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Other Name
WEDGE CAP, "ANDERSON SISTERS"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, THREAD, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20160044001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WEDGE CAP, "ANDERSON SISTERS"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1970
Materials
FELT, THREAD, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
11
Length
30
Width
1.7
Description
BLACK FELT WEDGE CAP WITH RED ACCENTS STITCHING. TWO RED AND GOLD PLASTIC BEADS ON THE FRONT EDGE. CURSIVE “ANDERSON SISTERS” EMBROIDERED IN RED ON ONE SIDE AND “ALICE” ON THE OTHER. VERY GOOD CONDITION: MAKEUP STAINS PRESENT OF THE INSIDE BRIM OF THE HAT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS WEDGE CAP WAS A COMPONENT OF THE UNIFORM THE SISTERS WORE WHEN THEY PERFORMED AT PLACES SUCH AS ARMY BASES AND DANCE HALLS. THIS CAP BELONGED TO ALICE, THE SECOND YOUNGEST OF THE SISTERS. IN 16 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE: RUTH STATES, “THE HAT WOULD BE AT LEAST FROM 1940 - ’41… ALL OF THE SISTERS HAD [A CAP AND] THEY WERE SPECIAL MADE FOR THEM. ‘ANDERSON SISTERS’ WAS EMBROIDERED ON ONE SIDE AND THEN THEIR NAMES ON THE OTHER. THEY WERE MADE TO GO WITH THESE MILITARY LOOKING DRESSES THAT THEY HAD. THEY TYPICALLY ALWAYS DRESSED ALIKE FOR THE PERFORMANCES. THE HATS WERE MADE TO GO ALONG WITH THEM WHEN THEY WERE DOING PERFORMANCES AT THE MILITARY BASES.” “[THE SISTERS] USUALLY CAME UP WITH [THE UNIFORM] COLLECTIVELY,” RUTH EXPLAINED, “AND THEY WORKED WITH A TAILOR IN TOWN WHO ACTUALLY DID SOME OF THEIR SUITS. THERE MIGHT BE A LABEL THAT I COULD FIND WITH REGARDS TO WHAT THAT COMPANY WAS….THERE WERE USUALLY ALWAYS TAILORS INVOLVED, AND WHEN THEY CAME UP WITH AN IDEA OR CONCEPT, THEY’D HAVE IT DONE AT THE SAME PLACE, BUT I DON’T HAVE THE DETAILS ON THAT.” MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING THIS CAP, WERE KEPT TOGETHER IN ONE OF ALICE’S TRUNKS. WHEN RUTH AND ELEANOR WERE HELPING THEIR MOTHER SORT HER THINGS, SHE EXPLAINED THE ITEMS IN THE TRUNK TO THEM. THE WEDGE CAP CAME TO THE MUSEUM ENCLOSED IN A SHADOW BOX COMPLETE WITH ARTICLE CLIPPINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS, WHICH WAS ASSEMBLED FOR A COMMUNITY DISPLAY. PERMISSION WAS GRANTED BY THE DONOR TO REMOVE THE CAP FROM THE BOX. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR PHOTOGRAPH OF THE BOX. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044001
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160044002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
9.5
Width
0.6
Description
SMALL, METAL MECHANICAL PENCIL WITH ADJUSTABLE BALL CHAIN ATTACHMENT. PENCIL HAS RAISED FILIGREE-DESIGN ELEMENTS THAT IS DETACHABLE. GOOD CONDITION: OVERALL TARNISHING OF METAL
Subjects
WRITTEN COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
DOMESTIC
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS PENCIL CAME FROM THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS ALICE SAVED FROM THE ANDERSON SISTERS ERA. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE: RUTH EXPLAINS, “[THIS IS] A TINY LITTLE MECHANICAL PENCIL USED TO BE SITTING ON MOM’S MUSIC STAND, SO THAT IF THERE WAS A NOTATION OR SOMETHING THEY WANTED TO DO [SHE COULD WRITE IT DOWN]. [IT] WAS SOMETHING USEFUL, BUT VERY PRETTY TO BE UP WHERE THEY WERE DOING THEIR MUSIC. THEY TREATED THEIR SPACE ON STAGE VERY SPECIALLY AND THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT WAS ON HER MUSIC STAND ALL THESE YEARS.” PROFESSIONALISM IN HOW THEY PRESENTED THEMSELVES WAS IMPORTANT TO THE GROUP, THE SISTERS EXPLAINED, INCLUDING RIGHT DOWN TO THE SMALL DETAILS, SUCH AS THE PENCIL. MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING THIS PENCIL, WERE KEPT TOGETHER IN ONE OF ALICE’S TRUNKS. WHEN RUTH AND ELEANOR WERE HELPING THEIR MOTHER SORT HER THINGS, SHE EXPLAINED THE ITEMS IN THE TRUNK TO THEM. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044002
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BAKELITE, LEATHER, VELVET
Catalogue Number
P20160044003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1980
Materials
BAKELITE, LEATHER, VELVET
No. Pieces
11
Height
27
Length
38
Width
11.5
Description
A: CASE: GREEN AND OFF-WHITE LEATHER CASE. BLACK PLASTIC/SILVER METAL LABEL THAT READS “CONN” ON FRONT OF CASE. GREEN HANDLE AT TOP WITH TWO METAL LATCHES ON EITHER SIDE. HINGES ON THE BOTTOM OF CASE TO OPEN. FOUR METAL FEET ON BOTTOM. CORK EDGES AROUND THE SIDES, STITCHED ON AND PAINTED OFF-WHITE COLOUR. INSIDE IS LINED WITH A GREEN VELVET. TOP FOLDS DOWN AND IS FASTENED WITH LEATHER STRAP AND METAL SNAP BUTTON. “CONN” LABEL IN TOP LEFT CORNER OF CASE THAT IS GOLD WITH BLACK AND RED PAINT INSIDE. THREE PEOPLE OF A MARCHING BAND IN IMAGE ON LABEL. THE BOTTOM HALF OF THE INSIDE OF CASE HAS EIGHT SECTIONS FOR INSTRUMENT PIECES AND ACCESSORIES. FAIR CONDITION: MODERATE TO SEVERE SURFACE DIRT OVERALL. VARIOUS GREEN STAINS AT TOP OF CASE. METAL COMPONENTS SCUFFED. SOME STITCHING AS SIDES COMING LOOSE. LOSS OF PAINT IN SEVERAL PLACES ALONG CORK EDGE. INSIDE FABRIC WORN. B: BLACK BAKELITE CLARINET BELL WITH SILVER AROUND BOTH EDGES. “CONN DIRECTOR U.S.A.” ETCHED ON OUTER SURFACE. 11 CM LENGTH. 8 CM BELL DIAMETER. C: BLACK BAKELITE LOWER JOINT WITH SILVER KEYS. CORK EDGE ON BOTTOM AND SILVER RIM AROUND TOP. “721800” ETCHED ON BACK NEAR CORK. PADDED THUMB REST ON BACK OF THIS JOINT. 25.5 CM X 2.5 CM. D: BLACK BAKELITE UPPER JOINT WITH SILVER KEYS. BOTH ENDS COVERED IN CORK. LOGO WITH THREE MARCHING BAND FIGURES ETCHED ON FRONT NEAR THE TOP. 22.5 CM X 2.3 CM (TOP DIAMETER SLIGHTLY WIDER). E: BLACK BAKELITE BARREL JOINT WITH SILVER EDGES. 6 CM X 3 CM (BOTTOM DIAMETER) 2.8 CM (TOP DIAMETER). F: BLACK BAKELITE MOUTHPIECE WITH CORK AT BOTTOM. METAL LIGATURE WITH ITS TWO SCREWS ATTACHED SECURING A REED TO THE MOUTHPIECE. 9 CM LONG WITH 2.1 CM DIAMETER AT BOTTOM. VERY GOOD CONDITION FOR B-F: SLIGHT SCUFFS OF SURFACE G: SILVER METAL MARCHING LYRE. CIRCULAR BAND WITH ADJUSTABLE SCREW FOR ATTACHMENT TO INSTRUMENT. THIS SCREWS ONTO A STEM, WHICH EXTENDS TO CONNECT TO A LYRIFORM SPRING CLAMP THAT IS MEANT TO HOLD MUSIC. FAIR CONDITION: SEVERE GREEN STAINING IN MANY AREAS OF SURFACE. METAL SLIGHTLY SCRATCHED OVERALL. H: BLACK PLASTIC REED HOLDER WITH SLOTS FOR TWO REEDS (ONE ON FRONT AND ONE ON). “LAVOZ” ETCHED IN PLASTIC ON FRONT AND BACK AND “USA” ABOVE THAT.7.7 CM X 2 CM. I: CLARINET REED ENCASED IN REED HOLDER (H).”RICO” IN MUSIC STAFF STAMPED ON BACKSIDE AND SIZE “V-2 ½” STAMPED BELOW THE LOGO. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION FOR H-I: SOME WEAR TO SIDE OF REED HOLDER WITH REED. REED SHOWS SIGNS OF USE. J: WHITE ENVELOPE THAT READS, “CONN EXCLUSIVE TUNING RING” WITH TEXT BELOW AND DIAGRAM OF THE TUNING RING PRINTED ALL IN BLACK INK ON THE FRONT OF THE ENVELOPE. THE BACK HAS SCOTCH TAPE SECURING THE RIGHT SIDE ENVELOPE FLAP. CAN FEEL ONE TUNING RING INSIDE ENVELOPE. 14 CM X 7.9 CM. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION: PAPER OF ENVELOPE HAS SEVERELY YELLOWED. K-N: TWO IDENTICAL TUBES OF CORK GREASE WITH CAPS. WHITE PLASTIC TUBE THAT READS, “PARAMOUNT MUSIC “PREMIUM” CORK GREASE” AND AN ADDRESS BELOW ALL IN RED FONT. TWISTABLE END TO EXTEND THE GREASE IN TUBE. GREASE STILL PRESENT IN TUBES. RED PLASTIC CAPS. ONE READS “B 7 ETHYL” (K) ON INSIDE OF CAP AND THE OTHER READS “B 87 ETHYL” (N). 6.8 CM X 1,7 CM. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT SURFACE DIRT ON LABEL. DISCOLOURING OF PLASTIC AROUND BOTTOM EDGES. GREASE IS CRYSTALIZING. O-P: SMALL, BLACK PLASTIC GREASE CONTAINER IN CUBE WITH GOLD METALLIC LETTERS ON LID “YAMAHA CORK GREASE”. HINGE ATTACHING LID TO CONTAINER, SO LID COMPLETE DETACHES. GREASE INSIDE OF THE CONTAINER. 2.7 CM X 2.7 CM X 2 CM. GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT SCRATCHING ON SURFACE. BROKEN HINGE. Q: CLARINET CLEANING SWAB WAND WITH TWISTED WIRE WAND/HANDLE AND MULTICOLOURED (BLUES AND PINKS), FABRIC SWAB. THE SWAB IS SHAGGED. 29 CM X 2.5 CM. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: WIRE IS SLIGHTLY BENT. R: CLOTH CLEANING SWAB WITH NATURAL-COLOURED TAN SUEDE CLOTH (APPROX. 12.5 CM X 6.3 CM) THAT HAS ROUGH EDGES. ONE CORNER OF SUEDE IS PINCHED TOGETHER WITH A SILVER METAL CLASP (TOOTHED), WHICH SECURES IT AROUND A BLACK STRING (57 CM IN LENGTH) WITH A SILVER-COLOURED WEIGHT AT THE END. FAIR CONDITION: STRING IS FRAYING MODERATELY IN ONE PLACE AND SLIGHTLY IN OTHERS. SUEDE FABRIC SHOWS DIRT. WEIGHT’S METAL IS SCUFFED.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
MILITARY
