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Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170037000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1940
Materials
SILVER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
17.4
Width
2.4
Description
STERLING SILVER BRACELET; BRACLET BANDS COMPRISED OF METAL LINKS WITH SPRINGRING CLASP AT END OF ONE CHAIN. CENTER OF BRACELET HAS OVAL STERLING SILVER DISC WITH CREST ON FRONT COMPRISED ON BLUE TEXT “RCAF” SURROUNDED BY LAUREL LEAVES, WITH A CROWN ABOVE AND OUTSTRETCHED WINGS ON SIDES. “RCAF” CREST ABOVE INSCRIPTION “PERLEY-MARTIN T.H., 4309A, J3513”. BACK OF DISC HAS INSCRIPTION “NO.5 E.F.T.S., LETHBRIDGE ALTA., CLASS NO.1, 22.7.40 TO 3.10.40, SIRKS, STRELING”. CHAINS ATTACHED TO THE CENTER DISC WITH METAL LOOPS ON SIDES OF DISC. CHAINS AND DISC TARNISHED; INSCRIPTION TEXT ON FRONT AND BACK IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
THE IDENTIFICATION BRACELET BELONGED TO FLYING OFFICER THOMAS HENRY PERLEY-MARTIN, AND WAS FASHIONED AS AN IDENTIFER FOR THE NO. 5 ELEMENTARY FLYING TRAINING SCHOOL IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. INFORMATION COMPILED ON THE NO. 5 ELEMENTARY FLYING TRAINING SCHOOL AND OTHER FLIGHT TRAINING SCHOOLS WAS SOURCED FROM LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND VETERANS AFFAIRS CANADA’S WEBSITE SECTION ON THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH AIR TRAINING PLAN. AT THE OUTBREAK OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR, THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH CANADA AND ADDITIONAL COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES, CREATED THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH AIR TRAINING PLAN TO ENHANCE TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR ROYAL AIR FORCE OFFICERS. THE PLAN ESTABLISHED THAT COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES WOULD BUILD FLIGHT SCHOOLS TO TRAIN OFFICERS FOR THE ROYAL AIR FORCE OR COMMONWEALTH AIR FORCES TO SERVE ALONGSIDE THE ROYAL AIR FORCE, INCLUDING THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. OFFICERS WOULD TRAVEL FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM TO A COMMONWEALTH COUNTRY, OR ENLISTED FROM THE COMMONWEALTH COUNTRY. CANADA ESTABLISHED 196 TRAINING FACILITIES AND RELIEF FIELDS, AND GRADUATED 72,835 STUDENTS, ACCORDING TO STATISTICS FROM THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA’S WEBSITE ON THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. IN THE SPRING OF 1940, THE ELEMENTARY FLIGHT TRAINING SCHOOL NO. 5 IN LETHBRIDGE OPENED, SEEING ITS FIRST RECRUITS FOR THE R.C.A.F. ENROLL AND ARRIVE ON JULY 22, 1940 FROM REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN. THE FLIGHT SCHOOL WAS ESTABLISHED AT KENYON FIELDS ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE CITY. STUDENTS WERE TAUGHT TO FLY IN 7 WEEKS, WITH AN ADDITIONAL 5 WEEK EXTENSION COURSE IN MORE ADVANCED FLYING. OF THE FIRST CLASS, GRADUATING OCTOBER 1940, WAS THOMAS HENRY PERLEY-MARTIN. PERLEY-MARTIN WAS BORN ON JANUARY 9, 1921 IN WINNIPEG, MANITOBA. PERLEY-MARTIN SERVED IN THE QUEEN’S OWN HIGHLANDERS OF CANADA CADETS FROM 1935-38, AND ENLISTED IN THE NON-PERMANENT ACTIVE AIR FORCE OF THE R.C.A.F. IN 1938. PERLEY-MARTIN UNDERTOOK INITIAL FLIGHT TRAINING IN TORONTO, ONTARIO, GRADUATING TO ELEMENTARY FLIGHT TRAINING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. GRADUATES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE E.F.T.S. WERE GIVEN, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, '…AN ENGRAVED IDENTIFICATION DISC BY THE SCHOOL', AS STATED BY DENNIS YORATH, MANAGER AT NO. 5 E.F.T.S. IT IS ONLY SPECULATION THAT THE DISC DESCRIBED BY THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IS THE ONE AFFIXED TO THE BRACELET. IN DECEMBER 1940-JANUARY 1941, THE NO. 5 E.F.T.S. WAS RELOCATED TO HIGH RIVER, ALBERTA, AND THE NO. 8 BOMBER AND GUNNERY SCHOOL WAS ESTABLISHED AT KENYON FIELD, LETHBRIDGE, OPENING IN OCTOBER 1941. UPON COMPLETING HIS E.F.T.S. TRAINING, PERLEY-MARTIN WENT ON TO COMPLETE HIS INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED TRAINING AT THE NO. 1 SERVICE FLYING TRAINING SCHOOL AT CAMP BORDEN, ONTARIO. REPORTS FROM THE SERVICE FILE OF T.H. PERLEY-MARTIN INDICATE THAT IN 1941, FOLLOWING HIS TRAINING IN CANADA, PERLEY-MARTIN WAS STATIONED IN OLD SARUM, ENGLAND. PERLEY-MARTIN WAS NOT RECOMMENDED FOR FLYING OR OTHER DUTIES IN 1941 FOLLOWING FLYING OFFENSES AND OUTSTANDING DEBTS, WITH THE OFFENSES RESULTING IN PERLEY-MARTIN BEING COURT MARTIALED AND TRIED. IN MARCH 1942, PERLEY-MARTIN WAS RETIRED FROM SERVICE, AND IN AUGUST 1942 HE BECAME A PILOT GENERAL WITH THE #122 SQN. ON JANUARY 7, 1945, PERLEY-MARTIN WAS KILLED DURING FLYING OPERATIONS IN JARVIS, ONTARIO, WHERE HE WAS AN INSTRUCTOR, WHILE ATTEMPTING TO LAND AN ANSON AIRCRAFT #7013 IN POOR VISIBILITY. ACCORDING TO A MEMORIAL WRITTEN ON PERLEY-MARTIN, HE WAS BURIED IN MOUNTAIN VIEW CEMETERY IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA. WHILE IN ENGLAND IN 1941, PERLEY-MARTIN MARRIED OLIVE CYNTHIA ROBERTS. THE COUPLE HAD ONE SON, BARRY THOMAS PERLEY-MARTIN. OLIVE AND BARRY RETURNED TO ENGLAND FOLLOWING THOMAS HENRY PERLEY-MARTIN’S DEATH, ACCORDING TO AN EMAIL FROM MARY PERLEY-MARTIN, THE WIFE OF THE LATE BARRY THOMAS PERLEY-MARTIN. THE BRACELET WAS PURCHASED BY THE GALT MUSEUM IN DECEMBER 2017 FROM T.M. SAUNDERS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE FLIGHT SCHOOLS AND WINNIPEG FREE PRESS ARTICLES ON T.H. PERLEY-MARTIN, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170037000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170037000
Acquisition Date
2017-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150021000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
SILVER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
17.7
Width
2
Description
STERLING SILVER BRACELET; BRACELET BANDS COMPRISED OF METAL LINKS WITH SNAP LOCK CLASP AT END OF ONE CHAIN. CENTER OF BRACELET HAS OVAL STERLING SILVER DISC WITH CREST ON FRONT OF AN EAGLE WITH OUTSTRETCHED WINGS HOLDING A CIRCLE IN ITS FEET, WITH SWASTIKA IN CENTER OF CIRCLE; FRONT HAS INSCRIPTION ON SIDES CREST “CAMP 133”. BACK OF DISC HAS INSCRIPTION “R.J. BORLAND, M2598, STERLING”. CHAINS ATTACHED TO THE CENTER DISC THROUGH HOLES IN SIDES OF DISC. CHAINS AND DISC ARE TARNISHED; INSCRIPTION TEXT ON FRONT AND BACK ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
THE BRACELET WAS CREATED AT CAMP 133, THE LETHBRIDGE PRISONER OF WAR CAMP DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR. THE CURATOR OF THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM’S MILITARY AND POLITICAL HISTORY DEPARTMENT NOTED IN AN EMAIL, ON THE BRACELET, THAT THE EAGLE DID NOT APPEAR TO BE AN OFFICIAL MILITARY SYMBOL. THE EAGLE WAS POSSIBLY FASHIONED BY HAND, OR CAST AS A COPY. HISTORIAN ROBERT HENDERSON ELABORATED, “NO DOUBT A PRIVATE PURCHASE BY THE GUARD—PROBABLY [BY] ROBERT BORLAND [WHO] SAW SERVICE AT LETHBRIDGE. THE NAZI SYMBOL REPRESENTS EARLY [1933+ ERA] NAZI STYLE SYMBOL, PROBABLY OBTAINED FROM A POW IN TRADE OR FRIENDSHIP. THE LETTERING ON IT [WAS] NO DOUBT DONE BY A JEWELLER WITH APPROPRIATE EQUIPMENT, NOT BY A POW WITHIN THE CAMP. WRIST BRACELETS WERE POPULAR ITEMS TO BE GIVEN TO THE GUARDS BY FAMILY OR SWEETHEARTS, OR BY FRIENDS WHEN THE GUARD WAS POSTED AWAY FROM HOME.” IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON DEVELOPED THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 WITH INFORMATION FROM THE GALT MUSEUM BROCHURE "LETHBRDGE'S INTERNMENT CAMPS" AND THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA WEBSITE. DURING WORLD WAR II THERE WERE 40 PRISONER OF WAR (P.O.W.) CAMPS CONSTRUCTED ACROSS CANADA TO HOUSE THE LARGE NUMBER OF INCOMING POWS - ENEMY MILITARY PERSONNEL THAT WERE CAPTURED IN COMBAT. CAMPS WERE BUILT IN ONTARIO, QUEBEC, THE MARITIMES AND ALBERTA. THE CAMPS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MEDICINE HAT WERE THE LARGEST, TOGETHER HOUSING 22,000 MEN. THE LETHBRIDGE CAMP, NO. 133, WAS BUILT IN THE SUMMER OF 1942, AND BY NOVEMBER OF THAT YEAR HOUSED 13,341 PRISONERS. THE CAMP WAS DIVIDED INTO SIX SECTIONS, EACH WITH SIX DORMITORIES, MESS HALLS, KITCHENS, AND ENTERTAINMENT FACILITIES. MEALS WERE IN SHIFTS WITH PRISONERS SERVING AS COOKS. TAILOR, BARBER AND SHOE REPAIR SHOPS WERE ALSO STAFFED BY PRISONERS, AND NON-COMBAT POWS PRACTICED THEIR PRE-WAR PROFESSIONS AS MEDICAL DOCTORS AND DENTISTS. HOUSING AND RATIONS WERE THE SAME STANDARD AS FOR THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES, WHICH SOMETIMES CAUSED RESENTMENT AMONG LETHBRIDGE CIVILIAN RESIDENTS, WHO WERE UNABLE TO OBTAIN MANY OF THE SAME SUPPLIES ON THEIR STRICT WARTIME RATION ALLOWANCES. WITH MANY YOUNG LOCAL MEN AWAY AT WAR, LOCAL FARMERS BEGAN TO REQUEST LABOUR ASSISTANCE FROM THE CAMP, ESPECIALLY FOR THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY. BY 1943 AN AGREEMENT WAS REACHED AND SOME OF THE PRISONERS WORKED ON FARMS THROUGHOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MOST OF THESE PRISONERS WENT FROM THE CAMP TO THE FARMS DAILY, BUT SOME WERE KEPT AT 'LODGES' AT THE MORE DISTANT FARMS FOR DAYS AT A TIME, WITH MINIMAL GUARDING. FOR THEIR LABOUR, THE PRISONERS WERE PAID 50 CENTS PER DAY. WITH WAR'S END, CAMP 133 CLOSED IN DECEMBER 1946 AND ITS PRISONERS WERE SENT BACK TO GERMANY. THE AREA WHERE THE CAMP STOOD EVENTUALLY BECAME AN INDUSTRIAL PARK AND PART OF THE FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTRE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING A COPY OF THE OBITUARY AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON LETHBRIDGE CAMP 133, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20150021000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20150021000
Acquisition Date
2015-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20130012001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
23
Height
8.3
Length
13.4
Width
3
Description
A. CARDBOARD BOX, BROWN PRINTED WITH YELLOW BACKGROUND, BLUE BORDERS AND IMAGES, AND BLUE TEXT, 13.4CM LONG X 3CM WIDE X 8.3CM TALL. FRONT OF BOX HAS FRONT HAS TEXT “ “SUPER-CLEAN, SMOKELESS, MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA” PRINTED WITH “C-I-L” LOGO. LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES OF BOX HAS WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BLUE BACKGROUND “TWENTY “DOMINION” .303 BRITISH COPPER POINT” AND BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “SMOKELESS, HIGH VELOCITY, 180 GRAIN BULLET, “SUPER-CLEAN””. BACK OF BOX HAS IMAGE OF BULLET WITH TEXT “DOMINION .303 BRITISH COPPER POINT” PRINTED ON IMAGE IN BLUE AND WHITE. FRONT OF BOX HAS TEXT “TWENTY .303 BRITISH, COPPER POINT, HIGH VELOCITY” IN WHITE ON BLUE BACKGROUND AROUND BULLET. BACK HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “”SUPER-CLEAN”, SMOKELESS, THESE “SUPER-CLEAN” CARTRIDGES ARE GUARANTEED TO BE OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY, POWERFUL, ACCURATE TO EXTREME RANGES AND “ALWAYS DEPENDABLE.” ALL “DOMINION” CARTRIDGES HAVE “SUPER-CLEAN” NON-MERCURIC PRIMING AND NON-FOULING BULLETS, WHICH KEEP THE RIFLE BORE IN PERFECT CONDITION. “MADE IN CANADA””. TOP OF BOX HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND, BESIDE “C-I-L” LOGO, “SUPER-CLEAN, ADAPTED TO, B.S.A., ROSS, LEE-METFORD, GIBBS, GREENER, REMINGTON, LEE-ENFIELD, AND WINCHESTER RIFLES., (WILL NOT INTERCHANGE WITH .303 SAVAGE)”. TOP HAS BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON INSIDE FLAP, “NOTE, BE SURE TO RETURN THIS CARTON WITH SAMPLE CARTRIDGE IF COMMUNICATING WITH US ON THE CONTENTS OF THIS PACKAGE. A SPECIAL TREATMENT OF THE NECK OF THESE CARTRIDGES PROTECTS THEM FROM DETERIORATION, ENSURES UNIFORM CRIMPING, GREATER ACCURACY AND LONGER LIFE.” INSIDE OF TOP FLAP HAS BLACK STAMPED TEXT “A.A.H.H.S., IP 51”. INSIDE OF TOP FLAP HAS BLACK RESIDUE FROM CARTRIDGES IN ROWS OF CIRCLES. INSIDE OF BOX IS BROWN CARDBOARD AND IS STAINED. OUTSIDE OF BOX IS STAINED WITH GREY; EDGES OF BOX ARE WORN AND FRAYED. BASE OF BOX HAS TEARS IN CARDBOARD AND CREASES AT CORNERS. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. C. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. D. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET HAS MINOR DARK STAINING WITH FINGERPRINT IMPRESSIONS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET IS TARNISHED; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. F. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. G. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. H. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. I. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET SHOWS MINOR CORROSION AND TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. J. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET HAS MINOR DARK STAINING WITH FINGERPRINT IMPRESSIONS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. K. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. L. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING AND CORROSION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. M. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING AND CORROSION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. N. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. O. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. P. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. Q. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. R. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. S. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. T. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. U. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; BASE OF SLIT HAS CREASE THAT RUNS DOWN FRONT OF CARDBOARD. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. V. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. W. CARDBOARD INSERT, 14CM LONG X 7.4CM WIDE. TOP OF INSERT HAS 9 SLITS WITH ROUNDED POINTS BETWEEN SLITS. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK AND GREY ALONG POINTS ON FRONT AND BACK. FRONT HAS CREASE RUNNING FROM SLIT TO LOWER EDGE ON LEFT SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FROM MARCH 20-31, 2018, THE AMMUNITION WAS LOANED TO DUANE KING OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA TO BE DEACTIVATED. THE AMMUNITION WAS DEACTIVATED AND RETURNED. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE AND DOCUMENTATION OF THE LOAN FOR DEACTIVATION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012001
