EMBROIDERED. BRIMLESS. SCALLOPED EDGE ALONG WEARER’S FOREHEAD. GATHERED IN BACK WITH ELASTIC AT THE BASE OF THE NECK. COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY ALL OVER CAP. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. THERE ARE ALSO TWO SECTIONS OF BABY BLUE RIBBON: ONE NEAR THE FRONT OF THE HAT IS LONGER AND THE SECOND SECTION OF RIBBON MAKES A HORSESHOE SHAPE AT THE BACK OF THE HEAD. L: 24.0CM W: 28.2CM OVERALL IN EXCELLENT CONDITION. .7 SHOE. MANUFACTURED. LEFT SHOE. RED CORDUROY, SLIP ON, KITTEN HEEL, EMBROIDERED, MULE-STYLE SHOE, WITH ENCLOSED TOES. RED TOE PORTION OF SHOE HAS A BLUE FLOWER, WITH YELLOW CENTRE, EMBROIDERED. NEXT TO EMBROIDERY IS A WHITE POM-POM. INSOLE OF SHOE IS TAN COLOURED LEATHER, STAMPED AT THE HEEL WITH A GOLD STAMP: “MADE IN HUNGARY SZOMBATHELY.” EMBOSSED ON SOLE OF SHOE “270.” SOLE OF HEEL IS BLACK RUBBER AND SOLE OF TOE PORTION IS LEATHER. H: 7.0CM L: 27.7CM W: 8.7CM OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SOLE IS WORN AT TOE, ESPECIALLY, WHERE THE LEATHER HAS WORN AWAY. GOLD STAMP ON INSOLE IS ALSO WORN AWAY. .8 SHOE. MANUFACTURED. RIGHT SHOE. RED CORDUROY, SLIP ON, KITTEN HEEL, EMBROIDERED, MULE-STYLE SHOE, WITH ENCLOSED TOES. RED TOE PORTION OF SHOE HAS AN EMBROIDERED BLUE FLOWER, WITH YELLOW CENTRE. NEXT TO EMBROIDERY IS A WHITE POM-POM. INSOLE OF SHOE IS TAN COLOURED LEATHER, STAMPED AT THE HEEL WITH A GOLD STAMP: “MADE IN HUNGARY SZOMBATHELY.” EMBOSSED ON SOLE OF SHOE “270.” SOLE OF HEEL IS BLACK RUBBER AND SOLE OF TOE PORTION IS LEATHER. H: 7.0CM L: 27.7CM W: 8.7CM OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SOLE IS WORN AT TOE, ESPECIALLY, WHERE THE LEATHER HAS WORN AWAY. GOLD STAMP ON INSOLE IS ALSO WORN AWAY.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A VARIETY OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, MARIA JOKUTY, AND A BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY.” A DESCRIPTION OF MARIA’S EMBROIDERY AND SEWING WORK, THE HISTORY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THE JOKUTY’S JOURNEY TO CANADA CAN BE FOUND BELOW THE HISTORY OF THE ARTIFACTS. MARIA MADE THIS COSTUME FOR HERSELF AND IS DONE IN THE STYLE OF THE KALOSCAI PROVINCE. IN AN INTERIVEW CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN DECEMBER 2015, MARIA SAID THAT THIS DRESS WAS BETTER THAN THE OTHERS “BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE THIS PART (POINTING TO MACHINE EMBROIDERY).” MARIA WOULD WEAR HER EMBROIDERED DRESS AT SPECIAL EVENTS: “WHEN WE HAD SPECIAL – EVEN WHEN WE HAD HERITAGE DAY – I DRESS UP. CANADA DAY. AND THEN WE USED TO HAVE [CELEBRATIONS] IN THE GALT GARDEN, YOU KNOW, MUSIC, DANCE, BUT I WEAR IT. BUT NOT DANCING OKAY, JUST PUT IT ON. AND MANY, MANY TIMES I DID. AND WE HAD DINNER AND DANCE – I PUT IT ON.” .2 UNDER SKIRT: MARIA SAID THAT THIS UNDER SKIRT GAVE FULLNESS TO THE OUTFIT: "YOU HAVE TO HAVE A FULLNESS. BECAUSE THAT WOULD BE JUST TOO PLAIN. BUT WHEN YOU HAVE THIS SKIRT, IT’S KIND OF FULL, YOU CAN SEE, AND IT’S 100% COTTON, AND THAT GIVES YOU KIND OF MORE FULLNESS AND YOU CAN SEE THE BEAUTY OF THE PLEATED SKIRT." .6 CAP: MARIA SAID ONLY MARRIED