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS CLARINET WAS PLAYED BY THREE GENERATIONS OF THE DONORS’ FAMILY. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. RUTH EXPLAINED, “IT WAS PURCHASED BRAND NEW [IN THE] EARLY ‘50S WITH THE INTENT THAT HER FIRST SON, BERNIE (BORN IN 1950) WOULD PLAY THE CLARINET, WHICH HE DID. MOM DID USE IT FOR SOME LATER PERFORMANCES WITH THE ANDERSON SISTERS, BUT IT WAS PURCHASED [FOR HIM]. AND HIS DAUGHTER, CONNIE, ALSO PLAYED THE CLARINET.” SPEAKING OF WHY THEY SELECTED THIS OBJECT TO BE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, RUTH SAID, “WHEN WE WERE GATHERING THINGS TOGETHER, WE THOUGHT [OF] WHAT INSTRUMENTS WE HAD THAT HAVE A CONNECTION. SO IT WAS DECIDED [ON THE CLARINET]. CONNIE WAS QUITE HAPPY TO KNOW THAT IT WAS COMING IN THIS DIRECTION, SINCE IT WAS GRANDMA’S CLARINET, IT SHOULD GO WITH GRANDMA’S THINGS.” OF ALL THE INSTRUMENTS ALICE KNEW HOW TO PLAY, THE CLARINET “WAS THE MAIN ONE,” RUTH CONTINUED, “BUT SHE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AS WELL. AND ALSO TAUGHT PIANO FOR YEARS AND YEARS AND YEARS. [ALL THE SISTERS] PLAYED PIANO REALLY WELL. SHE PLAYED OTHER INSTRUMENTS LIKE THE ORGAN, AND THERE WERE ACTUALLY INSTANCES TOO WHERE SOMEONE WOULD CALL ON HER TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY AN INSTRUMENT, AND SHE WOULD TEACH THEM HOW TO PLAY IT WITHOUT KNOWING HOW TO PLAY IT HERSELF, BECAUSE SHE KNEW THE TECHNIQUE [OR] WOULD LEARN THE TECHNIQUE. BUT THE CLARINET WAS HER MAIN THING WITH, AS I SAID, SAXOPHONE AND PIANO PROBABLY THE NEXT CLOSEST IN LINE.” THE SISTERS STATE THAT THEY REMEMBER THEIR MOTHER PLAYING THIS SPECIFIC CLARINET. ELEANOR SAID, “SHE DIDN’T PASS IT [ON] UNTIL CONNIE WANTED TO USE IT, BECAUSE BERNIE DIDN’T TAKE IT WITH HIM [FROM HOME].” RUTH ADDED, “YEAH, THAT’S RIGHT. I THINK IT’S REALLY ALWAYS BEEN HERS.” THE LAST TIME THEY REMEMBER HER PLAYING IT WOULD HAVE BEEN THE LAST TIME THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA PERFORMED, WHICH WAS A PERFORMANCE FOR THE ELKS IN GRANUM IN THE 1970S. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044003
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BAKELITE
Catalogue Number
P20160044004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Materials
BAKELITE
No. Pieces
1
Height
3
Length
8.3
Width
0.7
Description
RED TRANSLUCENT BAKELITE KEY CASE. OVAL-SHAPED KEY HOLDER WITH FADED GOLD METALLIC TEXT ON ONE SIDE WHICH READS, “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA." SLOTS ALONG BOTH SIDES TO HOLD TWO KEYS. GOOD CONDITION: MODERATE LOSS OF GOLD PAINT OF TEXT. OVERALL SCUFFING.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
LEISURE
DOMESTIC
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS KEY HOLDER CAME TO THE MUSEUM WITH A NOTE THAT STATED, “EACH OF THE SISTERS HAD A KEY HOLDER. THIS ONE IS ALICE’S.” IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. IN THE INTERVIEW, RUTH EXPLAINED THE KEY HOLDER WAS FROM THE EARLY 1940S (1940-41) AND ORIGINATED IN THE ERA THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS PERFORMING FREQUENTLY. “MOM SAID THAT EACH OF [THE SISTERS] HAD ONE OF THE KEY HOLDERS,” RUTH STATED, “YOU CAN SEE THROUGH IT [AND] THERE’S A LITTLE PLACE THAT A LITTLE KEY CAN BE KIND OF FOLDED IN OR TWO KEYS. I’M NOT SURE IF THE REASON THEY EVEN HAD ONE TO START WITH WAS SOMEONE THINKING THAT MAYBE THEY’D WANT TO SELL A BUNCH [TO] MAYBE MARKET AT THEIR CONCERTS, BUT THAT WASN’T SOMETHING THEY DID. THEY WERE THERE TO SELL MUSIC NOT ITEMS. THEY DIDN’T SELL ANYTHING BUT TICKETS.” “SO, THEY ALL ENDED UP WITH [A KEY HOLDER]. I BELIEVE MOM [WAS] THE ONLY ONE WHO HAD HERS STILL. THEY WERE ALWAYS GETTING APPROACHED WITH A MARKETING IDEA. I THINK UNLESS IT WAS SOMETHING THAT GRANDPA FELT COMPLIMENTED THINGS THEY DIDN’T GET INTO DOING THAT, WHICH MAYBE WAS A MISTAKE WHEN YOU THINK OF IT FROM A MARKETING STAND POINT. BUT THEY LOOKED AT THE MUSIC FIRST, AND THE TRINKETS WEREN’T SOMETHING THEY EVER REALLY GOT INTO.” MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING THIS KEY HOLDER, WERE KEPT TOGETHER IN ONE OF ALICE’S TRUNKS. WHEN RUTH AND ELEANOR WERE HELPING THEIR MOTHER SORT HER THINGS, SHE EXPLAINED THE ITEMS IN THE TRUNK TO THEM. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044004
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RHINESTONE
Catalogue Number
P20160044005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, RHINESTONE
No. Pieces
2
Height
2.1
Length
2.5
Width
0.9
Description
A-B: PAIR OF GOLD-COLOURED COSTUME JEWELRY EARRINGS. CRESENT-SHAPED, CURVING OUT TO FRONT. WHITE RHINESTONES SET IN GOLD-COLOURED METAL VERTICALLY DOWN CURVE OF EARRING. SCREW-ON CLASP AT BACK. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION: BOTTOM RHINESTONE MISSING OFF COMPONENT A AND SECOND FROM THE TOP RHINESTONE MISSING OFF B. METAL MODERATELY WORN/SCUFFED.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. OF THESE EARRINGS, RUTH RECALLED, “I KNOW THAT THESE WERE WORN WHEN THEY WERE PERFORMING. IF THEY WERE DRESSED ALIKE, THEY USUALLY HAD THE SAME JEWELRY AS WELL.” BOTH RUTH AND ELEANOR RECALLED THE EARRINGS BEING WORN BY THEIR MOTHER UP UNTIL THE 1980S. THE JEWELRY THE SISTERS WORE DURING THE PERFORMANCES “SHOWED A LOT OF USE,” RUTH EXPLAINED. “OTHER ONES REPLACED [OLDER PAIRS AS THEY WORE OUT] AND THEY WERE JUST SET ASIDE.” “ALL [THE SISTERS] LOVED TO DRESS UP. THERE WERE SOME OUTFITS THEY HAD THAT ACTUALLY HAVE GONE DOWN THROUGH FAMILY MEMBERS. HER GRANDDAUGHTER HAS A BEAUTIFUL FORMAL THAT [EACH SISTER] HAD. WHEN THEY DRESSED UP, THEY [REALLY] DRESSED UP. IT WAS WITH BRILLIANT, SHINY, BEAUTIFUL JEWELRY,” RUTH REMEMBERED. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044005
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160044006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
3.7
Length
5
Width
0.6
Description
SILVER AND BLACK OVAL BROOCH; 3 RAISED SILVER METAL LINES (LIKE A STAFF ON SHEET MUSIC) HORIZONTALLY ACROSS BROOCH WITH A SILVER SIXTEENTH NOTE SET ON TOP OF THE LINES. BACKGROUND IS COATED IN MATTE BLACK VARNISH. GOOD CONDITION: BLACK PAINT PRESENT ON SILVER METAL IN A COUPLE OF SPOTS. SLIGHT LOSS OF VARNISH IN SOME PLACES ON FRONT OF BROOCH.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THE ANDERSON SISTERS HAD MATCHING UNIFORMS THEY WOULD OFTEN WEAR FOR PERFORMANCES, WHICH INCLUDED PIECES SUCH AS THIS BROOCH. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. RUTH EXPLAINED, “IF THEY WERE DRESSED ALIKE, THEY USUALLY HAD THE SAME JEWELRY AS WELL.” BOTH RUTH AND ELEANOR RECALLED THE BROOCH BEING WORN BY THEIR MOTHER UP UNTIL THE 1980S. THE JEWELRY THE SISTERS WORE DURING THE PERFORMANCES “SHOWED A LOT OF USE,” RUTH EXPLAINED. “OTHER ONES REPLACED [OLDER PAIRS AS THEY WORE OUT] AND THEY WERE JUST SET ASIDE.” “ALL [THE SISTERS] LOVED TO DRESS UP. THERE WERE SOME OUTFITS THEY HAD THAT ACTUALLY HAVE GONE DOWN THROUGH FAMILY MEMBERS. HER GRANDDAUGHTER HAS A BEAUTIFUL FORMAL THAT [EACH SISTER] HAD. WHEN THEY DRESSED UP, THEY [REALLY] DRESSED UP. IT WAS WITH BRILLIANT, SHINY, BEAUTIFUL JEWELRY,” RUTH REMEMBERED. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044006
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"UNTITLED"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, METAL, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190006004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"UNTITLED"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
PAPER, METAL, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
74.8
Width
67
Description