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20130012002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.6
Length
6.9
Width
3
Description
CARDBOARD AMMUNITION BOX WITH 49 CARTRIDGES INSIDE. BOX IS BROWN CARDBOARD ON THE INSIDE, WITH OUTSIDE PRINTED YELLOW WITH BLUE BORDERS AND TEXT. BOX LID HAS TEXT “.22 LONG, SMOKELESS, DRY LUBRICATED BULLETS” BESIDE IMAGE OF A BULLET WITH “.22 LONG” PRINTED ON IMAGE. TEXT BELOW IMAGE, “SUPER-CLEAN” IN WHITE ON BLUE BACKGROUND BESIDE “C-I-L” LOGO, WITH TEXT BELOW “MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES HAVE BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND, “SUPER-CLEAN, .22 LONG, 50 R.F., SMOKELESS” AND “C-I-L” LOGO. FRONT OF BOX HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “THESE CARTRIDGES ARE PRIMED WITH “SUPER-CLEAN” NON-RUSTING PRIMING. IF THE RIFLE HAS FIRST BEEN THOROUGHLY CLEANED AS “DOMINION” “SUPER-CLEAN” .22’S ARE USED EXCLUSIVELY, THEY WILL NOT RUST OR CORRODE THE BORE.” BACK HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “76, 305” AND BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. TOP FLAP HAS BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON INSIDE “DANGEROUS WITHIN ONE MILE”. BOX IS WORN AT EDGES AND FADED; TOP FLAP HAS TEARS ON RIGHT SIDE, AND HEAVY WEAR AT LOWER EDGE.TOP FLAP IS CREASED ALONG LOWER LEFT CORNER; FRONT OF BOX IS STAINED WITH BLACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. CARTRIDGES INSIDE BOX ARE COMPRISED OF BRASS JACKET AND GREY POINT. JACKET HAS ENGRAVED “D” ON BASE; POINT OF CARTRIDGES HAVE THREE RINGS ENGRAVED ABOVE JACKET. CARTRIDGES OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FROM MARCH 20-31, 2018, THE AMMUNITION WAS LOANED TO DUANE KING OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA TO BE DEACTIVATED. THE AMMUNITION WAS DEACTIVATED AND RETURNED. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE AND DOCUMENTATION OF THE LOAN FOR DEACTIVATION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012002
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20130012003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
13
Height
11.6
Length
10.8
Width
6.6
Description
A. CARDOARD TOP, 10.3CM LONG X 6.3CM WIDE. TOP FLAP OF CARDBOARD BOX; BROWN INSIDE WITH RED, YELLOW, AND BLACK TEXT AND BACKGROUND PRINTED ON TOP. TOP HAS RED BORDER ALONG UPPER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT “CANUCK HEAVY LOAD” AND BLACK TEXT BELOW “12 GAUGE, 2 5/8 INCH, 25 SHOT SHELLS”. TOP HAS RED “C-I-L” LOGO PRINTED. TEXT BELOW PRINTED IN BOXES WITH BLACK BORDERS, FIRST BOX HAS RED BACKGROUND AND WHITE TEXT “HEAVY LOAD” AND BLACK TEXT INSIDE NEXT THREE BOXES, “OZ SHOT 1 1/8”, “SIZE OF SHOT, 5 HS”, “CODE DN, IA H6XX”. FRONT FLAP HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED “NOTE, BE SURE TO RETURN THIS BOX WITH SAMPLE CARTRIDGE IS COMMUNICATING WITH US CONCERNING THE CONTENTS OF THIS PACKAGE. 128 P63”. BACK OF CARDBOARD HAS LOSS IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER; FLAP IS CREASED FRONT AND BACK AND WORN AT EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CARDBOARD AMMUNITION BOX, 10.8CM LONG X 6.6CM WIDE X 11.6CM TALL. FRONT OF BOX PRINTED WITH RED AND BLACK IMAGE OF A SHOTGUN SHELL, AND RED BORDER ALOG TOP EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT “CANUCK HEAVY LOAD”; FRONT HAS BLACK TEXT BESIDE IMAGE “2 5/8 12 GAUGE, “SUPER-CLEAN”, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION” WITH RED “C-I-L- PRINTED; LOWER EDGE OF FRONT HAS RED BORDER WITH WHITE TEXT “WATERPROOFED, FINISHED IN “DUCO””. LEFT SIDE OF BOX HAS RED BORDERS AT TOP AND LOWER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BORDERS, AND BLACK TEXT PRINTED BETWEEN BORDERS, TEXT “”DOMINION”, BACKED BY MORE THAN HALF A CENTURY OF EXPERIENCE IN MANUFACTURING AMMUNITION FOR CANADIAN SPORTSMEN…” WITH COMPANY STATEMENT ON QUALITY. RIGHT SIDE OF BOX HAS RED BORDERS AT TOP AND LOWER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BORDERS, AND BLACK TEXT PRINTED BETWEEN BORDERS; TEXT “”CANUCK”, 12 GAUGE, 2 5/8 INCH, HEAVY LOAD SHOT SHELLS, CHOICE OF SHOT SIZES 2,4,5,6, 7 1/2, BB…” WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SHOT SIZES AND PURPOSES, AND “CAUTION, DO NOT USE THESE SHELLS EXCEPT IN GUNS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH MODERN HEAVY LOAD SMOKELESS POWDER SHOT SHELLS…” AND STORING INSTRUCTIONS. BACK OF BOX HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED IN BOX WITH RED BORDERS; TEXT “”CANUCK”, CANADA’S MOST POPULAR SHOT SHELL, IDEAL FOR THE SPORTSMAN WHO DESIRES A MODERATELY-PRICED “ALL-PURPOSE” SHOT SHELL, THE “CANUCK” HAS BEEN CANADA’S FAVOURITE FOR MORE THAN TWENTY-FIVE YEARS…” WITH DETAILS ON FEATURES OF THE SHELLS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR USE WITH FIREARMS. BASE OF BOX HAS RED BORDER ALONG TOP WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED “CNUCK HEAVY LOAD”; BASE HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED “12 GAUGE 2 5/8 INCH, 25 SHELL SHOTS, MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. TOP FLAPS OVER BOX OPENING PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT; LEFT FLAP HAS TEXT “WARNING: IT IS DANGEROUS TO PLACE: 16 GAUGE SHELLS IN 10 GAUGE GUNS, 20 GAUGE SHELLS IN 12 GAUGE GUNS, 28 GAUGE SHELLS IN 16 OR 20 GAUGE GUNS.”; RIGHT FLAP HAS TEXT “BECAUSE: THE SMALLER SHELL WILL PASS THROUGH THE CHAMBER AND LODGE IN THE BARREL. IF, WITH THE BARREL THUS OBSTRUCTED, ANOTHER SHELL IS FIRED IN IT, THE BARREL MAY BURST WITH POSSIBLE SERIOUS INJURY TO THE SHOOTER AND BY-STANDERS. BEFORE LOADING YOUR GUN MAKE SURE THE BARREL IS NOT OBSTRUCTED.” INSIDE OF BOX IS STAINED BLACK AND GREY; FRONT OF BOX HAS GREY SQUARE PENCIL DRAWINGS; RIGHT SIDE OF BOX HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE INK “20347.5, 20230, 117”. BOX IS WORN AT EDGES AND CREASED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS SCRATCHED AND TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. E. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS SCRATCHED AND TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. F. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. G. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. H. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. I. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. J. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. K. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. L. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. M. CARDBOARD FLAP, 3.4CM LONG X 2CM WIDE. FLAP DETACHED FROM BOX; FLAP HAS FLAT EDGE AT BASE AND ROUNDED TOP. EDGES ARE WORN AND FLAP HAS CREASE ACROSS THE MIDDLE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FROM MARCH 20-31, 2018, THE AMMUNITION WAS LOANED TO DUANE KING OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA TO BE DEACTIVATED. THE AMMUNITION WAS DEACTIVATED AND RETURNED. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE AND DOCUMENTATION OF THE LOAN FOR DEACTIVATION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012003
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
12
Height
55.5
Length
28.5
Width
10
Description
A: RIGHT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN METAL NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. N…ON CO. SYRACCUSE N.Y. U.S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN ON THE TOE AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. A CUT IN THE LEATHER SITS ABOVE THE TOE. THE STITCHING AT THE BACK OF THE BOOT HAS TORN OPEN AND AT THE TOP OF THE BOOT, NEXT TO THE LEATHER PULL, THE BOOT IS SPLIT NEXT TO THE SEAM. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.5CM, W: 10 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. B: THE TOE-SHAPED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT-SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R”. THE VARNISH IS CHIPPED AND DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. C: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “R” AND “6 R…”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, JUST AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. D: THE BACK PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “R”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. E: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, MINIMALLY SCRATCHED BUT DENTED AND DIMPLED. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.2 CM, L: 2.2 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. F: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 55 CM, L: 1.6 CM, W: 8.5 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. G: THE LEFT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN SILVER NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. NETTLET… CO. S…SE N.Y. ...S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN OVER THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE SIDE OF THE HEEL, AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.8 CM, W: 9.7 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. H: THE TOE SHAPED PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. I: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “L” AND “6 LEFT”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, MOSTLY AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. DIMENSIONS: H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. J: THE BACK PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. K: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, SCRATCHED AND WORN IN PLACES. A KNOT IN THE WOOD HAS FALLEN OUT AND LEFT A HOLE IN THE TOP OF THE INSERT. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.3 CM, L: 2.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. L: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R” WITH TWO LINES DRAWN OVER IT. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE INSERT IS A NAIL, THE TOP GRINDED DOWN. DIMENSIONS: H: 55.5 CM, L: 1.9 CM, W: 8.6 CM. CONDITION: GOOD.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
MILITARY
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