WOMEN WOULD WEAR THIS TYPE OF CAP: "SO THE GIRLS WHEN THEY ARE YOUNG, THEY WEARING THIS OUTFIT, OKAY. BUT THEN THE WOMEN, IF THEY GOT MARRIED, THEY HAVE TO WEAR A CAP! SO WHOEVER SEE YOU, 'OH, SHE’S MARRIED.' AND, BUT DON’T YOU THINK SHE’S BEAUTIFUL?” .7 & .8: SHOES: MARIA INDICATED THAT THE SHOES WERE PURCHASED IN HUNGARY AND THAT SHE DID NOT DO THE EMBROIDERY ON THE TOE: "THAT’S HOW WE BOUGHT IN HUNGARY. THEY MADE IT OVER THERE. WE WENT IN HUNGARY WITH MY HUSBAND I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PAIRS WE BOUGHT TO THE GIRLS. AND THE GIRLS, WHEN THEY WERE DANCING THEY HAVE ALL THE SAME PAIR OF DIFFERENT SIZES." MARIA BEGAN WORKING ON 16 DANCE OUTFITS IN 1977 AND IT TOOK HER “THREE-FOUR YEARS TO DO IT. BECAUSE YOU KNOW, I DESIGNED THE FLOWERS, AND THEN YOU KNOW THE EMBROIDERY, AND TO PUT IT TOGETHER WAS A VERY HARD JOB.” MAKING THE DANCE COSTUMES WAS IMPORTANT TO MARIA “BECAUSE [SHE] WAS PROUD OF BEING HUNGARIAN AND [SHE] WANTED TO SHOW SOMETHING DIFFERENT.” SHE LEARNED TO EMBROIDER AT THE AGE OF 12/13 FROM A NEIGHBOUR NAMED MARISSA IN HUNGARY. MARIA THINKS THAT MARISSA WAS ABOUT 25/26 YEARS OLD WHEN SHE TAUGHT MARIA HOW TO EMBROIDER. MARIA GETS A GREAT DEAL OF ENJOYMENT SEEING HER CREATIONS ON DANCERS WHILE THEY COMPETE: “VERY IMPORTANT. YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME. YOU PUT ALL ENERGY INTO IT TO BE ABLE TO FINISH IT AND THAT – BECAUSE HAPPINESS WAS WHEN THE GIRLS, THEY WAS DANCING ON A STAGE AND THEY’VE ALL GOT THE COSTUMES. YOU KNOW WHAT, WOW! YOU JUST CAN’T EX – I CAN’T EXPLAIN TO YOU.” MARIA GOT SOME OF HER PATTERNS FOR EMBROIDERY FROM THE EDMONTON HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY AND LATER RETURNED TO HUNGARY TO IMPROVE HER SKILLS, AS WELL AS TO LEARN HOW TO DO MACHINE EMBROIDERY. MARIA AND, AND HER HUSBAND, CHESTER, RETURNED TO HUNGARY ABOUT 3 TIMES, STAYING EACH TIME FOR ABOUT 2 MONTHS SO THAT MARIA COULD IMPROVE HER SKILLS. IN ADDITION TO CREATING THE COSTUMES, MARIA ALSO CARED FOR THEM, ENSURING THEY WERE AVAILABLE WHEN A DANCER WOULD NEED TO WEAR THEM: “YES, I WAS IN CHARGE. DRY CLEANING, WASHING, AND EVERYTHING. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS, LONG YEARS UNTIL WE MOVED AND THEN WE DIDN’T HAVE NO ROOM, AND THEN SOMEBODY ELSE, YOU KNOW. AND THEN WE HAD A MEETING AND THE DANCERS, THEY WAS LOOKING FOR SOMEBODY ELSE WHO WOULD TAKE CARE OF THEM, ‘CAUSE YOU SHOULD’VE SEEN THE GIRLS THEY WAS LIKE, YOU KNOW, “NO, MRS. JOKUTY, YOU TAKE GOOD CARE!” AND I DID.” ACCORDING TO CHESTER (GEZA) JOKUTY’S OBITUARY, CHESTER AND MARIA WERE MARRIED IN HUNGARY ON OCTOBER 3, 1949. CHESTER SERVED IN THE HUNGARIAN ARMY IN 1940, WAS TAKEN PRISONER BY THE RUSSIANS IN 1945, AND HELD PRISONER IN RUSSIA FOR THREE AND A HALF YEARS. IN THE BOOKLET “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY” MARIA INDICATES THAT CHESTER WAS NOT KEEN TO REMAIN IN HUNGARY FOLLOWING THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION, BECAUSE OF HIS TREATMENT AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIANS: CHESTER “SPENT THREE AND A HALF YEARS AS A P.O.W. IN ODESSA WHERE PRISONERS WERE USED AS SLAVE