WATERCOLOUR AND PASTEL PAINTING DEPICTING A TREE IN THE FOREGROUND IN BLACK PASTEL ON GREEN, PURPLE, PINK AND BLUE BLENDED WATERCOLOUR BACKGROUND. TREE AND GROUND OUTLINES ARE DONE IN PASTEL WITH ABSTRACT WATERCOLOUR BACKGROUNDS FOR LEAVES AND LANDSCAPE. PAINTING SIGNED IN FRONT LOWER RIGHT CORNER IN BLACK INK, "MELISSA MALKAS". PAINTING BACK IS STAINED, AND HAS INSCRIPTION IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER IN BLACK LEAD "PAINTING BY MELISSA MALKAS". PAINTING WAS DONATED IN A LAVENDER MATTE AND SILVER METAL FRAME. FRAME HAD WHITE COROPLAST BACKING WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE MARKER ON LEFT SIDE "MELISSA AFTER CALGARY". MATTE CONSISTED OF A FRONT BOARD WITH THE PAINTING SECURED BY MASKING TAPE ALONG FOUR EDGES. A TREATMENT WAS CONDUCTED ON OCTOBER 24, 2019 BY CONSERVATOR JULIET GRAHAM TO REMOVE THE MASKING TAPE FROM THE BACK OF THE PAINTING, AND TO SECURE HOLLYTEX TO THE REMAINING ADHESIVE ON THE PAINTING. PAINTING HAS TWO PINHOLES AT LOWER RIGHT CORNER, AND SMALL TEARS ALONG RIGHT EDGE [REVEALED DURING TREATMENT TO REMOVE TAPE]. PAINTING HAS ADHESIVE RESIDUE ALONG FRONT EDGES FROM PREVIOUS MATTING OR FRAMING. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. FOR FURTHER CONDITION DETAILS AND THE COMPLETE TREATMENT REPORT BY CONSERVATOR JULIET GRAHAM, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE PAINTING BY MELISSA MALKAS, FLAIG RECALLED, “MY BROTHERS AND I HAD MET [MELISSA MALKAS]. WE THOUGHT HIGHLY OF HER AS AN ARTIST, [AND] AS A PERSON. I BELIEVE SHE’S NOT AROUND IN TOWN ANY MORE, BUT SHE WAS PART OF THAT RURAL SCENE, WHERE YOU HAD A GREAT AMOUNT OF FREEDOM.” “I JUST [HAD], I BELIEVE, TWO OF MELISSA’S PIECES, THE PAINTING [WAS ONE], WHICH IS VERY BIG, BEAUTIFUL, AND PRETTY. ON THE BACK IT SAYS ‘AFTER CALGARY’. I’M NOT SURE WHAT THAT MEANS.” “[WE MET THE MALKAS’S] ONCE WE MOVED OUT TO BROXBURN. I DON’T KNOW IF THEY MOVED IN BEFOREHAND. THEY WERE [OUR] NEIGHBORS. MOM WAS RAISED ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND [MY PARENTS] KNEW HOW TO REACH OUT TO THE NEIGHBORS, AND MAKE FRIENDS, AND TAKE FOOD OVER AND VISIT…THEY WERE ALWAYS OUT VISITING.” “I KNOW [MY PARENTS] WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD...AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, MELISSA MALKAS WAS A SECOND GENERATION LETHBRIDGE ARTIST, THE DAUGHTER OF IRMA MALKAS (RODOWITZ) AND EGON MALKAS. MELISSA MALKAS GRADUATED FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY IN 1986 WITH A DEGREE IN FINE ARTS, AND ALSO ATTENDED THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. DURING HER CAREER, MALKAS EXHIBITED AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE WITH THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL OF LETHBRIDGE. MELISSA MALKAS EXHIBITED AS A SOLO ARTIST, AND WITH HER MOTHER IN 1996 AND 2003 AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE. MALKAS WAS AN INSTRUCTOR AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE FOR THE LETHBRIDGE ARTISTS CLUB IN 2005 AND 2010, TEACHING COURSES IN MIXED MEDIA WATERCOLOUR AND OILS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190006004
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
31
Diameter
13.4
Description
BLACK CANDLESTICK-STYLE TELEPHONE WITH RECEIVER AND SPEAKER. TELEPHONE SPEAKER IS ATTACHED TO BLACK ROUND BASE AND BLACK MIDDLE ROD WITH HOOK FOR HANGING THE RECEIVER; METAL STAND ON BROWN PADDED BASE WITH BLACK PLASTIC SPEAKER AT THE TOP. BASE HAS WHITE STAMPED TEXT AROUND BASE OF THE STAND “WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 26 15”. TELEPHONE HAS BLACK METAL PLATE BENEATH PLASTIC SPEAKER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT “9298W, WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 14 1919”. BASE HAS TWO BROWN CLOTH-COVERED CORDS EXTENDING FROM BACK OF BASE; FIRST CORD IS CUT OFF, SECOND CORD IS ATTACHED TO BLACK PLASTIC RECEIVER. RECEIVER IS CONE-SHAPED WITH WIDER MOUTHPIECE AT END. RECEIVER IS WRAPPED WITH BLACK TAPE AROUND MIDSECTION; RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND CORD, “PAT. IN U.S.A. APRIL 16, 1918, MAY 20, 1913, JUNE 3, 1913”. RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND BACK EDGE OF MOUTHPIECE “WESTERN ELECTRIC MADE IN U S A 143”. TELEPHONE HAS CHIPPED PAINT ON RECEIVER HOOK; SPEAKER OF TELEPHONE IS CHIPPED WITH LOSS IN PLASTIC; TELEPHONE BODY AND RECEIVER ARE STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
ON APRIL 3, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JOHN WENSVEEN REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE. WENSVEEN HAD RETIRED FROM ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED AND HAD KEPT THE TELEPHONE AS A SOUVENIR FROM HIS TIME EMPLOYED. ON HOW HE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE TELEPHONE, WENSVEEN ELABORATED, “WHEN I RETIRED [IN THE FALL OF 1989] FROM THE ELEVATOR, THESE PHONES WERE NOT USED ANY MORE SO THEY WERE MORE OR LESS DISCARDED. WHEN I RETIRED I [WOULD] JUST TAKE ONE HOME. SO I DID. I DIDN’T STEAL IT OR ANYTHING BECAUSE THEY WEREN’T USED ANYMORE.” “[I WORKED FOR] THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ELEVATOR LATER KNOWN AS ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED.” “THESE [PHONES] WERE IN THE ELEVATOR AND AS LONG AS THEY WERE WORKING, WE USED THEM. [THE COMPANY] DIDN’T WANT TO GO TO ANOTHER PHONE AND HAVE THE SAME THING SITTING IN THE OFFICE…THE PHONE WOULD RING AND THEN YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO OVER THERE AND ANSWER IT. THEY DECIDED WE’VE GOT TO GET SOMETHING THAT WE CAN CARRY WITH US AND THAT’S WHAT WE DID. WE COULD HAVE GONE THROUGH A REGULAR PHONE AS SUCH BUT, AGAIN, YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO THROUGH THAT OFFICE AND ANSWER THE PHONE.” “WE HAD A BOX, [THE] WIRE WAS CONNECTED ON TO THE BOX…IT WAS ON THE WALL AND IT HAD DIFFERENT FLOORS MARKED IN A LITTLE SPACE [WITH] A LITTLE BUTTON BEHIND IT. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT ANOTHER FLOOR, YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU PRESSED THAT BUTTON FOR THAT PARTICULAR FLOOR. THEN THE PHONE WOULD RING. THEN YOU WOULD GET IT OVER THERE AND YOU WOULD ANSWER THE CALL.” “I STARTED IN ’58 AND I THINK WE USED THEM FOR ABOUT 15 YEARS AFTER THAT [UNTIL ABOUT 1972]." “WE WENT OVER TO WALKIE TALKIES…[WHEN] I STARTED WORK THERE...WE WERE USING ALL THESE PHONES AND THEY HAD ONE OF THESE PHONES ON EACH FLOOR. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT SOMEBODY, THAT’S WHAT YOU HAD TO USE. THAT’S WHAT WE DID AND, LATER ON THEY WERE OFF-LISTED AND PUT IN THE BASEMENT, AND MORE OR LESS FORGOT ABOUT. SO I DECIDED TO TAKE ONE HOME.” “THESE PHONES WERE NOT THAT CLEAR. WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH CLEARER…[YOU] HELD THE MIC CLOSE TO YOU. IF YOU WERE TOO FAR AWAY FROM THE PHONE AND SOMEONE WAS TALKING YOU COULDN’T PICK IT UP VERY WELL. IT WAS SOMETHING AT THE TIME, IT WAS GOOD AT THE TIME BECAUSE THERE WAS NOTHING ELSE. BUT WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH BETTER.” “WE USED THIS PHONE ALL THE TIME WHEN WORKING THERE, SO IT WAS SOMETHING THAT WE WERE USED TO USING…THAT’S THE MAIN REASON [I BROUGHT IT HOME]. I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE NICE TO TAKE ONE AS A REMEMBRANCE OF THE ELEVATOR AND I’LL USE IT HOW IT USED TO BE.” “I PUT IT OUTSIDE, I HAVE A SHED, AND I PUT IT IN THE SHED AND IT MORE OR LESS STAYED THERE...I THOUGHT EVENTUALLY IT WOULD BE A KEEPSAKE AND WOULD BE A REMINDER OF MY PLACE WHERE I WORKED. [NOW] I’M DOWNSIZING. I’M GOING TO BE MOVING OUT OF THE HOUSE AND I KNEW I HAD THIS IN THE SHED OUTSIDE. I THOUGHT MAYBE THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO SEE IF I CAN DONATE IT AND I DIDN’T WANT TO THROW IT OUT.” ON HIS TIME WITH ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED, WENSVEEN RECALLED, “I WORKED ON THE SCALE FOR 8 YEARS. THE SCALES WERE UPSTAIRS AND THEY HAD 6 PITS DOWN BELOW WHERE THE GRAIN WOULD BE DUMPED. IN THE EARLY DAYS THEY USED BOXCARS, CPR, AND THEY WOULD HOLD 1500 BUSHELS. THEY WERE MADE FOR [TRANSPORT] AND THE GRAIN WOULD COME UP…ABOVE THE SCALE AND WE COULD CONTROL THAT AND WE WOULD WEIGH IT. I WORKED UP THERE FOR ABOUT 8 YEARS. THEN A POSITION CAME AVAILABLE DOWNSTAIRS FOR RECEIVING AND SHIPPING SO I PUT IN FOR IT AND I GOT THAT POSITION. I DID THE RECEIVING AND SHIPPING LATER ON, TAKING GRAIN IN AND SHIPPING GRAIN OUT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180007000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
Acquisition Date
2018-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Length
58.5
Width
22
Description