THIS PAIR OF RIDING BOOTS BELONGED TO MURRAY NELSON, THE BROTHER DONOR KATHRYN HINMAN. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THESE BOOTS AND THEIR OWNER, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HINMAN AT THE MUSEUM ON MARCH 20, 2017. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “THE PREVIOUS OWNER OF THESE BOOTS WAS MY BROTHER, MURRAY [NELSON],” HINMAN BEGAN, “HE PASSED AWAY AT THE END OF NOVEMBER 2015… HE WAS A LOCAL MUSICIAN. HE CAME INTO THE POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS FROM MY GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, WHO WAS LIEUTENANT COLONEL GEORGE S. BROWN. MY GRANDDAD WAS A GREAT FRIEND OF BRIGADIER GENERAL STEWART. GRANDDAD CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS AT SOME POINT FROM DR. STEWART AND WHEN MY BROTHER WAS ABOUT EIGHTEEN, MY GRANDFATHER PASSED THEM ON TO HIM.” “[MURRAY DID] TELL ME THAT HE WAS IN THE GARAGE OUT AT THE FARM, WHICH IS ACTUALLY BROWN ROAD JUST OFF THE COUTTS’ HIGHWAY AND THAT WAS WHERE MY GRANDFATHER’S ACREAGE WAS. ON THAT ACREAGE, THERE WAS A GARAGE [AMONG] MANY BUILDINGS. MURRAY HAD SAID GRANDDAD HAD TAKEN HIM INTO THE GARAGE AND WHEN MURRAY EXPRESSED AN INTEREST IN [THE BOOTS THERE] GRANDDAD SAID, ‘YUP, YOU CAN HAVE THEM. THEY WERE GENERAL STEWART’S FROM THE BOER WAR. TAKE GOOD CARE OF THEM.’” “[MY BROTHER] USED TO WEAR THEM PLAYING IN BANDS WHEN HE WAS EIGHTEEN AND UP,” HINMAN CONTINUED, “[THEY WERE] PART OF HIS DRESS CODE… THEY’RE LOVELY BOOTS. THE STORY WAS THAT THEY WERE FROM THE BOER WAR, WHICH PUTS THEM OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS OLD… [MY BROTHER] PROBABLY ACQUIRED [THESE BOOTS WHEN] MY GRANDFATHER PASSED AWAY IN 1968. MURRAY WOULD HAVE BEEN EIGHTEEN [THAT YEAR]. HE WAS IN HIS ELEMENT PLAYING WITH THE BANDS, EXPERIMENTING WITH ALL DIFFERENT KINDS OF MUSIC [AT THAT TIME]. I REMEMBER HIM LOOKING VERY COOL WEARING THEM. ALTHOUGH THESE ARE A VERY SMALL SIZE, RIGHT? SO I’M SURE THEY WERE A LITTLE PINCHEY.” “[MY BROTHER HAD] LONG HAIR – WELL EVERYBODY HAD LONG HAIR IN THE 60’S AND 70’S. [HE WAS] VERY COOL AND AT THAT POINT TOO MY DAD (BILL NELSON) HAD ACQUIRED A SMALL MGA, BURGUNDY-COLOURED, AND [MY BROTHER] USED TO BOMB AROUND AND GO TO BAND PRACTICE IN THAT. OH YEAH, HE WAS NOTORIOUS,” HINMAN LAUGHED, REMEMBERING. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER BROTHER, HINMAN REPLIED, “MY BROTHER WAS BORN IN 1950. HE WAS JUST A LITTLE OVER SIXTY-FIVE WHEN HE PASSED AWAY. HE WAS AN ACTIVE MUSIC TEACHER AND LOCAL GUITAR TEACHER IN TOWN. YOU COULD SEE HIM BUSKING ON THE STREETS IN FRONT OF THE PENNY COFFEE HOUSE AND IN FRONT OF ESQUIRE’S COFFEE HOUSE. EVERYBODY KNEW HIM. HE USED TO BUSK AT THE FARMER’S MARKET ON FIFTH STREET ON FIRST FRIDAYS. HE PLAYED IN BANDS FOREVER.” “[HE WAS IN A] ROCK’N ROLL BAND. HE WAS IN SO MANY BANDS OVER THE YEARS AND I DON’T KNOW THE NAMES OF THE EARLY BANDS. ONE OF [THE BANDS HE PLAYED WITH] WAS KRANDEL’S KLOUD MACHINE, ONE OF THEM WAS THE SHAMAN, AND THEN HE MOVED TO VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AND PLAYED IN VANCOUVER – UP AND DOWN THE WEST COAST. WHEN HE CAME BACK FROM THE COAST, HE JUST PLAYED EVERYWHERE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH VARIOUS PEOPLE… ANYWAY HE WAS VERY WELL KNOWN IN THE BAND SCENE AND HE HAD A RECORDING STUDIO. THAT WAS A PASSION. HE CALLED HIS RECORDING STUDIO, AARDVARK RECORDINGS. HE HAD HIS FIRST RECORDING STUDIO IN THE BASEMENT OF KRUEGER’S MUSIC, WHERE HE TAUGHT MUSIC FOR BILL KRUEGER. THEN HE MOVED ALL HIS STUFF OVER AND HE WAS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE TRIANON FOR YEARS TEACHING RECORDING AND THEN HE GOT INVOLVED IN TECHNOLOGY, SO HE STARTED FIXING COMPUTERS AND DID COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. HE KIND OF USED TECHNOLOGY IN THE RECORDING STUDIO. HE HAD THIS HUGE SOUND BOARD WITH ALL THE SWITCHES AND WHATEVER AND HE HAD TONS OF LIKE STACKS OF MACHINES [FOR RECORDING],” HINMAN REMEMBERED. “[MY BROTHER] HAD A REPUTATION,” HINMAN WENT ON, “[PEOPLE WOULD SAY TO ME], ‘OH YOUR MURRAY’S SISTER.’ IT WAS GREAT AND ACTUALLY MY HUSBAND WAS BORN IN CARDSTON AND HE HAD A BAND THAT HE USED TO PLAY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH. WE HAVE AN ACTUAL RECORDING FROM THE BASEMENT RECORDING STUDIO AT KRUEGER’S, WHEN [MY BROTHER] RECORDED WITH MY HUSBAND’S BAND. IT WAS GREAT.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE MUSICAL INFLUENCE WITHIN HER FAMILY, HINMAN EXPLAINED, “MY MOM (MARGARET NELSON) WAS A LOCAL MUSIC TEACHER. SHE WAS A PIANO TEACHER. MY DAD’S MOTHER WAS KATE MARQUIS NELSON, WHO WAS A LOCAL PIANO TEACHER SO [WE HAD INFLUENCE] FROM BOTH ENDS. WE ALL GREW UP IN OUR HOUSEHOLD WITH MUSIC. I HAVE A DEGREE IN MUSIC AND I’M A MUSIC TEACHER AND MY YOUNGER BROTHER, MARK, PLAYS CLASSICAL GUITAR. WE HAD MUSIC EVERYWHERE. I HAVE SOME PICTURES AT HOME OF THE THREE KIDS WITH A DRUM SET AND I’M ON THE KEYBOARD AND MURRAY IS PLAYING GUITAR AND, EVEN A PICTURE OF MY MOM SITTING AT THE DRUMS TAKING PART IN THE MERRIMENT IN OUR BASEMENT.” “MY DAD PLAYED IN THE SYMPHONY. IN FACT, MY MOM AND DAD REVIVED THE SYMPHONY IN THE EARLY ‘60S. SO IT WAS JUST NATURAL FOR MURRAY TO [BE MUSICAL]. HE PLAYED EVERYTHING. HE PLAYED BANJO WITH MUSICAL THEATRE ONE YEAR, AND TAUGHT BANJO. HE THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ‘ONLY’ BANJO TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. HE [ALSO] THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ONLY REAL GOOD GUITARIST TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE TOO,” HINMAN LAUGHED. “SO ANYWAY,” SHE CONTINUED, “IT WAS A STRUGGLE FINANCIALLY. MUSIC IS NOT AN EASY, AN EASY PROFESSION TO BE IN, A PERFORMING MUSICIAN. HE QUIT HIGH SCHOOL WHEN HE WAS PROBABLY SIXTEEN, BUT IN HIS MID TO LATE TWENTIES, HE FINISHED HIS DIPLOMA AND HE STARTED NURSING AT THE COLLEGE. HE DID PRETTY WELL [THERE], BUT HE DIDN’T DEAL WELL WITH AUTHORITY, SO HE DIDN’T FINISH IT. BUT [THROUGH THAT HE] GOT A LOT OF GOOD PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE. [AFTERWARDS] PROCEEDED TO PURSUE HIS PASSION, WHICH WAS MUSIC. IN THE LAST FEW YEARS OF HIS LIFE HE FIXED THOSE COMPUTER SIGNS THAT SIT ON THE SIDE OF THE ROAD. HE WOULD FIX THE MOTHER BOARD… HE JUST DID WHAT HE WANTED. HE LIVED IS LIFE HIS WAY.” TO THE QUESTION OF WHY HER GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, RECEIVED THE BOOTS FROM GENERAL JOHN SMITH STEWART, HINMAN ANSWERED, “THE ONLY REASON I CAN THINK OF IS THAT BECAUSE THEY WERE GREAT FRIENDS… [IF GENERAL STEWART PASSED AWAY IN THE 1970S], THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN AFTER MY GRANDFATHER [DIED]. I KNOW THAT THEY WERE INVOLVED IN THE MILITARY STUFF LOCALLY. ELLA STEWART AND MY GRANDMOTHER WERE GREAT FRIENDS. SOMEHOW [THESE BOOTS WERE] JUST PASSED ALONG TO GRANDDAD.” “WHEN MURRAY WAS DIAGNOSED WITH THE CANCER IN JUNE OF 2015, I KNEW THAT THERE WAS SOME ITEMS THAT HE HAD THAT I NEEDED TO RETRIEVE BECAUSE THEY WERE FAMILY HISTORY,” HINMAN REMEMBERED, “[AMONG THOSE TREASURED THINGS WERE] GENERAL STEWART’S BOOTS, SO I RETRIEVED THEM IN JULY… [MURRAY SAID], ‘TAKE THEM. DO WHAT YOU NEED TO DO WITH THEM.’” “[ONE REASON MY BROTHER HELD ON TO THE BOOTS WAS] HE WAS VERY CLOSE TO MY GRANDPARENTS, BECAUSE HE USED TO SPEND A LOT OF TIME OUT AT THE FARM,” HINMAN EXPLAINED, “I THINK THAT HE JUST COULDN’T BRING HIMSELF TO PART WITH THEM, BECAUSE THEY WERE PART OF HIS FAMILY HISTORY. IT WAS A SPECIAL KIND OF THING BECAUSE GRANDDAD HAD ACTUALLY PASSED THEM TO HIM.” MURRAY NELSON’S OBITUARY WAS PUBLISHED ON THE MARTIN BROTHERS FUNERAL CHAPELS WEBSITE. IT STATES, “WILLIAM MURRAY NELSON, AGE 65, PASSED AWAY PEACEFULLY AT THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL HOSPITAL ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2015, AFTER A VALIANT BATTLE WITH CANCER. MUSICIAN, PERFORMER, TEACHER, MENTOR, SOUND GUY, RECORDING GUY, VIDEO GUY, COMPUTER GUY, SIGN GUY; HE WAS A MAN WHO LIVED LIFE HIS WAY, ON HIS TERMS, DOING WHAT HE LOVED.” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON DECEMBER 9, 2015, SHORTLY AFTER THE MUSICIAN’S DEATH STATES THAT AT A LOCAL MUSIC SHOW, PROMINENT LEHTBRIDGE SONGWRITER, LEEROY STAGGER, BEGAN THE SHOW WITH A TRIBUTE TO NELSON. TO FURTHER UNDERSCORE NELSON’S REPUTATION IN THE CITY, A DECEMBER 23, 2015 ARTICLE TITLED, “2015 WAS A MEMORABLE YEAR FOR CITY MUSIC SCENE,” WRITTEN FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD BY RICHARD AMERY STATED, “LETHBRIDGE SAID GOODBYE TO MURRAY NELSON, WHO PASSED AWAY FROM CANCER THIS YEAR. NELSON WAS ONE OF THE SCENE’S MORE PROMINENT PERFORMERS ON STAGE PERFORMING SOLO AND WITH A VARIETY OF BANDS AS WELL AS BUSKING ON THE STREETS ALL OVER LETHBRIDGE…HIS MEMORY WILL LIVE ON IN THE STUDENTS HE TAUGHT AND THE SOULS HE TOUCHED ON STAGE OR JUST CHATTING AT VARIOUS WATER HOLES.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND THE COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REFERENCED.
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"1945 RED CROSS QUILT"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170035000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"1945 RED CROSS QUILT"
Date
1945
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
214
Width
168.5
Description
BLUE AND PINK QUILT WITH PATTERN OF 56 PINK DIAMONDS INTERLAID WITH BLUE DIAMONDS; PINK FABRIC DIAMONDS HAVE NAMES EMBROIDERED IN BLUE THREAD, LISTED BELOW. BLUE DIAMONDS HAVE AN EMBROIDERED FOUR PETAL DESIGN STITCHED IN FABRIC. QUILT HAS BLUE EMBROIDERED TEXT ON TWO CENTER DIAMONDS, “1945” AND “RED CROSS”. QUILT HAS FINISHED EDGES WITH PINK BORDERS. QUILT HAS FRAYING AND LOSS ON UPPER RIGHT EDGE; FABRIC AND EMBROIDERED TEXT IS FADED; QUILT HAS MINOR BROWN STAIN ON BACK AT LOWER EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. EMBROIDERED NAMES ON FRONT OF QUILT [ALPHABETICAL]: ANNAND, ASHMAN, BAILEY, BAKER, BARNES, BELL, BURNS, CARLSON, CARNELL, CHAMBERS, CHRISTIANSEN, CYNCH, DAYMON, DELANY, DEVEBER, DICKSON, DILATUSH, FALLON, FOSTER, GAIRNS, GIDDIE, GLADSTONE, GOBLE, GOING, GREGORY, HAGGLUND, HARRISON, HARWOOD, HATFIELD, HAUG, HINTON, HOLROYD, KEMMIS, KLOPPENBORG, MATKIN, MCEWEN, MCKENZIE, O’BRAY, PITTAWAY, PRESLEY, RACKETTE, REEVES, ROPER, SHERMAN, STEWART, STRATE, THOMAS, UDELL, WACHER, ZORN.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
THE WATERTON PARK RED CROSS QUILT WAS CREATED BY WATERTON FAMILIES DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND WAS EMBROIDERED WITH THE SURNAMES OF WATERTON RESIDENTS LIVING IN THE PARK DURING THE HOMEFRONT PERIOD. THE QUILT FEATURES 50 NAMES EMBROIDERED ON THE SURFACE, ALL SURNAMES OF WATERTON FAMILIES IN THE COMMUNITY DURING WORLD WAR 2 ACCORDING TO BERT PITTAWAY IN A LETTER TO THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION. THE QUILT WAS PART OF A RED CROSS SOCIETY INITIATIVE THAT SAW GLOBAL AND CANADIAN COMMUNITIES CREATE QUITS FOR SENDING OVERSEAS AND FOR RAISING FUNDS FOR THE RED CROSS. ACCORDING TO ONLINE INFORMATION FROM HALIFAX WOMEN’S HISTORY [HTTP://HALIFAXWOMENSHISTORY.CA/CANADIAN-COMFORT-QUILTS] AND ACTIVE HISTORY [HTTP://ACTIVEHISTORY.CA/2017/07/RED-CROSSES-AND-WHITE-COTTON-MEMORY-AND-MEANING-IN-FIRST-WORLD-WAR-QUILTS/], RED CROSS QUILTS WERE COMMONLY CREATED BY CANADIAN COMMUNITIES AS CIVILIAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO WAR EFFORTS DURING BOTH WORLD WARS. THE QUILTS WERE SENT TO THE RED CROSS FOR DISTRIBUTION TO FAMILIES DISPLACED BY THE WAR OVERSEAS AND TO REFUGEES; QUILTS WERE ALSO RAFFLED PUBLICLY IN COMMUNITIES TO RAISE FUNDS FOR QUILTING GROUPS AND THE RED CROSS. THE WATERTON QUILT WAS RAFFLED IN 1945 AND WON BY MARY PITTAWAY OF WATERTON. BERT PITTAWAY DONATED THE QUILT TO THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION FOR DISPLAY AT THE WATERTON HERITAGE CENTRE IN THE 1980S, IN MEMORY OF BERT’S PARENTS MARY AND JOHN EDWARD PITTAWAY. JOHN EDWARD PITTAWAY, FATHER OF JACK, BERTRAM, AND DENNIS PITTAWAY, BEGAN HIS MILITARY CAREER AS AN ARMY TRUMPETER IN AN IRISH MILITIA UNIT. J.E. PITTAWAY JOINED THE REGULAR ARMY IN NOVEMBER 1893, SERVING IN WORLD WAR 1 AND WORLD WAR 2, IN WORLD WAR 2 ACHIEIVING THE RANK OF BATTERY SERGEANT MAJOR. J.E. PITTAWAY MOVED TO WATERTON IN 1927 FROM IRELAND. J.E. PITTAWAY WORKED FOR THE PARKS DEPARTMENT AS A GARDENER AND THEN AS A CAMPGROUND CARETAKER. J.E. PITTAWAY DIED MARCH 13, 1956, WITH HIS FINAL TRIBUTE IN CALGARY ON MARCH 17, 1956. ACCORDING TO THE PARKS CANADA WEBSITE ON WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, MEMORY OF THE WARS WERE “…INSCRIBED ON LANDFORMS IN PLACE NAMES…AND THE CELEBRATION OF PEACE WAS GIVEN SYMBOLIC FORM IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE WORLD’S FIRST INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK IN 1932.” WATERTON NATIONAL PARK FEATURES LAKES, RIDGES, AND PEAKS NAMED WITH REFERENCES TO THE WORLD WARS, INCLUDING AVION RIDGE, FESTUBERT MOUNTAIN, AND MOUNT ALDERSON. IN 2017, THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION DISSOLVED AND REPRESENTATIVES FROM WATERTON LAKES PARK FACILITATED THE TRANSFER OF THE COLLECTIONS TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS. THE 1945 WATERTON QUILT WAS DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AS PART OF THE EFFORTS TO RE-HOME THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION’S COLLECTION. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE LETTER FROM BERT PITTAWAY, DONATION NOTES FROM THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION, INFORMATION FROM THE PARKS CANADA WEBSITE ON WATERTON LAKES PARK, AND NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON THE PITTAWAY FAMILY, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170035000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170035000
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HAIR COMB
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CORAL
Catalogue Number
P20160042002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HAIR COMB
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Materials
CORAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
10
Width
3.4
Description
STRAIGHT-EDGED COMB. AMBER-COLOURED, TRANSLUCENT MATERIAL SPECULATED CORAL BY DONOR. THE HANDLE EDGE IS CURVED AND THE COMB'S LENGTH TAPERS INWARD FROM THE HANDLE EDGE TO TEETH EDGE. TEETH WIDTH APPROX. 0.2 - 0.5 CM. THERE IS A 1.1 CM WIDE EDGE BETWEEN TEETH AND EDGE OF COMB ON EITHER SIDE. CONDITION: SMALL CHIP ON SIDE EDGE AND SLIGHT LOSS OF FINISH ON TEETH.