LABOUR. CHESTER WAS NOT A BIG MAN AND BECAUSE OF THE CONDITIONS, WAS EXTREMELY WEAK. DURING THIS TIME IF THE PRISONERS WERE NOT ABLE TO KEEP UP OR DO WHAT WAS REQUIRED OF THEM, THE RUSSIAN GUARDS SENT THEIR DOGS IN TO FORCE THE PRISONERS TO MOVE. HE HAD WITNESSED SO MUCH DEATH AND SUFFERING AND HAD SUFFERED SO BADLY IN THE COLD, AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIAN SOLDIERS, HE VOWED NEVER TO BE TAKEN BY THEM AGAIN.” MARIA CONTINUED IN THIS BOOKLET TO RECOUNT THEIR DECISION TO LEAVE HUNGARY: “SO, ON NOVEMBER 4TH [1956], WE DECIDED WE WOULD LEAVE … SO WE GATHERED OUR FAMILY AND MY MOTHER AND BEGAN WALKING AS FAST AS POSSIBLE TOWARDS AUSTRIA – ONLY ABOUT AN HOUR’S WALK FROM WHERE WE LIVED.” THE JOKUTY FAMILY REMAINED IN AUSTRIA FOR 6 MONTHS, WHERE MARIA RECALLS BEING WELL TREATED. THEY LEFT AUSTRIA AND ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN, NB AFTER A 12 DAY CROSSING, ON APRIL 22, 1957. AFTER A LONG TRAIN RIDE, THEY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. SHORTLY AFTER THEIR ARRIVAL THEY BEGAN WORK AS FARM LABOURERS IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON OCTOBER 29, 1979 HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY ABOUT THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION: “DESCRIBED SIMPLY, THE REVOLUTION ESTABLISHED A GOVERNMENT THAT TRIED TO MOVE AWAY FROM THE SOVIET UNION’S INFLUENCE. THE SOVIET UNION, SUBSEQUENTLY, SENT ARMED TROOPS INTO HUNGARY TO REASSERT ITS INFLUENCE. IN THE AFTERMATH, MANY PEOPLE FLED, ABOUT 37,000 TO CANADA ACCORDING TO FEDERAL DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION STATISTICS … CHESTER JOKUTY OF THE ASSOCIATION SAID ABOUT 2,000 PERSONS OF HUNGARIAN ORIGINS LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE AND THE SURROUNDING AREA.” MARIA INDICATED SEVERAL TIMES THROUGH THE COURSE OF HER INTERVIEW THAT LIFE WAS VERY DIFFICULT FOR THE JOKUTY FAMILY WHEN THEY FIRST ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. THE FAMILY’S FIRST ACCOMMODATIONS LEFT LITTLE TO BE DESIRED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE RUNNING WATER, TOILET, WE HAVE TO PULL THE WATER FROM THINGS, YOU KNOW, AND CHOP THE WOOD TO MAKE BREAKFAST. AND WINTERTIME, WE WAS SCARED TO DEATH THAT KIDS, WE’LL FREEZE TO DEATH. SOMETIMES I HAVE TO STAY UP, OR MY HUSBAND DID TO BE SURE THE WOOD, YOU KNOW THE STOVE IN THE KITCHEN – ONLY THING – THAT GIVE US A LITTLE BIT WARMTH. IT WAS VERY, VERY HARD.” MARIA RECALLS HAVING TO HITCH HIKE TO GET GROCERIES AND RELIED ON THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS TO GET HOME AGAIN: “AND NO CAR. YOU KNOW WHAT I DID? WE WAS SO HUNGRY, SO I SAID I HAVE TO TAKE A CHANCE. MY HUSBAND WAS WORKING AND KIDS WAS IN MCNALLY SCHOOL AND THEN I WENT ON THE ROAD, PUT MY HAND UP, AND WHATEVER HAPPENED, HAPPENED ... THEY DROP ME ON 5TH AVENUE SOMEWHERE, OR SAFEWAY, THEY DROP ME OVER THERE, BUT I HEARD THAT LOTS OF HUNGARIAN BACHELORS AND PEOPLE GO TO THE GARDEN HOTEL DRINKING BEER. SO WHEN I WENT OVER THERE, I COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, SO THEN I LISTENED TO THE LANGUAGES WHERE I HEAR THE HUNGARIAN LANGUAGES. SO