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Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
No. Pieces
2
Height
29.5
Width
15
Description
A: HANDMADE DOLL. THE “ESKIMO” DOLL IS MADE WITH LIGHT BLUE, FELT-LIKE FABRIC WITH WHITE FABRIC ACCENTS. THE FACE IS MADE OUT OF A LIGHTER FABRIC THAT IS PEACH-COLOURED. THE FACIAL DETAILS ARE HAND PAINTED. THE DOLL HAS BLUE EYES, EYEBROWS, NOSTRILS, RED LIPS, AND ROSY CHEEKS. THE LIGHT BLUE FABRIC THAT MAKES UP THE MAJORITY OF THE DOLL’S BODY IS ENCOMPASSING THE DOLL’S FACE LIKE A HOOD. THE DOLL’S TORSO IS COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. TWO HEART-SHAPED ARMS, MADE OF THE SAME MATERIAL, ARE ATTACHED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE BODY. THE DOLLS UPPER LEG AND FEET ARE COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. FROM THE KNEES TO THE ANKLES, A LIGHTER, WHITE FABRIC IS COVERING THE LEGS. B: DOLL SKIRT. AROUND THE DOLL’S WAIST IS A DETACHABLE SKIRT MADE OF THE SAME FABRIC AND A WHITE WAISTBAND. POOR CONDITION. ALL FABRIC IS WELL-WORN AND THREADBARE IN MULTIPLE PLACES. THE DOLL’S RED STUFFING IS VISIBLE THROUGH PARTS OF THE FABRIC. THERE IS DISCOLORATION (YELLOWING) OVERALL. THE STUFFING IS NOT EVENLY DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT THE DOLL. THE SEAMS AT THE ARMS ARE FRAGILE. THE PAINT FOR THE DOLL’S FACE IS SEVERELY FADED.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
LEISURE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THE FAMILY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. THIS DOLL BELONGED TO MORRIS AS A CHILD. SHE EXPLAINS, “THIS CAME FROM A GREAT AUNT WHO CAME TO VISIT US AND SHE ALWAYS BROUGHT GIFTS AND THIS ONE WAS MINE AND I LOVED THIS DOLL… I REMEMBER PLAYING WITH IT, IT WAS SOFT AND CUDDLY WHEN I HAD IT… MY DAUGHTER WENT THROUGH IT AND MY GRANDDAUGHTER AND THEN I PUT A STOP TO IT BEFORE THEY ATE IT UP OR DID SOMETHING… THEY LOVED IT AND THEY, YOU KNOW LITTLE KIDS, THEY’RE CARELESS SO I’LL KEEP IT...” IN A PHONE CALL WITH COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK ON OCTOBER 24, 2017, MORRIS SAID SHE RECIEVED THE DOLL FROM HER GREAT AUNT WHO HAD BROUGHT IT FROM VISITING BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS PLAYED WITH THE DOLL AS A CHILD, AS DID MORRIS' CHILDREN. THE DOLL WAS LOVED BY MULTIPLE GENERATIONS IN MORRIS' FAMILY AS HER GRANDCHILDREN AND GREAT GRANDCHILDREN WOULD ALSO PLAY WITH THE DOLL WHEN THEY CAME TO VISIT. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BERBER SHOE EDUKAN
Date Range From
2009
Date Range To
2015
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, THREAD, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20160011000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BERBER SHOE EDUKAN
Date Range From
2009
Date Range To
2015
Materials
LEATHER, THREAD, RUBBER
No. Pieces
2
Length
28.5
Description
PAIR OF DARK BROWN LEATHER SHOES. TWO PANELS OF LEATHER MAKE UP EACH SHOE (ONE FRONT PIECE AND ONE PIECE FOR THE HEEL). THE LEATHER IS STITCHED TOGETHER WITH A STIFF, LIGHT-COLOURED THREAD. THERE IS A LIGHT BROWN, LEATHER THREAD FOR THE TRIM OF THE SHOE THAT GOES AROUND TO CONNECT THE TWO LEATHER PIECES THAT MAKE UP THE SHOE. THE INSOLE IS A LIGHT-COLOURED LEATHER. THE BACK OF THE HEEL IS HIGHER THAN THE REST OF THE SHOE AND IS FOLDED DOWN INSIDE THE SHOE. LIGHT BROWN BOTTOM SOLE WITH BLACK RUBBER LINING THE TOP OF THE SOLE. GOOD CONDITION. ON BOTH SHOES THERE IS LIGHT SCUFFING NEAR THE TOES. THE SOLES ARE WORN FROM WEAR, ESPECIALLY NEAR THE TOES AND HEELS. ON THE LEFT SHOE VARNISH COATING IS UNEVEN. THERE IS A SMALL OF BUILD-UP OF THE VARNISH AT THE BACK HEEL. AT THE FRONT TOE, THERE IS A PIECE OF THE BLACK SECTION OF THE SOLE COMING OUT. ON THE RIGHT SHOE, THERE IS WEAR OF THE BROWN VARNISH AT THE TOP OF THE TOE. VARNISH AT THE BACK HEEL IS UNEVEN AT HEEL. INSOLE IS CRACKING SLIGHTLY. BOTTOM SECTION OF SOLE IS LIFTING OFF THE SHOE AND THERE IS A SHINY SUBSTANCE ON VARIOUS PLACES OF THE SOLE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THESE SHOES WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AFTER BEING FEATURED IN THE GALT’S EXHIBITION TITLED, "CHANGING PLACES: IMMIGRATION & DIVERSITY," THAT RAN FROM OCTOBER 31, 2015 TO JANUARY 17, 2016. THE DONOR, JAWAD ABOUCHA, WAS INTERVIEWED BY CURATOR WENDY AITKENS, ON JUNE 4, 2015 IN PREPARATION FOR THAT EXHIBITION. ANOTHER INTERVIEW WITH ABOUCHA WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON APRIL 26, 2016 DURING THE ACQUISITION PROCESS. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS A COMBINATION OF QUOTATIONS BY ABOUCHA EXTRACTED FROM BOTH INTERVIEWS: “I’M FROM MOROCCO AND MORE PRECISELY FROM SOUTHERN MOROCCO I WAS BORN IN A CITY CALLED TIZNIT… IT’S A CITY PROBABLY AS SMALL AS LETHBRIDGE. IT IS WHERE I WAS BORN AND RAISED… I WOULD SAY I BOUGHT [THESE SHOES] IN THE YEAR 2009… I LIVED IN FRANCE FOR FOUR YEARS SO THAT’S WHERE I BOUGHT THEM WHEN I WENT TO MOROCCO TO VISIT FAMILY… I JUST GO HOME ONCE EVERY TWO YEARS AND THEN IN MOROCCO I LIKE TO BUY THINGS THAT WOULD REMEMBER ME OF MOROCCO AND ONE OF THE THINGS I LIKE TO BUY IS SLIPPERS THAT I CAN WEAR INDOORS… I KEPT THEM [IN FRANCE AND WHEN I] MOVED TO CANADA [I] BROUGHT THEM WITH ME… … [I]N THE WINTER TIME I CAN WEAR THEM INDOORS, BUT IN THE SUMMERTIME I CAN WEAR LIKE WHEN I’M IN BACKYARD FOR EXAMPLE. I THINK WHEN I BROUGHT THEM HERE [IN] AUGUST LAST YEAR I THINK I WAS USING THEM PROBABLY IN THE SUMMERTIME.” “[THE SHOES ARE] CALLED EDUKAN FROM SOUTHERN MOROCCO… PEOPLE MOSTLY WEAR THE SHOES WHEN IT’S SUNNY OUTSIDE