A. BANJOLELE, 53 CM LONG X 19 CM WIDE X 5.5 CM TALL. BODY IS POLISHED BROWN WOOD WITH WHITE LEATHER DRUM/HEAD; BODY HAS SILVER METAL TAIL PIECE AND TONE RING AROUND DRUM/HEAD. NECK AND HEAD-STOCK ARE COVERED IN PEARL/TORTOISE SHELL; FRET ON NECK IS STRUNG WITH ONE SILVER WIRE AND ONE CLOTH STRING; FRETBOARD IS LINED WITH SILVER METAL FRETS. HEAD-STOCK HAS FOUR SILVER METAL TUNING PEGS AND BLACK AND GOLD TEXT LABEL “VALENCIA”. BACK HAS FOUR DISCOLORED WHITE, WOODEN TUNING PEGS AND SILVER METAL SPRING AT JUNCTION OF NECK AND HEAD-STOCK. BACK OF DRUM BODY HAS CUT-OUT SWIRLS IN WOOD. WOOD BODY IS SCRATCHED AND WORN AT EDGES; BACK OF NECK HAS PEELING FINISH ON WOOD; LEATHER OF DRUM/HEAD IS WORN AND STAINED BLACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CASE, 58.5 CM LONG X 9 CM TALL X 22 CM WIDE. CASE IS BROWN CLOTH COVERING A PAPER BOARD IN SHAPE OF BANJOLELE, WITH WIDER BASE. CASE OPENS AT BASE AND HAS BROWN LEATHER HINGE AND SILVER METAL CLASP. BROWN LEATHER HANDLE ON SIDE OF CASE IS BROKEN AND DETACHED AT END. INSIDE OF CASE IS LINED WITH DARK GREEN FABRIC. TOP OF CASE HAS “L W” HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. CASE IS WORN AROUND EDGES AND CLOTH IS FRAYING; BOTTOM OF CASE HAS WATER DAMAGE AND WHITE STAINING; TOP OF CASE HAS WHITE STAINING AND SCRATCHES. LEATHER HINGE AND HANDLE ARE CRACKED AND FADED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BEVE SPENGLER AND RUTH HILL REGARDING RUTH’S DONATION OF A BANJOLELE AND GUITAR. THE INSTRUMENTS WERE KEPT AND PLAYED BY THEIR FATHER, SYDNEY JAMES WOMACK, IN THE 1930S AND 1940S. ON THE BANJOLELE, RUTH RECALLED, “I CAN’T REMEMBER [MUCH] ABOUT [IT] AT ALL, BECAUSE HE BOUGHT [THE GUITAR] BUT SOMEHOW HE MUST HAVE SEEN THIS, AND THEN HE THOUGHT FOR LORNE [OUR BROTHER] HE WOULD BUY THAT [BANJOLELE] TO MATCH THE GUITAR.” “MY DAD USED TO PLAY ME TO SLEEP FROM THE TIME…WE WENT OUT TO THE FARM IN ’30. I WAS BORN IN ’27, SO ALL THE ‘30S HE PLAYED ME TO SLEEP EVERY NIGHT…I NEVER SAW MY DAD PLAY [THE BANJOLELE] YET HE BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE KNEW THERE WAS A MATCHING PAIR. HE COULDN’T AFFORD BOTH OF THEM AT THE SAME TIME. HE BOUGHT HIS GUITAR AND THEN, LATER ON WHEN HE HAD SOME MORE MONEY, HE WENT AND GOT THAT FOR LORNE, BUT I CAN’T REMEMBER HIM PLAYING IT.” “[HE BOUGHT THE BANJOLELE] HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. HE BROUGHT [HIS] VIOLIN FROM THE STATES, BUT THOSE TWO PIECES WERE BOUGHT IN LETHBRIDGE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE AT, BUT I KNOW IT WAS IN THE EARLY ‘20S BECAUSE THEY CAME TO THE FARM WITH US IN ’30. THEY CAME HERE IN ’18…HE WORKED AT THE CPR AS AN OILER AND THEN HE ENDED UP AT THE GALT GARDENS WORKING WITH THE PLANTS. WHEN THAT FIZZLED OUT, HE WANTED A FARM SO WE WENT FARMING.” HILL ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S MUSICAL BACKGROUND, NOTING, “[MY PARENTS] MOVED FROM ENGLAND TO IOWA. THEY WERE THERE FOR SEVEN YEARS AND DADDY LEARNED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE TOILET, IN THE OUTHOUSE. THAT’S WHAT HE TOLD US.” “HE LOVED MUSIC AND ACTUALLY HIS BEST WAS HAWAIIAN GUITAR…THAT’S WHY HE GOT [THE GUITAR], BECAUSE HE LOVED HAWAIIAN MUSIC. HE LOVED TO PLAY HAWAIIAN SONGS ON [THE GUITAR] BECAUSE THEY WERE SLOWER. THE VIOLIN HE COULD REALLY GO TO TOWN AND PLAY TWO STEPS.” “[WE] USED TO GO [TO DANCES] EVERY MONTH. I CAN SEE HIM WITH THE OLD MODEL T—HE WOULD HAVE TO PUT A FIRE UNDER IT TO GET IT STARTED AT HOME, THEN WE WOULD GO FOR THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND HE WOULD START PLAYING UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING. THEN HE HAS TO PUT THE FIRE UNDER TO GET THE CAR GOING AGAIN. THEY WERE BAD YEARS BUT THEY WERE WONDERFUL YEARS…FROM [1933] UNTIL I WENT OUT IN GRADE NINE HE USED TO COME, WE USED TO HAVE DANCES, ALL THROUGH THE THIRTIES WE HAD DANCES AT LEAST TWICE A MONTH.” BEVE ADDED, “HE PLAYED WITH OTHER MEN, HE DIDN’T PLAY BY HIMSELF.” RUTH ELABORATED, “THEY HAD A LADY ON THE PIANO, THEY HAD DADDY ON THE VIOLIN, AND THEN THEY HAD ANOTHER CHAP ON THE DRUMS…[OUR FATHER] TOOK THE LEAD. THE VIOLIN WOULD ALWAYS START BEFORE, BECAUSE HE HAD THE MEMORY OF THE PIECES HE WANTED TO PLAY AND NOBODY ELSE KNEW NOTHING UNTIL HE GOT STARTED. THEN THEY’D JOIN IN.” “HE WAS STILL PLAYING THE VIOLIN, HE USED TO LIKE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN. EVEN IN THE ‘40S [HE LIKED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN], I CAN REMEMBER THAT. HE DIDN’T SO MUCH PLAY [THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS] BUT HE PLAYED THE VIOLIN. “ “HE WAS GOOD. THAT DANCE FLOOR IN THE SCHOOL THERE WOULD BE LOADED AS SOON AS HE STARTED PLAYING. AS SOON AS HE STARTED TO PLAY THEY WERE ALL UP, AND AT NIGHT NOBODY LEFT UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING…HE USED TO TAKE THE GUITAR AND PLAY THE WALTZES ON THAT, BUT THE VIOLIN HE WOULD PLAY THE OTHERS.” “THAT CLASSICAL [MUSIC], HE HAD NO USE FOR [IT]. HE USED TO SAY, “THERE’S NO BEAT THERE.” THEY WERE HIS WORDS. THERE WAS NO BEAT AND HE SAID, “IF THEY CAN’T PLAY THIS, I’M NOT LISTENING.” HE COULDN’T READ MUSIC, BUT IF HE COULD SEE THE [NOTES] AS [THEY] WENT UP OR DOWN…THAT’S WHAT HE’D LOOK AT, AND THEN HE’D LEARN TO PLAY THAT SONG. THAT WAS ON THE GUITAR, THAT WAS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PART.” “[HE HAD THE INSTRUMENTS] ON OUR FARM AT KIPP, ALBERTA AND ON THE FARMHOUSE, I’M IN THE BED. HE [WOULD BE] PLAYING THAT AND THEN I’D GO TO SLEEP TO HIM PLAYING THAT DAY IN, WEEK AFTER WEEK. YEAR AFTER YEAR. HE ALWAYS PLAYED ME TO SLEEP.” “HE [PLAYED] IN THE FRONT ROOM. [THE INSTRUMENTS] STAYED IN THE CORNER, HE BUILT A SHELF FOR THE RADIO AND THEN [THE GUITAR] STOOD UNDERNEATH THAT SHELF. THAT’S WHERE [THEY] STAYED…[THE INSTRUMENTS WERE] WITH MY DAD UNTIL ’93, THEN HE CAME TO LIVE WITH ME AND OF COURSE HE BROUGHT HIS THINGS WITH HIM. I NEVER THOUGHT THEY WERE IN MY CLOSET AND I HADN’T DONE A BIG CLEANING, SO THEY’VE JUST BEEN THERE. NOW I THOUGHT IT’S TIME TO LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT THEM...[OUR FATHER] DIED IN ’98.” “I DIDN’T WANT THE INSTRUMENTS TO BE GARBAGED. I WANTED THEM TO MEAN SOMETHING, AND I KNEW…THE MUSEUM WOULD ACCEPT THEM…IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL [FOR MY DAD TO PLAY FOR ME] BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC TOO. THAT WAS REALLY SOMETHING TO HAVE HIM PLAYING TO ME ALL THE TIME [AT BEDTIME].” “LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT [THE INSTRUMENTS] NOW. I’VE GOT ALL THE MEMORIES…I CAN SEE HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN HEAR HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN SEE IT AT THE DANCEHALL, I’VE GOT IT RIGHT THERE. SO SOMEBODY ELSE CAN LOOK AT [THEM] NOW.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, SHELL
Catalogue Number
P20180001002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, METAL, SHELL
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Length
94
Width
32.5
Description
A. GUITAR, 94 CM LONG X 32.5 CM WIDE X 9 CM TALL. WOODEN BODY WITH PEARL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID AS PICK GUARD AND ALONG FRET BOARD; GUITAR IS STRUNG WITH SIX WIRE STRINGS. GUITAR HAS SIX TUNING KNOBS AT HEAD WITH WHITE PLASTIC HANDLES ON METAL SCREWS. GUITAR BODY HAS DECORATIVE BROWN, RED AND GREEN TRIM AROUND EDGE; GUITAR HAS BLACK KNOB AT BASE. “VALENCIA” LABEL AT TOP OF HEAD; GUITAR SHOWS WEAR AND STAINING ON PICK GUARD AND FRET BOARD; GUITAR HAS SOILING INSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. GUITAR CASE, 100 CM LONG X 37 CM WIDE X 13 CM TALL. BLACK FAUX-LEATHER EXTERIOR WITH LEATHER BUCKLE AT BASE AND LEATHER HANDLE FIXED TO TOP WITH SILVER RINGS; CASE OPENS AT BASE. BASE OF CASE HAS BLACK METAL SNAP AROUND LEATHER BUCKLE STRAP. INSIDE OF CASE LINED WITH BROWN FAUX-FUR. CASE IS HEAVILY WORN ON EDGES AND PEELING; CASE IS SCRATCHED ON SIDES; LEATHER BUCKLE STRAP AT BASE IS CRACKED AND FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BEVE SPENGLER AND RUTH HILL REGARDING RUTH’S DONATION OF A BANJOLELE AND GUITAR. THE INSTRUMENTS WERE KEPT AND PLAYED BY THEIR FAMER, SYDNEY JAMES WOMACK, IN THE 1930S AND 1940S. ON THE GUITAR, RUTH HILL RECALLED, “HE BOUGHT IT AND STARTED STRUMMING ON IT…IT WAS ALWAYS ON HIS LAP…MY DAD USED TO PLAY ME TO SLEEP FROM THE TIME…WE WENT OUT TO THE FARM IN ’30. I WAS BORN IN ’27, SO ALL THE ‘30S HE PLAYED ME TO SLEEP EVERY NIGHT…I NEVER SAW MY DAD PLAY [THE BANJOLELE] YET HE BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE KNEW THERE WAS A MATCHING PAIR. HE COULDN’T AFFORD BOTH OF THEM AT THE SAME TIME. HE BOUGHT HIS GUITAR AND THEN, LATER ON WHEN HE HAD SOME MORE MONEY, HE WENT AND GOT [THE BANJOLELE] FOR LORNE.” “HE LOVED MUSIC AND ACTUALLY HIS BEST WAS HAWAIIAN GUITAR…THAT’S WHY HE GOT [THE GUITAR], BECAUSE HE LOVED HAWAIIAN MUSIC. HE LOVED TO PLAY HAWAIIAN SONGS ON [THE GUITAR] BECAUSE THEY WERE SLOWER. THE VIOLIN HE COULD REALLY GO TO TOWN AND PLAY TWO STEPS.” “[HE BOUGHT THE GUITAR] HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. HE BROUGHT [HIS] VIOLIN FROM THE STATES, BUT THOSE TWO PIECES WERE BOUGHT IN LETHBRIDGE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE AT, BUT I KNOW IT WAS IN THE EARLY ‘20S BECAUSE THEY CAME TO THE FARM WITH US IN ’30. THEY CAME HERE IN ’18…HE WORKED AT THE CPR AS AN OILER AND THEN HE ENDED UP AT THE GALT GARDENS WORKING WITH THE PLANTS. WHEN THAT FIZZLED OUT, HE WANTED A FARM SO WE WENT FARMING.” HILL ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S MUSICAL BACKGROUND, NOTING, “[MY PARENTS] MOVED FROM ENGLAND TO IOWA. THEY WERE THERE FOR SEVEN YEARS AND DADDY LEARNED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE TOILET, IN THE OUTHOUSE. THAT’S WHAT HE TOLD US.” “[WE] USED TO GO [TO