THEN I HEARD IT, AND I WENT AND I INTRODUCED MYSELF, WHO I AM, AND, “WE ARE ON THE SUGAR BEETS SOWING, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US? I NEED A GROCERY, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US …?” AND THEY FIND US SOMEBODY WHO WAS DRIVING, AND I DON’T KNOW WHAT THE NAME, WHAT THE NAME WAS, BECAUSE LONG TIME AGO, THEY GOT MY GROCERY IN THE CAR AND TOOK ME TO THE FARM FREE. CAN YOU IMAGINE? I WISH I COULD GIVE HIM A BIG HUG AND THANKFUL.” CHESTER’S OBITUARY INDICATES THAT HE “WAS A VERY PROUD HUNGARIAN AND A FOUNDING LIFETIME MEMBER OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA IN 1977 AND SERVED AS PRESIDENT FOR TEN YEARS. HE ALSO WAS A FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ETHNIC ASSOCIATION IN 1977.” IN A HERALD ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON NOVEMBER 14, 1989, MARGARET GUGYELKA (SECRETARY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY) INDICATED THAT THE SOCIETY STARTED IN 1977: “’THERE WAS AN OLDTIMERS’ GROUP BEFORE THAT, BUT IT WAS MORE LIKE A FRATERNITY … THE SOCIETY WAS STARTED BY A SMALL GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO WANTED TO CARRY ON HUNGARIAN TRADITIONS.’” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2, 1983 INDICATES THAT THE SOCIETY ALSO PARTICIPATED IN THE WESTERN CANADIAN HUNGARIAN FOLK DANCE FESTIVAL. IN THE ARTICLE, CHESTER SAID THAT THE “FESTIVAL IS NOT A COMPETITION BUT RATHER AN EVENT DESIGNED TO KEEP CULTURAL HERITAGE ALIVE AND DANCE GROUPS IN TOUCH … JOKUTY SAYS HUNGARIAN DANCING HAS PROVEN ‘VERY, VERY POPULAR’ BECAUSE OF THE VARIETY OF DANCES – 46 IN ALL OF AT THE 1982 FESTIVAL HELD IN LETHBRIDGE – AND THE COLOURFUL COSTUMES UNIQUE TO EACH PROVINCE. THE COSTUMES HAVE PROVEN TO BE A BIG EXPENSE FOR THE SOCIETY SINCE ONE OUTFIT CAN COST UP TO $600 TO MAKE. MADE TO MEASURE BOOTS FROM MONTREAL ARE AS MUCH AS $150.” MARIA LAMENTS THAT THE SOCIETY ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE. SHE EXPLAINED THAT THERE SIMPLY ISN’T THE VOLUNTEER LABOUR FORCE TO CONTINUE DOING ALL THAT THE SOCIETY USED TO: “WHEN WE USED TO MAKE – EVERY YEAR BEFORE CHRISTMAS WE USED TO MAKE FOUR THOUSAND, FIVE THOUSAND CABBAGE ROLLS AND WE ADVERTISE, WE LET THE PEOPLE KNOW YOU HAVE TO PUT THE NAME AHEAD AND YOU HAVE TO COME PICK. ALL DAY WE WAS WORKING, BUT FIVE O’CLOCK, SIX O’CLOCK PEOPLE CAME AND TAKE [THE CABBAGE ROLLS] BECAUSE WE USED TO HAVE IT IN A BILL KERGAN CENTER, AND OVER THERE IS WALK-IN COLDER. BUT NOW, THIS YEAR [2015], NO CABBAGE ROLLS AND PEOPLE ARE DISAPPOINTED, BUT WE DON’T HAVE NO VOLUNTEERS. YOU KNOW, GOLDEN YEARS CATCH UP WITH PEOPLE.” SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY" AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20150038001
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150038002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
5
Length
68.9
Width
106.5
Description