AND BEAUTIFUL AND THEN YOU CAN JUST WEAR THESE ONES… [THE SHOES] SYMBOLIZE SOMETHING OF MY CULTURAL BACKGROUND… I THINK IT IS THE SHAPE AND THEY’RE ALSO MADE OF, I THINK, IT’S ANIMAL SKIN… THEY’RE MADE IN MOROCCO BUT ESPECIALLY THEY SYMBOLIZE MY BACKGROUND BECAUSE THEY’RE MADE IN SOUTHERN MOROCCO AND THEY’RE [ALSO] CALLED BERBER SHOES AND PEOPLE DO WEAR THEM LIKE IN THE MOUNTAINS. I DON’T KNOW FOR HOW MANY CENTURIES PEOPLE USE TO MAKE THESE SHOES BUT WHEN YOU GO TO SMALL CITIES OR IN THE MOUNTAINS THERE ARE PEOPLE WHO MAKE THESE SHOES LIKE BY HAND. I PICKED UP THIS COLOUR WHEN I BOUGHT THEM BECAUSE I THINK THIS COLOUR DOESN’T GET CHANGED VERY QUICK WHEN THERE IS DIRT AND STUFF. THESE SHOES IN MOROCCO SYMBOLIZE THE BERBER CULTURE… I HAVE THE OTHER PICTURE IN MY MIND THAT PEOPLE MAKING [THEM] BY HAND AND THE WAY THEY CUT THE SKIN AND MAKE IT AND THEY PAINT IT AND THEY PUT THE GLUE. THAT’S THE WHOLE WORK OF THESE PEOPLE [WHO ARE] MAKING THESE SORT OF SHOES [AND] I THINK ABOUT IT.” ABOUCHA FURTHER DISCUSSES THE PURCHASE OF THE SHOES IN MOROCCO, INCLUDING THEIR COST: “I WOULD SAY AROUND IN CANADIAN MONEY IT WOULD PROBABLY BE FIFTEEN DOLLARS, WHICH IS NOT TOO EXPENSIVE BACK HOME BUT IT IS A VERY REASONABLE PRICE FOR THEM... MOSTLY SOME [VENDORS] ONLY SELL SHOES BUT IT’S A LOT OF DIFFERENT KINDS, COLOUR[S] FOR MALE OF FEMALES AND THERE IS DIFFERENT TYPES AND I LIKE THE WAY THEY ARRANGE THEM TOGETHER IN FRONT OF THE STORE. PEOPLE WHO SELL THESE SHOES, LIKE DIFFERENT MERCHANTS, THEY ALL GATHER IN ONE PART OF WHAT WE CALL BACK HOME “A SOUK” WHICH IS A NAME FOR THE TRADITIONAL MARKET… BACK HOME WE CAN ALWAYS TAKE THESE ONES AND REPAIR THEM FOR VERY CHEAP AND MOST PEOPLE DO THAT. I HAD THE OPTION ACTUALLY TO TAKE THEM BACK HOME AND REPAIR THEM AND BRING THEM BACK BUT AT THE PRICE OF FIFTEEN DOLLARS, [IT] IS NOT SO MUCH, I CAN BUY A PAIR OF NEW ONES THAT KEEP ME FOR FIVE MORE YEARS SO I DONATE THESE ONES TO GALT MUSEUM.” ABOUCHA GOES ON TO TALK ABOUT THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE SHOES BEING FROM HIS BIRTH COUNTRY AS HE LIVES ABROAD: “I LEFT MOROCCO WHEN I WAS TWENTY-ONE AND I’M THIRTY YEARS OLD NOW. I’VE BEEN LIVING ABROAD FOR NINE YEARS. I STILL HAVE A LOT OF FAMILY MEMBERS LIVING IN MOROCCO… MY MOM, FATHER-IN-LAW, MY SISTER, MY YOUNGER BROTHER, MY GRANDPARENTS, MY UNCLES, THAT’S ON MY DAD’S SIDE [ARE STILL IN MOROCCO]. ON MY MOM’S SIDE, ALL MY UNCLES ARE LIVING IN FRANCE. MY OLDER BROTHER ALSO LIVES IN FRANCE… I STILL SPEAK THE LANGUAGE, STILL HAVE LOTS OF MEMORIES AND STORIES OF CHILDHOOD AND ADULTHOOD AND SOME OF UNIVERSITY SO I SPENT QUITE A LOT OF TIME IN MOROCCO. IT’S A COUNTRY WHERE I WAS BORN AND RAISED. SO I HAVE SOME THINGS THAT ONCE IN A WHILE WHEN I LOOK AT IT, [AND THEY] REMIND ME OF WHERE I COME FROM… [I] REMEMBER WHERE I COME FROM WHEN I SEE [THE SHOES]. I THINK OF BACK HOME, I THINK OF WHERE I WAS RAISED AND THE PEOPLE WHO MADE THEM AND THE FAMILY MEMBERS THAT WEAR THEM ESPECIALLY MY GRANDFATHER. HE WEARS THEM LOTS, AND I’M VERY CLOSE TO HIM.” AT THE TIME OF THE INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN, ABOUCHA HAD BEEN IN CANADA FOR ABOUT FOUR AND A HALF YEARS: “I DIDN’T IMMIGRATE TO CANADA STRAIGHT FROM MOROCCO. I ALSO LIVED IN FRANCE FOR 4 YEARS WHILE I DID PART OF MY STUDIES THERE. WHEN I WAS IN MOROCCO I WENT TO THE UNIVERSITY IN ANOTHER CITY CALLED AGADIR. THERE IS NO UNIVERSITY IN TIZNIT. SO I HAD TO MOVE TO AGADIR AND I DID MY BACHELOR’S IN CHEMISTRY. AND THEN LOTS OF PEOPLE IN MOROCCO GO TO ANOTHER PLACE TO FINISH THEIR STUDIES. THEY USUALLY CHOOSE TO GO TO FRANCE BECAUSE WE ALSO LEARN FRENCH. SO I DECIDED TO GO AND HAVE AN EXPERIENCE SOMEWHERE ELSE AND GET A DEGREE AND PRACTICE MY FRENCH. I WENT TO FRANCE, THAT WAS IN 2007, AND I LIVED THERE FOR 4 YEARS AND I GOT MY MASTER’S IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES. I WORKED FOR A BIT AND THEN AFTER LIVING THERE FOR 4 YEARS I THOUGHT I PROBABLY NEEDED TO GO SOMEWHERE ELSE... AND ONE OF THE REASONS I MOVED TO CANADA WAS BECAUSE I USED TO HAVE A REALLY GOOD ENGLISH TEACHER IN MOROCCO. I LIKED ENGLISH AND I ALWAYS WANTED TO GO TO AN ENGLISH-SPEAKING COUNTRY, SO I DECIDED TO GO TO CANADA. I [CONSIDERED] OTHER PLACES BUT I KNEW ABOUT CANADA AND I COULD USE MY QUALIFICATIONS SO I CAME HERE AND GAVE IT A TRY AND THAT’S WHAT I DID… I APPLIED FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCY BEFORE I MOVED TO CANADA, WHILE I WAS IN FRANCE I GOT IT SO I MOVED TO STRAIGHT TO CANADA. I AM WHAT IS CALLED A PERMANENT RESIDENT AND I THINK THAT USED TO BE CALLED A LANDED IMMIGRANT BEFORE… I CAME TO MONTREAL FIRST BECAUSE I HAVE SOME FRIENDS WHO LIVE THERE. I LIVED THERE FOR A COUPLE OF MONTHS… AND THEN I DECIDED TO MOVE TO ALBERTA BECAUSE THERE WERE JOBS HERE AND I KNEW I WOULD PRACTICE MY ENGLISH HERE [TOO]. I MOVED HERE [IN] ABOUT FEBRUARY 2012.” “… I MOVED [TO LETHBRIDGE] ON MY OWN BECAUSE I GOT USED TO BEING BY MYSELF AND I HAD THAT EXPERIENCE LIKE IN FRANCE. I WASN’T SCARED OF MOVING HERE WITHOUT ANYBODY… I LIKE THAT ADVENTURE. I AM VERY ORGANIZED WHEN IT COMES TO MOVING TO A NEW PLACE. I DO LOTS OF RESEARCH AND THEN I GET ORGANIZED. I TAKE MY TIME TO MAKE A DECISION. I JUST ASSUME IT AND I GO AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS... I AM WORKING IN POWER ENGINEERING. I DID CHEMISTRY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES BUT WHEN I MOVED HERE, WHILE TRYING TO GET MY DESIGNATIONS, I CHOOSE TO GO ANOTHER FIELD WHICH WAS SOMEWHAT BETTER RELATED TO WHAT I DID BEFORE WHICH IS POWER ENGINEERING. I’M WORKING NOW