DANCES] EVERY MONTH. I CAN SEE HIM WITH THE OLD MODEL T—HE WOULD HAVE TO PUT A FIRE UNDER IT TO GET IT STARTED AT HOME, THEN WE WOULD GO FOR THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND HE WOULD START PLAYING UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING. THEN HE HAS TO PUT THE FIRE UNDER TO GET THE CAR GOING AGAIN. THEY WERE BAD YEARS BUT THEY WERE WONDERFUL YEARS…FROM [1933] UNTIL I WENT OUT IN GRADE NINE HE USED TO COME, WE USED TO HAVE DANCES, ALL THROUGH THE THIRTIES WE HAD DANCES AT LEAST TWICE A MONTH.” BEVE ADDED, “HE PLAYED WITH OTHER MEN, HE DIDN’T PLAY BY HIMSELF.” RUTH ELABORATED, “THEY HAD A LADY ON THE PIANO, THEY HAD DADDY ON THE VIOLIN, AND THEN THEY HAD ANOTHER CHAP ON THE DRUMS…[OUR FATHER] TOOK THE LEAD. THE VIOLIN WOULD ALWAYS START BEFORE, BECAUSE HE HAD THE MEMORY OF THE PIECES HE WANTED TO PLAY AND NOBODY ELSE KNEW NOTHING UNTIL HE GOT STARTED. THEN THEY’D JOIN IN.” “HE WAS STILL PLAYING THE VIOLIN, HE USED TO LIKE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN. EVEN IN THE ‘40S [HE LIKED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN], I CAN REMEMBER THAT. HE DIDN’T SO MUCH PLAY [THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS] BUT HE PLAYED THE VIOLIN. “ “HE WAS GOOD. THAT DANCE FLOOR IN THE SCHOOL THERE WOULD BE LOADED AS SOON AS HE STARTED PLAYING. AS SOON AS HE STARTED TO PLAY THEY WERE ALL UP, AND AT NIGHT NOBODY LEFT UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING…HE USED TO TAKE THE GUITAR AND PLAY THE WALTZES ON THAT, BUT THE VIOLIN HE WOULD PLAY THE OTHERS.” “THAT CLASSICAL [MUSIC], HE HAD NO USE FOR [IT]. HE USED TO SAY, “THERE’S NO BEAT THERE.” THEY WERE HIS WORDS. THERE WAS NO BEAT AND HE SAID, “IF THEY CAN’T PLAY THIS, I’M NOT LISTENING.” HE COULDN’T READ MUSIC, BUT IF HE COULD SEE THE [NOTES] AS [THEY] WENT UP OR DOWN…THAT’S WHAT HE’D LOOK AT, AND THEN HE’D LEARN TO PLAY THAT SONG. THAT WAS ON THE GUITAR, THAT WAS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PART.” “[HE HAD THE INSTRUMENTS] ON OUR FARM AT KIPP, ALBERTA AND ON THE FARMHOUSE, I’M IN THE BED. HE [WOULD BE] PLAYING THAT AND THEN I’D GO TO SLEEP TO HIM PLAYING THAT DAY IN, WEEK AFTER WEEK. YEAR AFTER YEAR. HE ALWAYS PLAYED ME TO SLEEP.” “HE [PLAYED] IN THE FRONT ROOM. [THE INSTRUMENTS] STAYED IN THE CORNER, HE BUILT A SHELF FOR THE RADIO AND THEN [THE GUITAR] STOOD UNDERNEATH THAT SHELF. THAT’S WHERE [THEY] STAYED…[THE INSTRUMENTS WERE] WITH MY DAD UNTIL ’93, THEN HE CAME TO LIVE WITH ME AND OF COURSE HE BROUGHT HIS THINGS WITH HIM. I NEVER THOUGHT THEY WERE IN MY CLOSET AND I HADN’T DONE A BIG CLEANING, SO THEY’VE JUST BEEN THERE. NOW I THOUGHT IT’S TIME TO LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT THEM...[OUR FATHER] DIED IN ’98.” “I DIDN’T WANT THE INSTRUMENTS TO BE GARBAGED. I WANTED THEM TO MEAN SOMETHING, AND I KNEW…THE MUSEUM WOULD ACCEPT THEM…IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL [FOR MY DAD TO PLAY FOR ME] BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC TOO. THAT WAS REALLY SOMETHING TO HAVE HIM PLAYING TO ME ALL THE TIME [AT BEDTIME].” “LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT [THE INSTRUMENTS] NOW. I’VE GOT ALL THE MEMORIES…I CAN SEE HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN HEAR HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN SEE IT AT THE DANCEHALL, I’VE GOT IT RIGHT THERE. SO SOMEBODY ELSE CAN LOOK AT [THEM] NOW.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180001002
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
IRON, LEATHER, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20160020000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Materials
IRON, LEATHER, STEEL
No. Pieces
2
Length
15.5
Width
9.1
Diameter
12.2
Description
METAL COW BELL WITH LEATHER STRAP. BELL IS MADE UP OF 2 PIECES OF METAL FUSED TOGETHER AT SIDES WITH TWO NAILS IN EACH SEAM. TOP IS FOLDED TOGETHER WITH THE ENDS FUSED DOWN THE SIDE IN A TRIANGULAR FOLD. FRONT AND BACK OF BELL ARE RELATIVELY FLAT, COMING OUT SLIGHTLY AT EDGE. WELDING OF BELL IS CRUDE. INSIDE OF THE BELL IS THE CLAPPER WITH A BALL END THAT IS 10.5 CM IN CIRCUMFERENCE. BALL IS ATTACHED TO A ROD THAT IS HOOKED TO THE LOOP INSIDE THE TOP OF BELL. FLAT METAL LOOP AT TOP OF BELL ATTACHES THE BELL TO LEATHER STRAP THAT IS 109.4 CM IN LENGTH AND 2.4 CM IN WIDTH. 9 HOLES PUNCHED IN LEATHER FOR STRAP ADJUSTMENT WITH THE BUCKLE GOING THROUGH THE 10TH HOLE PUNCH. STANDARD METAL BUCKLE WITH LEATHER BELT LOOP FOR THE EXCESS LENGTH OF STRAP. FAIR CONDITION: METAL SEVERELY RUSTED IN COLOUR. AT ONE SEAM NEAR THE BASE, THE METAL HAS OXIDIZED TO A GREEN COLOUR. METAL SURFACE INSIDE OF BELL HAS LOST SHINE AND IS RUSTY. STRAP IS SEVERELY WORN AND HAS SCRATCHES AND LOSS OF FINISH OVERALL. END OF THE STRAP OPPOSITE OF BUCKLE IS TORN OFF.
Subjects
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
History
ON 14 JULY, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONOR, ELLENNOR PORTER, AND HER DAUGHTER, KAREN PORTER AT THE GALT MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THAT INTERVIEW. ELLENNOR’S HUSBAND WAS ROBERT MICHAEL “MICK” PORTER. HE FOUND THE BELL AS ELLENNOR REMEMBERS, “[I REMEMBER] HIM BRINGING IT IN THE HOUSE… I DON’T KNOW JUST HOW LONG AGO… [AND HIM SAYING], ‘LOOK WHAT I GOT.’ THEN IT WAS JUST EVERYONE WAS SAYING, ‘WOW,’ AND PLAYING AROUND WITH IT… [AFTER THAT] IT WAS PUT IN THE BASEMENT WITH THE REST OF THE THINGS.” KAREN AND ELLENNOR BELIEVE THE BELL WOULD HAVE BEEN FOUND BY MICK IN THE 1950S OR THE 1960S. ELLENNOR CONTINUED, “[HE FOUND IT ON] THE RANCH. HE WAS OUT VISITING HIS RELATIVES OUT THERE. HE HAD AUNTS AND UNCLES ON THE BURN RANCH. HE’S PROBABLY JUST RE-VISITING THEIR PLACE THAT HAD BEEN SOLD, SO MAYBE IT CAME FROM PINCHER CREEK. IN THAT AREA ANYWAY, LUNDBRECK OR PINCHER CREEK.” “DAD WOULD GO UP SOMETIMES BY HIMSELF,” KAREN ADDED, “I DON’T THINK ANY OF US WERE WITH HIM WHEN HE CAME HOME WITH THAT. I THINK WE WERE AT HOME WHEN HE BROUGHT IT TO THE HOUSE… IT IS ALSO POSSIBLE THAT HIS FATHER AND MOTHER HAD [THE BELL] AT THEIR HOUSE AND GAVE IT TO HIM. THEY WERE FARMERS AT THE WALDRON RANCH – NOW THE WALDRON RANCH – [BUT IT] WAS THE PORTER RANCH. THEY HAD A HOUSE IN PINCHER CREEK, SO THERE IS A POSSIBILITY THAT’S ALSO WHERE HE WOULD HAVE GOTTEN IT.” THINKING BACK TO HER LATE HUSBAND’S DAYS IN THE AREA, ELLENNOR EXPLAINED, “[MICK’S] DAD WAS AT THE PORTER/WALDRON RANCH. IT WAS JUST THE PORTER RANCH AND AFTER HE MOVED TO PINCHER, HE SOLD LIKE HIS INTEREST PART OF IT TO WALDRON, SO IT [BECAME] A PARTNERSHIP… THE WALDRON RANCH IS NEAR BLACK MOUNTAIN ON THAT ROAD, TOWARDS THE BAR-U RANCH.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE BELL, ELLENNOR SAID, “[THIS BELL] BRINGS BACK MEMORIES FROM WAY BACK WHEN WE USED TO LOOK FOR CATTLE BACK IN THE BUSH, AND I IMAGINE THAT’S WHAT MY HUSBAND MUST HAVE THOUGHT TOO… [IT WOULD BE] A REMEMBRANCE FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. THEY PROBABLY HAD TO BRING IN THE OLD MILK COW AND SHE WOULD BE WEARING THE BELL. THAT’S WHAT THEY DID. THEY PUT IT ON THE BIG MILK COW, SO THAT WHEN THEY WANTED THEM TO COME IN TO MILK THEY COULD FIND THEM. SOMETIMES THEY’D GO HIDE IN THE BUSH, SO THEY KEPT THE BELL ON THEM SO THEY COULD KEEP TRACK OF WHERE THEY WERE AT.” ELLENNOR FURTHER EXPLAINED, “I HAD NO CONNECTION WITH THAT BELL. WE HAD NO CATTLE. WE WERE GRAIN FARMERS.” KAREN ADDED, “MUM AND DAD WERE WHEAT FARMING ON [THE K-LAZY-A-RANCH]. THERE WERE CATTLE THERE, BUT MUM DOESN’T REMEMBER THERE BEING CATTLE WITH BELLS ON. THEY WERE IN THE FARM YARD… THERE WERE HARDLY ANY TREES. THAT WAS THE RANCH ORIGINALLY AND LATER BECAME A WHEAT FARM. IF THEY KEPT IT AS A RANCH WITH CATTLE AND HORSES, THAT MEANT THEY COULD NEVER EVER LEAVE AND IT WAS PRETTY ISOLATED, SO OVER THE YEARS DAD TALKED THE OWNER INTO LETTING HIM COVERT IT TO WHEAT.” “THERE WAS NO BUSH [THERE FOR THE COWS] TO HIDE IN. SO NO NEED FOR A BELL!” ELLENNOR REMEMBERED. THE DONOR AND HER DAUGHTER REMEMBERED HOW MICK VALUED OBJECTS AND MEMORIES. “HIS EYES WOULD LIGHT UP [AND HE WOULD SAY], ‘LOOK WHAT WE HAVE HERE,’ [WHEN HE SAW SOMETHING ATTACHED TO A MEMORY]. HE HAD ALL KINDS OF MEMORIES OF HIS GROWING UP. SOME WERE NOT TOO HAPPY, SOME WERE VERY HAPPY, BUT HE ALWAYS REALLY LOVED COWS. IT DIDN’T MATTER WHERE WE WENT TRAVELLING IN THE WORLD…[HE ALWAYS] STOPPED AND TOOK SOME PICTURES. ‘OH LOOK AT THE COWS!’ HE’D SAY,” ELLENNOR JUMPED IN, COMPLETING HER DAUGHTER’S SENTENCE. “DAD TOOK THOUSANDS OF PICTURES OF COWS. FOR HIM THERE WAS A REAL CORRELATION,” KAREN FINISHED. “[THE BELL IS A TREASURE] BECAUSE IT HAS BEEN IN OUR HOME FOR SUCH A LONG TIME. WHEN DAD BROUGHT IT HOME, IN HIS PERSPECTIVE, HE WOULD HAVE THE SAME KIND OF MEMORIES MY MUM DOES OF HEARING THE COWS…I CAN REMEMBER THEM WHEN I WAS LITTLE ON THE FARM OUT BY SKIFF HEARING COW BELLS OR BEING OUT AT MY GRANDMOTHER’S FARM BY OLDS HEARING COW BELLS… [THIS BRINGS] THE MEMORY OF DAD BEING EXCITED ABOUT [THE BELL] AND TRYING TO WAKE US UP IN THE MORNING RINGING IT, IF WE WERE SLEEPING IN TOO LONG. THAT’S MORE THE MEMORY FOR US… [BUT] I WAS NEVER ON THE RANCH WHEN MY DAD WOULD HAVE FOUND [THIS SPECIFIC] BELL, SO THOSE MEMORIES AREN’T MY MEMORIES, THEY’RE MORE HIS MEMORIES. HE ALWAYS TREASURED IT, HE ALWAYS WANTED IT KEPT AND WE’D LIKE TO HONOUR THAT,” KAREN ADDED. NOTES FROM AN 2008 INTERVIEW WITH MICKEY AND ELEANOR PORTER STATE THE DONOR’S FATHER-IN-LAW, GEORGE ENGLISH PORTER, WAS BORN 1878 IN ORILLIA, ONTARIO AND DIED ON MARCH 16, 1959. HE CAME WEST FROM ONTARIO IN 1896 AT THE AGE OF SEVENTEEN. GEORGE PORTER’S FAMILY SETTLED 30 MILES NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ON THE EASTERN SLOPES OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. THE FAMILY SETTLED ON THE BLACK MOUNTAIN RANCH. GEORGE WAS ONE OF FOURTEEN CHILDREN IN THE FAMILY. HER MOTHER-IN-LAW WAS BORN IN EASTERN CANADA BEFORE MOVING TO OREGON. SHE IMMIGRATED TO CANADA WHEN SHE WAS8 YEARS OLD AND WAS RAISED ON THE BURN RANCH NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ALBERTA. THE NOTES FURTHER STATE THE DONOR, ELLENNOR PORTER, WAS BORN IN 1922. THE OBITUARY FOR ROBERT MICHAEL “MICK” PORTER READS MICK WAS BORN ON MAY 23, 1921 IN COWLEY, ALBERTA. HE ATTENDED SCHOOL IN COWLEY AND GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL FROM ST. MICHAEL’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL IN PINCHER CREEK. HE JOINED THE RCAF DURING WWII AND UPON AN HONOURABLE DISCHARGE AFTER A HIP INJURY, HE WORKED AS A GRAIN BUYER. HE MARRIED ELLENNOR CHRISTOFFERSEN IN OLDS, ALBERTA. LATER, HE WORKED FOR THE MCINTYRE RANCH FOR 5 YEARS. IN 1953, HE BEGAN FARMING IN THE SKIFF AREA AND RETIRED IN 1984. MICK AND ELLENNOR HAD FIVE CHILDREN: LAWNA ROBART, MICHAEL, RONALD, KAREN PORTER, AND CHRISTOPHER, WHO PASSED AWAY AS AN INFANT. MICK PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 AT THE AGE OF 91 YEARS. HISTORY OF THE WALDRON CATTLE RANCH LTD. WAS PUBLISHED IN THE “CANADIAN CATTLEMEN” PUBLICATION IN MARCH OF 1946. IT STATES THE RANCH “COMPRISED ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND ACRES OF LAND SITUATED IN SOUTH-WESTERN ALBERTA. IT WAS SITUATED IN A VALLEY EXTENDING BETWEEN THE PORCUPINE HILLS AND OLD MAN RIVER FOR ABOUT 30 MILES NORTH AND SOUTH AND VARYING FROM THREE TO FIVE MILES IN WIDTH.” THE HISTORY STATES THE WALDRON CATTLE RANCH WAS FORMED IN 1883 BY SIR JOHN WALROND WALROND OF BARONET AND LORD CLINTON OF LONDON – BOTH MEN OF ENGLAND. ON JUNE 26TH, 1884, QUEEN VICTORIA GRANTED THE RANCH AN INDENTURE OF LEASE TO SIR WALROND, BARONET. (THE TEXT OF THAT LEASE AGREEMENT WAS PRODUCED AS PART OF THE CATTLEMEN PUBLICATION AND IS ATTACHED TO THE ARTIFACT’S PERMANENT RECORD.) ACCORDING TO THE ARTICLE, THE FIRST PURCHASE OF CATTLE WAS IN 1883 – 3,125 HEAD FOR $100,000. IN 1897, THE COMPANY WAS INCORPORATED UNDER THE CANADIAN JOINT STOCK COMPANIES ACT, MOVING ITS HEAD OFFICE FROM LONDON, ENGLAND. DUNCAN MCEACHRAN WAS APPOINTED PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER OF THE RANCH AND DAVID WARNOCK FROM GLASGOW BECAME THE LOCAL MANAGER. AT THE TIME OF THIS TRANSITION, IT IS BELIEVED THE RANCH HAD GROWN TO 12,311, THOUGH THIS WAS A MERE ESTIMATE. MCEACHRAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THE COMPANY FROM ITS BEGINNING IN 1883, WHEN HE STARTED AS THE GENERAL MANAGER. HIS LEADERSHIP GOT THE COMPANY THROUGH “PERIODS OF DEPRESSED CONDITION.” AFTER A HARSH WINTER IN 1906-1907, THE RANCH LOST APPROXIMATELY 5,000 HEAD OF CATTLE DUE TO SEVERE TEMPERATURE CHANGES. AFTER THIS, IN THE SUMMER OF 1908, THE RANCH “DISPOSED OF ALL ITS CATTLE TO PAT BURNS. FOLLOWING THE SALE, THE LAND OF THE WALDRON RANCH, EXCLUDING 1,000 ACRES WAS LEASED FIRST TO W. R. HULL, THEN TO PAT BURNS. C. W. BUCHANAN WAS APPOINTED THE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER OF THE RANCH THAT IN 1923. MCEACHRAN PASSED AWAY IN OCTOBER 1924. ANOTHER HISTORY ON THE RANCH WAS FOUND BY MUSEUM RESEARCHERS IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. PUBLISHED ON 1 MAY 1954, THE ARTICLE READS, “AT ONE TIME THE WALDRON LEASE CONSISTED OF BETWEEN 300,000 TO 400,000 ACRES OF LAND, EXTENDING FROM WHAT IS KNOWN AS STOWE TO THE NORTH FORK OF THE OLDMAN RIVER. IN THE NORTH FORK DISTRICT THE LAND WAS DIVIDED INTO FIVE BRANCHES… AT ITS PEAK IN THE SUMMER OF 1906 THE RANCH HAD 20,000 HEAD OF STOCK.” GEORGE PORTER IS LISTED IN THE HISTORY AS ONE OF THE CATTLE MEN EMPLOYED BY THE WALDRON RANCH FROM 1883 TO 1908. ABOUT HIM, THE ARTICLE STATES, “GEORGE PORTER [WAS] A GOOD STOCKMAN, [WHO] LATER BOUGHT 12 SECTIONS OF THE COMPANY’S FREEHOLD AT ITS NORTHERN END AND ADJOINING LAND ALREADY OWNED BY HIM.” “GEORGE PORTER AND SONS HAVE SOLD THEIR RANCH AND CATTLE TO JOHN FRANCIS MILLER… THE PORTER RANCH IS ABOUT THIRTY MILES NORTH OF LUNDBRECK AND ADJOINS THE 19,000 ACRE WALDRON RANCH WHICH MR. MILLER ALSO OWNS HAVING PURCHASED IT FROM P. BURNS RANCHES LAST FEBRUARY,” THE HISTORY STATES. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE 21 AUGUST 1953 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ANNOUNCED, “TWO OF THE LARGEST AND MOST FAMOUS RANCHES IN THE SOUTH-WESTERN ALBERTA FOOTHILLS ARE BEING OFFERED FOR SALE. THEY ARE THE WALDRON AND PORTER RANCHERS, NORTH OF LUNDBRECK. THESE PROPERTIES ARE OWNED NOW BY JOHN F. MILLER OF LAS VEGAS, NEVADA… [THEY] HAVE BEEN OPERATED BY MR. MILLER’S SON, WHO TOOK OVER THE JOB SEVERAL YEARS AGO WHEN THE MILLERS BOUGHT THE WALDRON FROM THE WALDRON RANCHING COMPANY AND THE PORTER RANCH PROPERTY FROM GEORGE PORTER…” THE HISTORY OF GEORGE AND NORA PORTER (NEE BURN)’S MARRIAGE WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON JUNE 26, 1954 FOR THEIR 50TH ANNIVERSARY. THE COUPLE WERE MARRIED AT THE BURN RANCH IN JUNE 21 1904. THE COUPLE’S FOURTEEN CHILDREN WERE: MARJORIE ANDERSON, NORMAN PORTER, PHYLLIS ROBBINS, KATHLEEN HAMILTON, WINNIFRED BONERTZ, SANDY PORTER, EILEEN IRONMONGER, JEAN ALCOCK, JOSEPHINE ROBINSON, LILLIAN CHRISTIANSON, ISOBEL SINNOT, MICHAEL PORTER, LAWRENCE PORTER, AND CONNIE PORTER. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20080020001 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE PORTER AND BURN FAMILIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160020000
Acquisition Date
2016-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"FRANK... DOMINION AVE. FRANK SLIDE 1903" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20160031001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"FRANK... DOMINION AVE. FRANK SLIDE 1903" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1984
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
29.6
Length
57.8
Width
2.1
Description
“FRANK ALTA. (N.WT) DOMINION AVE FRANK SLIDE 1903” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – LANDSCAPE (RECEDING ROAD/MOUNTIAN), “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY”, 1984. A FRAMED WATERCOLOUR WITH INK LINE DRAWING AND ACRYLIC HIGHLIGHT, UNDER A MAT. THE SIGHT EDGE OF THE PAINTING MEASURES 4.6 CM LENGTH AND 16.5 CM HEIGHT WITHIN THE FRAME. THE PAINTING DEPICTS A RECEDING ROAD, LINED ON BOTH SIDES WITH BUILDINGS, FIGURES LOOKING OUT THE TOP WINDOWS. IN THE BACKGROUND LIES MOUNTAINS AND A ROCKSLIDE WHILE IN THE CENTER FOREGROUND TWO FIGURES RUN ACROSS THE ROAD. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY GREY WASHES, PALE GREEN, BLUE, YELLOW, AND ORANGE USED IN THE BUILDINGS. IN THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “FRANK ALTA. (N.WT) DOMINION AVE FRANK SLIDE 1903 IRENE MCCAUGHERTY 1984” IN BLACK INK, THE WORDS “FRANK SLIDE” WRITTEN WITH A THICKER PEN. THE FRAME IS A THIN SILVER METAL WITH A WIRE HANGER ON THE BACK. THE MAT IS GREY, WITH A CUT OUT FRAME MEASURING 1.9CM WIDE AROUND THE SIGHT EDGE OF THE PAINTING. THE PAINTING HAS CREASES THROUGH ITS CENTER, LIKELY FROM BEING FOLDED IN HALF BEFORE FRAMING.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” “[THIS PAINTING OF THE] FRANK SLIDE,” MCCAUGHERTY SAID – WHILE LOOKING AT THE PAINTING TITLED, “FRANK ALTA. (N.WT) DOMINION AVE FRANK SLIDE 1903,” “[IS ONE] I’M SURPRISED DIDN’T GO SOONER, BECAUSE IT’S A PART OF HISTORY AND QUITE A WELL-KNOWN PART.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031001
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"THE ARCH, SPRING CHINOOK" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20160031002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"THE ARCH, SPRING CHINOOK" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1989