MEZOSEGI STYLE OF DRESS. .1: BLOUSE. MANUFACTURED. WHITE, THREE-QUARTER LENGTH SLEEVE, BUTTON-UP, TRIMMED IN LACE. BAND COLLAR, TRIMMED WITH A THIN BAND OF WHITE LACE. SLEEVES HEMMED WITH TWO RUFFLES OF WHITE LACE AND EACH BAND OF LACE IS 12.5 CM WIDE. BLOUSE CLOSES IN THE FRONT WITH 5 BUTTONS. PLACKET TRIMMED WITH THE SAME LACE FOUND AT THE COLLAR. REMNANTS OF A BLACK LABEL FOUND AT THE BACK OF NECK, INSIDE BLOUSE. L: 68.9CM W: 106.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .2: UNDERSKIRT. HANDMADE. IVORY COLOURED, APPROXIMATELY KNEE LENGTH, WITH MACHINE-MADE LACE DETAILING ALONG HEM. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH TWO VERY LONG IVORY COLOURED BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 109.0 CM LONG, THE OTHER IS 136.0 CM LONG. TO INCREASE FULLNESS OF THE UNDERSKIRT, THERE IS A 27.5 CM WIDE RUFFLE ALONG THE BOTTOM OF THE SKIRT. THIS RUFFLE AND THE HEM LINE ARE BOTH TRIMMED IN A FLORAL PATTERNED LACE. L: 56.2CM W: 87.7CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. LACE TRIM HAS COME UNDONE AT THE FRONT OF THE SKIRT, ON THE UPPER RUFFLE AND ESPECIALLY ON THE LOWER RUFFLE. .3: VEST. HANDMADE. PINK AND YELLOW FLOWERS WITH GREENERY ON MAROON BACKGROUND, CLOSES IN FRONT WITH BLACK VELCRO, CROPPED LENGTH. TRIMMED WITH PINK CREPE AROUND NECKLINE AND AROUND ARMS. BAND OF PINK CREPE AROUND EACH SHOULDER STRAP, CREATING A SLIGHT SWEETHEART NECKLINE. THE SAME PINK CREPE IS ON THE INSIDE OF THE VEST AT THE HEM. L: 46.0CM W: 48.2CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .4: OVERSKIRT. HANDMADE. PINK AND YELLOW FLOWERS WITH GREENERY ON MAROON BACKGROUND, SEVERAL STRIPS OF FABRIC OR RIBBON ALONG HEMLINE OF SKIRT. ACCORDION PLEATS MAKE FOR A VERY FULL SKIRT. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH WHITE VELCRO AND MAROON BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 91.5 CM LONG, THE OTHER IS 92.5 CM LONG. STRIPES OF FABRIC OR RIBBON START 24.0 CM FROM BOTTOM OF SKIRT. THE FIRST STRIP IS MADE OF YELLOW SATIN FABRIC, THEN A THIN SECTION OF THE SKIRT FABRIC. NEXT IS A 10.7 CM WIDE STRIP OF PINK: A THIN SATIN RIBBON OF LIGHT PINK IS SEWN ONTO THE TOP AND BOTTOM OF A PIECE OF DARKER PINK CREPE, MUCH LIKE THAT FOUND ON THE TRIM OF THE VEST (P20150038002.3). BELOW THE TWO-TONED PINK STRIPE IS ANOTHER STRIP OF SKIRT FABRIC. THEN THERE IS A STRIP OF YELLOW SATIN RIBBON, BABY BLUE SATIN RIBBON, AND FINALLY AT THE VERY BOTTOM OF THE HEMLINE, A STRIP OF RED SATIN RIBBON. WIDTH OF SKIRT IS MEASURED ALONG HEM. THE SKIRT IS 69.0 CM WIDE WITH THE PLEATS PRESSED CLOSELY TOGETHER. SKIRT IS 287.5 CM WIDE WHEN THE PLEATS ARE FLATTENED. L: 65.0CM W: 287.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .5 APRON. HANDMADE. WHITE, EYELET LACE, COTTON, TWO VERTICAL RIBBON STRIPS ON FRONT. THREE PANEL CONSTRUCTION. FLORAL PATTERNED EYELET LACE, WITH MORE FLOWERS TOWARDS THE HEMLINE OF THE APRON. CENTRE PANEL IS SOLID FABRIC AT THE WAISTBAND. SIDE PANELS ARE EYELET LACE. SIDES AND BOTTOM OF APRON HAVE A SCALLOPED CUTOUT LACE EDGING. VERTICAL STRIPS ARE WHITE RIBBON WITH MACHINE EMBROIDERED RED ROSES. WAISTBAND TIES HAVE SAME EYELET LACE AND SCALLOPING. L:53.2CM W: 185.0CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. YELLOW STAINING ON FRONT OF APRON BETWEEN THE TWO VERTICAL STRIPES, AS WELL AS ON THE WEARER’S LEFT SIDE, TOWARDS THE HEMLINE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A