AS A POWER ENGINEER – STILL TAKING COURSES. I ALWAYS LIKE TO LEARN. I HAD LOTS OF UPS AND DOWNS WHEN I MOVED HERE WITH JOBS. IT WAS HARD TO GET A JOB IN THE BEGINNING BUT NOW IT’S GETTING BETTER... IT’S VERY DIFFERENT HERE IN CANADA… THERE ARE A LOT OF PROFESSIONAL REGULATIONS HERE SO YOU HAVE TO PROBABLY GO AND WRITE SOME MORE EXAMINATIONS AND GET YOUR QUALIFICATIONS RECOGNIZED BEFORE YOU CAN LOOK FOR A JOB. THAT'S ONE OF THE PROBLEMS, A LOT OF IMMIGRANTS HAVE TO FACE THAT. [BUT] THERE ARE LOTS OF SERVICES HERE FOR IMMIGRANTS AND THEY HELP PEOPLE WRITING RESUMES AND COVER LETTERS, GETTING THEIR QUALIFICATIONS RECOGNIZED. THERE IS A SERVICE HERE CALLED “FLEXIBILITY” AND THEY HELPED ME A LOT… I MET A MARGARET LISTER [AT FLEXIBILITY], AND SHE HELPED ME A LOT. SHE GOT ME IN CONTACT WITH PEOPLE, WITH EMPLOYERS. SHE HELPED ME LOTS WITH MY RESUME, MY COVER LETTER…” “I THINK LETHBRIDGE IS A VERY EXCEPTIONAL PLACE. IT WAS NOT EASY TO MEET PEOPLE HERE FOR ME… IT’S A DIFFERENT COMMUNITY. I’VE LIVED IN DIFFERENT CITIES. I’VE LIVED IN CALGARY AND MONTREAL AND DIFFERENT PLACES BEFORE. I USED TO LIVE IN SMALL CITIES OR TOWNS LIKE THIS BUT ALSO ONE OF THE THINGS I NOTICE IN LETHBRIDGE, IT CAN BE CONSERVATIVE A BIT. AND I WAS NOT USED TO THAT AND IT WAS ALSO A CHALLENGE LIVING IN A CITY LIKE THIS. BUT WE CAN ALWAYS MEET PEOPLE WITH WHOM WE CAN SHARE SAME VALUES. IT TAKES SOME TIME, YES... I WAS USED TO HAVING LOTS OF FRIENDS AND WHEN I MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE, I THINK IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I REALIZED IT WAS HARD TO MEET FRIENDS. THAT WAS THE CASE NOT ONLY FOR ME BUT ALSO FOR THE PEOPLE FROM THE COUNTRY. I ALSO THINK IT IS A GOOD THING THAT THIS IS A UNIVERSITY TOWN. SO THERE’S LOTS OF STUDENTS AND I CAN MEET DIFFERENT PEOPLE BUT IT WAS DEFINITELY HARD IN THE BEGINNING. IT TOOK ME ALMOST 2 YEARS JUST TO MEET FRIENDS AND HAVE SOME CONTACTS… I DIDN’T REALLY HAVE A PROBLEM WITH COMMUNICATING WITH PEOPLE HERE. DEFINITELY, WHEN I JUST MOVED HERE MY ENGLISH WAS NOT AS GOOD AS IT IS NOW. AND THAT’S ONE OF MY GOALS IN MOVING TO ALBERTA AND NOW IT’S GOOD. IT’S GOOD. HAVING FRIENDS ALSO HELPS.” “EVERY WEEK I MEET PEOPLE COMING FROM A DIFFERENT PLACE – BC OR ONTARIO OR OVERSEAS. I THINK THE POPULATION IS CHANGING. I THINK THERE IS MORE AND MORE [PEOPLE] FROM DIFFERENT PLACES COMING TO CALGARY OR TO LETHBRIDGE AND THAT HAS AN IMPACT ON THE BALANCE. IT IS ALSO GOOD FOR DIVERSITY [IN] THE PROVINCE…[THERE ARE] AT LEAST 10 PEOPLE HERE FROM MOROCCO. MOST OF THE PEOPLE FROM MOROCCO LIVE IN MONTREAL BECAUSE THEY SPEAK FRENCH, SO IT IS ALSO WHY THEY CHOOSE TO GO TO QUEBEC INSTEAD OF COMING TO ALBERTA… WHEN IT COMES TO LETHBRIDGE [DIVERSITY] HELPS THEM DEFINITELY BECAUSE THERE’S NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE COMING FROM DIFFERENT PLACES WHEN IT COMES TO LETHBRIDGE. BUT IT’S CHANGING BECAUSE PEOPLE GET TO KNOW OTHER CULTURES. [IT] BRINGS PEOPLE TOGETHER [TO] GET TO KNOW OTHERS – THAT ALSO HELPS WITH STEREOTYPES - IMMIGRANTS, PEOPLE COMING FROM A DIFFERENT RELIGION, RACE. IT HELPS PEOPLE GETTING TO KNOW THE WORLD – LIKE WITHOUT HAVING TO GO ABROAD.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE EXISTANCE OF MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT MUSLIM BELIEFS IN LETHBRIDGE, ABOUCHA RESPONDED, “THERE IS STILL [MISCONCEPTIONS]. I THINKS IT HAS SOMETHING TO DO WITH THE MEDIA. THAT’S ONE OF THE REASONS WHY I MENTIONED THAT AS MORE PEOPLE ARE COMING HERE, [IT] IS GOING TO CHANGE THE WAY PEOPLE HERE SEE IMMIGRANTS. BUT THERE ARE STILL THOSE STEREOTYPES. BUT I ALSO BELIEVE THERE ARE NOT ONLY STEREOTYPES ABOUT MUSLIMS, BUT THERE ARE STEREOTYPES ABOUT ALL ETHNICITIES AND ALL RELIGIONS. IT IS, I THINK, IT IS PART OF THE REALITY IN THE WORLD.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20160011000
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20150038001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Materials
COTTON, SILK, LEATHER
No. Pieces
8
Length
61.0
Width
87.5
Description
KALOCSA/KALOCSAI STYLE OF HUNGARIAN DRESS. .1: BLOUSE. IVORY COLOURED, SHORT SLEEVED, SLIGHTLY SQUARE NECKLINE, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE DETAILS. BLOUSE CLOSES WITH FOUR METAL SNAPS AT SHOULDER, TWO SNAPS ON EITHER SIDE OF NECKLINE. SLIGHT A-LINE SHAPE TO BLOUSE. FLOWER SHAPED CROCHETED LACE DETAILING AT CUFFS AND AROUND NECKLINE. EACH OF THE LACE FLOWERS HAS FIVE PETALS ALONG SLEEVE CUFF. CROCHET LACE DETAILING AT NECKLINE IS SMALLER AND FLOWERS ONLY HAVE FOUR PETALS. COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY AT FRONT OF NECKLINE AND JUST ABOVE SLEEVE CUFFS. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. L: 61.0CM W: 87.5CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT YELLOWING AROUND NECKLINE AND AT ARMPITS. SEAM HAS LET LOOSE UNDER WEARER’S RIGHT ARM. VERY SMALL DARK BROWN STAIN ON BACK, BELOW WEARER’S RIGHT ARM. .2: UNDER SKIRT. IVORY COLOURED, APPROXIMATELY KNEE LENGTH, WITH MACHINE-MADE LACE DETAILING ALONG HEM. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH TWO VERY LONG IVORY COLOURED TWILL TAPE TIES. GATHERED AT WAIST BAND, CREATING A FULL SKIRT. TWO PIECE SKIRT WITH SEAMS AT FRONT AND BACK. TIES ARE EACH APPROXIMATELY 137.0 CM LONG. L: 60.8CM W: 145.0CM (AT HEM) OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. DARK GREY LINE APPROXIMATELY 21.5 CM DOWN FROM WAISTBAND CIRCLES THE ENTIRE SKIRT. .3: OVER SKIRT. BURGUNDY, HEAVY, SILKY MATERIAL WITH A REPEATING SQUARE PATTERN WOVEN INTO THE FABRIC (PATTERN CONSISTS OF FOUR VERY SMALL SQUARES, WHICH MAKE UP A SLIGHTLY LARGE SQUARE, REPEATED IN A VERTICLE STRIPE). ACCORDION PLEATS MAKE FOR A VERY FULL SKIRT. THERE IS A 9.5 CM STRIP OF MACHINE-MADE, IVORY LACE APPROXIMATELY 18.7 CM UP FROM THE HEM. INSIDE OF SKIRT IS LINED WITH A PINK FLORAL PATTERNED SILKY FABRIC, APPROXIMATELY 18.0 CM UP FROM THE HEM. THIS PINK FLORAL PATTERNED MATERIAL IS ALSO VISIBLE FOR 2.4 CM ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE SKIRT AT THE HEM. SKIRT CLOSES AT WAIST WITH LONG BURGUNDY BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 120.1 CM LONG, THE SECOND IS 135.5 CM LONG. WIDTH OF SKIRT IS MEASURED ALONG HEM. THE SKIRT IS 46.0 CM WIDE WITH THE PLEATS PRESSED CLOSELY TOGETHER. SKIRT IS 203.0 CM WIDE WHEN THE PLEATS ARE FLATTENED. L: 65.5CM W: 203.0CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. LACE HAS YELLOWED CONSIDERABLY. .4: VEST. IVORY COLOURED, CROPPED VEST, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE DETAILS CLOSES AT FRONT WITH 6 SILVER COLOURED METAL SNAPS. FLOWER SHAPED CROCHET LACE DETAILING AROUND THE WHOLE VEST, EXCEPT AT THE CLOSURE, WHERE THERE IS DETAILING ON THE WEARER’S RIGHT SIDE ONLY. EACH OF THE LACE FLOWERS HAS FIVE PETALS. LARGE COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY ALL OVER VEST. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. VEST MAY HAVE BEEN MADE BIGGER AT ONE POINT: THERE IS A STRIP OF WHITER MATERIAL UNDER BOTH ARMS, EACH STRIP IS APPROXIMATELY 3.0CM WIDE, AT THE SIDE SEAMS. L: 47.5CM W: 57.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .5: APRON. IVORY COLOURED, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE AND CUTWORK LACE DETAILING AROUND EDGE. SIDES AND BOTTOM OF APRON HAVE BOTH CUTWORK AND CROCHETED LACE DETAILING. THE CUTWORK LACE DETAILING IS COMPOSED OF TWO DIFFERENT FLOWERS, IN A REPEATING PATTERN. EACH OF THESE LARGE FLOWERS IS APPROXIMATELY 7.0 CM IN DIAMETER. BETWEEN THE LARGE FLOWERS ARE SQUARE SHAPED SECTIONS OF CROCHETED LACE. JUST INSIDE THE LACE DETAILING ARE 10 SECTIONS OF EMBROIDERED FLOWERS, MADE UP OF FIVE PAIRS OF FLOWERS. THE MAIN PORTION OF THE APRON IS ALSO EMBROIDERED, SHOWING FLOWERS INCLUDING TWO-TONED RED ROSES, TWO-TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO-TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO-TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. THERE ARE ALSO GROUPS OF PEPPERS OR POSSIBLY CARROTS (THEY ARE RED AND ORANGE). LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. WAIST TIES EACH HAVE A SMALL SECTION OF EMBROIDERY AND CROCHETED LACE. L: 56.0CM W: 119.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .6: CAP. IVORY COLOURED, EMBROIDERED. BRIMLESS. SCALLOPED EDGE ALONG WEARER’S FOREHEAD. GATHERED IN BACK WITH ELASTIC AT THE BASE OF THE NECK. COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY ALL OVER CAP. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. THERE ARE ALSO TWO SECTIONS OF BABY BLUE RIBBON: ONE NEAR THE FRONT OF THE HAT IS LONGER AND THE SECOND SECTION OF RIBBON MAKES A HORSESHOE SHAPE AT THE BACK OF THE HEAD. L: 24.0CM W: 28.2CM OVERALL IN EXCELLENT CONDITION. .7 SHOE. MANUFACTURED. LEFT SHOE. RED CORDUROY, SLIP ON, KITTEN HEEL, EMBROIDERED, MULE-STYLE SHOE, WITH ENCLOSED TOES. RED TOE PORTION OF SHOE HAS A BLUE FLOWER, WITH YELLOW CENTRE, EMBROIDERED. NEXT TO EMBROIDERY IS A WHITE POM-POM. INSOLE OF SHOE IS TAN COLOURED LEATHER, STAMPED AT THE HEEL WITH A GOLD STAMP: “MADE IN HUNGARY SZOMBATHELY.” EMBOSSED ON SOLE OF SHOE “270.” SOLE OF HEEL IS BLACK RUBBER AND SOLE OF TOE PORTION IS LEATHER. H: 7.0CM L: 27.7CM W: 8.7CM OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SOLE IS WORN AT TOE, ESPECIALLY, WHERE THE LEATHER HAS WORN AWAY. GOLD STAMP ON INSOLE IS ALSO WORN AWAY. .8 SHOE. MANUFACTURED. RIGHT SHOE. RED CORDUROY, SLIP ON, KITTEN HEEL, EMBROIDERED, MULE-STYLE SHOE, WITH ENCLOSED TOES. RED TOE PORTION OF SHOE HAS AN EMBROIDERED BLUE FLOWER, WITH YELLOW CENTRE. NEXT TO EMBROIDERY IS A WHITE POM-POM. INSOLE OF SHOE IS TAN COLOURED LEATHER, STAMPED AT THE HEEL WITH A GOLD STAMP: “MADE IN HUNGARY SZOMBATHELY.” EMBOSSED ON SOLE OF SHOE “270.” SOLE OF HEEL IS BLACK RUBBER AND SOLE OF TOE PORTION IS LEATHER. H: 7.0CM L: 27.7CM W: 8.7CM OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SOLE IS WORN AT TOE, ESPECIALLY, WHERE THE LEATHER HAS WORN AWAY. GOLD STAMP ON INSOLE IS ALSO WORN AWAY.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A VARIETY OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, MARIA JOKUTY, AND A BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY.” A DESCRIPTION OF MARIA’S EMBROIDERY AND SEWING WORK, THE HISTORY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THE JOKUTY’S JOURNEY TO CANADA CAN BE FOUND BELOW THE HISTORY OF THE ARTIFACTS. MARIA MADE THIS COSTUME FOR HERSELF AND IS DONE IN THE STYLE OF THE KALOSCAI PROVINCE. IN AN INTERIVEW CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN DECEMBER 2015, MARIA SAID THAT THIS DRESS WAS BETTER THAN THE OTHERS “BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE THIS PART (POINTING TO MACHINE EMBROIDERY).” MARIA WOULD WEAR HER EMBROIDERED DRESS AT SPECIAL EVENTS: “WHEN WE HAD SPECIAL – EVEN WHEN WE HAD HERITAGE DAY – I DRESS UP. CANADA DAY. AND THEN WE USED TO HAVE [CELEBRATIONS] IN THE GALT GARDEN, YOU KNOW, MUSIC, DANCE, BUT I WEAR IT. BUT NOT DANCING OKAY, JUST PUT IT ON. AND MANY, MANY TIMES I DID. AND WE HAD DINNER AND DANCE – I PUT IT ON.” .2 UNDER SKIRT: MARIA SAID THAT THIS UNDER SKIRT GAVE FULLNESS TO THE OUTFIT: "YOU HAVE TO HAVE A