Subjects
TOILET ARTICLE
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THIS COMB CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK ALONG WITH THE COMB WERE HER MOTHER’S HAIR ORNAMENTS AND A VASE (P20160042001 & 003-004). MRS. NISHIYAMA REMEMBERED, “[MY MOTHER] EXPLAINED TO ME THAT SHE’D KEPT THESE BECAUSE THEY WERE HERS – GIVEN TO HER BY HER PARENTS – AND SHE WANTED ME TO SORT OF TAKE CARE OF THEM… [THEY WERE] NOT ANYTHING TO USE AROUND HERE, ANYWAY, SO WE JUST THOUGHT THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL, AND, ONCE IN A WHILE, WE GET TO SEE IT.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE REMEMBERED HER MOTHER USING THE COMB AND HAIR ACCESSORIES, MRS. NISHIYAMA STATED, “NO. BY THE TIME SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE REALIZED THERE’S NO DRESSING UP OR NOTHING. YOU KNOW THE HAIRDOS – THE FANCY HAIRDOS THAT THEY HAD IN JAPAN - THEY WERE LONG GONE, SO THEY JUST WENT BY. I KNOW SHE BRAIDED HER HAIR AND WORE A BUN ON THE BACK OF HER HEAD, FOR YEARS AND YEARS, BEFORE SHE CUT IT SHORT. SO, I JUST REMEMBERED A LITTLE TREASURE THAT SHE HAD IN THE DRAWER… IT WAS IN A SPECIAL SPOT IN THE DRESSER, AND WE ONLY GOT TO SEE IT ONCE IN A WHILE. IT WAS SPECIAL. IT WAS HER TREASURES THAT SHE KEPT.” MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THAT HER MOTHER PROBABLY DID NOT USE THE COMB ONCE SHE WAS IN ALBERTA. SHE SAID, “I DOUBT [THEY WERE USED]. IT DOESN’T LOOK SERVICEABLE REALLY, BUT IT’S DAYS BEFORE PLASTIC – AND I KNOW SHE TOLD ME IT WAS A SPECIAL MATERIAL. I MEAN, A SPECIAL NATURAL MATERIAL. WHETHER IT’S CORAL, I’M NOT SURE. I CAN’T SAY THAT. SPEAKING OF THE ITEMS’ USE ONCE THEY WERE IN HER POSSESSION, MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID, “[THEY WERE] NOT REALLY [USED]. I THINK I’VE HAD IT OUT WHEN THEY ASKED FOR IT AT JAPANESE GARDENS. I THINK WE HAD SOMETHING ELSE SOMEWHERE, WHERE WE HAD A DISPLAY… I THINK THAT’S THE ONLY TIMES THAT THEY CAME OUT… THIS (THE COMB) WAS SOMETHING THAT WE ONLY GOT TO SEE OCCASIONALLY.” THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042002
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONE
Catalogue Number
P20160042003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONE
No. Pieces
1
Height
16.3
Length
8.5
Description
FAN-SHAPED HAIR ORNAMENT WITH TWO LARGE PRONGS. CREAM-COLOURED WITH BROWN DAPPLING. 5 WHITE TULIP-SHAPED DESIGNS ON FANNED EDGE OF ORNAMENT WITH GREEN RHINESTONES INLAID IN THE WHITE SECTIONS OF DESIGN. TWO THIN LINES ARE ETCHED ON EITHER SIDE OF EACH WHITE TULIP SECTION. CONDITION: DESIGN FADED WITH ONE GREEN RHINESTONE MISSING ON AN INNER TULIP. SLIGHT LOSS OF FINISH ESPECIALLY AT THE WHITE PORTIONS OF DESIGN. SCUFFED SURFACE OVERALL.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THIS HAIR ORNAMENT AND A MATCHING ONE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S COMB AND A VASE ALSO DONATED WITH THE TWO HAIR ORNAMENTS (P20160042001 & 003-004). MRS. NISHIYAMA REMEMBERED, “[MY MOTHER] EXPLAINED TO ME THAT SHE’D KEPT THESE BECAUSE THEY WERE HERS – GIVEN TO HER BY HER PARENTS – AND SHE WANTED ME TO SORT OF TAKE CARE OF THEM… [THEY] CAME WITH HER WHEN SHE GOT MARRIED… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… [THESE] TWO PIECES ARE HER HAIR ORNAMENTS, AND I’M GUESSING THAT THEY ARE BONE… [THEY WERE] NOT ANYTHING TO USE AROUND HERE, ANYWAY, SO WE JUST THOUGHT THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL, AND, ONCE IN A WHILE, WE GET TO SEE IT.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE REMEMBERED HER MOTHER USING THE COMB AND HAIR ACCESSORIES, MRS. NISHIYAMA STATED, “NO. BY THE TIME SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE REALIZED THERE’S NO DRESSING UP OR NOTHING. YOU KNOW THE HAIRDOS – THE FANCY HAIRDOS THAT THEY HAD IN JAPAN - THEY WERE LONG GONE, SO THEY JUST WENT BY. I KNOW SHE BRAIDED HER HAIR AND WORE A BUN ON THE BACK OF HER HEAD, FOR YEARS AND YEARS, BEFORE SHE CUT IT SHORT. SO, I JUST REMEMBERED A LITTLE TREASURE THAT SHE HAD IN THE DRAWER… IT WAS IN A SPECIAL SPOT IN THE DRESSER, AND WE ONLY GOT TO SEE IT ONCE IN A WHILE. IT WAS SPECIAL. IT WAS HER TREASURES THAT SHE KEPT.” SPEAKING OF THE ITEMS’ USE ONCE THEY WERE IN HER POSSESSION, MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID, “[THEY WERE] NOT REALLY [USED]. I THINK I’VE HAD IT OUT WHEN THEY ASKED FOR IT AT JAPANESE GARDENS. I THINK WE HAD SOMETHING ELSE SOMEWHERE, WHERE WE HAD A DISPLAY… I THINK THAT’S THE ONLY TIMES THAT THEY CAME OUT…” THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042003
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONES
Catalogue Number
P20160042004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONES
No. Pieces
1
Length
11
Width
6.5
Description
CROWN-SHAPED HAIR ORNAMENT. SHAPE IS MADE UP OF FOUR TULIP SHAPES. BONE COLOUR IS CREAM WITH BROWN DAPPLING. THE TULIPS ARE WHITE INLAID WITH GREEN RHINESTONES. LEAF-SHAPED DESIGNS ON THE BASE (TWO PER FLOWER) ARE BLACK INLAID WITH PALE BLUE RHINESTONES. FINE LINES ARE ETCHED INTO THE BLACK OF LEAVES AND AROUND THE FLOWER HEADS. CONDITION: DESIGNS ARE SLIGHTLY FADED WITH SLIGHT DIRT ACCUMULATION ON WHITE AREAS OF FLOWERS. TWO GREEN RHINESTONS AND ONE BLUE RHINESTONE MISSING. CLOSING MECHANISM AT BACK IS MISSING. SLIGHT SCUFFS ON OVERALL SURFACE.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THIS HAIR ORNAMENT AND A MATCHING ONE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S COMB AND A VASE ALSO DONATED WITH THE HAIR ORNAMENTS (P20160042001 & 003-004). MRS. NISHIYAMA REMEMBERED, “[MY MOTHER] EXPLAINED TO ME THAT SHE’D KEPT THESE BECAUSE THEY WERE HERS – GIVEN TO HER BY HER PARENTS – AND SHE WANTED ME TO SORT OF TAKE CARE OF THEM… [THEY] CAME WITH HER WHEN SHE GOT MARRIED… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… [THESE] TWO PIECES ARE HER HAIR ORNAMENTS, AND I’M GUESSING THAT THEY ARE BONE… [THEY WERE] NOT ANYTHING TO USE AROUND HERE, ANYWAY, SO WE JUST THOUGHT THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL, AND, ONCE IN A WHILE, WE GET TO SEE IT.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE REMEMBERED HER MOTHER USING THE COMB AND HAIR ACCESSORIES, MRS. NISHIYAMA STATED, “NO. BY THE TIME SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE REALIZED THERE’S NO DRESSING UP OR NOTHING. YOU KNOW THE HAIRDOS – THE FANCY HAIRDOS THAT THEY HAD IN JAPAN - THEY WERE LONG GONE, SO THEY JUST WENT BY. I KNOW SHE BRAIDED HER HAIR AND WORE A BUN ON THE BACK OF HER HEAD, FOR YEARS AND YEARS, BEFORE SHE CUT IT SHORT. SO, I JUST REMEMBERED A LITTLE TREASURE THAT SHE HAD IN THE DRAWER… IT WAS IN A SPECIAL SPOT IN THE DRESSER, AND WE ONLY GOT TO SEE IT ONCE IN A WHILE. IT WAS SPECIAL. IT WAS HER TREASURES THAT SHE KEPT.” SPEAKING OF THE ITEMS’ USE ONCE THEY WERE IN HER POSSESSION, MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID, “[THEY WERE] NOT REALLY [USED]. I THINK I’VE HAD IT OUT WHEN THEY ASKED FOR IT AT JAPANESE GARDENS. I THINK WE HAD SOMETHING ELSE SOMEWHERE, WHERE WE HAD A DISPLAY… I THINK THAT’S THE ONLY TIMES THAT THEY CAME OUT…” THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042004
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PERPETUAL MEMORY TABLET
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160042005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PERPETUAL MEMORY TABLET
Date
1949
Materials
WOOD, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
60.5
Length
12.6
Width
0.6
Description
ONLINE RESEARCH INDICATES THE NAMES FOR THIS TABLET INCLUDE SHIRAKI-IHAI TABLET, MEMORIAL TABLET, OR ANCESTRAL TABLET. THIS TABLET IS MADE UP OF A FINISHED WOODEN BOARD WITH JAPANESE CALLIGRAPHY IN BLACK INK WRITTEN VERTICALLY ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BOARD. HOLE DRILLED THROUGH TOP CENTER OF THE BOARD FOR HANGING. ONE SIDE CONTAINS FOUR VERTICAL ROWS OF CHARACTERS, WHOSE HEIGHT RANGES FROM 1-3 CM. "15" IS MARKED IN PENCIL AT THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER. THE OPPOSING SIDE CONTAINS 2 VERTICAL ROWS OF CHARACTERS WITH A SINGLE CHARACTER AT THE TOP. CHARACTERS ON THIS SIDE RANGE FROM 3 TO 7 CM IN HEIGHT. CONDITION: THE BOARD HAS SLIGHT SCRATCHING AND SOME MISSING VARNISH OVERALL.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
RELIGION
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE BROUGHT [THIS BOARD] FROM RAYMOND AS A MEMORY FOR MAC’S DAD, [KOHEI NISHIYAMA]. IN RAYMOND, AT THE BUDDHIST CHURCH, THERE WAS A YEARLY PERPETUAL MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR ALL THE MEMBERS WHO HAD DIED.” THIS BOARD WAS PART OF THAT SERVICE, MRS. NISHIYAMA CONTINUED, “… [IT] IS LIKE THE DONATION THINGS YOU SEE ON THE WALLS [IN CHURCHES]... [THERE] IS AN OLD JAPANESE CUSTOM TO PUT [THE RECORD OF A MEMORIAL DONATION] ON A BOARD, WITH THE NAME [OF THE DONOR] ON THE BACK, AND WE HONOR THEIR MEMORY EACH YEAR, REGARDLESS OF WHAT YEAR THEY PASSED AWAY. SO WHEN YOUR FAMILY MEMBER DIES, AND YOU WANT TO MAKE SURE THAT THE CHURCH CARRIES ON WITH THE PERPETUAL MEMORY SERVICE, THIS WENT UP AS A SORT OF A RECEIPT… WE HAVE A SPECIAL SERVICE IN DECEMBER ALWAYS… MOST OF THE MEMBERS MAKE A DONATION TOWARDS THAT…" MR. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED FURTHER, “THEY HAD [THE BOARDS] ON THE CHURCH WALL FOR THE PERPETUAL MEMORY.” AFTER THE INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA CLARIFIED THAT MR. NISHIYAMA’S DAD, KOHEI, MADE THE DONATION IN SOMEBODY’S MEMORY IN 1949. IT IS UNKNOWN IN WHOSE MEMORY THIS DONATION WAS MADE. THERE IS JAPANESE CALLIGRAPHY ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BOARD. “IT SAYS HIS DAD CAME FROM NEW WESTMINSTER, SO THIS IS ‘NEW’ ‘WEST’,” MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THE JAPANESE CHARACTERS, “… IT MUST SAY THAT HE CAME FROM THE NEW WESTMINSTER BUDDHIST CHURCH (ON THE SIDE WITH THE WORDS IN LARGER SCRIPT)… HE WAS AN ORIGINAL MEMBER THERE, AND THIS WOULD BE HIS NAME RIGHT THERE – KOHEI NISHIYAMA – [ON THE SIDE WITH SMALLER CHARACTERS].” SHE EXPLAINS FURTHER, “THE DATE IS RIGHT HERE – 1949. 1949, JANUARY IS THE DATE THEY RECEIVED THE DONATION…” THE GALT MUSEUM REACHED OUT TO A TRANSLATOR TO INTERPRET THE BOARD. THE INFORMATION PROVIDED STATES THAT THE SIDE OF THE BOARD WITH FOUR LINES OF CHARACTERS BEGINS WITH “MONEY 400 DOLLARS” AT THE TOP. AT THE BOTTOM THE FIRST LEFT LINE INCLUDES THE DONOR NAME. THE MIDDLE LINE INCLUDES THE NAME OF RAYMOND BUDDHIST TEMPLE AMONG OTHER INFORMATION. THE FAR RIGHT ROW SAYS, “1949 FEBRUARY.” ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE IT INCLUDES “ORGANIZE FUNERAL,” THE NAME OF THE TEMPLE, AND “SHOW RESPECT.” IN RESPONSE TO THE QUESTION OF WHO MADE THE BOARD, MR. NISHIYAMA REPLIED, “I WOULD SAY SOMEBODY… AT THE RAYMOND CHURCH [MADE THE BOARD].” MRS. NISHIYAMA ELABORATED ON THAT: “…I KNOW MAC’S DAD DID A LOT OF THE CALLIGRAPHY BECAUSE HE WAS GOOD AT IT. I’M NOT SURE WHO DID THIS.” THEY EXPLAINED THAT IN THE RAYMOND CHURCH, THESE MEMORIAL DONATION BOARDS WOULD BE DISPLAYED “ON THE WALL OF THE CHURCH, INSIDE [AND] UP HIGHER. BUT WHEN THE CHURCH GOT SOLD, I THINK MOST OF IT WENT INTO THE GARBAGE.” THIS BOARD WAS HANGING ON THE WALL OF THE RAYMOND BUDDHIST CHURCH FROM 1949 TO THE TIME THE CHURCH WAS CLOSED IN 2006. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THE ACT OF REMEMBERING AS IT EXISTS TODAY: “FOR INSTANCE, RIGHT NOW THE TEMPLE DOESN’T KEEP TRACK… THE FAMILY HAS TO REMEMBER. SO THIS COMING SUNDAY IS THE FIRST SUNDAY IN DECEMBER, WE CALL SHOTSUKI HOYO, WHICH IS A MEMORIAL DAY, WHICH IS OBSERVED FIRST OF THE MONTH, EVERY MONTH EXCEPT AUGUST, AND SO TECHNICALLY I WOULD BE AT THE TEMPLE TO ATTEND THE MEMORIAL SERVICE. MY DAD DIED IN DECEMBER…” MR. NISHIYAMA ELABORATED ON THE IMPORTANCE OF REMEMBERING, “YOU MUST REMEMBER. IT’S NOT JUST TO REMEMBER; IT’S OUT OF GRATITUDE THAT’S WHAT’S BEHIND IT. YOU ARE GRATEFUL NO MATTER HOW MANY YEARS AGO. HERE WE ARE TODAY BECAUSE OF [THE PEOPLE WHO CAME BEFORE]… IT’S TO SAY, ‘THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU’…NONE OF THE CHURCHES DO THIS ANYMORE… IF YOU MAKE A DONATION, THAT’S THAT. IT GOES TO THE TEMPLE, AND THAT’S IT, AND IT’S FORGOTTEN” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID, “BUT RAYMOND USED TO DO THE PERPETUAL MEMORY SERVICE EVERY YEAR IN DECEMBER, AND IT WAS JUST PART OF THE ROUTINE THAT WE EXPECTED…IT’S TO KEEP THE MEMORY ALIVE. IT’S JUST A PART OF OUR CULTURE.” MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THAT OUT OF ALL THE ITEMS THEY COLLECTED FROM THE RAYMOND BUDDHIST CHURCH, THIS MEMORIAL DONATION BOARD HOLDS THE MOST PERSONAL IMPORTANCE: “WHEN YOUR NAME’S ON SOMETHING, WELL, THAT’S MINE, OR OURS.” SPEAKING OF THE CHURCH’S CLOSURE, MRS. NISHIYAMA REMEMBERED, “IT WAS VERY EMOTIONAL. I TELL YOU. I HAVE… A FULL CD OF THE LAST DAY OF THE CHURCH, AND IT WAS LIKE A FUNERAL. WHEN ALL THE SHRINE… WAS DONE – EVERYTHING WAS LOADED ON THE FLAT DECK… AND GOING DOWN THE HIGHWAY, AND WE ALL HAD TEARS IN OUR EYES.: “THIS IS ALL HAPPENING,” MR. NISHIYAMA SAID ABOUT WITNESSING THE CHURCH'S CLOSURE, “IT’S BECAUSE WE LIVE SO LONG [AND WERE ABLE TO SEE IT CLOSE]. WE’RE HEALTHY. IF WE [WERE] GONE 20 YEARS AGO, IT WOULD HAVE ALL BEEN DONE [WITHOUT US SEEING]. WE WOULDN’T HAVE ALL [THESE MEMORIES]. BUT HERE WE ARE. WE HAVE TO BE GRATEFUL EVEN FOR THE ACHES AND PAINS OF OLD AGE. WE’RE HERE.” MRS. NISHIYAMA FINISHED BY SAYING, "FOR ME, IT’S A VALUABLE MEMORY – BOTH CHURCH AND DAD – AND ALL THE WORK – AND HIS DAD - BEAUTIFUL CALLIGRAPHY. SOME OF THE OTHER BOARDS, HE DID THE WRITING ON IT.” A FAMILY HISTORY WAS SUBMITTED TO THE BOOK “NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS” (PUBLISHED 2001) BY MAC AND REYKO NISHIYAMA. ACCORDING TO THAT HISTORY MAC’S FATHER, KOHEI NISHIYAMA, WAS BORN IN KUMAMOTO-KEN, JAPAN ON 10 MAY 1895. HE CAME TO CANADA IN 1915 AND SETTLED IN SAPPERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA. HE “WORKED FOR THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY FOR 29 YEARS BEFORE BEING EVACUATED FIRST TO A ROAD CAMP AND LATER TO THE TASHME RELOCATION CAMP. IN 1946, AFTER THE WAR ENDED, HE AND HIS FAMILY MOVED TO WELLING, ALBERTA TO WORK ON THE FLOYD WILDE FARM.” THE BOOK CONTINUES: “HE MARRIED HIDE MURAKAMI IN 1918. HIDE WAS ALSO BORN IN KUMAMOTO-KEN, JAPAN ON 16 SEPTEMBER 1898. THEY RAISED A FAMILY OF TWO BOYS AND THREE GIRLS: KAORU BETTY, JACK NOBORU, FUMI ROCY, MAKIO (MAC), AND MAY MISAO…” “AFTER RAISING SUGAR BEETS FOR SEVERAL YEARS WITH HIS FAMILY, KOHEI AND HIDE RETIRED TO THE TOWN OF RAYMOND… KOHEI… AND HIDE WERE BOTH VERY ACTIVE MEMBERS OF THE RAYMOND BUDDHIST CHURCH,” IT STATES IN THE BOOK. AS STATED IN THE BOOK, HIDE PASSED AWAY IN 1968 AND KOHEI PASSED AWAY IN 1983 AT THE AGE OF 88. HIDE’S OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD STATES THAT SHE WAS 69 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME OF HER PASSING. THE OBITUARY STATES THAT SHE WAS MARRIED TO MR. NISHIYAMA ON 20 DECEMBER 1918 IN KUMAMOTO CITY. THEY WENT TO NEW WESTMINISTER, BRITISH COLUMBIA TOGETHER IN APRIL 1919. THE OBITUARY OF MAC NISHIYAMA STATES THAT HE WAS BORN IN SAPPERTON, NEW WESTMINISTER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, ON 23 AUGUST 1927 TO KOHEI AND HIDE NISHIYAMA. THE FAMILY WAS INTERNED IN TASHME, BRITISH COLUMBIA DURING THE WAR. THE FAMILY RELOCATED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA WHEN THE WAR ENDED. IT WAS AT THE RAYMOND BUDDHIST CHURCH WHERE HE MET REYKO KARAKI AND THE COUPLE WAS MARRIED IN 1953. TOGETHER THEY HAD SIX CHILDREN. HE PASSED AWAY ON 28 MAY 2017. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, COPIES OF THE NIKKEI FAMILY HISTORY, AND BOARD TRANSLATION. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PLEASE REFERENCE P20030040000, FOR AN INTERVIEW WITH MAC NISHIYAMA REGARDING A CRATE HE DONATED.