VARIETY OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, MARIA JOKUTY, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN DECEMBER 2015, AND A BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY.” A DESCRIPTION OF MARIA’S EMBROIDERY AND SEWING WORK, THE HISTORY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THE JOKUTY’S JOURNEY TO CANADA CAN BE FOUND BELOW THE HISTORY OF THE ARTIFACTS. .1: BLOUSE. MARIA INDICATED THAT THIS ITEM OF CLOTHING IS THE ONLY ONE THAT SHE DIDN'T MAKE HERSELF. SHE DID ADD THE LACE RUFFLE TO THE SLEEVE. .4: OVER SKIRT. MARIA INDICATED IN HER INTERVIEW THAT THE PLEATING ALLOWED THE SKIRT TO FLARE WHEN THE DANCER SPINS: "THE SKIRT, WHEN YOU DANCE WITH THE SKIRT, WHEN YOU SPIN, THE GIRL SPINNING, YOU KNOW, IT’S SO BEAUTIFUL. BECAUSE THIS IS ALSO EVERYTHING HOMEMADE. I MADE IT, OKAY, AND SENT IT TO MONTREAL FOR SPECIAL PRESSING, YOU KNOW, BUT LOOK AT THAT.” MARIA BEGAN WORKING ON THIS OUTFIT (AND 15 OTHER DANCE OUTFITS) IN 1977 AND IT TOOK HER “THREE-FOUR YEARS TO DO IT. YOU KNOW, I DESIGNED THE FLOWERS, AND THEN YOU KNOW THE EMBROIDERY, AND TO PUT IT TOGETHER WAS A VERY HARD JOB.” MAKING THE DANCE COSTUMES WAS IMPORTANT TO MARIA “BECAUSE [SHE] WAS PROUD OF BEING HUNGARIAN AND [SHE] WANTED TO SHOW SOMETHING DIFFERENT.” SHE LEARNED TO EMBROIDER AT THE AGE OF 12/13 FROM A NEIGHBOUR NAMED MARISSA IN HUNGARY. MARIA THINKS THAT MARISSA WAS ABOUT 25/26 YEARS OLD WHEN SHE TAUGHT MARIA HOW TO EMBROIDER. MARIA GETS A GREAT DEAL OF ENJOYMENT SEEING HER CREATIONS ON DANCERS WHILE THEY COMPETE: “VERY IMPORTANT. YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME. YOU PUT ALL ENERGY INTO IT TO BE ABLE TO FINISH IT AND THAT – BECAUSE HAPPINESS WAS WHEN THE GIRLS, THEY WAS DANCING ON A STAGE AND THEY’VE ALL GOT THE COSTUMES. YOU KNOW WHAT, WOW! YOU JUST CAN’T EX – I CAN’T EXPLAIN TO YOU.” MARIA GOT SOME OF HER PATTERNS FOR EMBROIDERY FROM THE EDMONTON HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY AND LATER RETURNED TO HUNGARY TO IMPROVE HER SKILLS, AS WELL AS TO LEARN HOW TO DO MACHINE EMBROIDERY. MARIA AND HER HUSBAND, CHESTER, RETURNED TO HUNGARY ABOUT 3 TIMES, STAYING EACH TIME FOR ABOUT 2 MONTHS SO THAT MARIA COULD IMPROVE HER SKILLS. IN ADDITION TO CREATING THE COSTUMES, MARIA ALSO CARED FOR THEM, ENSURING THEY WERE AVAILABLE WHEN A DANCER WOULD NEED TO WEAR THEM: “YES, I WAS IN CHARGE. DRY CLEANING, WASHING, AND EVERYTHING. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS, LONG YEARS UNTIL WE MOVED AND THEN WE DIDN’T HAVE NO ROOM, AND THEN SOMEBODY ELSE, YOU KNOW. AND THEN WE HAD A MEETING AND THE DANCERS, THEY WAS LOOKING FOR SOMEBODY ELSE WHO WOULD TAKE CARE OF THEM, ‘CAUSE YOU SHOULD’VE SEEN THE GIRLS THEY WAS LIKE, YOU KNOW, “NO, MRS. JOKUTY, YOU TAKE GOOD CARE!” AND I DID.” ACCORDING TO CHESTER (GEZA) JOKUTY’S OBITUARY, CHESTER AND MARIA WERE MARRIED IN HUNGARY ON OCTOBER 3, 1949. CHESTER SERVED IN THE HUNGARIAN ARMY IN 1940, WAS TAKEN PRISONER BY THE RUSSIANS IN 1945, AND HELD PRISONER IN RUSSIA FOR THREE AND A HALF YEARS. IN THE BOOKLET “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY” MARIA INDICATES