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
36.2
Length
47.7
Width
1.8
Description
“THE ARCH SPRING CHINOOK” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK - LANDSCAPE (SNOW BALL FIGHT), “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY”, 1989. A FRAMED WATERCOLOUR WITH INK LINE DRAWING AND ACRYLIC HIGHLIGHTS, UNDER A TWO LAYERED MAT. THE SIGHT EDGE OF THE PAINTING MEASURES 26.7 CM LENGTH AND 13.9 CM HEIGHT WITHIN THE FRAME. THE PAINTING DEPICTS THREE HOUSES UNDERNEATH A LAYER OF SNOW, WITH FIGURES IN THE FOREGROUND CREATING SNOWMEN AND HAVING A SNOWBALL FIGHT. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY BARE WHITE PAPER, WITH A BLUE, GREY WASH OF THE SKY. THE THREE HOUSES ARE YELLOW, PINK, AND BLUE, THE FIGURES PRIMARILY RED AND BLACK. IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “THE ARCH SPRING CHINOOK IRENE MCCAUGHERTY 1989” IN BLACK INK. THE FRAME IS A THIN SILVER METAL WITH A WIRE HANGER ON THE BACK. THE TOP MAT IS WHITE, WITH A YELLOW EDGE AND THE BOTTOM MAT PALE BLUE WITH A YELLOW EDGE. THE GLASS OF THE FRAME IS SCRATCHED, ABOVE THE MAT.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” “NOW THIS IS SOMETHING,” MCCAUGHERTY EXCLAIMED AS HE LOOKED AT THE WORK TITLED, “THE ARCH SPRING CHINOOK,” “KIDS PLAYING OUT IN THE SNOW. [IT REMINDS ME OF] WHERE I WENT TO A SMALL SCHOOL. WE WENT OUTSIDE AND PLAYED IN THE SNOW. IT WAS EXPECTED THAT THAT WAS WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO. SCHOOLS WEREN’T THAT BIG. THIS WOULD BE GRADES ONE TO GRADE NINES IN THE SAME SCHOOL.” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031002
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"EASTER SUNDAY 1907" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20160031003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"EASTER SUNDAY 1907" - IRENE MCCAUGHERTY
Date
1982
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
40.5
Length
74
Width
2.7
Description
“EASTER SUNDAY 1907” PAINTING, WATERCOLOUR/INK – LANDSCAPE (HOUSES/HORSE CARRIAGES), “IRENE E. MCCAUGHERTY”, 1982. A FRAMED WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WITH INK LINE DRAWING, UNDER A TWO LAYERED MAT. THE SIGHT EDGE OF THE PAINTING MEASURES 53.8 CM LENGTH AND 19 CM HEIGHT WITHIN THE FRAME. THE PAINTING DEPICTS A STREET, FRAMED BY SIDEWALKS, WITH A COLLECTION OF HOUSES IN THE BACKGROUND WITH A CHURCH WITHIN THEM. THE SCENE IS FULL OF FIGURES, MEN IN BLACK, WOMEN IN COLOURED DRESSES, AND FIVE HORSE CARRIAGES TRAVELLING THE ROAD. THE PAINTING IS PRIMARILY GREY AND GREEN-BLUE WASHES, WITH GREEN, YELLOW, BLUE, AND BROWN COLOURS IN THE LINE OF HOUSES IN THE MIDDLE. IN THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER THE PAINTING IS TITLED AND SIGNED “EASTER SUNDAY 1907 IRENE E MCCAUGHERTY 1982” IN BLACK INK. THE WOODEN FRAME IS GREY AND A REDDISH-BROWN WITH A WIRE HANGER ON THE BACK. THE MAT MIRRORS THE COLOUR SCHEME OF THE FRAME, PALE GREY ON THE TOP LEVEL, PALE REDDISH-BROWN ON THE BOTTOM. THE TWO PIECES OF THE FRAME THAT MEET AT THE TOP RIGHT HAND CORNER ARE SPLIT FROM EACH OTHER.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
A COLLECTION OF EIGHT WATERCOLOURS BY IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY HER SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. EARLY ACQUISITION RECORDS OF MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK DISPLAY THE FOLLOWING ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY WAS AN ARTIST, POET, AND WRITER. SHE WAS BORN IN HARDIEVILLE ON NOVEMBER 27, 1914. SHE LIVED IN FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA MOST OF HER LIFE. IT WAS THERE THAT MCCAUGHERTY PAINTED AND WROTE ABOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S PIONEER DAYS. SHE PUBLISHED THREE BOOKS WITH HER POETRY, STORIES, AND PAINTINGS THAT ILLUSTRATE LETHBRIDGE’S PAST THROUGH HER MEMORIES. MANY RURAL NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED HER WRITING REGULARLY. IN 1994, SHE WAS WELCOMED AS AN HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. IN 1995, THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE PRESENTED MCCAUGHERTY WITH AN HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS DEGREE FOR HER WORK TO PRESERVE THE HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. SHE WORKED WITH ALL THREE ARTS FROM 1950 UNTIL THE END OF HER LIFE, IN 1996.” FOR THIS PARTICULAR ACQUISITION OF WORKS, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE ARTIST’S SON, RONNIE MCCAUGHERTY. THIS INTERVIEW TOOK PLACE AT THE MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 22, 2017. INFORMATION FROM THAT INTERVIEW FOLLOWS BELOW: “I HAVE NO IDEA HOW MANY PAINTINGS MY MOTHER HAD DONE,” MCCAUGHERTY BEGAN, “BEFORE SHE PASSED AWAY WE FORMED A COMPANY. THAT CUT DOWN ON A LOT OF PROBLEMS AS FAR AS KEEPING THE ARTWORK AROUND AND ONE OF HER WISHES [FOR THE COMPANY] WAS TO START DONATING IT…[I’M DISPERSING THE COLLECTION NOW, BECAUSE] I DON’T REALLY HAVE GOOD STORAGE SPACE, BECAUSE WE DOWNSIZED. WHEN WE WERE IN COALDALE, I HAD THEM STORED IN THOSE BIG METAL CABINETS. WHEN ANYONE WANTED TO SEE SOMETHING YOU HAD TO FISH THROUGH THE WHOLE THING.” “[MY MOM PAINTED] EVERY DAY… [PAINTING IS] WHAT GOT HER UP EVERY DAY… SHE DIDN’T START PAINTING UNTIL LATER ON IN LIFE. AND IT WAS THERAPY, BECAUSE BETWEEN HER AND MY DAD, THERE WASN’T A GREAT DEAL OF GOOD FEELINGS,” MCCAUGHERTY CONTINUED, EXPLAINING HOW OFTEN HIS MOTHER PRACTICED HER ART, “[THERE IS A LARGE] NUMBER OF PICTURES THAT SHE DREW THAT HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTED. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY HUNDRED PICTURES THAT I’VE DONATED TO DIFFERENT KIND OF PLACES. IT’S A LOT… SHE HAD HER SCHEDULE [TO WORK ON HER ART], WHERE SHE WOULD BE AT IT FOR SO LONG… [THE SUBJECT MATTER SHE FOCUSED ON IN HER PAINTINGS,] KIND OF WENT IN CYCLES. SHE STARTED DOING THOSE EXTRA LARGE ONES OF DANCING. PEOPLE ARE NOW STARTING TO LIKE THOSE. I QUESTIONED WHEN SHE DID THOSE, BECAUSE SHE WOULD PRINT ON THERE WHAT THE SONG WAS AND IN A WAY THIS MADE A COMIC OUT OF IT, BUT IT DID TELL THE STORY. ALL THE NAMES CHANGED [DEPENDING] ON WHAT SCHOOL IT WAS [SET IN, BUT] AS FAR AS THE SUBJECT MATTER, IT WAS THE SAME… IN HER TIME [DANCING] WAS THE BIG THING, THE WEEKEND DANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. I REMEMBER THAT TOO: GOING TO THE COUNTRY DANCES; THE BANJO OUT OF TUNE, BUT PLAYING IT; SOMEBODY POUNDED ON THE PIANO; KIDS BEING ON THE DESKS, SLEEPING. IT WAS JUST A DIFFERENT WAY OF LIFE. NOW THE WAY THAT LIFE HAS CHANGED OVER NOT THAT MANY YEARS, IT’S HARD TO KEEP UP.” “[MY MOTHER] DID SO MANY PAINTINGS. IT’S INTERESTING HOW MANY WERE CALLED UNDER THE SAME NAME. PEOPLE SAY, ‘OH, I’VE SEEN THAT ONE,’ BUT [THEY] HAVEN’T, IT’S SOMETHING DIFFERENT,” MCCAUGHERTY STATED, “SHE TOOK PICTURES AND [FROM THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS] SHE’D HAVE AN IDEA OF A PAINTING AND A WAY SHE’D GO.” ONE WORK INCLUDED IN THE COLLECTION IS TITLED, “EASTER SUNDAY 1907.” OF THE PAINTING, MCCAUGHERTY DESCRIBED, “THIS IS AN EASTER SUNDAY [SCENE AND I IMAGINE IS TYPICAL OF] WHAT IT WAS ON THAT SUNDAY. PEOPLE DIDN’T HAVE CARS, SO IT WAS BUGGIES…” SPEAKING TO HIS MOTHER’S LEGACY, MCCAUGHERTY EXPLAINS, “THE NEW GENERATION DOESN’T REALLY UNDERSTAND [HER WORK, BUT] THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INTERESTED IN IT, SURELY ARE GOING TO BUY [SOME WORKS] NOW OR END UP GETTING IT SOMEHOW. [THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MY MOTHER’S ART] ARE GOING TO PASS ON, AS WELL.” TAKEN FROM A PREVIOUS ARTIFACT RECORD DESCRIBING MCCAUGHERTY’S WORK, IT IS STATED, “IRENE MCCAUGHERTY'S FOLK ART WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS EXPLORE SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S CULTURAL NARRATIVE AND TELL THE STORY OF WHAT THE PRAIRIE PEOPLE’S LIFE WAS LIKE DURING THE LATTER PART OF THE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES. SHE DEPICTED IN HER PAINTINGS THE HISTORICAL PAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND EXAMPLES OF THE DRESS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20060016036 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE ARTIST IRENE MCCAUGHERTY AND HER ARTWORK. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT RECORD FOR THIS ARTIFACT COLLECTION (P20160031) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THIS DONATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION FROM THE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017.
Catalogue Number
P20160031003
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE, KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010013
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE, KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
18.7
Length
23.9
Description
WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER PAINTING THAT DEPICTS SCENE OF FIELD WITH FENCES STRETCHING HORIZONTALLY ACROSS THE IMAGE. GUARD TOWER AND WATER TOWER ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE IMAGE. HOUSES AMOUNG BUSHES. MOUNTAINS IN DISTANT BACKGROUND. THE WORK IS TITLED "LETHBRIDGE, KANADA," IN THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER. THE BACK IS CENSOR STAMPED WITH A CIRCULAR STAMP THAT READS, "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51". VERY GOOD / EXCELLENT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF PAPER. SLIGHT FOXING OVERALL. WRINKLE ON BACK RIGHT EDGE.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMAN ARMY AND WAS CAPTURED BY THE ALLIED FORCES IN AFRICA (OR ITALY; SOURCES VARY). ENGEL CAME FROM THE OZADA PRISONER OF WAR (POW) CAMP TO THE LETHBRIDGE POW CAMP 133 BY DECEMBER 1942. THIS PAINTING, TITLED "LETHBRIDGE, KANADA" DEPICTS THAT CAMP. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (POW) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A POW, KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A POW. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A POW WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE POW CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED POW RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE POW’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010013
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"UMNAK"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010014
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"UMNAK"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
19
Length
27.5
Description
WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER PAINTING DEPICTING A SNOW-COVERED SCENE OF A CAMP, INCLUDING A FIGURE IN FRONT OF TENTS WITH MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND. BLANK BORDER AROUND ALL SIDES. SIGNED "UMNAK" ON THE BOTTOM LEFT AND "K. ENGEL." ON THE BOTTOM RIGHT. THE BACK SIDE IS STAMPED WITH A CIRCULAR CENSOR STAMP THAT READS, "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51." VERY GOOD / EXCELLENT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF PAPER; SLIGHT WRINKLES AT UPPER AND LEFT EDGES.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (POW) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A POW, KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A POW. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A POW WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE POW CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED POW RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE POW’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010014
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER OZADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010015
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER OZADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
12.8
Length
20.4
Description
WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER PAINTING DEPICTING SCENE OF CAMP IDENTICAL TO P20160010010, BUT IN COLOUR INSTEAD OF GRAPHITE. THE IMAGE INCLUDES ROW OF TENTS ON THE LEFT SIDE, FENCING RECEDING FROM THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER, AND WATCHTOWERS ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE SCENE. MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND. THE PAINTING IS TITLED, "K. G. LAGER OZADA" ON THE BOTTOM LEFT. THE BACK SIDE IS STAMPED WITH A CIRCULAR CENSOR STAMP THAT READS, "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51". VERY GOOD / EXCELLENT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF THE PAPER; SLIGHT FOXING AT THE UPPER LEFT; PENCIL MARK IN THE TOP LEFT OF THE BACK.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (POW) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A POW, KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A POW. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A POW WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE POW CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED POW RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE POW’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010015
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"KANADA, OZADA; K. G. LAGER; 21 NOVEMBER 1944"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010016
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"KANADA, OZADA; K. G. LAGER; 21 NOVEMBER 1944"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
17.4
Length
23.5
Description
WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER PAINTING WITH THREE GREY STRUCTURES ON THE LEFT WITH A PATH LEADING UP TO THEM. ROW OF TENTS ON THE RIGHT OF IMAGE. HILLS AND MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND AND COLOURFUL SKY. THE BACK SIDE IS SIGNED IN PENCIL READING, "KANADA, OZADA; K. G. LAGER; 21. NOVEMBER 1944." CENSOR STAMPED. VERY GOOD / EXCELLENT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF THE PAPER; THREE MODERATE BROWN STAINS ON THE BOTTOM RIGHT QUADRANT OF THE WORK. BOTH CORNERS OF THE LEFT SIDE ARE CURLING UP.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
N 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMAN ARMY AND WAS CAPTURED BY THE ALLIED FORCES IN AFRICA (OR ITALY; SOURCES VARY). HE WAS TRANSFERRED THE PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 IN OZADA IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS OF CANADA ON 25 JULY 1942. THIS DRAWING, TITLED "KANADA, OZADA; K. G. LAGER; 21. NOVEMBER 1944," DEPICTS THAT CAMP. K. G. LAGER IS AN ABBREVIATION FOR FOR KRIEGSGEFANGENENLAGER, WHICH MEANS PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN GERMAN. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (POW) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A POW, KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A POW. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A POW WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE POW CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED POW RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE POW’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010016
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"OZADA, KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010017
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"OZADA, KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
30
Length
22.1
Description
WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER PAINTING OF A SNOW-COVERED CAMP WITH 3 TENTS ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE SCENE. WHITE STRUCTURE TO THE RIGHT OF THE TENTS. WATCHTOWER BEHIND TENTS AND MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND. THE PAINTING IS TITLED "OZADA, KANADA" ON THE BOTTOM LEFT AND SIGNED BY THE ARTIST "K. ENGEL" ON THE BOTTOM RIGHT. THE BACK SIDE IS CENSOR STAMPED - "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51". VERY GOOD / EXCELLENT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF PAPER; WRINKLING AT THE TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES; AND FOXING ON THE BACK.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMAN ARMY AND WAS CAPTURED BY THE ALLIED FORCES IN AFRICA (OR ITALY; SOURCES VARY). HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133 IN OZADA IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS OF CANADA ON 25 JULY 1942. THIS DRAWING, TITLED "OZADA KANADA," DEPICTS THAT CAMP. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (POW) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A POW, KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A POW. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A POW WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE POW CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED POW RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE POW’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010017
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER LETHBRIDGE, KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160010018
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"K. G. LAGER LETHBRIDGE, KANADA"
Date Range From
1942
Date Range To
1946
Materials
WATERCOLOUR, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
17.4
Length
21.3
Description
WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER PAINTING DEPICTING SCENE OF FIELD WITH FENCE AND A GUARD TOWER. DARK BLUE-GREY SKY. SIGNED "K.G. LAGER LETHBRIDGE, KANADA" IN BOTTOM LEFT. CENSOR STAMPED, "INT. OP. CANADA CENSORED 51" ON THE BACK SIDE. VERY GOOD / EXCELLENT CONDITION: OVERALL YELLOWING OF PAPER.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, A COLLECTION OF WORKS BY KARL ENGEL WERE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMAN ARMY AND WAS CAPTURED BY THE ALLIED FORCES IN AFRICA (OR ITALY; SOURCES VARY). ENGEL CAME FROM THE OZADA PRISONER OF WAR (POW) CAMP TO THE LETHBRIDGE POW CAMP 133 BY DECEMBER 1942. THIS PAINTING IS TITLED, "K. G. LAGER LETHBRIDGE, KANADA" AND DEPICTS THAT CAMP. K. G. LAGER IS AN ABBREVIATION FOR FOR KRIEGSGEFANGENENLAGER, WHICH MEANS PRISONER OF WAR CAMP IN GERMAN. THE ARTIST WAS THE GRAND COUSIN OF THE DONOR, ROLF ZINSSMEISTER. A BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST WRITTEN BY ZINSSMEISTER IN AN EMAIL STATES: “[ENGEL] WAS BORN IN 1909 IN MANNHEIN AND HAD BEEN EDUCATED AS AN OPERA SINGER. HIS HOBBIES WERE PAINTING AND CHESS… DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, KARL ENGEL WAS CALLED UP BY THE GERMAN ARMY FOR MILITARY SERVICE. SOMEWHERE DURING THIS AWFUL WAR, THE UNIT TO WHICH HE BELONGED WAS CAPTURED IN ITALY BY THE ALLIED TROOPS. FROM THERE, HE WAS TRANSFERRED AS PRISONER OF WAR (POW) TO CANADA, TOGETHER WITH MANY OTHER GERMAN SOLDIERS VIA KAIRO (SIC) AND ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT ON THE MS QUEEN MARY I. IN HIS BELONGINGS, I FOUND DRAWINGS MADE IN ROME, ITALY, AND KAIRO AND ALEXANDRIA EGYPT. ALL HIS DRAWINGS, EVEN THOSE IN CAMPS OF UMNAK, OZADA, AND LETHBRIDGE HAD BEEN CENSORED BY THE VICTORIOUS POWER AUTHORITIES WITH A STAMP TO BE RELEASED TO SEND HOME. AS A POW, KARL ENGEL USED HIS TALENT TO DRAW. I THINK THAT ONE AFTER ANOTHER OF HIS PAINTINGS ARRIVED AT HIS PARENTS’ HOME IN GERMANY. THIS WAS HIS WAY TO KEEP HIS PARENTS INFORMED ABOUT HIS ACTUAL SITUATION AS A POW. OF COURSE HIS LIFE AS A POW WASN’T GLORIOUS, BUT AS [FAR AS] I KNOW HE NEVER MADE COMPLAINTS ABOUT HIS SITUATION AS A PRISONER IN THE CAMP.” ACCORDING TO THE EMAIL, HE WAS NEVER MARRIED AND HAD NO CHILDREN. ENGEL PASSED AWAY IN FRANKFURT, MAIN IN 1974. OF HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTIST, ZINSSMEISTER EXPLAINED, “AS A CHILD, I MET ENGEL OCCASIONALLY IN MY PARENTS’ HOME. IN 1974, I ASSISTED IN HIS FUNERAL IN SEEHEIM-JUGENHEIM. A LITTLE LATER I MOVED TO HIS PARENTS’ HOUSE IN SEEHEIN-JUGENHEIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS OLDER BROTHER. THAT’S HOW I RECEIVED THE INFORMATION OF KARL ENGEL’S FORMER LIFE. [IT WAS] THERE I FOUND THE DRAWINGS IN HIS BELONGINGS AND KEPT THEM UNTIL TODAY.” THE WORKS DEPICT SCENES OF ROME, ITALY; A CAMP IN CAIRO, EGYPT; A CAMP IN ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT; A CAMP ON UMNAK ISLAND, ALASKA, UNITED STATES; THE POW CAMP IN OZADA, ALBERTA, CANADA; AND LETHBRIDGE’S PRISONER OF WAR CAMP 133. IN EARLY 2016, COLLECTIONS INTERN ELISE PUNDYK EMAILED POW RESEARCHER MICHAEL O’HAGAN REGARDING FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT ENGEL. HIS RECORDS STATE THAT ENGEL WAS A PRIVATE IN THE GERMANY ARMY – MOST LIKELY IN THE AFRIKA KORPS, WHICH WAS FIRST IN AFRICA IN 1941. HE WAS CAPTURED IN NORTH AFRICA. HIS PRISONER OF WAR IDENTITY NUMBER WAS 037079. ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 1392 PRISONERS OF WAR THAT ARRIVED AT THE TEMPORARY CAMP OZADA – LOCATED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS BETWEEN CALGARY AND BANFF – ON 25 JULY 1942. BY DECEMBER 1942, ALL OF THE POW’S HAD BEEN TRANSFERRED FROM THE CAMP AT OZADA TO LETHBRIDGE. IN A 2018 EMAIL, O’HAGAN PROVIDED FURTHER INFORMATION STATING: “[ENGEL] REMAINED IN (OR AT LEAST ATTACHED TO) CAMP 133 (FIRST OZADA, THEN LETHBRIDGE) FOR THE DURATION OF HIS TIME IN CANADA. HE [SPENT] SOME TIME DURING SEPTEMBER 1945 WORKING ON FARMS IN THE LETHBRIDGE AREA, EITHER FROM ONE OF THE NINE HOSTELS OPERATING AROUND LETHBRIDGE OR GOING OUT ON DAILY WORK PARTIES FROM CAMP 133.” THE FARM RECORDS FROM THIS PERIOD ARE INCOMPLETE, SO IT CANNOT BE DETERMINED AS TO WHERE HE WORKED OR FOR HOW LONG. O’HAGAN EXPLAINED ENGEL WAS ONE OF THE 2759 POWS TRANSFERRED BACK TO THE UNITED KINGDOM ABOARD HMT MAURETANIA, WHICH LEFT HALIFAX ON 31 MARCH 1946. IN NOVEMBER 2016 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN WROTE TO THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE IN BERLIN, GERMANY REQUESTING INFORMATION FROM THE SERVICE FILES OF KARL ENGEL. THE DEUTSCHE DIENSTSTELLE PROVIDED THE INFORMATION ON ENGEL IN 2018, NOTING THAT ENGEL’S CIVILIAN PROFESSION, AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT, WAS OPERA SINGER AND PAINTER. ENGEL WAS BORN MARCH 20, 1913 IN LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERMANY, AND ENLISTED WITH THE 2ND COMPANY INFANTRY RESERVE 212 ON APRIL 23, 1940. FROM 1940-1942 ENGEL SERVED WITH THE 1ST, 3RD, AND 9TH INFANTRY RESERVES, WITH HIS LAST SERVICE RANK NOTED AS CHIEF RIFLEMAN. ENGEL WAS CAPTURED AND IMPRISONED FROM JANUARY 2, 1942 UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 1947, WITH HIS INITIAL CAPTURE OCCURRING IN BARDIA, LIBYA AND FIRST IMPRISONMENT IN CAMP ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT. ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 308, FAYID/BITTERSEE, EGYPT IN JANUARY 1942, THEN TO 304 HELWAN, EGYPT WHERE HE SPENT FIVE MONTHS. ENGEL WAS SENT TO CANADA IN JUNE, 1942 AS A PRISONER OF WAR, STAYING AT CAMP 133 OZADA AND LETHBRIDGE UNTIL APRIL, 1946, WHEN FOLLOWING THE WAR ENGEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO CAMP 183 QUORN, ENGLAND. ENGEL RETURNED TO GERMANY IN A US DETENTION CAMP IN 1947, REMAINING AT CAMP 26 DACHAU UNTIL HIS RELEASE IN FEBRUARY 1947. PLEASE REFERENCE P20040008000 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT LETHBRIDGE’S CAMP 133. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE WORKS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160010018
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

84 records – page 1 of 5.