FULLNESS. BECAUSE THAT WOULD BE JUST TOO PLAIN. BUT WHEN YOU HAVE THIS SKIRT, IT’S KIND OF FULL, YOU CAN SEE, AND IT’S 100% COTTON, AND THAT GIVES YOU KIND OF MORE FULLNESS AND YOU CAN SEE THE BEAUTY OF THE PLEATED SKIRT." .6 CAP: MARIA SAID ONLY MARRIED WOMEN WOULD WEAR THIS TYPE OF CAP: "SO THE GIRLS WHEN THEY ARE YOUNG, THEY WEARING THIS OUTFIT, OKAY. BUT THEN THE WOMEN, IF THEY GOT MARRIED, THEY HAVE TO WEAR A CAP! SO WHOEVER SEE YOU, 'OH, SHE’S MARRIED.' AND, BUT DON’T YOU THINK SHE’S BEAUTIFUL?” .7 & .8: SHOES: MARIA INDICATED THAT THE SHOES WERE PURCHASED IN HUNGARY AND THAT SHE DID NOT DO THE EMBROIDERY ON THE TOE: "THAT’S HOW WE BOUGHT IN HUNGARY. THEY MADE IT OVER THERE. WE WENT IN HUNGARY WITH MY HUSBAND I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PAIRS WE BOUGHT TO THE GIRLS. AND THE GIRLS, WHEN THEY WERE DANCING THEY HAVE ALL THE SAME PAIR OF DIFFERENT SIZES." MARIA BEGAN WORKING ON 16 DANCE OUTFITS IN 1977 AND IT TOOK HER “THREE-FOUR YEARS TO DO IT. BECAUSE YOU KNOW, I DESIGNED THE FLOWERS, AND THEN YOU KNOW THE EMBROIDERY, AND TO PUT IT TOGETHER WAS A VERY HARD JOB.” MAKING THE DANCE COSTUMES WAS IMPORTANT TO MARIA “BECAUSE [SHE] WAS PROUD OF BEING HUNGARIAN AND [SHE] WANTED TO SHOW SOMETHING DIFFERENT.” SHE LEARNED TO EMBROIDER AT THE AGE OF 12/13 FROM A NEIGHBOUR NAMED MARISSA IN HUNGARY. MARIA THINKS THAT MARISSA WAS ABOUT 25/26 YEARS OLD WHEN SHE TAUGHT MARIA HOW TO EMBROIDER. MARIA GETS A GREAT DEAL OF ENJOYMENT SEEING HER CREATIONS ON DANCERS WHILE THEY COMPETE: “VERY IMPORTANT. YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME. YOU PUT ALL ENERGY INTO IT TO BE ABLE TO FINISH IT AND THAT – BECAUSE HAPPINESS WAS WHEN THE GIRLS, THEY WAS DANCING ON A STAGE AND THEY’VE ALL GOT THE COSTUMES. YOU KNOW WHAT, WOW! YOU JUST CAN’T EX – I CAN’T EXPLAIN TO YOU.” MARIA GOT SOME OF HER PATTERNS FOR EMBROIDERY FROM THE EDMONTON HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY AND LATER RETURNED TO HUNGARY TO IMPROVE HER SKILLS, AS WELL AS TO LEARN HOW TO DO MACHINE EMBROIDERY. MARIA AND, AND HER HUSBAND, CHESTER, RETURNED TO HUNGARY ABOUT 3 TIMES, STAYING EACH TIME FOR ABOUT 2 MONTHS SO THAT MARIA COULD IMPROVE HER SKILLS. IN ADDITION TO CREATING THE COSTUMES, MARIA ALSO CARED FOR THEM, ENSURING THEY WERE AVAILABLE WHEN A DANCER WOULD NEED TO WEAR THEM: “YES, I WAS IN CHARGE. DRY CLEANING, WASHING, AND EVERYTHING. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS, LONG YEARS UNTIL WE MOVED AND THEN WE DIDN’T HAVE NO ROOM, AND THEN SOMEBODY ELSE, YOU KNOW. AND THEN WE HAD A MEETING AND THE DANCERS, THEY WAS LOOKING FOR SOMEBODY ELSE WHO WOULD TAKE CARE OF THEM, ‘CAUSE YOU SHOULD’VE SEEN THE GIRLS THEY WAS LIKE, YOU KNOW, “NO, MRS. JOKUTY, YOU TAKE GOOD CARE!” AND I DID.” ACCORDING TO CHESTER (GEZA) JOKUTY’S OBITUARY, CHESTER AND MARIA WERE MARRIED IN HUNGARY ON OCTOBER 3, 1949. CHESTER SERVED IN THE HUNGARIAN ARMY IN 1940, WAS TAKEN PRISONER BY THE RUSSIANS IN 1945, AND HELD PRISONER IN RUSSIA FOR THREE AND A HALF YEARS. IN THE BOOKLET “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY” MARIA INDICATES THAT CHESTER WAS NOT KEEN TO REMAIN IN HUNGARY FOLLOWING THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION, BECAUSE OF HIS TREATMENT AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIANS: CHESTER “SPENT THREE AND A HALF YEARS AS A P.O.W. IN ODESSA WHERE PRISONERS WERE USED AS SLAVE LABOUR. CHESTER WAS NOT A BIG MAN AND BECAUSE OF THE CONDITIONS, WAS EXTREMELY WEAK. DURING THIS TIME IF THE PRISONERS WERE NOT ABLE TO KEEP UP OR DO WHAT WAS REQUIRED OF THEM, THE RUSSIAN GUARDS SENT THEIR DOGS IN TO FORCE THE PRISONERS TO MOVE. HE HAD WITNESSED SO MUCH DEATH AND SUFFERING AND HAD SUFFERED SO BADLY IN THE COLD, AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIAN SOLDIERS, HE VOWED NEVER TO BE TAKEN BY THEM AGAIN.” MARIA CONTINUED IN THIS BOOKLET TO RECOUNT THEIR DECISION TO LEAVE HUNGARY: “SO, ON NOVEMBER 4TH [1956], WE DECIDED WE WOULD LEAVE … SO WE GATHERED OUR FAMILY AND MY MOTHER AND BEGAN WALKING AS FAST AS POSSIBLE TOWARDS AUSTRIA – ONLY ABOUT AN HOUR’S WALK FROM WHERE WE LIVED.” THE JOKUTY FAMILY REMAINED IN AUSTRIA FOR 6 MONTHS, WHERE MARIA RECALLS BEING WELL TREATED. THEY LEFT AUSTRIA AND ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN, NB AFTER A 12 DAY CROSSING, ON APRIL 22, 1957. AFTER A LONG TRAIN RIDE, THEY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. SHORTLY AFTER THEIR ARRIVAL THEY BEGAN WORK AS FARM LABOURERS IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON OCTOBER 29, 1979 HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY ABOUT THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION: “DESCRIBED SIMPLY, THE REVOLUTION ESTABLISHED A GOVERNMENT THAT TRIED TO MOVE AWAY FROM THE SOVIET UNION’S INFLUENCE. THE SOVIET UNION, SUBSEQUENTLY, SENT ARMED TROOPS INTO HUNGARY TO REASSERT ITS INFLUENCE. IN THE AFTERMATH, MANY PEOPLE FLED, ABOUT 37,000 TO CANADA ACCORDING TO FEDERAL DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION STATISTICS … CHESTER JOKUTY OF THE ASSOCIATION SAID ABOUT 2,000 PERSONS OF HUNGARIAN ORIGINS LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE AND THE SURROUNDING AREA.” MARIA INDICATED SEVERAL TIMES THROUGH THE COURSE OF HER INTERVIEW THAT LIFE WAS VERY DIFFICULT FOR THE JOKUTY FAMILY WHEN THEY FIRST ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. THE FAMILY’S FIRST ACCOMMODATIONS LEFT LITTLE TO BE DESIRED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE RUNNING WATER, TOILET, WE HAVE TO PULL THE WATER FROM THINGS, YOU KNOW, AND