Catalogue Number
P20160042005
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOD, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20170033001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY
Date
2011
Materials
COTTON, WOOD, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
65
Width
42
Description
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY IN MATTE AND FRAME. EMBROIDERY COMPLETED IN BROWN ON WHITE FABRIC, AND SHOWS THE 1910 GALT HOSPITAL FRONT. EMBROIDERY INSIDE BROWN AND GREY MATTE AND BROWN WOOD FRAME WITH GLASS OVER. FRONT OF FRAME HAS BLACK ENGRAVED PLAQUE ON BOTTOM EDGE READING “GALT HOSPITAL/MUSEUM & ARCHIVES, 1910, DESIGNED AND STITCHED, 2011, BELINDA CROWSON”. BACK OF FRAME COVERED IN BROWN PAPER WITH SILVER WIRE ATTACHED FOR HANGING. BACK OF FRAME HAS WHITE LABEL WITH TEXT “LA GALLERY CUSTOM FRAMING & ART, 421-5TH ST. SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE, AB T1J 2B6, PH. 380.4556, FAX 380.4562, WEBSITE WWW.THELAGALLERY.COM, EMAIL INFO@THELAGALLERY.COM, W/O # H0761, ASSEMBLED BY CM”” WITH CHECK BOXES ON LABEL FOR “MOUNTING METHOD” AND “GLASS”, “NON-GLARE GLASS” CHECKED. FRAME HAS CHIPS ON FRONT EDGES; BACK HAS TEARS IN PAPER BACKING. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON NOVEMBER 16, 2017 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BELINDA CROWSON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A MUNICIPAL CAMPAIGN SIGN AND BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY PIECE. CROWSON WAS EMPLOYED WITH THE GALT MUSEUM AS THE MUSEUM EDUCATOR, WITH A REPUTATION AS A RENOWNED LOCAL HISTORIAN, UNTIL HER ELECTION TO CITY OF LETHBRIDGE COUNCIL IN 2017. ON THE BLACK EMBROIDERY PIECE, CROWSON RECALLED, “SHARING [THIS] WAS HARD, BECAUSE THIS WAS THE FIRST [PIECE] I DESIGNED…AND I VERY MUCH KNOW THE MEANING. IT WAS HANGING IN THE CLASSROOM [AT THE GALT MUSEUM] FOR YEARS, BUT IT WAS VERY HARD [TO GIVE UP], BECAUSE I DESIGNED IT; I STITCHED IT; AND IT’S A PIECE OF MYSELF.” “IT IS SOMETHING THAT I ACTUALLY DESIGNED, AND I HAD NEVER DESIGNED A PIECE BEFORE. I HAD TO LEARN HOW TO DESIGN IT, SO I ACTUALLY HAD A PICTURE AND GRAPH PAPER. I LEARNED HOW TO TAKE A PHOTOGRAPH, AND TURN IT INTO BLACKWORK STITCHES, EVEN THOUGH, OF COURSE, IT’S DONE IN BROWN, AND NOT BLACK. THE NAME DOESN’T ACTUALLY MEAN THE COLOR.” “BLACKWORK COMES FROM THE ELIZABETHAN TIME, AND IT WAS DONE WHEN LACE WAS REALLY EXPENSIVE. THEY WOULD TAKE BLACK THREAD ON WHITE MATERIAL. IF YOU DO BLACKWORK PROPERLY, IT’S ABSOLUTELY REVERSIBLE. IF YOU DID IT ON CUFFS OR COLLARS IT WOULD ALMOST LOOK LIKE LACE, AND BE REVERSIBLE FROM BOTH SIDES. IT’S A TYPE OF EMBROIDERY THAT USES PRIMARILY STRAIGHT LINES. I TAUGHT A CLASS TO PEOPLE AT THE GALT MUSEUM [ON] HOW TO DO BLACKWORK. I ACTUALLY TAUGHT AN EMBROIDERY CLASS IN THIS DESIGN, WHICH IS A VERY SIMPLE TYPE OF EMBROIDERY TO DO, BUT CAN CREATE INCREDIBLY ELABORATE DESIGNS.” “I COMPLETED [THIS PIECE] IN 2011 AND HAD IT FRAMED THAT SAME YEAR. IT’S SUEDE AROUND THE PICTURE MATTE.” “SOMETHING LIKE THIS SIZE OF PICTURE, IN BLACKWORK, PROBABLY ONLY TOOK ME ABOUT 2 WEEKS TO STITCH. IT’S A VERY QUICK DESIGN, BUT IT FILLS IN – AND, IF I WAS TO REDO IT AGAIN, I’D FILL IN MORE OF THE BLANK SPACES. [BLACKWORK IS] SUPPOSED TO LOOK AS COMPLETE AS POSSIBLE, BUT I WANTED TO MAKE THE COLUMNS STICK OUT, SO IT MAY HAVE WORKED IN THAT REGARD.” CROWSON ELABORATED ON HER BACKGROUND DOING EMBROIDERY, NOTING, “I HAVE BEEN DOING EMBROIDERY SINCE [I WAS] A KID. IT’S SOMETHING MY GRANDMOTHER KNEW; MY MOTHER KNEW; IT’S SOMETHING I WAS TAUGHT, AND, OF MY SIBLINGS, I’M THE ONLY ONE WHO DOES IT. THE OTHERS LIKE TO DO MORE STITCHING WITH MACHINES. I LOVE THE HAND-STITCHING, AND I HAVE LONG BEEN THINKING ABOUT DESIGNING. I ALSO HAVE A PASSION FOR HISTORIC BUILDINGS. I HAD DONE A BLACKWORK PIECE, WHICH WAS A PATTERN THAT I HAD BOUGHT AND I ABSOLUTELY LOVED IT. IT’S A REALLY NICE WAY OF DOING EMBROIDERY, SO I THOUGHT “THERE’S A WAY OF CAPTURING HISTORIC BUILDINGS IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY.” I MADE MYSELF A CHALLENGE OF FIGURING IT OUT, AND, OF COURSE, THE WAY I DO MANY THINGS, I DIDN’T ACTUALLY RESEARCH HOW TO DESIGN. I JUST TAUGHT MYSELF, AND IT TOOK ME A WEEKEND. I THREW AWAY ABOUT 3 DESIGNS, UNTIL I REALIZED YOU’VE GOT TO START IN THE CENTER AND WORK OUT. THE NICE THING ABOUT THE GALT HOSPITAL—BECAUSE I DID THE FAÇADE OF THE HOSPITAL [IN THIS PIECE]—IS THAT IT IS SO BEAUTIFULLY SYMMETRICAL, IT MADE IT EASIER. I HAD…THE VARIEGATED THREAD, AND THE MATERIAL TO STITCH ON. THEN IT WAS A MATTER OF ACTUALLY CREATING IT. THE PATTERN HAD A LOT OF ERASING DONE ON IT, AS I CHANGED THINGS. I’M VERY PROUD OF THE WINDOWS…MY GOODNESS, THAT BUILDING HAS A LOT OF WINDOWS! IT WAS FUN, AND THIS WAS THE FIRST ONE [I MADE]. SINCE THEN I HAVE DONE GALBRAITH SCHOOL, THE BOWMAN, AND THE POST OFFICE. THE GALBRAITH SCHOOL IS HANGING AT GALBRAITH SCHOOL, THE BOWMAN IS IN MY HOUSE, AND THE POST OFFICE WAS RAFFLED OFF TO HELP RAISE MONEY FOR CHINATOWN.” “I REMEMBER, AS A KID, I WAS NOT SUPPOSED TO, BUT I WENT THROUGH ONE OF MY MOM’S JEWELRY BOXES. IN THERE WAS THE WORK SHE HAD DONE AS A KID. SHE HAD BEEN PRACTICING HER STITCHES. THAT STUCK WITH ME, AND I REMEMBER HER TALKING ABOUT HOW SHE HAD BEEN TAUGHT FROM HER MOM. MY GRANDMOTHER KEPT CROSS-STITCHING EMBROIDERY UNTIL HER ARTHRITIS GOT TOO BAD. WHEN I DO IT, I REALLY DO FEEL I AM PART OF THAT CHAIN, BECAUSE I DO HAVE EMBROIDERY THAT BOTH MY MOM AND MY GRANDMOTHER HAVE DONE. IT IS INTERESTING BECAUSE, FROM THE MENNONITE TRADITION ESPECIALLY, A LOT OF THE STITCHES I HAVE COME FROM THAT TRADITION, SO IT’S VERY MUCH A PART OF THAT. I WOULD LIKE TO SIT DOWN, ONE DAY WHEN I GET TIME, WITH MY MOM’S COUSIN, WHO DOES WHAT’S CALLED 3-D EMBROIDERING. IN MY FAMILY, PEOPLE ACTUALLY HAVE THE ORDERED EVERY DAY TEA TOWELS, THEY HAVE THE BED TOWELS. IT’S SUCH A PART OF THE SOUTHERN ART, SO MY [WORKS ARE] A LITTLE MORE MODERN INTERPRETATION OF SOME OF THAT. MY GREAT-GRANDMOTHER WOULD HAVE SAT IN RUSSIA, DOING THE SAME STITCHES.” “I DON’T KNOW [HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE REGION ARE DOING BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY]. I TAUGHT THE CLASS IN … EMBROIDERY, BUT I DON’T THINK A LOT OF PEOPLE ARE PICKING UP BLACKWORK. IT’S INTERESTING, WHEN I MENTION THIS, TALKING TO SOME PEOPLE ONLINE, ONE OF MY FRIENDS WHO HAS A HISTORIC HOUSE IS LIKE, “COULD I PAY YOU TO DESIGN MY HOUSE?” [BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY] IS A FUN WAY FOR ME TO TAKE THOSE TWO IDEAS I LOVE-–OF STITCHING, AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS-–BECAUSE PHOTOGRAPHY, WITH WHAT PEOPLE HAVE TODAY, IS RELATIVELY EASY. YOU CAN TAKE POINT-AND-SHOOT. SOME PEOPLE ARE MUCH BETTER AT IT--THEY’RE ARTISTIC-–BUT THIS IS A WAY OF CAPTURING A BUILDING. YOU HAVE TO, VERY PERSONALLY, SIT THERE, AND BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO MEASURE EVERYTHING OUT, EVEN TO DESIGN IT, YOUR APPRECIATION OF THE ARCHITECTURE IS VERY DIFFERENT THAN A POINT-AND-SHOOT CAMERA.” “I’VE DONE FIVE BUILDINGS NOW, AND I HAVE SEEN EACH ONE IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY. I REMEMBER THINKING, WITH THE POST OFFICE, WHEN YOU ACTUALLY LOOK AT THE HEIGHT OF THE CLOCK TOWER COMPARED TO THE BASE OF THE BUILDING, [YOU SEE THE] PHENOMENAL ARCHITECTURE, [BUT] IT’S ONLY WHEN YOU ARE STITCHING IT THAT YOU REALIZE THAT THE BASE OF THAT BUILDING ISN’T STRAIGHT. THE BUILDING GOES WITH THE SLANT OF THE SIDEWALK, AND I HAD TO TAKE AN ARTISTIC EYE, AND MAKE THE BOTTOM OF THE BUILDING STRAIGHT FROM THE FRONT. THE OTHER THING, WITH THE POST OFFICE, THERE’S ALMOST NO HISTORIC [PHOTOGRAPHS] OF IT STRAIGHT-ON; IT’S ALWAYS ON THE CORNER, BECAUSE THAT’S EASIER. I CAN’T CROSS-STITCH MY BUILDING ON THE CORNER, SO I HAD TO ACTUALLY TAKE MY OWN PHOTOGRAPHS, INSTEAD OF HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS. THIS HAS REALLY GIVEN ME A NEW APPRECIATION OF THE BUILDINGS, BECAUSE I HAD TO LOOK AT THEM SO CAREFULLY. WITH THE BOWMAN—WITH ALL THESE BUILDINGS--YOU HAD TO THINK WHAT TIME PERIOD YOU WANTED TO DISPLAY. SO THE ONE OF THE BOWMAN, I HAVE THE UNION JACK FLYING [IN] THE PICTURE, BECAUSE I WANTED [TO CAPTURE] IT BACK WHEN IT WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED.” “IT’S AN ADDICTION. YOU SIT IN FRONT OF THE TELEVISION, AND SOMETIMES A WEEKEND PASSES AND YOU HAVEN’T DONE MUCH. WHEN YOU’RE WORKING ON A PROJECT, FOR MYSELF, IT’S LIKE, “I’M GOING TO GET IT DONE.” THEN YOU TAKE A BREAK BEFORE YOU PICK UP THE NEXT PROJECT, SO YOU CAN DO ALL THE OTHER STUFF. TRYING TO PUT [AN ESTIMATE OF TIME SPENT CREATING] IT, I WOULDN’T HAVE A CLUE.” “I THINK EVERYBODY [HAS] MULTI-FACETS IN THEIR BRAINS, AND I USE DIFFERENT PARTS OF IT. IT’S ALWAYS FUN TO CHALLENGE, TO TRY NEW THINGS. ONE OF THE THINGS I’D LIKE TO DO…I’VE SEEN PEOPLE WHO ARE CROSS-STITCHING ON METAL [PUTTING HOLES IN]. IN THE SPRING, I WILL BE DOING A CROSS-STITCH PATTERN ON ‘PAGE WIRE’, THAT [ATTACHES] TO A FENCE, SO IT WILL BE OUTDOOR CROSS-STITCH. I LOVE WORKING WITH MY SILKS, AND MY REALLY DELICATE STUFF, BUT THE BEAUTIFUL THING ABOUT EMBROIDERY IS YOU CAN TAKE IT DIFFERENT WAYS. WHY SHOULD KNITTERS HAVE ALL THE FUN WHEN THEY GO ‘YARN-BOMBING’? WE CAN DO ‘CROSS-STITCH BOMBING’, TOO. IT’S ONE OF THOSE THINGS WHERE YOU CAN TAKE A VERY OLD FORM, AND MAKE IT VERY MODERN.” “IT WAS A HARD DECISION [TO DONATE IT]. I HAVE THE PATTERN. I CAN ALWAYS RECREATE IT. IT WOULD NEVER BE THE SAME. I DON’T CARE IF YOU RECREATE SOMETHING, IT’S NEVER THE SAME THING. BUT I HAD TO LET THE LOGICAL PART OF MY BRAIN HANDLE THIS DECISION, BECAUSE IT DID HANG IN THE CLASSROOM AND YOU POINTED TO THIS THING A LOT WHEN WE DISCUSSED THE BUILDING. FOR A LOT OF STUDENTS THIS WAS THE PICTURE OF THE BUILDING THAT THEY REMEMBER SEEING, SO THE CONNECTION TO MY JOB JUST MADE IT SUCH A STRONG [POINT]. THE OTHER THING IS, AS AN ARTIST…I GET TO SAY I’M AN ART-PIECE IN A MUSEUM. THAT’S QUITE THE HONOR. IT WASN’T CHOSEN AS AN ART-PIECE, BUT STILL I CAN MAKE THAT WORK. [I SPENT] PROBABLY A WEEK TALKING TO FAMILY MEMBERS AS WELL, BECAUSE I HAVE A LOT OF CROSS-STITCH IN MY HOUSE, FROM PATTERNS AND DIFFERENT THINGS. I REMIND THEM I’M NOT GOING TO DIE SOON, BUT SOME OF MY NIECES HAVE TOLD ME WHICH ONES THEY WANT WHEN I’M DEAD. SO I ALSO NEEDED TO TALK TO FAMILY, AND MAKE SURE THAT NOBODY WAS GOING TO BE CRINGING TO FIND IT WAS GONE. IT IS INTERESTING HOW THINGS THAT YOU CREATE [HAVE] A SENSE OF OWNERSHIP FOR OTHER PEOPLE TOO, SO I HAD TO DOUBLE CHECK WITH OTHER PEOPLE TOO.” “IT WAS JULY OR AUGUST OF 2000, WHEN I WAS INTERVIEWED BY WILMA WOODS, AND I WAS BETWEEN TEACHING [JOBS]…AND GETTING CLOSE TO THE START OF SCHOOL. I DIDN’T REALLY WANT TO SUB, AND IT WAS A TEMPORARY SIX MONTH POSITION. I APPLIED, AND WILMA INTERVIEWED ME ON THE MAIN FLOOR, IN THE HALF OF WHAT’S NOW THE FRIEND’S BOARDROOM. THAT IS WHERE HER OFFICE WAS, AND WHERE SHE DID THE INTERVIEW. I PREPPED. I WENT TO B. MACCABEE’S BOOKSTORE AND BOUGHT THE CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND READ THE ENTIRE BOOK…BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. I WASN’T REALLY THINK ABOUT WHETHER I’D GET THE JOB, SO I GAVE REFERENCES TO HER AND REALIZED I HADN’T ACTUALLY LET THE REFERENCES KNOW. I CALLED THEM AFTER I GOT HOME, WHICH WAS GOOD, BECAUSE I GUESS SHE CALLED FIVE MINUTES AFTERWARDS BECAUSE SHE WAS PRETTY QUICK. I STARTED [AT THE GALT MUSEUM] SEPTEMBER 1, 2000, WITH THE EXHIBIT ON THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT AND ITS CENTENNIAL. IT WAS A SIX MONTH GRANT POSITION. I WAS SUPPOSED TO BE A TEMPORARY POSITION, BECAUSE AT THAT POINT THE E. TEAM HAD GEARED DOWN ON STAFF AT THE MUSEUM. SO I STARTED THERE, AND…JANUARY AND FEBRUARY OF THE YEAR, THEY WENT TO CITY COUNCIL AND ASKED FOR IT TO BE MADE A FULL-TIME PERMANENT POSITION. IT HAD TO BE POSTED, BUT I APPLIED AND GOT THE FULL-TIME PERMANENT POSITION IN MARCH 2001. I MADE THE DECISION, BUT WITHOUT REALLY THINKING ABOUT IT, THAT TEMPORARY POSITION TURNED INTO A SEVENTEEN YEAR JOB.” “[OF THE WORKS I’VE DONE] IT’S DEFINITELY ONE OF THE BIG ONES. THERE [WERE] A FEW OTHER THINGS I TOOK OUT OF MY OFFICE THAT HAVE BEEN WITH ME FROM THE BEGINNING…THE REASON I STITCHED THIS BUILDING WAS MY CONNECTION TO THE BUILDING. IT’S NOT ONLY A PHENOMENAL BUILDING, BUT THIS WAS ‘HOME’ FOR 17 YEARS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170033001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170033001
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
37
Length
36.4
Width
20
Description
A. BUTTON ACCORDION, 37 CM TALL X 36.4 CM LONG X 20 CM WIDE. ACCORDION IS BROWN POLISHED WOOD WITH BLACK AND LIGHT BROWN TRIM; ACCORDION HAS BLACK PLASTIC BELLOWS AND SILVER PLATE OVER THREE ROWS OF WHITE BUTTONS AT SIDE; OPOPSITE END OF ACCORDION HAS FOUR ROWS OF WHITE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS SET IN SILVER PLATE ABOVE BLACK LEATHER STRAP. TOP OF ACCORDION HAS TWO SILVER BASS/TREBLE SWITCHES. BORDERS AROUND BELLOWS HAVE PEAL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID. ACCORDION IS MISSING BUTTON FROM FOURTH ROW OF BUTTONS, AND HAS TWO WOODEN SUBSTITUTE BUTTONS IN SECOND AND FOURTH ROWS. FRONT OF ACCORDION HAS WINDOW ABOVE BELLOWS WITH GLASS PLATE OVER WHITE PAPER AND BLACK TEXT “C. DALLAPE, TRENTO (ITALIA)”. ACCORDION HAS FOUR BRASS FEET ON SIDE WITH FOUR ROWS OF BUTTONS. WOOD IS WORN AT HANDLES AND EDGES; METAL PLATES AND ACCENTS HAVE CORROSION. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BLUE COTTON BAG, 72 CM LONG X 53 CM WIDE. BAG HAS HANDLE ATTACHED TO COVER FLAP; COVER FLAP HAS THREE BUTTON HOLES. BAG HAS TWO BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS ON FRONT ALONG TOP EDGE. BAG HAS PATCHES STITCHED WITH BLACK THREAD ON FRONT UPPER LEFT CORNER, ON BACK IN THE CENTER OF BAG, AND ON THE BACK BESIDE LEFT CORNER OF HANDLE. BAG IS TORN IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER AND FRAYED; BAG IS TORN ALONG LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES AND ON FRONT AT UPPER RIGHT EDGE; BACK HAS TORN HOLES AT BOTTOM. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LESLIE MORTON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A BUTTON ACCORDION. THE ACCORDION WAS OWNED AND PLAYED BY MORTON’S GRANDFATHER, GIUSEPPE (JOSEPH) "FABRO" BRIDAROLLI, AND WAS LATER OWNED BY HER UNCLE, SYLVIO "SYL" BRIDAROLLI, BEFORE BECOMING IN HER POSSESSION. MORTON DISCUSSED HER MEMORIES OF THE ACCORDION IN HER HOME, STATING, “IT’S A BUTTON ACCORDION…THERE’S BUTTON ACCORDIONS AND PIANO ACCORDIONS, AND I PLAY THE PIANO. IF I HAD A PIANO ACCORDION, I COULD AT LEAST PICK OUT THE NOTES BECAUSE I COULD READ THE MUSIC. THIS IS SOMETHING DIFFERENT. YOU HAVE TO BE A REAL MUSICIAN TO PLAY A BUTTON ACCORDION BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY BY EAR. THERE’S THE MELODY SIDE AND THE CHORD SIDE AND YOU JUST DO IT BY EAR. IF YOU LISTEN TO HIS TAPE [IN ARCHIVES]…HE WAS JUST TURNING 81 WHEN HE MADE THIS TAPE AND HE WAS TRYING TO REMEMBER SOME OF THE SONGS HE KNEW. ONE CAME OUT REALLY GOOD AND THEN HE GOT THE MELODY OF SOMETHING. HE WAS PICKING IT OUT AND HE WAS INTO THINGS HE WAS MORE FAMILIAR WITH. HE WAS VERY MUSICAL AND HAD A REAL EAR. IT’S SORT OF LIKE AN IRISH BUTTON ACCORDION BUT NOT QUITE. IT’S BIGGER.” “WHAT I REMEMBER [MY GRANDPARENTS] TELLING ME IS WHEN HE WAS HERE, HE HAD IT MADE FOR HIM IN ITALY AND IT WAS SENT OVER TO CANADA WHEN HE LIVED HERE. I ALSO UNDERSTOOD HE PLAYED IN ITALY BUT THIS ACCORDION WAS MADE FOR HIM THERE AND SENT OVER [IN THE 1920S].” “IT’S A TREASURE. I WOULD SAY OF ALL THE THINGS I FOUND IN MY PARENTS’ HOME AND ALL THE THINGS I’VE HAD TO FIND HOMES FOR, ALL THE THINGS THAT WOULD REMIND ME OF MY CHILDHOOD, THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING. EVER. IT EVOKES REALLY STRONG MEMORIES. THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT MUSIC IN A FAMILY. IF YOU CAN MEET TOGETHER AND YOU CAN SHARE MUSIC, WHICH OUR FAMILY DID, IT LEAVES AN IMPRESSION THAT YOU DON’T EVER FORGET.” “[THE ACCORDION] REALLY WAS FOR MY GRANDFATHER [GIUESEPPE “JOSEPH” BRIDAROLLI]. IT WAS FROM HIM. THAT’S WHERE THE [LOVE OF] MUSIC CAME FROM FOR ALL [MY FAMILY].” “WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL, WE WOULD GO OVER TO [MY GRANDPARENTS’] HOUSE AT 909 - 8TH STREET NORTH, [MY GRANDFATHER] ALWAYS PLAYED. HE’D JUST SIT IN HIS KITCHEN AND HE’D PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. HE WOULD SIT ON A BENCH BY THE BACK DOOR OUTSIDE AND HE WOULD PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. AT CHRISTMAS, MY GRANDPARENTS WOULD COME OVER [TO OUR HOME] AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. MY MOTHER WOULD PLAY THE VIOLIN, MY SISTER THE PIANO. SHE WAS BETTER THAN ME AND WE WOULD ALL SING CAROLS. FOR MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE THE SAME. HE ALWAYS WAS THERE PLAYING HIS ACCORDION. WHEN MY UNCLE AND AUNT CAME TO VISIT, IT WAS THE SAME THING. HE’D PLAY.” ON HER FAMILY’S HISTORY AND CONNECTION TO THE ACCORDION, MORTON ELABORTED, “[MY GRANDFATHER] STOPPED WORKING IN THE MINES IN THE FIFTIES. HE WAS STILL DOING IT IN THE FIFTIES. WHEN THEY CAME OVER FOR SUNDAY DINNER OR WE WENT OVER THERE [MY GRANDFATHER WOULD PLAY]. [WHEN] MY GRANDMOTHER WAS WELL ENOUGH, WE WOULD ALTERNATE [HOMES FOR DINNERS]. THEN WHEN IT GOT HARDER FOR HER [SUNDAY DINNER] WAS ALWAYS IN OUR HOME. I MADE A TAPE WHEN MY PARENTS WENT TO INDIA IN 1971, AND THAT’S WHEN MY UNCLE GOT MARRIED AS WELL. WE CORRESPONDED BY CASSETTE TAPE. THAT SOUNDS VERY ANTIQUATED NOWADAYS. THERE WAS NO EMAIL. PHONES WERE DIFFICULT WHEN YOU TRIED TO PHONE INDIA AND [WE] HAD TO YELL INTO THE PHONE. SO WE DECIDED TO MAKE CASSETTE TAPES…I WENT DOWN SEPTEMBER THE 5TH, 1971…AND I HAD HIM PLAY THE ACCORDION SO THAT I COULD SEND THIS TAPE TO MY PARENTS. [THIS TAPE HAS] HIS VOICE A LITTLE BIT IN THE BACKGROUND AND MINE A TINY BIT BUT IT’S HIS MUSIC THAT’S IMPORTANT. IT WAS SENT OVER TO INDIA FOR THEM AND WE’VE KEPT IT EVER SINCE. HE DIED IN ’72 AND WE PLAYED THAT ACCORDION TAPE A HUNDRED MILLION TIMES. MY UNCLE ALSO HAD ONE OF COURSE. HE WAS ALWAYS PLAYING. MY MOTHER TELLS A STORY, ALTHOUGH IT’S NOT A FAMILY ONE BUT SHE SAID THAT FRIENDS OF HIS, WHEN IT WAS THEIR BIRTHDAY, HE WOULD GO OVER SIT UNDER THEIR WINDOW AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. HE WOULD PLAY AT GATHERINGS OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY. HE PLAYED AT DANCES.” “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN SEPTEMBER 7TH 1890 AND MY GRANDMOTHER [MARIA BERTE] WAS JANUARY 9TH, 1893. THEY WERE FROM CAVENDINE, ITALY, WHICH IS IN THE PROVINCE OF TRENTO AND THAT’S WHERE THIS ACCORDION WAS MANUFACTURED…THEY WERE VERY POOR OVER THERE…I FOUND A PAPER IN THE MIDDLE OF THE FAMILY DOCUMENTS THAT, I DON’T SPEAK ITALIAN, BUT IT LOOKED LIKE A POVERTY DOCUMENT THAT HAS MY GRANDFATHER—HIS FATHER’S NAME ON IT. THEY WERE VERY POOR AND THEY WOULD HAVE COME HERE TO MAKE A BETTER LIFE FOR HIS FAMILY.” “I UNDERSTAND THAT MY GRANDFATHER CAME OVER BY HIMSELF PRIOR TO 1920. HE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE AND SIZED THINGS UP. HE WENT BACK TO ITALY AND GOT MARRIED TO MY GRANDMOTHER IN 1920. MY MOTHER WAS BORN OVER THERE. IT WAS 1924, IN OCTOBER WHEN HE BROUGHT HIS WIFE AND HIS YOUNG DAUGHTER, ANN, OVER. THEY CAME ON A BOAT AND LANDED IN THE MARITIMES, AND THEY MADE THEIR WAY TO LETHBRIDGE. THEY STARTED IN COALHURST FOR A SHORT WHILE…AND THEN THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. MY UNCLE WAS BORN HERE IN 1926.” “I CAN GUESS [MY GRANDPARENTS MOVED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA] BECAUSE [OF] MILLIE LUCIANI—THERE WERE BERTE FAMILIES HERE AND MY GRANDMOTHER WAS A BERTE. MILLIE LUCICANI’S FATHER[WAS A BERTE AND HE WAS A COUSIN OF MY [GRAND]MOTHER] … THERE WAS COMMUNICATION THERE THAT THIS WAS THE PLACE TO COME BECAUSE THEY WERE ALREADY HERE.” “WHEN MY GRANDFATHER DIED IN 1972, I HAD THIS ACCORDION AND THEN, AT A CERTAIN POINT I GAVE IT TO MY UNCLE, HIS SON, SYL. HE HAD IT IN FERNIE THEN IN MERRITT. HE DIED IN 2011 AND MY AUNT SENT IT TO ME. WE TALKED ABOUT LEAVING IT TO THE MUSEUM BUT I DIDN’T WANT TO LET GO OF IT YET. WHAT HAS SPURRED IT ON IS THAT THERE IS NOBODY ELSE TO PASS IT ON TO.” “I WAS GIVEN THIS BECAUSE, WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL I JUST LOVED IT. HE PLAYED AND I LOVED IT. MY UNCLE LOVED IT TOO, HE DIDN’T LIVE HERE AND BECAUSE IT WAS EASY AND MY PARENTS HAD TO LEAVE FOR INDIA, I GOT IT TEMPORARILY. IT DID BELONG MORE TO MY MOM AND MY UNCLE THAN TO ME, BUT I HAD IT FIRST FOR QUITE A WHILE.” “MY SISTER AND I WERE TALKING AND WE THOUGHT, WELL REALLY IT WAS MORE [OUR UNCLE’S] THAN OURS. THAT’S WHY [I GAVE IT TO HIM]. BY GOING TO ME IT WENT TO MY MOM AND SHE WAS THE ELDEST. BUT WHEN MY MOTHER WAS GETTING REALLY SICK AND HE WAS COMING TO VISIT HER AND SHE WASN’T GOING TO LIVE, THEN IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IT GO TO THE NEXT PERSON WHICH REALLY WOULD BE MY UNCLE. WE THOUGHT IT WAS THE RIGHT THING AND HE WAS ENCHANTED. IT WAS REALLY HIS AT THAT POINT.” “I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY IT SO I TRIED, BUT I HAD ARTHRITIS IN MY SHOULDERS SO I COULDN’T. I WOULD TAKE [IT] OUT EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE AND TRY TO PLAY “SILENT NIGHT”. I JUST TOOK IT WHEREVER I WENT AND TRIED TO LOOK AFTER IT.” “IT WOULD BE [ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN MY HOME] AND I’M SURE FOR MY UNCLE TOO. PICTURES ARE REALLY IMPORTANT TO OUR FAMILY AND TO ME. I KNOW TO MY UNCLE SYL AS WELL THIS WOULD BE [IMPORTANT] BECAUSE WE ALL REMEMBERED [MY GRANDFATHER] PLAYING ALL THE TIME. HE NEVER SAT DOWN WITHOUT IT ON HIS LAP. TO MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE EVEN STRONGER BECAUSE, OF COURSE, HE GREW UP WITH HIS FATHER PLAYING THE ACCORDION.” “MY GRANDPARENTS HAD TWO CHILDREN, MY MOTHER ANN, AND HER BROTHER SYL. SYL NEVER HAD ANY CHILDREN, THEY ADOPTED A GIRL ONCE BUT THAT WAS LONG AGO [AND] SHE’S OUT OF THE PICTURE. THERE’S MY AUNT, HIS WIFE, AND THERE’S ME. MY PARENTS HAVE PASSED AWAY AND MY SISTER, LAUREL, PASSED AWAY IN 2009 IN GENEVA. IF SOMETHING HAPPENS TO ME, THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO WAY THIS BRIDAROLLI FAMILY WILL CARRY ON. THE ANDERSON FAMILY [MY FATHER’S FAMILY] THERE WERE EIGHT OF THEM. THERE’S NOBODY ELSE. THERE’S ME AND I FEEL A LITTLE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE IT’S POSSIBLE THAT THE JOSEPH BRIDAROLLI FAMILY IS IN SOME WAY REMEMBERED. MY GRANDFATHER WAS A COAL MINER IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE ALSO WAS A PART OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY AND THEY WEREN’T RICH; THEY WEREN’T POWERFUL. THEY DIDN’T HOLD POSITIONS BUT I THINK THEIR STORY IS VERY IMPORTANT AS IMMIGRANTS FROM ITALY AND I’D LIKE TO TELL THEIR STORY. THAT’S THE REASON I BROUGHT IT. I THINK IT WOULD BE REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IN SOME WAY IT IS PERPETUATED BOTH FOR MY UNCLE AND MY MOTHER AS WELL AS HER PARENTS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180011000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20180010001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
38.9
Length
48.5
Width
31.5
Description
TRANSMITTER RADIO WITH SILVER STEEL FRONT AND METAL MESH BODY. FRONT PANEL HAS METER GAUGE IN UPPER LEFT CORNER WITH BLACK FRAMING AND CLEAR COVER, LABEL ABOVE IN WHITE “EXCITER BUFFER, MULT.—DRIVER GRID” AND BLACK LABEL ON METER “D.C. MILLIAMPERES, STARK, SERIAL MODEL 46”; METER GAUGE IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER HAS BLACK FRAMING AND CLEAR COVER, WITH WHITE LABEL ABOVE “R.F. FINAL, POWER AMPLIFIER PLATE” AND BLACK LABEL ON METER “D.C. MILLIAMPERES, TRIPLET, MODEL 327-T, PATENT 2,346,521, 2,364,724 OTHERS PENDING”. RED PLATE AT TOP EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT “ED REDEKOPP” ABOVE WHITE LABEL “TRANSMITTER, VAR. FREQ. OSC.”; CENTER METER GAUGE FRAMED IN BLACK WITH CLEAR COVER AND BLACK KNOB WITH SILVER TRIM BENEATH, METER HAS BLACK LABEL TEXT “NATIONAL CO. INC, MALDEN, MASS, NATIONAL VELVET VERNIER DIAL, TYPE LCN, PATENT [ILLEGIBLE], J475-3”. FRONT HAS BLACK DIAL WITH SILVER ENGRAVED PLATE AROUND ON LEFT SIDE WITH WHITE LABEL “EXCITATION CONTROL”; DIAL ON RIGHT SIDE HAS BLACK HANDLE AND SILVER ENGRAVED PLATE AROUND WITH WHITE LABEL “P.A. PLATE TUNING”. BOTTOM OF FRONT HAS SIX DIALS WITH GREY KNOBS AND SILVER PLATES AROUND, WITH WHITE LABELS ABOVE READING, LEFT TO RIGHT, “METER SWITCH, DR. PLATE TUNING, V.F.O., TEST—OPERATE C.W. A.M., BAND SWITCH HIGH LOW, ANT. COUPLING”. LOWER LEFT CORNER HAS BLACK DIAL WITH SILVER ENGRAVED PLATE AROUND AND WHITE LABEL ABOVE “DR. GRID TUNING”. BOTTOM CENTER OF FRONT HAS THREE SILVER SWITCHES WITH WHITE LABELS, LEFT TO RIGHT, “FILS./CEF, LOW/OFF, HIGH/OFF”. BACK LOWER EDGE HAS SILVER PLATE WITH THREE BLACK PLUGS-INS AND TWO FITTINGS; LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS WHITE PLASTIC MOUNT WITH FIVE SILVER SCREWS, HANDWRITTEN PENCIL TEXT WRITTEN BESIDE SCREWS ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES, LEFT FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, “GOD, B+, GRID” AND RIGHT “H.COV”. LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS TWO METAL FITTINGS WITH HANDWRITTEN PENCIL TEXT BELOW “KEYER, VFO” AND BRASS KNOB ABOVE. TRANSMITTER SHOWS MINOR SIGN OF WEAR AT BACK; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE RADIO TRANSMITTER, REDEKOPP NOTED, “THE TRANSMITTER HAD TO BE SERVICED REGULARLY…I WOULD SAY PROBABLY ’53 [I BUILT THIS RADIO], MID TO LATE ‘50S.” “I WOULD SAY [I USED THIS] PROBABLY SIX YEARS, GIVE OR TAKE. IT’S SOMETHING THAT I COULD HAVE USED FOR A LONG TIME BUT HAD TO GIVE UP…” “THERE’S SEVERAL DIFFERENT REASONS FOR DIALS. [ONE DIAL] IS FOR TUNING THE PLATE. THERE’S A LIGHTBULB IN THERE THAT YOU THROW ON THAT REDUCES THE AC INPUT VOLTAGE TO A LOW VOLTAGE SO THAT YOU CAN TUNE THE PLATE OUTPUT. IF YOU DON’T GET THAT PLATE OUTPUT TUNED QUICKLY, THAT 813 FINAL TUBE WILL JUST GLOW RED HOT AND MELT AND COLLAPSE. HIGH POWER, HIGH WATTAGE. THAT’S THE KEY. I USUALLY KNOW WHERE IT HAS TO BE, AND THEN IT’LL GIVE ME THE READING [ON A METER]. [ONE DIAL] IS THE FREQUENCY. YOU GOTTA WORK FOUR DIFFERENT BANDS, AND THE CERTAIN FREQUENCIES THAT YOU COVER, YOU GOTTA BE RIGHT IN THERE, DEAD ON. YOU CAN’T BE OUT OF CERTAIN FREQUENCIES THAT ARE GOVERNMENT ALLOCATED FOR AMATEUR RADIO ONLY. EIGHTY METERS STARTS AT 3.5 MEGACYCLES AND YOU GOTTA WORK WITHIN THAT AND UP. IF YOU’RE BELOW OR ABOVE WHAT YOU’RE SUPPOSED TO BE, YOU CAN BE IN BIG TROUBLE.” “THERE’S A TUBE IN THE BOTTOM…YOU CAN’T SEE [IT]. THERE’S A FAN AT THE BOTTOM TO COOL THE THING ’CAUSE IT GETS HOT! THERE’S ALL THESE THINGS TO CONSIDER, BUT THAT’S ALL BEEN TAKEN CARE OF BY THE ENGINEER, AND I DESIGNED IT ACCORDING TO SPECIFICATIONS. THAT 813 IS CAPABLE OF 500 WATTS. IT’S A POWERFUL TUBE; IT’S A BIG BOTTLE. BUT, I DON’T HAVE A…POWER TO DRIVE IT. I’VE GOT OIL FILTER CAPACITORS WHICH ARE ALL WAR SURPLUS. I GOT [THEM] FOR CHEAP AND THEY’RE HIGH VOLTAGE-–HIGHER THAN YOUR STANDARD YOU CAN BUY FOR RADIOS; YOU COULD NEVER USE THEM. EVEN NOW, I DON’T KNOW WHETHER YOU COULD EVER BUY AN OIL FILTER CAPACITOR; THAT WAS ALL WAR SURPLUS STUFF.” “A LOT OF THE STUFF AT THE TIME WAS STILL WAR SURPLUS STUFF. THEY USED TO HAVE WAR SURPLUS STORES. YOU COULD BUY STUFF CHEAP! A DIAL SCALE LIKE [THOSE ON THE TRANSMITTER] OR METERS…YOU [WILL] PAY THE PRICE. THERE WERE SO MANY OTHER THINGS THAT WERE CHEAP. A PERSON TOOK ADVANTAGE OF IT AT THE TIME, BUT THAT’S PASSÉ. THAT’S FINISHED; NO MORE.” “[WHEN YOU’RE DIALING SOMEONE TO TALK] IT GOES THROUGH THE MODULATOR…THROUGH THE TRANSMITTER AND AT THAT FREQUENCY. THEY’LL HEAR YOU AT THAT FREQUENCY. YOU’LL HEAR AMATEUR RADIO STATIONS CALLING TO TALK TO SOMEBODY LIKE, “CQ, CQ” MEANS ‘CALLING,’ AND THEN YOU SIGN YOUR STATION. THESE CALLS, IN CANADA, GO NUMERICALLY. V7S ARE ALL [BRITISH COLUMBIA]; V6S ARE ALBERTANS; V5, SASKATCHEWAN; AND V4 AND SO ON DOWN THE LINE.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010001
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, ALUMINUM
Catalogue Number
P20180010002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, ALUMINUM
No. Pieces
1
Height
22.5
Diameter
12.8
Description
RADIO MICROPHONE FIXED TO BLACK PLASTIC CORD WITH SILVER STEEL FITTINGS. MICROPHONE BASE IS GREY METAL WITH FIXED WOODEN STAND PAINTED GREY. MICROPHONE HAS GREY METAL CASING WITH SILVER GRILL FITTED OVER MICROPHONE; PLATE AT BASE OF MICROPHONE HEAD IS SILVER AND BLACK METAL WITH SILVER TEXT “CANADIAN ASTATIC LIMITED, TORONTO, CANADA, MADE IN CANADA, JT 40, PATENT NOTICE INSIDE”. BLACK CORD IS ATTACHED TO BACK BASE OF MICROPHONE CASING WITH SCREW FITTING. WOODEN STAND HAS PAINT CHIPPED; GREY BASE IS SCUFFED AND STAINED; STEEL FITTING AT END OF CORD IS TARNISHED AND STEEL FITTING SECURED TO MICRORPHONE ON CORD IS CORRODED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE MICROPHONE, REDEKOPP NOTED, “[IT WAS] JUST A CRYSTAL MICROPHONE. CHEAP MICROPHONE. CRYSTALS WERE CHEAP. A DYNAMIC MICROPHONE GETS A LITTLE BIT MORE INVOLVED. THIS IS THE CHEAPEST WAY OF GOING, AND IT’S A HIGH OUTPUT, AND IT’S NOT OF HIGH QUALITY. MICROPHONES-–THE HIGHS ARE A BIT PEAKISH. THERE ARE DIFFERENT LEVELS. IT’S A GOOD MICROPHONE FOR CONVERSATION.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010002
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CODE KEY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180010003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CODE KEY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.5
Length
28.5
Width
10.1
Description
MORSE CODE KEY ATTACHED TO COMPRESSED WOOD BOARD; KEY CODE HAS SILVER UNFINISHED STEEL BODY WITH STEEL FITTINGS AND BAR ATTACHED BLACK METAL KEY. SILVER BAR ATTACHED TO BLACK KEY HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AT BASE “IOF/556”. WOOD BOARD HAS HOLE DRILLED THROUGH ALONG RIGHT EDGE. BOARD HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER IN PENCIL “E.K. REDEKOPP”. BOARD IS STRATCHED ON TOP AND HAS BLACK STAINING BELOW BLACK KEY; BACK OF BOARD HAS STAINING AND DISCOLORATION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE CODE KEY, REDEKOPP NOTED, “LATER ON, I JUST DROPPED [USING THIS] HAND KEY AND WENT TO [THE] DOW KEY.” “MORSE CODE, WE HAD TO LEARN. THAT WAS A MUST. IN AMATEUR RADIO, YOU STARTED WITH IT. YOU DIDN’T START WITH [THE MICROPHONE] AT ALL. IN FACT, IN SECOND CLASS YOU COULDN’T USE A MICROPHONE; YOU HAD TO USE THE KEY ONLY IN MORSE CODE. [THE DOW KEY] IS WHAT I USED BECAUSE MY AWKWARD HAND WOULD NOT HANDLE THAT [HAND KEY]. [IT] DIDN’T WORK VERY WELL FOR ME. I DON’T KNOW HOW ANYONE CAN SEND FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THAT THING AND THAT’S WHAT THEY USE.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010003
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QSL CARD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180010004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QSL CARD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
14
Width
9
Description