THAT CHESTER WAS NOT KEEN TO REMAIN IN HUNGARY FOLLOWING THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION, BECAUSE OF HIS TREATMENT AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIANS: CHESTER “SPENT THREE AND A HALF YEARS AS A P.O.W. IN ODESSA WHERE PRISONERS WERE USED AS SLAVE LABOUR. CHESTER WAS NOT A BIG MAN AND BECAUSE OF THE CONDITIONS, WAS EXTREMELY WEAK. DURING THIS TIME IF THE PRISONERS WERE NOT ABLE TO KEEP UP OR DO WHAT WAS REQUIRED OF THEM, THE RUSSIAN GUARDS SENT THEIR DOGS IN TO FORCE THE PRISONERS TO MOVE. HE HAD WITNESSED SO MUCH DEATH AND SUFFERING AND HAD SUFFERED SO BADLY IN THE COLD, AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIAN SOLDIERS, HE VOWED NEVER TO BE TAKEN BY THEM AGAIN.” MARIA CONTINUED IN THIS BOOKLET TO RECOUNT THEIR DECISION TO LEAVE HUNGARY: “SO, ON NOVEMBER 4TH [1956], WE DECIDED WE WOULD LEAVE … SO WE GATHERED OUR FAMILY AND MY MOTHER AND BEGAN WALKING AS FAST AS POSSIBLE TOWARDS AUSTRIA – ONLY ABOUT AN HOUR’S WALK FROM WHERE WE LIVED.” THE JOKUTY FAMILY REMAINED IN AUSTRIA FOR 6 MONTHS, WHERE MARIA RECALLS BEING WELL TREATED. THEY LEFT AUSTRIA AND ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN, NB AFTER A 12 DAY CROSSING, ON APRIL 22, 1957. AFTER A LONG TRAIN RIDE, THEY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. SHORTLY AFTER THEIR ARRIVAL THEY BEGAN WORK AS FARM LABOURERS IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON OCTOBER 29, 1979 HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY ABOUT THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION: “DESCRIBED SIMPLY, THE REVOLUTION ESTABLISHED A GOVERNMENT THAT TRIED TO MOVE AWAY FROM THE SOVIET UNION’S INFLUENCE. THE SOVIET UNION, SUBSEQUENTLY, SENT ARMED TROOPS INTO HUNGARY TO REASSERT ITS INFLUENCE. IN THE AFTERMATH, MANY PEOPLE FLED, ABOUT 37,000 TO CANADA ACCORDING TO FEDERAL DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION STATISTICS … CHESTER JOKUTY OF THE ASSOCIATION SAID ABOUT 2,000 PERSONS OF HUNGARIAN ORIGINS LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE AND THE SURROUNDING AREA.” MARIA INDICATED SEVERAL TIMES THROUGH THE COURSE OF HER INTERVIEW THAT LIFE WAS VERY DIFFICULT FOR THE JOKUTY FAMILY WHEN THEY FIRST ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. THE FAMILY’S FIRST ACCOMMODATIONS LEFT LITTLE TO BE DESIRED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE RUNNING WATER, TOILET, WE HAVE TO PULL THE WATER FROM THINGS, YOU KNOW, AND CHOP THE WOOD TO MAKE BREAKFAST. AND WINTERTIME, WE WAS SCARED TO DEATH THAT KIDS, WE’LL FREEZE TO DEATH. SOMETIMES I HAVE TO STAY UP, OR MY HUSBAND DID TO BE SURE THE WOOD, YOU KNOW THE STOVE IN THE KITCHEN – ONLY THING – THAT GIVE US A LITTLE BIT WARMTH. IT WAS VERY, VERY HARD.” MARIA RECALLS HAVING TO HITCH HIKE TO GET GROCERIES AND RELIED ON THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS TO GET HOME AGAIN: “AND NO CAR. YOU KNOW WHAT I DID? WE WAS SO HUNGRY, SO I SAID I HAVE TO TAKE A CHANCE. MY HUSBAND WAS WORKING AND KIDS WAS IN MCNALLY SCHOOL AND THEN I WENT ON THE ROAD, PUT MY HAND UP, AND WHATEVER HAPPENED, HAPPENED. SO THEY DROP ME ON 5TH AVENUE SOMEWHERE, OR SAFEWAY, THEY DROP ME OVER THERE, BUT I HEARD THAT LOTS OF HUNGARIAN BACHELORS AND PEOPLE GO TO THE GARDEN HOTEL DRINKING BEER. SO WHEN I WENT OVER THERE, I COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, SO THEN I LISTENED TO THE LANGUAGES WHERE I HEAR THE HUNGARIAN LANGUAGES. SO THEN I HEARD IT, AND I WENT AND I INTRODUCED MYSELF, WHO I AM, AND, “WE ARE ON THE SUGAR BEETS SOWING, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US? I NEED A GROCERY, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US …?” AND THEY FIND US SOMEBODY WHO WAS DRIVING, AND I DON’T KNOW WHAT THE NAME, WHAT THE NAME WAS, BECAUSE LONG TIME AGO, THEY GOT MY GROCERY IN THE CAR AND TOOK ME TO THE FARM FREE. CAN YOU IMAGINE? I WISH I COULD GIVE HIM A BIG HUG AND THANKFUL.” CHESTER’S OBITUARY INDICATES THAT HE “WAS A VERY PROUD HUNGARIAN AND A FOUNDING LIFETIME MEMBER OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA IN 1977 AND SERVED AS PRESIDENT FOR TEN YEARS. HE ALSO WAS A FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ETHNIC ASSOCIATION IN 1977.” IN A HERALD ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON NOVEMBER 14, 1989, MARGARET GUGYELKA (SECRETARY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY) INDICATED THAT THE SOCIETY STARTED IN 1977: “’THERE WAS AN OLDTIMERS’ GROUP BEFORE THAT, BUT IT WAS MORE LIKE A FRATERNITY … THE SOCIETY WAS STARTED BY A SMALL GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO WANTED TO CARRY ON HUNGARIAN TRADITIONS.’” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2, 1983 INDICATES THAT THE SOCIETY ALSO PARTICIPATED IN THE WESTERN CANADIAN HUNGARIAN FOLK DANCE FESTIVAL. IN THE ARTICLE, CHESTER SAID THAT THE “FESTIVAL IS NOT A COMPETITION BUT RATHER AN EVENT DESIGNED TO KEEP CULTURAL HERITAGE ALIVE AND DANCE GROUPS IN TOUCH … JOKUTY SAYS HUNGARIAN DANCING HAS PROVEN ‘VERY, VERY POPULAR’ BECAUSE OF THE VARIETY OF DANCES – 46 IN ALL OF AT THE 1982 FESTIVAL HELD IN LETHBRIDGE – AND THE COLOURFUL COSTUMES UNIQUE TO EACH PROVINCE. THE COSTUMES HAVE PROVEN TO BE A BIG EXPENSE FOR THE SOCIETY SINCE ONE OUTFIT CAN COST UP TO $600 TO MAKE. MADE TO MEASURE BOOTS FROM MONTREAL ARE AS MUCH AS $150.” MARIA LAMENTS THAT THE SOCIETY ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE. SHE EXPLAINED THAT THERE SIMPLY ISN’T THE VOLUNTEER LABOUR FORCE TO CONTINUE DOING ALL THAT THE SOCIETY USED TO: “WHEN WE USED TO MAKE – EVERY YEAR BEFORE CHRISTMAS WE USED TO MAKE FOUR THOUSAND, FIVE THOUSAND CABBAGE ROLLS AND WE ADVERTISE, WE LET THE PEOPLE KNOW YOU HAVE TO PUT THE NAME AHEAD AND YOU HAVE TO COME PICK. ALL DAY WE WAS WORKING, BUT FIVE O’CLOCK, SIX O’CLOCK PEOPLE CAME AND TAKE [THE CABBAGE ROLLS] BECAUSE WE USED TO HAVE IT IN A BILL KERGAN CENTER, AND OVER THERE IS WALK-IN COOLER.. BUT NOW, THIS YEAR [2015], NO CABBAGE ROLLS AND PEOPLE ARE DISAPPOINTED, BUT WE DON’T HAVE NO VOLUNTEERS. YOU KNOW, GOLDEN YEARS CATCH UP WITH PEOPLE.” SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY" AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20150038002
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

19 records – page 1 of 1.