CHOP THE WOOD TO MAKE BREAKFAST. AND WINTERTIME, WE WAS SCARED TO DEATH THAT KIDS, WE’LL FREEZE TO DEATH. SOMETIMES I HAVE TO STAY UP, OR MY HUSBAND DID TO BE SURE THE WOOD, YOU KNOW THE STOVE IN THE KITCHEN – ONLY THING – THAT GIVE US A LITTLE BIT WARMTH. IT WAS VERY, VERY HARD.” MARIA RECALLS HAVING TO HITCH HIKE TO GET GROCERIES AND RELIED ON THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS TO GET HOME AGAIN: “AND NO CAR. YOU KNOW WHAT I DID? WE WAS SO HUNGRY, SO I SAID I HAVE TO TAKE A CHANCE. MY HUSBAND WAS WORKING AND KIDS WAS IN MCNALLY SCHOOL AND THEN I WENT ON THE ROAD, PUT MY HAND UP, AND WHATEVER HAPPENED, HAPPENED ... THEY DROP ME ON 5TH AVENUE SOMEWHERE, OR SAFEWAY, THEY DROP ME OVER THERE, BUT I HEARD THAT LOTS OF HUNGARIAN BACHELORS AND PEOPLE GO TO THE GARDEN HOTEL DRINKING BEER. SO WHEN I WENT OVER THERE, I COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, SO THEN I LISTENED TO THE LANGUAGES WHERE I HEAR THE HUNGARIAN LANGUAGES. SO THEN I HEARD IT, AND I WENT AND I INTRODUCED MYSELF, WHO I AM, AND, “WE ARE ON THE SUGAR BEETS SOWING, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US? I NEED A GROCERY, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US …?” AND THEY FIND US SOMEBODY WHO WAS DRIVING, AND I DON’T KNOW WHAT THE NAME, WHAT THE NAME WAS, BECAUSE LONG TIME AGO, THEY GOT MY GROCERY IN THE CAR AND TOOK ME TO THE FARM FREE. CAN YOU IMAGINE? I WISH I COULD GIVE HIM A BIG HUG AND THANKFUL.” CHESTER’S OBITUARY INDICATES THAT HE “WAS A VERY PROUD HUNGARIAN AND A FOUNDING LIFETIME MEMBER OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA IN 1977 AND SERVED AS PRESIDENT FOR TEN YEARS. HE ALSO WAS A FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ETHNIC ASSOCIATION IN 1977.” IN A HERALD ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON NOVEMBER 14, 1989, MARGARET GUGYELKA (SECRETARY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY) INDICATED THAT THE SOCIETY STARTED IN 1977: “’THERE WAS AN OLDTIMERS’ GROUP BEFORE THAT, BUT IT WAS MORE LIKE A FRATERNITY … THE SOCIETY WAS STARTED BY A SMALL GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO WANTED TO CARRY ON HUNGARIAN TRADITIONS.’” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2, 1983 INDICATES THAT THE SOCIETY ALSO PARTICIPATED IN THE WESTERN CANADIAN HUNGARIAN FOLK DANCE FESTIVAL. IN THE ARTICLE, CHESTER SAID THAT THE “FESTIVAL IS NOT A COMPETITION BUT RATHER AN EVENT DESIGNED TO KEEP CULTURAL HERITAGE ALIVE AND DANCE GROUPS IN TOUCH … JOKUTY SAYS HUNGARIAN DANCING HAS PROVEN ‘VERY, VERY POPULAR’ BECAUSE OF THE VARIETY OF DANCES – 46 IN ALL OF AT THE 1982 FESTIVAL HELD IN LETHBRIDGE – AND THE COLOURFUL COSTUMES UNIQUE TO EACH PROVINCE. THE COSTUMES HAVE PROVEN TO BE A BIG EXPENSE FOR THE SOCIETY SINCE ONE OUTFIT CAN COST UP TO $600 TO MAKE. MADE TO MEASURE BOOTS FROM MONTREAL ARE AS MUCH AS $150.” MARIA LAMENTS THAT THE SOCIETY ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE. SHE EXPLAINED THAT THERE SIMPLY ISN’T THE VOLUNTEER LABOUR FORCE TO CONTINUE DOING ALL THAT THE SOCIETY USED TO: “WHEN WE USED TO MAKE – EVERY YEAR BEFORE CHRISTMAS WE USED TO MAKE FOUR THOUSAND, FIVE THOUSAND CABBAGE ROLLS AND WE ADVERTISE, WE LET THE PEOPLE KNOW YOU HAVE TO PUT THE NAME AHEAD AND YOU HAVE TO COME PICK. ALL DAY WE WAS WORKING, BUT FIVE O’CLOCK, SIX O’CLOCK PEOPLE CAME AND TAKE [THE CABBAGE ROLLS] BECAUSE WE USED TO HAVE IT IN A BILL KERGAN CENTER, AND OVER THERE IS WALK-IN COLDER. BUT NOW, THIS YEAR [2015], NO CABBAGE ROLLS AND PEOPLE ARE DISAPPOINTED, BUT WE DON’T HAVE NO VOLUNTEERS. YOU KNOW, GOLDEN YEARS CATCH UP WITH PEOPLE.” SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY" AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20150038001
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150038002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
5
Length
68.9
Width
106.5
Description
MEZOSEGI STYLE OF DRESS. .1: BLOUSE. MANUFACTURED. WHITE, THREE-QUARTER LENGTH SLEEVE, BUTTON-UP, TRIMMED IN LACE. BAND COLLAR, TRIMMED WITH A THIN BAND OF WHITE LACE. SLEEVES HEMMED WITH TWO RUFFLES OF WHITE LACE AND EACH BAND OF LACE IS 12.5 CM WIDE. BLOUSE CLOSES IN THE FRONT WITH 5 BUTTONS. PLACKET TRIMMED WITH THE SAME LACE FOUND AT THE COLLAR. REMNANTS OF A BLACK LABEL FOUND AT THE BACK OF NECK, INSIDE BLOUSE. L: 68.9CM W: 106.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .2: UNDERSKIRT. HANDMADE. IVORY COLOURED, APPROXIMATELY KNEE LENGTH, WITH MACHINE-MADE LACE DETAILING ALONG HEM. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH TWO VERY LONG IVORY COLOURED BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 109.0 CM LONG, THE OTHER IS 136.0 CM LONG. TO INCREASE FULLNESS OF THE UNDERSKIRT, THERE IS A 27.5 CM WIDE RUFFLE ALONG THE BOTTOM OF THE SKIRT. THIS RUFFLE AND THE HEM LINE ARE BOTH TRIMMED IN A FLORAL PATTERNED LACE. L: 56.2CM W: 87.7CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. LACE TRIM HAS COME UNDONE AT THE FRONT OF THE SKIRT, ON THE UPPER RUFFLE AND ESPECIALLY ON THE LOWER RUFFLE. .3: VEST. HANDMADE. PINK AND YELLOW FLOWERS WITH GREENERY ON MAROON BACKGROUND, CLOSES IN FRONT WITH BLACK VELCRO, CROPPED LENGTH. TRIMMED WITH PINK CREPE AROUND NECKLINE AND AROUND ARMS. BAND OF PINK CREPE AROUND EACH SHOULDER STRAP, CREATING A SLIGHT SWEETHEART NECKLINE. THE SAME PINK CREPE IS ON THE INSIDE OF THE VEST AT THE HEM. L: 46.0CM W: 48.2CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .4: OVERSKIRT. HANDMADE. PINK AND YELLOW FLOWERS WITH GREENERY ON MAROON BACKGROUND, SEVERAL STRIPS OF FABRIC OR RIBBON ALONG HEMLINE OF SKIRT. ACCORDION PLEATS MAKE FOR A VERY FULL SKIRT. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH WHITE VELCRO AND MAROON BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 91.5 CM LONG, THE OTHER IS 92.5 CM LONG. STRIPES OF FABRIC OR RIBBON START 24.0 CM FROM BOTTOM OF SKIRT. THE FIRST STRIP IS MADE OF YELLOW SATIN FABRIC, THEN A THIN SECTION OF THE SKIRT FABRIC. NEXT IS A 10.7 CM WIDE STRIP OF PINK: A THIN SATIN RIBBON OF LIGHT PINK IS SEWN ONTO THE TOP AND BOTTOM OF A PIECE OF DARKER PINK CREPE, MUCH LIKE THAT FOUND ON THE TRIM OF THE VEST (P20150038002.3). BELOW THE TWO-TONED PINK STRIPE IS ANOTHER STRIP OF SKIRT FABRIC. THEN THERE IS A STRIP OF YELLOW SATIN RIBBON, BABY BLUE SATIN RIBBON, AND FINALLY AT THE VERY BOTTOM OF THE HEMLINE, A STRIP OF RED SATIN RIBBON. WIDTH OF SKIRT IS MEASURED ALONG HEM. THE SKIRT IS 69.0 CM WIDE WITH THE PLEATS PRESSED CLOSELY TOGETHER. SKIRT IS 287.5 CM WIDE WHEN THE PLEATS ARE FLATTENED. L: 65.0CM W: 287.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .5 APRON. HANDMADE. WHITE, EYELET LACE, COTTON, TWO VERTICAL RIBBON STRIPS ON FRONT. THREE PANEL CONSTRUCTION. FLORAL PATTERNED EYELET LACE, WITH MORE FLOWERS TOWARDS THE HEMLINE OF THE APRON. CENTRE PANEL IS SOLID FABRIC AT THE WAISTBAND. SIDE PANELS ARE EYELET LACE. SIDES AND BOTTOM OF APRON HAVE A SCALLOPED CUTOUT LACE EDGING. VERTICAL STRIPS ARE WHITE RIBBON WITH MACHINE EMBROIDERED RED ROSES. WAISTBAND TIES HAVE SAME EYELET LACE AND SCALLOPING. L:53.2CM W: 185.0CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. YELLOW STAINING ON FRONT OF APRON BETWEEN THE TWO VERTICAL STRIPES, AS WELL AS ON THE WEARER’S LEFT SIDE, TOWARDS THE HEMLINE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A VARIETY OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, MARIA JOKUTY, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN DECEMBER 2015, AND A BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY.” A DESCRIPTION OF MARIA’S EMBROIDERY AND SEWING WORK, THE HISTORY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THE JOKUTY’S JOURNEY TO CANADA CAN BE FOUND BELOW THE HISTORY OF THE ARTIFACTS. .1: BLOUSE. MARIA INDICATED THAT THIS ITEM OF CLOTHING IS THE ONLY ONE THAT SHE DIDN'T MAKE HERSELF. SHE DID ADD THE LACE RUFFLE TO THE SLEEVE. .4: OVER SKIRT. MARIA INDICATED IN HER INTERVIEW THAT THE PLEATING ALLOWED THE SKIRT TO FLARE WHEN THE DANCER SPINS: "THE SKIRT, WHEN YOU DANCE WITH THE SKIRT, WHEN YOU SPIN, THE GIRL SPINNING, YOU KNOW, IT’S SO BEAUTIFUL. BECAUSE THIS IS ALSO EVERYTHING HOMEMADE. I MADE IT, OKAY, AND SENT IT TO MONTREAL FOR SPECIAL PRESSING, YOU KNOW, BUT LOOK AT THAT.” MARIA BEGAN WORKING ON THIS OUTFIT (AND 15 OTHER DANCE OUTFITS) IN 1977 AND IT TOOK HER “THREE-FOUR YEARS TO DO IT. YOU KNOW, I DESIGNED THE FLOWERS, AND THEN YOU KNOW THE EMBROIDERY, AND TO PUT IT TOGETHER WAS A VERY HARD JOB.” MAKING THE DANCE COSTUMES WAS IMPORTANT TO MARIA “BECAUSE [SHE] WAS PROUD OF BEING HUNGARIAN AND [SHE] WANTED TO SHOW SOMETHING DIFFERENT.” SHE LEARNED TO EMBROIDER AT THE AGE OF 12/13 FROM A NEIGHBOUR NAMED MARISSA IN HUNGARY. MARIA THINKS THAT MARISSA WAS ABOUT 25/26 YEARS OLD WHEN SHE TAUGHT MARIA HOW TO EMBROIDER. MARIA GETS A GREAT DEAL OF ENJOYMENT SEEING HER CREATIONS ON DANCERS WHILE THEY COMPETE: “VERY IMPORTANT. YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME. YOU PUT ALL ENERGY INTO IT TO BE ABLE TO FINISH IT AND THAT – BECAUSE HAPPINESS WAS WHEN THE GIRLS, THEY WAS DANCING ON A STAGE AND THEY’VE ALL GOT THE COSTUMES. YOU KNOW WHAT, WOW! YOU JUST CAN’T EX – I CAN’T EXPLAIN TO YOU.” MARIA GOT SOME OF HER PATTERNS FOR EMBROIDERY FROM THE EDMONTON HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY AND LATER RETURNED TO HUNGARY TO IMPROVE HER SKILLS, AS WELL AS TO LEARN HOW TO DO MACHINE EMBROIDERY. MARIA AND HER HUSBAND, CHESTER, RETURNED TO HUNGARY ABOUT 3 TIMES, STAYING EACH TIME FOR ABOUT 2 MONTHS SO THAT MARIA COULD IMPROVE HER SKILLS. IN ADDITION TO CREATING THE COSTUMES, MARIA ALSO CARED FOR THEM, ENSURING THEY WERE AVAILABLE WHEN A DANCER WOULD NEED TO WEAR THEM: “YES, I WAS IN CHARGE. DRY CLEANING, WASHING, AND EVERYTHING. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS, LONG YEARS UNTIL WE MOVED AND THEN WE DIDN’T HAVE NO ROOM, AND THEN SOMEBODY ELSE, YOU KNOW. AND THEN WE HAD A MEETING AND THE DANCERS, THEY WAS LOOKING FOR SOMEBODY ELSE WHO WOULD TAKE CARE OF THEM, ‘CAUSE YOU SHOULD’VE SEEN THE GIRLS THEY WAS LIKE, YOU KNOW, “NO, MRS. JOKUTY, YOU TAKE GOOD CARE!” AND I DID.” ACCORDING TO CHESTER (GEZA) JOKUTY’S OBITUARY, CHESTER AND MARIA WERE MARRIED IN HUNGARY ON OCTOBER 3, 1949. CHESTER SERVED IN THE HUNGARIAN ARMY IN 1940, WAS TAKEN PRISONER BY THE RUSSIANS IN 1945, AND HELD PRISONER IN RUSSIA FOR THREE AND A HALF YEARS. IN THE BOOKLET “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY” MARIA INDICATES THAT CHESTER WAS NOT KEEN TO REMAIN IN HUNGARY FOLLOWING THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION, BECAUSE OF HIS TREATMENT AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIANS: CHESTER “SPENT THREE AND A HALF YEARS AS A P.O.W. IN ODESSA WHERE PRISONERS WERE USED AS SLAVE LABOUR. CHESTER WAS NOT A BIG MAN AND BECAUSE OF THE CONDITIONS, WAS EXTREMELY WEAK. DURING THIS TIME IF THE PRISONERS WERE NOT ABLE TO KEEP UP OR DO WHAT WAS REQUIRED OF THEM, THE RUSSIAN GUARDS SENT THEIR DOGS IN TO FORCE THE PRISONERS TO MOVE. HE HAD WITNESSED SO MUCH DEATH AND SUFFERING AND HAD SUFFERED SO BADLY IN THE COLD, AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIAN SOLDIERS, HE VOWED