WHITE PAPER CARD WITH BLUE IMAGE IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF ALBERTA AND SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA WITH LABELLED CITIES “EDMONTON, CALGARY, LETHBRIDGE, VANCOUVER” AND LETHBRIDGE, SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA SHADED. CARD HAS RED LINES BORDER RUNNING DOWN LEFT SIDE; FRONT OF CARD HAS RED TEXT “LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA, 825-6TH STREET SOUTH, VE6ZS, “THE HEART OF THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY”, RADIO CONFIRMING QSO OF 19, AT P.M., A.M., M.S.T., UR. MC. CW. PHONE, SIGS RST, XMTR, PWR, W.INP. RCVR., QSL. VY 73, EDWARD K. REDEKOPP, OPR”. BACK OF CARD HAS BLUE BLEED IN UPPER LEFT CORNER AND SMALL STAINS; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE QSL CODE, REDEKOPP NOTED, “MY CALL WAS VE6ZS. IT’S ONE OF THE OLDER CALLS-–JUST TWO-LETTER CALLS. LATER ON, THEY RAN OUT OF TWO-LETTER CALLS AND YOU COULD GO INTO THREE-LETTER CALLS…I WAS ONE OF THE EARLY ONES AND IT WAS A NICE, SHORT CALL AND YOU WANT TO KEEP IT. NOW, WHEN YOU FORFEIT IT, SOMEONE ELSE GETS THAT CALL. IT’S BEEN GOING AROUND THE THING MORE THAN ONCE ALREADY. SEVERAL OTHERS HAVE HAD IT SINCE. BUT IF I’D HAVE KEPT MY FEE UP, I WOULD STILL BE VE6ZS.” “[THE CARDS CAN BE MADE AT SHOPS WHERE THEY] PRINT WHATEVER YOU WANT. YOU JUST GIVE [PRINTERS] AN IDEA, AND TELL THEM WHAT YOU WANT ON, ALL THE DETAILS YOU HAVE TO GIVE THEM, AND THEN THEY’LL PRINT [A CARD] UP FOR YOU IN THEIR FANCIFUL WAY, NOT MINE. THEY DID A GOOD JOB. IT’S ACCEPTABLE. BUT IF YOU LOOK AT OTHER ACKNOWLEDGMENT CARDS YOU CAN SEE THAT [IT’S] ABSOLUTELY WILD WHAT SOME PEOPLE HAVE. SOME ARE HILARIOUS; THEY’RE COMICAL. OTHERS ARE DIFFERENT.” “[I WOULDN’T MAIL CARDS OUT] EVERY DAY, NECESSARILY, BUT EVERY WEEK [I WOULD] SEND SOME. THERE’S TWO DIFFERENT WAYS OF SENDING THEM, TOO. PEOPLE WILL SEND TO [A DISTRIBUTOR] LIKE BILL SAVAGE [WHO]…RECEIVED THE CARDS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD AND HE WAS A DISTRIBUTOR OF LETHBRIDGE TO ALL THE AMATEURS WHEN THEY GET THEM IN. YOU’D PICK THEM UP EVERY SO OFTEN. LIKE THE RUSSIANS. THEY WENT TO MOSCOW-–BOX 88, WAS IT? EVERYTHING WENT THROUGH MOSCOW. YOU COULD TALK DIRECTLY TO SOMEBODY BUT YOU NEVER COULD GET A CARD DIRECTLY FROM THEM. ALWAYS THROUGH MOSCOW ’CAUSE MOSCOW CENSORED EVERYTHING.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010004
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"THE RADIO AMATEUR'S HANDBOOK"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180010005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"THE RADIO AMATEUR'S HANDBOOK"
Date
1957
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
4
Height
3.2
Length
24.3
Width
17
Description
A. BOOK, 24.3 CM LONG X 17 CM WIDE X 3.2 CM TALL. BOOK HAS RED COVER AND SILVER TEXT “34TH EDITION, 1957, THE RADIO AMATEUR’S HANDBOOK, THE STANDARD MANUAL OF AMATEUR RADIO COMMUNICATION, $3.50 U.S.A. PROPER, PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE”; COVER HAS SILVER IMAGE OF RADIO TOWER OVER A HOUSE ROOF AND TREES IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER. SPINE HAS SILVER TEXT PRINTED “1957, THE RADIO AMATEUR’S HANDBOOK, THIRTY-FOURTH EDITION”. INSIDE FRONT PAGE HAS TEXT WRITTEN IN PENCIL IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER “E.K. REDEKOPP, 305-7 AVE. A. SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE, OCTOBER 16, 1957”. INSIDE TITLE PAGE HAS BLACK PRINTED TEXT “THE RADIO AMATEUR’S HANDBOOK, BY THE HEADQUARTERS STAFF OF THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE, WEST HARTFORD, CONN., U.S.A.”; BACK OF TITLE PAGE HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED “COPYRIGHT 1957 BY THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE…LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CATALOG CARD NUMER: 41-3345…THE RUMFORD PRESS, CONCORD, NEW HAMPSIRE, U.S.A.”. INSIDEOF BOOK HAS HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON PAGES. SPINE IS DAMAGED AND LIFTING FROM PAGES INSIDE; COVER IS WORN AND SCRATCHED ON FRONT AND SPINE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. PAPER INSERT, 22.2 CM LONG X 10.2 CM WIDE. LIGHT BROWN PAPER WITH BLACK TEXT ON FRONT; FRONT HAS DARK BROWN BORDER ALONG UPPER EDGE WITH LIGHT BROWN TEXT “Q CODES”; BELOW BORDER ON FRONT IS LISTING OF Q CODES IN BLACK INK WITH THEIR DEFINITIONS, INCLUDES “SPECIAL ABBREVIATIONS ADOPTED BY ARRL”. FRONT OF CARD SHOWS 35 CODES PRINTED AND ONE HANDWRITTEN AT TOP IN PENCIL “QRA-WHAT IS THE NAME OF IN ST.? NAME OF THE ST”. CARD HAS PENCIL MARKS MADE BESIDE CERTAIN CODES ON LIFT. BACK OF CARD IS PRINTED WITH BROWN TEXT ON LIGHT BROWN BACKGROUND “SSR” AND THREE BLACK BANNERS ACROSS PAPER WITH LIGHT BROWN TEXT “LESS DISTORTION, MORE TALKING POWER, DECREASAED BANDWIDTH”. CARD IS SEVERELY DISCOLOURED WITH FADING ON BACK; BACK IS CREASED AND HAS TEAR IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER; BACK AND FRONT ARE STAINED; FRONT HAS ADHESIVE STAIN ALONG UPPER EDGE; CARD IS SEVERELY CREASED AT BOTTOM EDGE OF UPPER BROWN BORDER. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. PAPER INSERT, 43.5 CM LONG X 28 CM WIDE. INSERT IS WHITE WITH BLACK TEXT AND IMAGES PRINTED; FRONT HAS HEADER WITH BLACK TEXT “RADIO SUPPLY, HAM NEWS, MCLEOD BUILDING EDMONTON, MARCH 1947, 134-12TH AVENUE W. CALGARY, HAM HEADQUARTERS FOR EQUIPMENT AND INFORMATION”. INSERT FRONT INCLUDES PHOTO AND PRINTED STORIES; INSIDE OF INSERT HAS IMAGES, SPECIFICATIONS, AND PRICES FOR RADIO PARTS AND EQUIPMENT; BACK PAGE HAS IMAGES, SPECIFICATIONS, AND PRICES FOR RADIOS, AND WRITTEN TEXT IN PENCIL UPPER RIGHT CORNER “12, 267 50/56 00/211 50”. PAPER IS FOLDED AND CREASED TWICE ACROSS; PAPER SHOWS SIGNS OF DISCOLORATION ALONG EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. PAPER INSERT, 21.5 CM LONG X 13.4 CM WIDE. PAPER IS BLACK LINED WITH BLUE HAND-DRAWN DIAGRAMS ON FRONT AND TEXT; TEXT IS WRITTEN IN BLUE INK IN CURSIVE, “IF NO TONE OBTAINED WITH KEY CLOSED, [RECEIVE] VALUE OF R8. REDUCE VALUE IF CONSTANT [TOL] IS RECEIVED REGARDLESS OF KEY UP OR DOWN POSITION”. PAPER HAS BLACK PRINTED BORDER AT BOTTOM WITH TEXT “CHRYCO “ALL-MAKE” PARTS…FINEST FOR ALL CARS”. PAPER HAS HOLE PUNCHED IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER. PAPER SHOWS MINOR SIGNS OF DISCOLORATION AROUND EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE INSTRUCTION MANUAL, REDEKOPP NOTED, “I USED TO GET THE AMATEUR RADIO HANDBOOK. THIS IS [AN] AMATEUR RADIO HANDBOOK. IT COMES OUT ANNUALLY, AND ALL THE LATEST TRANSMITTERS AND DEVELOPMENTS, ANTENNAS INCLUDED…[ARE]ALL IN HERE. THE DEVELOPMENTS. I THINK IT’S IN THIS MANUAL THAT THIS TRANSMITTER THE ENGINEER HAD DESIGNED, AND I WAS READING UP ON IT AND I THOUGHT, “MAN, THAT’S A TERRIFIC TRANSMITTER. I LIKE THAT.” IT COVERS ALL THE BANDS THAT I WOULD BE USING: 80, 40, 20, 15 AND 10, AND SO I THOUGHT, “I HAVE TO BUILD THAT THING.” THAT’S WHAT GOT ME GOING ON IT. IT TOOK ME ABOUT FOUR MONTHS TO BUILD IT BECAUSE YOU ONLY DO SO MUCH EVERY DAY, AND YOU [HAVE TO] TEND TO THE FAMILY.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010005
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ANTENNA TUNER
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, COPPER, CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20180010006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ANTENNA TUNER
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
STEEL, COPPER, CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
17
Length
25.5
Width
15.3
Description
HOMEMADE ANTENNA TUNER; GREY, UNFINISHED STEEL BASE WITH TWO COPPER COILS ON TOP SECURED WIT SCREWS AND FOUR WHITE CERAMIC MOUNTS. COILS ARE JOINED TOGETER WITH METAL BAR AT SCREWS IN THE CENTER, AND JOINED BY CLOTH-COVERED WIRE AT SCREWS ON ENDS; CENTER METAL BAR JOINING COILS HAS BLUE PLASTIC COVER WRAPPED AROUND IT. COILS JOINED AT END SCREWS WITH CLOTH-COVERED WIRE TO WHITE METAL MOUNT WITH SILVER METAL DISCS. MOUNT HAS TWO SETS OF NINETEEN DISCS; DISCS ARE SHAPED LIKE HALF-CIRCLES; DISCS ARE JOINED AT TOPS WITH METAL ROD RUNNING THROUGH. TUNER SHOWS SIGNS OF WEAR, AND IS STAINED WITH SOILING; TUNER BASE HAS HOLES PUNCHED IN SIDES AND TOP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE INSTRUCTION MANUAL, REDEKOPP NOTED, “THE ANTENNA IS ALMOST THE KEY TO A SUCCESSFUL STATION. THERE’S TWO THINGS: YOU CAN EITHER GET YOUR RADIO WAVES THROUGH THE ANTENNA, OR YOU CAN HEAT YOUR CONDUCTOR, YOUR TRANSMISSION LINE, IF IT DOESN’T MATCH, TOO.” “YOU HAVE TO HAVE YOUR ANTENNA TUNED. FREQUENCY AND WAVE LENGTH GO TOGETHER AND THEY ARE VERY IMPORTANT. YOU HAVE TO HAVE THIS TUNED TO THE CORRECT FREQUENCY SO IT WILL MATCH THE ANTENNA. IF IT DOESN’T MATCH, YOU’RE JUST [HEATING] YOUR CONDUCTOR AND YOU’RE NOT GETTING ANYWHERE FAR. THAT’S THE KEY. THERE’S WHAT THEY CALL A STANDING WAVE RATIO…IF IT’S TOO HIGH, IT’S JUST HEATING A WIRE AND YOU’RE NOT GETTING [A SIGNAL] OUT. THE NEARER TO ONE-TO-ONE THAT YOU CAN GET–THREE-TO-ONE IS GOOD…NOT IDEAL, BUT GOOD—FOUR-TO-ONE, FIVE-TO-ONE-–FORGET [IT]. YOU’RE JUST HEATING THE WIRE. ANTENNAS [ARE] AMAZING. AS A MATTER OF FACT, IT’S A SCIENCE. ANTENNAS [ARE] A SCIENCE.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010006
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WEDGE CAP, "ANDERSON SISTERS"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, THREAD, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20160044001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WEDGE CAP, "ANDERSON SISTERS"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1970
Materials
FELT, THREAD, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
11
Length
30
Width
1.7
Description
BLACK FELT WEDGE CAP WITH RED ACCENTS STITCHING. TWO RED AND GOLD PLASTIC BEADS ON THE FRONT EDGE. CURSIVE “ANDERSON SISTERS” EMBROIDERED IN RED ON ONE SIDE AND “ALICE” ON THE OTHER. VERY GOOD CONDITION: MAKEUP STAINS PRESENT OF THE INSIDE BRIM OF THE HAT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS WEDGE CAP WAS A COMPONENT OF THE UNIFORM THE SISTERS WORE WHEN THEY PERFORMED AT PLACES SUCH AS ARMY BASES AND DANCE HALLS. THIS CAP BELONGED TO ALICE, THE SECOND YOUNGEST OF THE SISTERS. IN 16 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE: RUTH STATES, “THE HAT WOULD BE AT LEAST FROM 1940 - ’41… ALL OF THE SISTERS HAD [A CAP AND] THEY WERE SPECIAL MADE FOR THEM. ‘ANDERSON SISTERS’ WAS EMBROIDERED ON ONE SIDE AND THEN THEIR NAMES ON THE OTHER. THEY WERE MADE TO GO WITH THESE MILITARY LOOKING DRESSES THAT THEY HAD. THEY TYPICALLY ALWAYS DRESSED ALIKE FOR THE PERFORMANCES. THE HATS WERE MADE TO GO ALONG WITH THEM WHEN THEY WERE DOING PERFORMANCES AT THE MILITARY BASES.” “[THE SISTERS] USUALLY CAME UP WITH [THE UNIFORM] COLLECTIVELY,” RUTH EXPLAINED, “AND THEY WORKED WITH A TAILOR IN TOWN WHO ACTUALLY DID SOME OF THEIR SUITS. THERE MIGHT BE A LABEL THAT I COULD FIND WITH REGARDS TO WHAT THAT COMPANY WAS….THERE WERE USUALLY ALWAYS TAILORS INVOLVED, AND WHEN THEY CAME UP WITH AN IDEA OR CONCEPT, THEY’D HAVE IT DONE AT THE SAME PLACE, BUT I DON’T HAVE THE DETAILS ON THAT.” MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING THIS CAP, WERE KEPT TOGETHER IN ONE OF ALICE’S TRUNKS. WHEN RUTH AND ELEANOR WERE HELPING THEIR MOTHER SORT HER THINGS, SHE EXPLAINED THE ITEMS IN THE TRUNK TO THEM. THE WEDGE CAP CAME TO THE MUSEUM ENCLOSED IN A SHADOW BOX COMPLETE WITH ARTICLE CLIPPINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS, WHICH WAS ASSEMBLED FOR A COMMUNITY DISPLAY. PERMISSION WAS GRANTED BY THE DONOR TO REMOVE THE CAP FROM THE BOX. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR PHOTOGRAPH OF THE BOX. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044001
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

116 records – page 1 of 6.