NEVER TO BE TAKEN BY THEM AGAIN.” MARIA CONTINUED IN THIS BOOKLET TO RECOUNT THEIR DECISION TO LEAVE HUNGARY: “SO, ON NOVEMBER 4TH [1956], WE DECIDED WE WOULD LEAVE … SO WE GATHERED OUR FAMILY AND MY MOTHER AND BEGAN WALKING AS FAST AS POSSIBLE TOWARDS AUSTRIA – ONLY ABOUT AN HOUR’S WALK FROM WHERE WE LIVED.” THE JOKUTY FAMILY REMAINED IN AUSTRIA FOR 6 MONTHS, WHERE MARIA RECALLS BEING WELL TREATED. THEY LEFT AUSTRIA AND ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN, NB AFTER A 12 DAY CROSSING, ON APRIL 22, 1957. AFTER A LONG TRAIN RIDE, THEY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. SHORTLY AFTER THEIR ARRIVAL THEY BEGAN WORK AS FARM LABOURERS IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON OCTOBER 29, 1979 HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY ABOUT THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION: “DESCRIBED SIMPLY, THE REVOLUTION ESTABLISHED A GOVERNMENT THAT TRIED TO MOVE AWAY FROM THE SOVIET UNION’S INFLUENCE. THE SOVIET UNION, SUBSEQUENTLY, SENT ARMED TROOPS INTO HUNGARY TO REASSERT ITS INFLUENCE. IN THE AFTERMATH, MANY PEOPLE FLED, ABOUT 37,000 TO CANADA ACCORDING TO FEDERAL DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION STATISTICS … CHESTER JOKUTY OF THE ASSOCIATION SAID ABOUT 2,000 PERSONS OF HUNGARIAN ORIGINS LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE AND THE SURROUNDING AREA.” MARIA INDICATED SEVERAL TIMES THROUGH THE COURSE OF HER INTERVIEW THAT LIFE WAS VERY DIFFICULT FOR THE JOKUTY FAMILY WHEN THEY FIRST ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. THE FAMILY’S FIRST ACCOMMODATIONS LEFT LITTLE TO BE DESIRED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE RUNNING WATER, TOILET, WE HAVE TO PULL THE WATER FROM THINGS, YOU KNOW, AND CHOP THE WOOD TO MAKE BREAKFAST. AND WINTERTIME, WE WAS SCARED TO DEATH THAT KIDS, WE’LL FREEZE TO DEATH. SOMETIMES I HAVE TO STAY UP, OR MY HUSBAND DID TO BE SURE THE WOOD, YOU KNOW THE STOVE IN THE KITCHEN – ONLY THING – THAT GIVE US A LITTLE BIT WARMTH. IT WAS VERY, VERY HARD.” MARIA RECALLS HAVING TO HITCH HIKE TO GET GROCERIES AND RELIED ON THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS TO GET HOME AGAIN: “AND NO CAR. YOU KNOW WHAT I DID? WE WAS SO HUNGRY, SO I SAID I HAVE TO TAKE A CHANCE. MY HUSBAND WAS WORKING AND KIDS WAS IN MCNALLY SCHOOL AND THEN I WENT ON THE ROAD, PUT MY HAND UP, AND WHATEVER HAPPENED, HAPPENED. SO THEY DROP ME ON 5TH AVENUE SOMEWHERE, OR SAFEWAY, THEY DROP ME OVER THERE, BUT I HEARD THAT LOTS OF HUNGARIAN BACHELORS AND PEOPLE GO TO THE GARDEN HOTEL DRINKING BEER. SO WHEN I WENT OVER THERE, I COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, SO THEN I LISTENED TO THE LANGUAGES WHERE I HEAR THE HUNGARIAN LANGUAGES. SO THEN I HEARD IT, AND I WENT AND I INTRODUCED MYSELF, WHO I AM, AND, “WE ARE ON THE SUGAR BEETS SOWING, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US? I NEED A GROCERY, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US …?” AND THEY FIND US SOMEBODY WHO WAS DRIVING, AND I DON’T KNOW WHAT THE NAME, WHAT THE NAME WAS, BECAUSE LONG TIME AGO, THEY GOT MY GROCERY IN THE CAR AND TOOK ME TO THE FARM FREE. CAN YOU IMAGINE? I WISH I COULD GIVE HIM A BIG HUG AND THANKFUL.” CHESTER’S OBITUARY INDICATES THAT HE “WAS A VERY PROUD HUNGARIAN AND A FOUNDING LIFETIME MEMBER OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA IN 1977 AND SERVED AS PRESIDENT FOR TEN YEARS. HE ALSO WAS A FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ETHNIC ASSOCIATION IN 1977.” IN A HERALD ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON NOVEMBER 14, 1989, MARGARET GUGYELKA (SECRETARY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY) INDICATED THAT THE SOCIETY STARTED IN 1977: “’THERE WAS AN OLDTIMERS’ GROUP BEFORE THAT, BUT IT WAS MORE LIKE A FRATERNITY … THE SOCIETY WAS STARTED BY A SMALL GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO WANTED TO CARRY ON HUNGARIAN TRADITIONS.’” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2, 1983 INDICATES THAT THE SOCIETY ALSO PARTICIPATED IN THE WESTERN CANADIAN HUNGARIAN FOLK DANCE FESTIVAL. IN THE ARTICLE, CHESTER SAID THAT THE “FESTIVAL IS NOT A COMPETITION BUT RATHER AN EVENT DESIGNED TO KEEP CULTURAL HERITAGE ALIVE AND DANCE GROUPS IN TOUCH … JOKUTY SAYS HUNGARIAN DANCING HAS PROVEN ‘VERY, VERY POPULAR’ BECAUSE OF THE VARIETY OF DANCES – 46 IN ALL OF AT THE 1982 FESTIVAL HELD IN LETHBRIDGE – AND THE COLOURFUL COSTUMES UNIQUE TO EACH PROVINCE. THE COSTUMES HAVE PROVEN TO BE A BIG EXPENSE FOR THE SOCIETY SINCE ONE OUTFIT CAN COST UP TO $600 TO MAKE. MADE TO MEASURE BOOTS FROM MONTREAL ARE AS MUCH AS $150.” MARIA LAMENTS THAT THE SOCIETY ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE. SHE EXPLAINED THAT THERE SIMPLY ISN’T THE VOLUNTEER LABOUR FORCE TO CONTINUE DOING ALL THAT THE SOCIETY USED TO: “WHEN WE USED TO MAKE – EVERY YEAR BEFORE CHRISTMAS WE USED TO MAKE FOUR THOUSAND, FIVE THOUSAND CABBAGE ROLLS AND WE ADVERTISE, WE LET THE PEOPLE KNOW YOU HAVE TO PUT THE NAME AHEAD AND YOU HAVE TO COME PICK. ALL DAY WE WAS WORKING, BUT FIVE O’CLOCK, SIX O’CLOCK PEOPLE CAME AND TAKE [THE CABBAGE ROLLS] BECAUSE WE USED TO HAVE IT IN A BILL KERGAN CENTER, AND OVER THERE IS WALK-IN COOLER.. BUT NOW, THIS YEAR [2015], NO CABBAGE ROLLS AND PEOPLE ARE DISAPPOINTED, BUT WE DON’T HAVE NO VOLUNTEERS. YOU KNOW, GOLDEN YEARS CATCH UP WITH PEOPLE.” SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY" AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20150038002
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail