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Other Name
"TREES"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20190006001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"TREES"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.2
Width
48.4
Description
OIL ON WOOD PANEL PAINTING IN BROWN WOODEN FRAME. PAINTING DEPICTS TWO CLUSTERS OF TREES WITH GREEN AND YELLOW-ORANGE LEAVES, WITH A BROWN FOREGROUND AND BLUE BACKGROUND. BACKGROUND HAS TWO TONES OF BLUE DEPICTING HILLS AND SKY. FOREGROUND HAS RED AND GOLD TONES. BRUSH STROKES ARE DISTINCT SHOWING GRASS IN FOREROUND; PAINTING HAS PAINT APPLIED HEAVILY TO YELLOW-ORANGE TREE LEAVES. PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLUE IN FRONT LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF CANVAS “M. PISKO”. FRAME AROUND CANVAS IS BROWN WITH DOUBLE-CIRCLES ENGRAVED BETWEEN DOUBLE LINES ALONG TRIM; FRAME HAS FOUR SCREWS LOCATED AT UPPER AND LOWER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS. BACK OF FRAME HAS CARDBOARD BACKING SECURED TO WOODEN FRAME WITH SILVER TAPE. CARDBOARD BACKING HAS WHITE LABEL ON LEFT SIDE WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “MIKE PISKO, 1998 $100.00”; CARDBOARD BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN PENCIL IN UPPER LEFT CORNER “TRUCK [UNDERLINED], 01 0066”. FRONT OF CANVAS HAS YELLOW DISCOLORATION AND STAINING IN UPPER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS. FRONT OF FRAME HAS MINOR CHIPPING AND DENTS ALONG OUTER EDGES. CARDBOARD BACKING HAS BROWN AND BLUE STAINING; BACK OF FRAME HAS WHITE STAINING ALONG LOWER LEFT EDGE, AND BLUE STAINING AT UPPER LEFT EDGE; UPPER RIGHT EDGE OF FRAME IS SPLITTING ALONG SEAM. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE PAINTING BY MIKE PISKO, FLAIG RECALLED, “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING PISKO OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD...AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” IN 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON MICHAEL PISKO WAS FOUND IN A PRESS RELEASE ANNOUNCING THE 'MICHAEL PISKO MEMORIAL AWARD', WHICH WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE ARTIST'S WIDOW AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS IN 2000, TO BE AWARDED TO A GRADUATING BFA DEGREE PAINTER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE: "MICHAEL PISKO WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1913. HE MADE HIS LIVING AS A SUCCESSFUL SIGN PAINTER THROUGH HIS BUSINESS, CITY SIGN COMPANY, BUT LANDSCAPE PAINTING WAS HIS LIFE'S FULFILLMENT. TO HONE HIS SKILLS, HE STUDIED THREE SUMMERS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND SOUGHT INSTRUCTION FROM SENIOR VISITING ARTISTS WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON INVITATION OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, OF WHICH HE, IN 1937, WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS. PISKO GREATLY ADMIRED A.Y. JACKSON, THE GROUP OF SEVEN MASTER, WITH WHOM HE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SKETCH AND PAINT AROUND LETHBRIDGE WHENEVER JACKSON CAME TO TOWN TO VISIT HIS BROTHER. HE WAS ALSO DEEPLY INFLUENCED BY H.G. GLYDE, WHO TAUGHT AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART IN CALGARY AND AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND WHO VISITED LETHBRIDGE TO TEACH ART CLASSES AT THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN 1947 PISKO WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HE WAS A PROLIFIC PAINTER, WHO EXHIBITED REGULARLY WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HIS WORK IS REPRESENTED IN MANY PRIVATE, CORPORATE AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, AMONG THEM THE ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. MICHAEL PISKO PASSED AWAY IN 1999." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190006001
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
N.T. (VILLAGE VIEW FROM PORCH)
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1964
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20190006002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
N.T. (VILLAGE VIEW FROM PORCH)
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1964
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
34.2
Length
49.3
Description
OIL ON WOOD PANEL PAINTING IN WHITE WOODEN FRAME. IMAGE OF TREES AND HOUSES IN SNOW, WITH SIDE OF BUILDING AT LEFT EDGE AND HOUSE PILLAR AT RIGHT EDGE; HOUSES WHITE WITH RED-BROWN ROOFS IN BACKGROUND, AND TREES IN FOREGROUND. SNOW COMPRISED OF BLUE AND WHITE PAINT; TREES COMPLETED IN BLACK, GREEN, BROWN AND ORANGE TONES; HOUSE PILLAR AND SIDING IN BROWN AND GREEN. PAINTING SIGNED IN RED IN LOWER LEFT CORNER “E.E. RIETHMAN”. MID-GROUND HAS BROWN FENCE BETWEEN TREES AND BUILDINGS IN BACKGROUND. FRONT OF FRAME HAS WHITE TRIM ALONG FRONT OF CANVAS, WITH GOLD TRIM ABOVE WHITE TRIM; FRAME PAINTED OFF-WHITE. BACK OF PAINTING HAS BROWN PAPER BACKING WITH TWO BLACK METAL SCREW ON UPPER LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES, WITH WHITE CORD FASTENED TO SCREWS. LEFT EDGE OF BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER “OWNED BY H. FLAIG 3279791, NF5”; BACKING HAS STAMPED TEXT IN FADED INK ALONG LOWER EDGE “GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, 310 – 7TH ST. SOUTH – LETHBRIDGE”. BACKING HAS WHITE PAPER LABEL AT UPPER EDGE WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “$20.00 /1970”; BACKING HAS PRINTED ARTICLE IN CENTER ON WHITE PAPER WITH BLACK TEXT “ERNEST E. RIETHMAN, EXHIBITION APRIL 25 – MAY 31 ORGANIZED BY THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ART GALLERY WITH FUNDING ASSISTANCE FROM THE ALBERTA ART FOUNDATION…” WITH BIOGRAPHY ON ERNEST E. RIETHMAN BY “BRENT LAYCOCK, GUEST CURATOR” AND BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO “WATERTON LAKE, C.1958, OIL ON PANEL, 56 X 86 CM, COLLECTION OF MR. AND MRS. DON AND JUDY NILSSON, PHOTO: DON CORMAN”. PAPER BACKING HAS TEARS BESIDE SCREWS; BACKING HAS YELLOWED MASKING TAPE ALONG LOWER EDGE OF PAPER ARTICLE; ARTICLE EDGES STAINED YELLOW FROM ADHESIVE RESIDUE. BACK OF FRAME HAS PAIRS OF METAL NAILS IN UPPER AND LOWER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS, WITH NAILS HEADS COVERED WITH BROWN PAINT. BACK OF FRAME IS STAINED AND CHIPPED AT EDGES AND CORNERS; FRONT OF FRAME HAS BROWN AND WHITE STAINING ALONG EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE PAINTING BY MIKE PISKO, FLAIG RECALLED, “ “VIEW FROM THE PORCH” WOULD HAVE BEEN UP IN THE HOUSE FOR QUITE A WHILE. THAT’S VERY FAMILIAR TO ME. IT’S CERTAINLY THE STYLE OF [ART] THAT THEY WOULD DO. MOM WAS ALWAYS MENTIONING THE OIL. IT’S THE KIND OF [ART] THEY WOULD HAVE DONE, THAT THEY WOULD HAVE LIKED.” “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING RIETHMAN OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD...AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN, WAS DEVELOPED BY JANE EDMUNDSON IN 2014, USING A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 24, 1964 AND RECORD P20120030007.ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN (1895 - 1964) WAS BORN IN SWITZERLAND IN 1895 AND WENT ON TO STUDY ART AT AN ACADEMY IN BASIL, THEN AT THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF INTERIOR DECORATING AND PAINTING. IN 1919 HE CAME TO CANADA SETTLING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1947. HE WORKED AS AN INTERIOR DECORATOR IN THE CITY, AND HIS WORK WAS HIGHLY SOUGHT. HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED LANDSCAPE ARTIST AND WOULD FREQUENTLY JOIN TRIPS ORGANIZED BY A.Y.JACKSON, WHOSE STYLE IS SAID TO HAVE HEAVILY INFLUENCED RIETHMAN’S. DURING HIS TIME WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, HE SERVED AS BOTH HEAD OF COMMITTEES AND TAUGHT LESSONS IN FIGURE DRAWING. RIETHMAN WAS SUCCESSFUL IN WHAT HE DID, AS CRITICS ENJOYED HIS WORK AND HE WAS ABLE TO FREQUENTLY DISPLAY IN EXHIBITIONS. ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES COMPILED IN 2019, RIETHMAN WAS EXHIBITED FREQUENTLY IN SOLO AND GROUP EXHIBITIONS IN LETHBRIDGE THROUGH THE 1950S-1960S. PRIOR TO HIS PAINTING CAREER, RIETHMAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THEATRE GROUPS AND PAGEANTS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, DESIGNING BACKGROUNDS AND CREATING FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERFORMANCES. IN 1955, RIETHMAN AND K.E. HUDSON BECAME PARTNERS IN RIETHMAN—HUDSON PAINTING AND DECORATING IN LETHBRIDGE. RIETHMAN’S ARTWORKS WERE OFTEN FRAMED, EXHIBITED AND SOLD AT GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, LETHBRIDGE BEGINNING IN 1958. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES OPERATED IN CALGARY AND OPENED A BRANCH IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, WITH HEINO DEEKEN AS MANAGER IN LETHBRIDGE. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES WERE KNOWN TO EXHIBIT ARTWORKS BY SOUTHERN ALBERTA ARTISTS AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN A STATEMENT TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1962, RIETHMAN STATED ABOUT HIS PRACTICE, “ALTHOUGH I PREFER LANDSCAPES AND OCCASIONAL PORTRAITS, NOW AND THEN I EXPERIMENT A LITTLE FROM NATURALISTIC INTO MODERN STYLE…ONCE IN A WHILE IT IS GOOD [TO] CHANGE STYLE TO KEEP FROM GETTING IN A RUT…I PAINT AS I FEEL AND TO HECK WITH THE PUBLIC. POSSIBLY I’M NOT COMMERCIAL ENOUGH, BUT I PREFER HAVING THE FREEDOM TO EXPRESS MYSELF AS I WISH…I AM GRADUALLY RETIRING FROM BUSINESS…AND PLAN TO PAINT AND PAINT AND PAINT. I MAY NOT BE THE BEST, BUT I CERTAINLY HAVE FUN.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA. UPDATE: ON 24 OCTOBER 2019, ERNEST E. RIETHMAN’S GRANDDAUGHTER LINDA BAINES SHARED A “PERSONAL RECORD” WITH MUSEUM STAFF. THE LATTER DAY SAINT DOCUMENT WAS COMPLETED BY HER GRANDMOTHER CLARA S. RIETHMAN--ERNEST’S WIFE. IT IS A HANDWRITTEN CHRONOLOGY OF CLARA’S LIFE IN SWITZERLAND AND ALBERTA. PERSONAL INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN THE DOCUMENT EXTENDS TO ERNEST’S LIFE . TO SEE THIS RECORD, PLEASE SEE P19705197000’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20190006002
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"SLEEPING TODDLER WITH REVOLVER"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20190006003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SLEEPING TODDLER WITH REVOLVER"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, GLASS, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
42.7
Width
51.3
Description
PENCIL SKETCH ON PAPER INSIDE FRAME WITH METAL EDGES AND GLASS COVERING. SKETCH OF A SMALL CHILD ASLEEP HOLDING A DOLL, WITH A REVOLVER BESIDE THE DOLL. SKETCH UNSIGNED, ATTRIBUTED TO E.E. RIETHMAN. SKETCH INSIDE WHITE MATTE WITH BLACK INNER TRIM, WITH GLASS FRONT TO FRAME. FRAME SILVER METAL WITH FLORAL PATTERNED TRIM AROUND INSIDE. BACK OF FRAME HAS BROWN PAPER BACKING WITH SILVER LOOP-SCREW AT LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES, WITH SILVER METAL WIRES ATTACTED TO SCREWS. BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER AT UPPER LEFT CORNER “BY E. RIETHMAN” AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER AT LOWER-MIDDLE “OWNED BY H. FLAIG, 3279791, NF5.”. LOWER EDGE OF BACKING HAS WHITE LABEL WITH BLACK PRINTED TEXT “M.G.M. WALL DÉCOR, 317 – 4TH ST. SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE, AB, 328-0923” AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK ON LABEL “$120.00”. BACKING HAS FOLDED CORNER IN UPPER LEFT CORNER, AND TEAR IN PAPER AT LOWER RIGHT CORNER. FRONT OF SKETCH HAS GREEN STAINING AT RIGHT EDGE, BLUE-GREY STAIN AT LOWER LEFT EDGE, AND GREY STAINS ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES OF IMAGE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE SKETCH BY ERNEST RIETHMAN, FLAIG RECALLED, ““THE BOY AND THE TEDDY BEAR”, I WONDER IF MOM DIDN’T HAVE THAT BECAUSE SHE WAS THINKING OF ME. IT LOOKS A LITTLE BIT LIKE I MIGHT HAVE LOOKED, AS A KID, AND I WOULD HAVE BEEN VERY YOUNG AT THAT TIME I THINK THIS ONE WAS DONE.” “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING RIETHMAN OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD...AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN, WAS DEVELOPED BY JANE EDMUNDSON IN 2014, USING A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 24, 1964 AND RECORD P20120030007.ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN (1895 - 1964) WAS BORN IN SWITZERLAND IN 1895 AND WENT ON TO STUDY ART AT AN ACADEMY IN BASIL, THEN AT THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF INTERIOR DECORATING AND PAINTING. IN 1919 HE CAME TO CANADA SETTLING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1947. HE WORKED AS AN INTERIOR DECORATOR IN THE CITY, AND HIS WORK WAS HIGHLY SOUGHT. HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED LANDSCAPE ARTIST AND WOULD FREQUENTLY JOIN TRIPS ORGANIZED BY A.Y.JACKSON, WHOSE STYLE IS SAID TO HAVE HEAVILY INFLUENCED RIETHMAN’S. DURING HIS TIME WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, HE SERVED AS BOTH HEAD OF COMMITTEES AND TAUGHT LESSONS IN FIGURE DRAWING. RIETHMAN WAS SUCCESSFUL IN WHAT HE DID, AS CRITICS ENJOYED HIS WORK AND HE WAS ABLE TO FREQUENTLY DISPLAY IN EXHIBITIONS. ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES COMPILED IN 2019, RIETHMAN WAS EXHIBITED FREQUENTLY IN SOLO AND GROUP EXHIBITIONS IN LETHBRIDGE THROUGH THE 1950S-1960S. PRIOR TO HIS PAINTING CAREER, RIETHMAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THEATRE GROUPS AND PAGEANTS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, DESIGNING BACKGROUNDS AND CREATING FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERFORMANCES. IN 1955, RIETHMAN AND K.E. HUDSON BECAME PARTNERS IN RIETHMAN—HUDSON PAINTING AND DECORATING IN LETHBRIDGE. RIETHMAN’S ARTWORKS WERE OFTEN FRAMED, EXHIBITED AND SOLD AT GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, LETHBRIDGE BEGINNING IN 1958. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES OPERATED IN CALGARY AND OPENED A BRANCH IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, WITH HEINO DEEKEN AS MANAGER IN LETHBRIDGE. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES WERE KNOWN TO EXHIBIT ARTWORKS BY SOUTHERN ALBERTA ARTISTS AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN A STATEMENT TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1962, RIETHMAN STATED ABOUT HIS PRACTICE, “ALTHOUGH I PREFER LANDSCAPES AND OCCASIONAL PORTRAITS, NOW AND THEN I EXPERIMENT A LITTLE FROM NATURALISTIC INTO MODERN STYLE…ONCE IN A WHILE IT IS GOOD [TO] CHANGE STYLE TO KEEP FROM GETTING IN A RUT…I PAINT AS I FEEL AND TO HECK WITH THE PUBLIC. POSSIBLY I’M NOT COMMERCIAL ENOUGH, BUT I PREFER HAVING THE FREEDOM TO EXPRESS MYSELF AS I WISH…I AM GRADUALLY RETIRING FROM BUSINESS…AND PLAN TO PAINT AND PAINT AND PAINT. I MAY NOT BE THE BEST, BUT I CERTAINLY HAVE FUN.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA. UPDATE: ON 24 OCTOBER 2019, ERNEST E. RIETHMAN’S GRANDDAUGHTER LINDA BAINES SHARED A “PERSONAL RECORD” WITH MUSEUM STAFF. THE LATTER DAY SAINT DOCUMENT WAS COMPLETED BY HER GRANDMOTHER CLARA S. RIETHMAN--ERNEST’S WIFE. IT IS A HANDWRITTEN CHRONOLOGY OF CLARA’S LIFE IN SWITZERLAND AND ALBERTA. PERSONAL INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN THE DOCUMENT EXTENDS TO ERNEST’S LIFE . TO SEE THIS RECORD, PLEASE SEE P19705197000’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20190006003
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DOG TAG
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190014000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DOG TAG
Date
1950
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
2.4
Width
3
Description
METAL TAG WITH FOUR SQUARE EDGES AND UPPER RIGHT EDGE ROUNDED; TAG HAS HOLE CUT IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER. FRONT OF TAG HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “DOG TAG, CITY OF LETHBRIDGE, 8177”. FRONT HAS SHALLOW HOLE IN LOWER LEFT CORNER. TAG IS WORN AND TARNISHED AROUND HOLE AT LOWER RIGHT EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
ON JUNE 26, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CARLY STEWART REGARDING THE DONATION OF A DOG LICENSE. ON THE LICENSE, STEWART RECALLED, “IT WAS JUST IN THE BUTTON BOX OF MY MOTHER’S AND WHEN (MY FAMILY) CLEANED UP MY MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S ESTATE IT WAS THROWN INTO THE BOX FOR CARLY AND BARBARA…1974.” “WE HAD TO GO DOWN TO CITY HALL AND BUY [THE DOG LICENSE]. I DON’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE, A DOLLAR ($1.00) OR SOMETHING A DOLLAR TWENTY-FIVE ($1.25)...” STEWART ELABORATED ON HIS CONNECTIONS TO THE DOG, STATING, “[I CONSIDERED HIM MY DOG BECAUSE] I JUST ADOPTED (HIM) WHEN HE CAME AND HE FOLLOWED ME AND SO OF COURSE I WAS OUT MORE AROUND TOWN THAN MY SISTERS WERE…WHEN [MY SISTERS] WENT OUT THEY JUST WENT TO A GIRLFRIEND’S HOUSE LEAVING US BOYS [WANDERING] ALL OVER THE PLACE.” “…BACK IN ABOUT 1945 OR 46 WE LIVED IN HOLLAND, MANITOBA. MY SISTER (HELEN MARIE STEWART) WHO WAS THREE OR FOUR YEARS OLDER THAN I…BECAUSE OF THE SHORTAGE OF LABOURERS AT THAT TIME, MY SISTER WENT TO WORK IN THE SUMMER FOR A FARMER TO HELP WITH THE FARMER’S WIFE TO PREPARE HARVEST DINNERS…COLLECT EGGS…THE FARMER’S NAME WAS JOE JEFFERY OUT OF HOLLAND, MANITOBA…[THE FARMER’S] DOG HAD A BATCH OF PUPPIES SO SHE BROUGHT ONE HOME WITH HER WHEN SHE CAME HOME TO START SCHOOL AGAIN AND WE NAMED IT JEFF BECAUSE OF THE JEFFERYS…[THE DOG] WAS A PRETTY REASONABLE MIDSIZED DOG, A COLLIE CROSS…IT WAS BROWN AND TAN BUT HAD FLOPPY EARS…MY DAD GOT A HARNESS MADE FOR THE DOG ON MY REQUEST…THE DOG PULLED ME AROUND IN THE SLEIGH ALL WINTER CHASING THE (OTHER) DOGS, DOGS LOVE TO CHASE CARS OR HORSES OR ANYTHING AT ALL…I WOULDN’T DETER HIM FROM DOING IT AND I WOULD RIDE ON THE SLEIGH JUST GOING TO BEAT HECK…THEN IN 1948 WE MOVED TO ALBERTA AND I GOT A LITTLE BIGGER AND THE DOG WAS NOT BIG ENOUGH TO PULL ME IN THE SLEIGH…I ALSO MADE A JOCKEY CART, A SULKY, THAT RUN THROUGH THE TRACES (OF THE HARNESS), IT WOULD GO LIKE HECK ANYWAYS AND THE DOG DID THAT FOR (A COUPLE OF) YEARS…(WE FOUND) A SET OF [JINGLE] BELLS LIKE THEY HAD ON HORSES…I STRAPPED THEM ACROSS THE SHOULDER STRAP, THE BELLY STRAP ON THE BACK OF THE DOG’S HARNESS…[ALL WE HAD] TO DO TO GET THE DOG HOME [WHEN]HE WAS OUT ROAMING AROUND…WAS TAKE THAT HARNESS OUT THE BACK DOOR AND SHAKE IT…WITHIN MINUTES OR SECONDS THE DOG WAS THERE TO GO, ANXIOUS TO GO WITH ME TO DO WHATEVER. MANY TIMES HE WAS JUST CALLED TO THE HOUSE, WE WEREN’T GOING ANYWHERE (WE JUST WANTED HIM HOME).” “[WE MOVED TO ALBERTA BECAUSE] MY FATHER HAD ASTHMA, EXTREMELY BAD AND THE DRY CLIMATE HERE IN ALBERTA WAS A GOD BLESSING TO HIM…HE FELT A LOT BETTER HERE. THAT BROUGHT US TO ALBERTA IN AUGUST 1948…[THE DOG MADE ME FEEL BETTER MOVING TO A NEW PLACE] THE DOG WAS MY BEST FRIEND I GUESS…WE LIVED ONE YEAR AT THAT HOUSE AND THEN WE MOVED TO STRATHMORE, ALBERTA FOR A YEAR FOR ANOTHER REASON. THAT DOG WOULD FOLLOW ME TO SCHOOL AT STRATHMORE. OUR (SCHOOL) ROOM WAS UPSTAIRS OFF OF THE FIRE ESCAPE…THE DOG WOULD SNIFF IT, SNIFF MY TRAIL TO SCHOOL AND COME UP…THE FIRE ESCAPE AND WHINE AT THE BACK DOOR (A BIG DISTRACTION TO THE CLASS) AND MY TEACHER WOULD LET THE DOG IN AND HE’D SIT ON THE FLOOR BESIDE MY DESK.” “I WAS REALLY THE ONLY ONE WITH A DOG. THERE WAS A SMALLER DOG LIVED ON THE SAME BLOCK…BUT IT WAS JUST A SMALL DOG AND MY DOG WAS WHAT YOU’D CALL TRAINED…I WAS GROWING, PUTTING ON TOO MUCH WEIGHT FOR THE DOG TO HAUL AT THAT TIME BUT THE DOG STAYED WITH US. WE MOVED BACK ONTO 21ST STREET SOUTH AT 8TH AVENUE AND THE DOG CAME WITH US THERE FROM STRATHMORE IN 1950…OF COURSE WE HAD TO HAVE A DOG LICENSE FOR WHEN WE WERE IN LETHBRIDGE OR THE DOG POUND PICKED THEM UP SO THIS IS THE DOG’S LICENSE THAT WE HAD. NOW ABOUT 1954 OR 55 THE DOG WAS FOUND DEAD ABOUT A BLOCK AWAY BESIDE A HOUSE, JUST (BESIDE) A REGULAR RESIDENTIAL HOUSE. IT WAS JUST FOUND DEAD ON A SUNDAY MORNING…[THE CITY DOG POUND] TRACED THE DOG BACK THROUGH THE LICENSE TO OUR ADDRESS AND MY DAD WENT TO IDENTIFY IT AT THE POUND OR WHEREVER THEY TOOK IT (HIM) AND THEY CUT OFF THE COLLAR WITH THIS TAG ON IT.” “I THINK HE WAS POISONED BUT I WAS SIXTEEN OR SEVENTEEN AND I WAS NOT DISTRAUGHT OVER HIS DEATH BUT I MISSED HIM OF COURSE…MY DAD DIDN’T TAKE ME ALONG TO THE POUND TO IDENTIFY IT SO…HE KNEW MY, MY DAD WAS A GENTLE PERSON SO HE KNEW MY DEMEANOR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190014000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190014000
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"1945 RED CROSS QUILT"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170035000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"1945 RED CROSS QUILT"
Date
1945
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
214
Width
168.5
Description
BLUE AND PINK QUILT WITH PATTERN OF 56 PINK DIAMONDS INTERLAID WITH BLUE DIAMONDS; PINK FABRIC DIAMONDS HAVE NAMES EMBROIDERED IN BLUE THREAD, LISTED BELOW. BLUE DIAMONDS HAVE AN EMBROIDERED FOUR PETAL DESIGN STITCHED IN FABRIC. QUILT HAS BLUE EMBROIDERED TEXT ON TWO CENTER DIAMONDS, “1945” AND “RED CROSS”. QUILT HAS FINISHED EDGES WITH PINK BORDERS. QUILT HAS FRAYING AND LOSS ON UPPER RIGHT EDGE; FABRIC AND EMBROIDERED TEXT IS FADED; QUILT HAS MINOR BROWN STAIN ON BACK AT LOWER EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. EMBROIDERED NAMES ON FRONT OF QUILT [ALPHABETICAL]: ANNAND, ASHMAN, BAILEY, BAKER, BARNES, BELL, BURNS, CARLSON, CARNELL, CHAMBERS, CHRISTIANSEN, CYNCH, DAYMON, DELANY, DEVEBER, DICKSON, DILATUSH, FALLON, FOSTER, GAIRNS, GIDDIE, GLADSTONE, GOBLE, GOING, GREGORY, HAGGLUND, HARRISON, HARWOOD, HATFIELD, HAUG, HINTON, HOLROYD, KEMMIS, KLOPPENBORG, MATKIN, MCEWEN, MCKENZIE, O’BRAY, PITTAWAY, PRESLEY, RACKETTE, REEVES, ROPER, SHERMAN, STEWART, STRATE, THOMAS, UDELL, WACHER, ZORN.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
THE WATERTON PARK RED CROSS QUILT WAS CREATED BY WATERTON FAMILIES DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND WAS EMBROIDERED WITH THE SURNAMES OF WATERTON RESIDENTS LIVING IN THE PARK DURING THE HOMEFRONT PERIOD. THE QUILT FEATURES 50 NAMES EMBROIDERED ON THE SURFACE, ALL SURNAMES OF WATERTON FAMILIES IN THE COMMUNITY DURING WORLD WAR 2 ACCORDING TO BERT PITTAWAY IN A LETTER TO THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION. THE QUILT WAS PART OF A RED CROSS SOCIETY INITIATIVE THAT SAW GLOBAL AND CANADIAN COMMUNITIES CREATE QUITS FOR SENDING OVERSEAS AND FOR RAISING FUNDS FOR THE RED CROSS. ACCORDING TO ONLINE INFORMATION FROM HALIFAX WOMEN’S HISTORY [HTTP://HALIFAXWOMENSHISTORY.CA/CANADIAN-COMFORT-QUILTS] AND ACTIVE HISTORY [HTTP://ACTIVEHISTORY.CA/2017/07/RED-CROSSES-AND-WHITE-COTTON-MEMORY-AND-MEANING-IN-FIRST-WORLD-WAR-QUILTS/], RED CROSS QUILTS WERE COMMONLY CREATED BY CANADIAN COMMUNITIES AS CIVILIAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO WAR EFFORTS DURING BOTH WORLD WARS. THE QUILTS WERE SENT TO THE RED CROSS FOR DISTRIBUTION TO FAMILIES DISPLACED BY THE WAR OVERSEAS AND TO REFUGEES; QUILTS WERE ALSO RAFFLED PUBLICLY IN COMMUNITIES TO RAISE FUNDS FOR QUILTING GROUPS AND THE RED CROSS. THE WATERTON QUILT WAS RAFFLED IN 1945 AND WON BY MARY PITTAWAY OF WATERTON. BERT PITTAWAY DONATED THE QUILT TO THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION FOR DISPLAY AT THE WATERTON HERITAGE CENTRE IN THE 1980S, IN MEMORY OF BERT’S PARENTS MARY AND JOHN EDWARD PITTAWAY. JOHN EDWARD PITTAWAY, FATHER OF JACK, BERTRAM, AND DENNIS PITTAWAY, BEGAN HIS MILITARY CAREER AS AN ARMY TRUMPETER IN AN IRISH MILITIA UNIT. J.E. PITTAWAY JOINED THE REGULAR ARMY IN NOVEMBER 1893, SERVING IN WORLD WAR 1 AND WORLD WAR 2, IN WORLD WAR 2 ACHIEIVING THE RANK OF BATTERY SERGEANT MAJOR. J.E. PITTAWAY MOVED TO WATERTON IN 1927 FROM IRELAND. J.E. PITTAWAY WORKED FOR THE PARKS DEPARTMENT AS A GARDENER AND THEN AS A CAMPGROUND CARETAKER. J.E. PITTAWAY DIED MARCH 13, 1956, WITH HIS FINAL TRIBUTE IN CALGARY ON MARCH 17, 1956. ACCORDING TO THE PARKS CANADA WEBSITE ON WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, MEMORY OF THE WARS WERE “…INSCRIBED ON LANDFORMS IN PLACE NAMES…AND THE CELEBRATION OF PEACE WAS GIVEN SYMBOLIC FORM IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE WORLD’S FIRST INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK IN 1932.” WATERTON NATIONAL PARK FEATURES LAKES, RIDGES, AND PEAKS NAMED WITH REFERENCES TO THE WORLD WARS, INCLUDING AVION RIDGE, FESTUBERT MOUNTAIN, AND MOUNT ALDERSON. IN 2017, THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION DISSOLVED AND REPRESENTATIVES FROM WATERTON LAKES PARK FACILITATED THE TRANSFER OF THE COLLECTIONS TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS. THE 1945 WATERTON QUILT WAS DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AS PART OF THE EFFORTS TO RE-HOME THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION’S COLLECTION. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE LETTER FROM BERT PITTAWAY, DONATION NOTES FROM THE WATERTON NATURAL HISTORY ASSOCIATION, INFORMATION FROM THE PARKS CANADA WEBSITE ON WATERTON LAKES PARK, AND NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON THE PITTAWAY FAMILY, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170035000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170035000
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"MASKINOGE #14"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, PAINT, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20190001008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"MASKINOGE #14"
Date
2002
Materials
CANVAS, PAINT, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.6
Length
28
Width
35.6
Description
OIL PAINTING ON CANVAS; PAINTING DEPICTS A LIGHT WHITE, PINK, AND GREY SKY WITH GREY-PINK MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND, PINK, BLUE, GREY, GREEN, AND BROWN HILLS IN THE MIDGROUND, AND WHITE AND RED TREES IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER ON YELLOW, WHITE, AND BROWN GRASS IN THE FOREGROUND. CANVAS PAINTING WRAPS AROUND THE EDGES OF THE FRAME; PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLACK PAINT AT THE LOWER LEFT CORNER, “© KAREN BROWNLEE, 2002 34”. BACK OF PAINTING IS OPEN TO SHOW THE CANVAS WRAPPED AROUND AN UNPAINTED WOOD FRAME; CANVAS IS STAPLED TO THE FRAME AT CORNERS AND ON TOP AND LEFT SIDES. BACK HAS WIRE STRETCHED FROM LEFT EDGE TO THE RIGHT EDGE AND FASTENED WITH HOOKS IN WOOD FRAME. BACK OF CANVAS HAS BLACK MARKER TEXT, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, “OIL ON CANVAS, 11” X 14”, KAREN BROWNLEE EOW #343, 34, MASKINONGE #14”. TOP EDGE OF FRAME HAS A WHITE CARD STAPLED TO THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER, WITH BLACK AND BLUE TEXT, “KAREN M. BROWNLEE, B.A., A.S.A., PUBLISHED, PROFESSIONAL VISUAL ARTIST & ILLUSTRATOR, PH: (403) 327-0519 EMAIL: KAREN@KARENBROWNLEE.COM, WEBSITE: WWW.KARENBROWNLEE.COM”, AND CARD FEATURES TWO IMAGES OF PAINTINGS. BACK OF CANVAS IS STAINED WITH PAINT AND HAS FRAYING EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘MASKINOGE #14’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “THIS OIL WAS PAINTED IN THE PICNIC SHELTER, WITH THE FLYING ANTS DESCRIBED IN THE WATERTON EN PLEIN AIR ARTIST STATEMENT.” “THE FOLLOWING IS A DESCRIPTION OF MY WATERTON EN PLEIN AIR WORK. THIS DESCRIPTION APPLIES TO: AUTUMN, BELLY RIVER AREA SW ALBERTA, 1996 AND CAMERON LAKE IN THE FALL, 1992.” “ONE OF MY CHINESE BRUSH PAINTING STUDENTS, DEE (TURNER) RYRIE) AND I BECAME FRIENDS IN THE EARLY 1980’S. SHE INVITED ME ANNUALLY OR SEMI-ANNUALLY (SPRING AND FALL) TO GO WITH HER TO THE FAMILY CABIN IN WATERTON TO LOCATION PAINT. WE DID THIS FOR MANY YEARS. IT WAS MARVELOUS…DEE AND I SPENT FIVE DAY WEEKS PER TIME.” “WE WOULD GET UP IN THE MORNING, HAVE OUR BREAKFAST AND PACK OUR LUNCH. PENDING THE WEATHER, AND WHERE WE WANTED TO PAINT: WE WOULD HEAD OFF TO THAT SITE, SET UP, AND PAINT FOR 4 - 6 HOURS…THEN, BACK TO HER PLACE FOR A NAP. WE WOULD PACK A SUPPER OR EAT AT THE CABIN; AND GO OFF FOR ANOTHER SESSION TO A DIFFERENT PLACE. THEN BACK TO HER CABIN FOR SHOWERS, CONVERSATION ART CRITIQUING, AND BED.” “WE WERE, AND ARE, VERY COMPATIBLE. ALTHOUGH ONE TIME, AT A DIFFERENT EN PLEIN AIR WEEK AT HINTON, I ALMOST ACCIDENTLY DRANK HER DIET COKE FROM THE COOLER. DEE CAUGHT ME, THE DIET COKE WAS IN MY HAND, AND NOT DRANK, SO ALL WAS WELL. IT WAS HER LAST DIET COKE, TO BOOT. SHE WOULD NEVER DRINK A DIET PEPSI. IT DIDN’T MATTER TO ME WHICH DIET POP I CONSUMED, BUT IT SURE MATTERED TO HER. WE LAUGHED ABOUT THIS AT THE TIME, AND TO THIS DAY.” “ON COOL DAYS, WE WOULD TRY TO FIND A PICNIC SHELTER WITH GLASS WINDOWS AND A DOOR, AND TABLES. THEY WERE FEW AND FAR IN BETWEEN AT THAT TIME…THE MOST MEMORABLE TIME FOR ME: WAS WHEN WE PAINTED IN THE PICNIC SHELTER IN MASKINOGE, SOUTH OF THE HIGHWAY INTO THE PARK.” “IT WAS COOL /COLD, WITH A WIND, AND A FEW SNOWFLAKES—THE THIRD WEEK IN SEPTEMBER. WE STOKED A FIRE IN THE CAMP KITCHEN, AND IT KEPT US AND NICE AND TOASTY. WE WERE STILL ALL BUNDLED UP IN HOODIES AND WINTER CLOTHING…I NOTICED A FEW BUGS ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOW. NO WORRIES, WE WERE LOCATION PAINTING. BUGS ARE THE NORM. YOU PICK THEM OUT OF YOUR PAINTING, AND CARRY ON. THE LIGHT ON THE MOUNTAINS HAD TO BE CAPTURED.” “DEE COMES UP TO ME, AND ASKED: ‘KAREN, HAVE YOU NOTICED HOW MANY FLYING ANTS THERE ARE ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOWS.’…IT TURNED OUT THAT WE HAD STOKED THAT CAMP KITCHEN FOR FIVE HOURS OR SO. COMPLETELY HEATED UP THE CONCRETE AROUND IT. WAKING UP THE NEST OF FLYING ANTS! EACH WINDOW PANE WAS COVERED WITH HUNDREDS OF ANTS! AND, THEY WERE POURING OUT IN RIVERS FROM THE BASE OF THE COOK STOVE!” “NEEDLESS TO SAY, WE: PUT THE FIRE OUT, AND PACKED UP IN A HURRY. ANOTHER EN PLEIN AIR STORY FOR THE BOOKS…MOSTLY, WE STAYED IN THE WATERTON INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK. OCCASIONALLY, WE WENT SOUTH OR NORTH OF THE PARK TO PAINT.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001008
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"BELLY RIVER AREA S.W."
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
Catalogue Number
P20190001001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"BELLY RIVER AREA S.W."
Date
1996
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.3
Width
57.7
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER; PAINTING DEPICTS A BLUE, YELLOW, AND PINK SKY IN THE BACKGROUND, WITH RED-BROWN AND GREEN HILLS, GREEN TREES AND HILLS IN THE MIDGROUND, AND YELLOW, ORANGE, RED, AND BROWN TREES ON GREEN GRASS IN THE FOREGROUND. PAINTING HAS GRID/BORDER LINES DRAWN IN PENCIL; PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLACK PAINT AT THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER, “KAREN BROWNLEE 1996 ©, BELLY RIVER AREA S.W. NO #1”. PAINTING HAS PENCILED TEXT ALONG LOWER EDGE/BORDER, “AUTUMN, BELLY RIVER AREA S.W. AD 41, 1996 © KAREN BROWNLEE IMAGE SIZE 12” X 18”, WINSOR & NEWTON WATERCOLOR A+AA, ON 300LB ARCHES, PAINTED ON LOCATION, EOW #220”. BACK HAS ADHESIVE TAPE RESIDUE AT CORNERS; FRONT HAS MINOR STAINING AT LOWER LEFT CORNER; LEFT, UPPER, AND RIGHT EDGES OF PAPER WERE TORN AND HAVE MINOR RESULTING FRAYING; PAPER HAS STAMP IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER, “ARCHES”; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘BELLY RIVER AREA S.W.’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “THIS PAINTING IS STARTED ON SITE, JUST OFF THE HIGHWAY THAT LEADS TO THE U.S. AUTUMN BELLY RIVER AREA WAS FINISHED IN THE STUDIO. IT WAS THE THIRD WEEK IN SEPTEMBER. THE COLORS WERE GREAT. THE SNOW HAD YET TO FALL. THE WIND HAD NOT BLOWN OFF THE BEAUTIFULLY COLORED LEAVES. “THE FOLLOWING IS A DESCRIPTION OF MY WATERTON EN PLEIN AIR WORK. THIS DESCRIPTION APPLIES TO: AUTUMN, BELLY RIVER AREA SW ALBERTA, 1996 AND CAMERON LAKE IN THE FALL, 1992.” “ONE OF MY CHINESE BRUSH PAINTING STUDENTS, DEE (TURNER) RYRIE) AND I BECAME FRIENDS IN THE EARLY 1980’S. SHE INVITED ME ANNUALLY OR SEMI-ANNUALLY (SPRING AND FALL) TO GO WITH HER TO THE FAMILY CABIN IN WATERTON TO LOCATION PAINT. WE DID THIS FOR MANY YEARS. IT WAS MARVELOUS…DEE AND I SPENT FIVE DAY WEEKS PER TIME.” “WE WOULD GET UP IN THE MORNING, HAVE OUR BREAKFAST AND PACK OUR LUNCH. PENDING THE WEATHER, AND WHERE WE WANTED TO PAINT: WE WOULD HEAD OFF TO THAT SITE, SET UP, AND PAINT FOR 4 - 6 HOURS…THEN, BACK TO HER PLACE FOR A NAP. WE WOULD PACK A SUPPER OR EAT AT THE CABIN; AND GO OFF FOR ANOTHER SESSION TO A DIFFERENT PLACE. THEN BACK TO HER CABIN FOR SHOWERS, CONVERSATION ART CRITIQUING, AND BED.” “WE WERE, AND ARE, VERY COMPATIBLE. ALTHOUGH ONE TIME, AT A DIFFERENT EN PLEIN AIR WEEK AT HINTON, I ALMOST ACCIDENTLY DRANK HER DIET COKE FROM THE COOLER. DEE CAUGHT ME, THE DIET COKE WAS IN MY HAND, AND NOT DRANK, SO ALL WAS WELL. IT WAS HER LAST DIET COKE, TO BOOT. SHE WOULD NEVER DRINK A DIET PEPSI. IT DIDN’T MATTER TO ME WHICH DIET POP I CONSUMED, BUT IT SURE MATTERED TO HER. WE LAUGHED ABOUT THIS AT THE TIME, AND TO THIS DAY.” “ON COOL DAYS, WE WOULD TRY TO FIND A PICNIC SHELTER WITH GLASS WINDOWS AND A DOOR, AND TABLES. THEY WERE FEW AND FAR IN BETWEEN AT THAT TIME…THE MOST MEMORABLE TIME FOR ME: WAS WHEN WE PAINTED IN THE PICNIC SHELTER IN MASKINOGE, SOUTH OF THE HIGHWAY INTO THE PARK.” “IT WAS COOL /COLD, WITH A WIND, AND A FEW SNOWFLAKES—THE THIRD WEEK IN SEPTEMBER. WE STOKED A FIRE IN THE CAMP KITCHEN, AND IT KEPT US AND NICE AND TOASTY. WE WERE STILL ALL BUNDLED UP IN HOODIES AND WINTER CLOTHING…I NOTICED A FEW BUGS ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOW. NO WORRIES, WE WERE LOCATION PAINTING. BUGS ARE THE NORM. YOU PICK THEM OUT OF YOUR PAINTING, AND CARRY ON. THE LIGHT ON THE MOUNTAINS HAD TO BE CAPTURED.” “DEE COMES UP TO ME, AND ASKED: ‘KAREN, HAVE YOU NOTICED HOW MANY FLYING ANTS THERE ARE ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOWS.’…IT TURNED OUT THAT WE HAD STOKED THAT CAMP KITCHEN FOR FIVE HOURS OR SO. COMPLETELY HEATED UP THE CONCRETE AROUND IT. WAKING UP THE NEST OF FLYING ANTS! EACH WINDOW PANE WAS COVERED WITH HUNDREDS OF ANTS! AND, THEY WERE POURING OUT IN RIVERS FROM THE BASE OF THE COOK STOVE!” “NEEDLESS TO SAY, WE: PUT THE FIRE OUT, AND PACKED UP IN A HURRY. ANOTHER EN PLEIN AIR STORY FOR THE BOOKS…MOSTLY, WE STAYED IN THE WATERTON INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK. OCCASIONALLY, WE WENT SOUTH OR NORTH OF THE PARK TO PAINT.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001001
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL #3, BUNNIES + BIKES"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
Catalogue Number
P20190001002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL #3, BUNNIES + BIKES"
Date
2007
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
57.8
Width
76.7
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER; PAINTING DEPICTS A BLUE SKY WITH CLOUDS AND GREEN TREES IN BACKGROUND, GREEN AND WHITE BUILDING IN MIDGROUND WITH RED AND WHITE SIGN “SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL” AND BLACK AND WHITE SIGN “ROOMS FOR RENT $250/MO JAM SESSIONS $3 COVER” AND MEN GATHERED OUTSIDE BESIDE PARKED MOTORCYCLES, AND FOREGROUND SHOWING A MAN KNEELING BESIDE A MOTORCYCLE ON A DIRT STREET, WITH TWO BROWN-BLACK RABBITS IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER. PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLACK PAINT AT LOWER RIGHT EDGE, “© KAREN BROWNLEE 2007, SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL #3, BUNNIES + BIKES”. PAINTING HAS GRID/BORDER LINES DRAWN IN PENCIL; PAINTING HAS INVERTED STAMP IN UPPER LEFT CORNER, “AQUARELLE ARCHES”. BACK OF PAINTING HAS MINOR STAINING; EDGES OF PAPER WERE TORN AND HAVE MINOR RESULTING FRAYING; FRONT HAS MINOR PAINT LOSS AT LOWER EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL #3, BIKERS AND BUNNIES’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “MY MOTHER’S SISTER AND HER HUSBAND (DOT “DOC” AND HELEN PETERSON) OPERATED THE GARAGE NORTH OF THE SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL. IT WAS A VERY FAMILIAR PLACE TO ME BECAUSE MY AUNTY HELEN FREQUENTLY BABYSAT ME. I REMEMBER GETTING GAS AT THE STATION, AND ASKING MY PARENTS/AUNTY HELEN FOR CHOCOLATE BARS AND OTHER TREATS.” “THE SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL AND GARAGE SHARED THE SAME GRAVEL PARKING AREA. THE SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL WAS A LANDMARK, IT ANSWERED THE CHILDHOOD QUESTION OF ‘WHEN ARE WE GOING TO GET THERE.’ THE PLACE WAS FULL OF CARS, MOTORCYCLES, AND PEOPLE COMING AND GOING. SOMETIMES THEY’D COME TO MY UNCLE’S GARAGE FOR GAS.” “I HAD ALWAYS MEANT TO STOP AND PHOTOGRAPH THE SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL. ONE SUNDAY, WHILE DRIVING OUR SON, LOGAN, TO A HOCKEY GAME IN PICTURE BUTTE: WE WERE EARLY ENOUGH FOR ME TO STOP, AMIDST THE BOYS COMPLAINTS. HOW DOES A PARENT COMPARE TO A FUN HOCKEY DRESSING ROOM FULL OF BOYS?” “THERE WAS NO ONE AROUND THE HOTEL. IT WAS STILL EARLY AUTUMN, OCTOBER 2006 AND THE TREES HAD FOLIAGE. I COMPOSED A FEW POINT AND SHOOT SHOTS, AND OFF TO THE RINK WE WENT.” “JAN. 9, 2007 THE SEVENTY YEAR OLD SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL BURNED TO THE GROUND. I FELT COMPELLED TO PAINT THE HOTEL, AND MADE A TRIP OUT TO THE GENERAL STORE ACROSS THE STREET—WHICH HAD COFFEE AND TABLES FOR PEOPLE TO SIT DOWN AND CHEW THE FAT. THAT’S WHAT I DID. AND LEARNED HOW THE TOWN WAS OVERRUN WITH RABBITS—FROM A FEW DOMESTICATED ONES THAT FOUND FREEDOM SEVERAL YEARS AGO.” “THAT IS HOW I CAME TO PAINT MOTORCYCLES, PEOPLE, AND RABBITS IN THE FOREGROUND OF THE SHAUGHNESSY HOTEL. THE FOREGROUND OF THE PAINTING DID NOT EXIST IN MY PHOTOGRAPHS. I ADDED PEOPLE, MOTORCYCLES AND RABBIT.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001002
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"CAMERON LAKE IN FALL"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190001003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"CAMERON LAKE IN FALL"
Date
1992
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
57.4
Width
76.2
Description
WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER; PAINTING DONE IN POINTILLISM STYLE DEPICTING A BLUE SKY AND BLUE-GREEN HILLS IN BACKGROUND, WITH GREEN, ORANGE, AND BLUE TREES ON GRASS ABOVE A BLUE LAKE IN THE MIDGROUND, AND GREEN, ORANGE, YELLOW, PURPLE, AND PINK TREES ON GRASS ABOVE THE LAKE IN THE FOREGROUND. PAINTING HAS GRID/BORDER LINES DRAWN IN PENCIL; PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLACK PAINT AT THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER, “CAMERON LAKE IN FALL, © KAREN BROWNLEE, 1992”. PAINTING HAS PENCILED TEXT ALONG THE LOWER EDGE/BORDER, “IMAGE SIZE 21” X 28”, WATERCOLOR + GOUACHE ON 300LB FABRIANO, CAMERON LAKE IN FALL, K. BROWNLEE, 1992 ©, EOW #163”. BACK OF PAINTING HAS MINOR LOSS IN PAPER AT LOWER LEFT CORNER; BACK HAS MINOR STAINING; BACK HAS ADHESIVE TAPE RESIDUE ALONG EDGES AND CORNERS; UPPER AND LOWER EDGES OF THE PAINTING ARE WORN; UPPER EDGE OF PAINTING HAS MINOR LOSS IN PAPER; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘CAMERON LAKE IN FALL’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “THIS PAINTING WAS STARTED ON LOCATION EN PLEIN AIR. THE LIGHT QUICKLY CHANGED, FORCING ME TO FINISH IT IN THE STUDIO.” “THE FOLLOWING IS A DESCRIPTION OF MY WATERTON EN PLEIN AIR WORK. THIS DESCRIPTION APPLIES TO: AUTUMN, BELLY RIVER AREA SW ALBERTA, 1996 AND CAMERON LAKE IN THE FALL, 1992.” “ONE OF MY CHINESE BRUSH PAINTING STUDENTS, DEE (TURNER) RYRIE) AND I BECAME FRIENDS IN THE EARLY 1980’S. SHE INVITED ME ANNUALLY OR SEMI-ANNUALLY (SPRING AND FALL) TO GO WITH HER TO THE FAMILY CABIN IN WATERTON TO LOCATION PAINT. WE DID THIS FOR MANY YEARS. IT WAS MARVELOUS…DEE AND I SPENT FIVE DAY WEEKS PER TIME.” “WE WOULD GET UP IN THE MORNING, HAVE OUR BREAKFAST AND PACK OUR LUNCH. PENDING THE WEATHER, AND WHERE WE WANTED TO PAINT: WE WOULD HEAD OFF TO THAT SITE, SET UP, AND PAINT FOR 4 - 6 HOURS…THEN, BACK TO HER PLACE FOR A NAP. WE WOULD PACK A SUPPER OR EAT AT THE CABIN; AND GO OFF FOR ANOTHER SESSION TO A DIFFERENT PLACE. THEN BACK TO HER CABIN FOR SHOWERS, CONVERSATION ART CRITIQUING, AND BED.” “WE WERE, AND ARE, VERY COMPATIBLE. ALTHOUGH ONE TIME, AT A DIFFERENT EN PLEIN AIR WEEK AT HINTON, I ALMOST ACCIDENTLY DRANK HER DIET COKE FROM THE COOLER. DEE CAUGHT ME, THE DIET COKE WAS IN MY HAND, AND NOT DRANK, SO ALL WAS WELL. IT WAS HER LAST DIET COKE, TO BOOT. SHE WOULD NEVER DRINK A DIET PEPSI. IT DIDN’T MATTER TO ME WHICH DIET POP I CONSUMED, BUT IT SURE MATTERED TO HER. WE LAUGHED ABOUT THIS AT THE TIME, AND TO THIS DAY.” “ON COOL DAYS, WE WOULD TRY TO FIND A PICNIC SHELTER WITH GLASS WINDOWS AND A DOOR, AND TABLES. THEY WERE FEW AND FAR IN BETWEEN AT THAT TIME…THE MOST MEMORABLE TIME FOR ME: WAS WHEN WE PAINTED IN THE PICNIC SHELTER IN MASKINOGE, SOUTH OF THE HIGHWAY INTO THE PARK.” “IT WAS COOL /COLD, WITH A WIND, AND A FEW SNOWFLAKES—THE THIRD WEEK IN SEPTEMBER. WE STOKED A FIRE IN THE CAMP KITCHEN, AND IT KEPT US AND NICE AND TOASTY. WE WERE STILL ALL BUNDLED UP IN HOODIES AND WINTER CLOTHING…I NOTICED A FEW BUGS ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOW. NO WORRIES, WE WERE LOCATION PAINTING. BUGS ARE THE NORM. YOU PICK THEM OUT OF YOUR PAINTING, AND CARRY ON. THE LIGHT ON THE MOUNTAINS HAD TO BE CAPTURED.” “DEE COMES UP TO ME, AND ASKED: ‘KAREN, HAVE YOU NOTICED HOW MANY FLYING ANTS THERE ARE ON THE INSIDE OF THE WINDOWS.’…IT TURNED OUT THAT WE HAD STOKED THAT CAMP KITCHEN FOR FIVE HOURS OR SO. COMPLETELY HEATED UP THE CONCRETE AROUND IT. WAKING UP THE NEST OF FLYING ANTS! EACH WINDOW PANE WAS COVERED WITH HUNDREDS OF ANTS! AND, THEY WERE POURING OUT IN RIVERS FROM THE BASE OF THE COOK STOVE!” “NEEDLESS TO SAY, WE: PUT THE FIRE OUT, AND PACKED UP IN A HURRY. ANOTHER EN PLEIN AIR STORY FOR THE BOOKS…MOSTLY, WE STAYED IN THE WATERTON INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK. OCCASIONALLY, WE WENT SOUTH OR NORTH OF THE PARK TO PAINT.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001003
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"OLD MAN RIVER COLORS"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
Catalogue Number
P20190001004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"OLD MAN RIVER COLORS"
Date
$2,500.00
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
56.2
Width
75.6
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER; PAINTING DEPICTS BLUE SKY AND GREEN, RED, YELLOW, AND WHITE TREES IN BACKGROUND, WITH TREES DONE IN POINTILISM STYLE, MIDGROUND AND FOREGROUND SHOW A LAKE IN YELLOW, GREEN, BLUE, PINK, ORANGE, AND WHITE POINTILISM STYLE. PAINTING SIGNED IN GREY PAINT AT LOWER RIGHT CORNER, “OLD MAN RIVER COLORS, 1991, © KAREN BROWNLEE”. PAINTING HAS PENCILED TEXT ALONG LOWER EDGE/BORDER, “IS 21” X 28”, OLDMAN RIVER COLORS, 1991-52 © EOW #134”; PAINTING HAS ERASED TEXT ON FRONT, “PERMANENT COLLECTION (FOR LOGAN). BACK HAS MINOR STAINING; FRONT HAS ADHESIVE TAPE RESIDUE AT CORNERS; UPPER AND LOWER EDGES OF PAPER WERE TORN AND HAVE MINOR RESULTING FRAYING; UPPER EDGE OF PAINTING HAS STAMP IN PAPER, “CM FABRIANO 100/100”; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘OLDMAN RIVER COLOURS’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “I HAVE CONSISTENTLY THROUGHOUT MY CAREER TAKEN NUMEROUS PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE OLD RIVER COULEES, ESPECIALLY IN THE FALL. THIS PAINTING IS DERIVED FROM ONE OF THOSE PHOTOGRAPHS.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001004
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"THE FIELDS ARE HIGH"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
Catalogue Number
P20190001005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"THE FIELDS ARE HIGH"
Date
1992
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
56.3
Width
75
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER; PAINTING DONE IN POINTILLISM STYLE DEPICTING A BLUE SKY IN THE BACKGROUND ABOVE A BLACK BRIDGE AND BLUE RIVER, WITH GREEN AND YELLOW FARM FIELDS IN THE MIDGROUND AND FOREGROUND. PAINTING HAS GRID/BORDER LINES DRAWN IN PENCIL; PAINTING IS SIGNED IN BLACK PAINT AT THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER, “THE FIELDS ARE HIGH, 1992, © KAREN BROWNLEE”. PAINTING HAS PENCILED TEXT ALONG THE LOWER EDGE/BORDER, “THE FIELDS ARE HIGH, MONARCH BRIDGE, W/C + GOUACHE ON 300LB ARCHES, IS 21” X 28”, K. BROWNLEE 1992 ©, EOW #166”. BACK OF PAINTING HAS ADHESIVE TAPE RESIDUE AT CORNERS AND ALONG EDGES; BACK HAS MINOR BLACK STAINING; LEFT, UPPER, AND RIGHT EDGES OF PAPER WERE TORN AND HAVE MINOR RESULTING FRAYING; PAINTING HAS MINOR WARPING OF PAPER IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘THE FIELDS ARE HIGH, MONARCH BRIDGE’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “THE VIEW IS FROM THE SOUTH LOOKING NORTH. I HAD OFTEN SEEN THIS BRIDGE, WHICH SEEMED TO BE FORGOTTEN IN THE LANDSCAPE—COMPARED TO THE HIGH LEVEL BRIDGE IN LETHBRIDGE. ONE DAY, I WAS ABLE TO STOP ALONG THE HIGHWAY AND TAKE SEVERAL SHOTS OF IT.” “IT IS DERIVED FROM ONE OF MY PHOTOGRAPHS. I AM A POINT AND SHOOT PHOTOGRAPHER, EVEN THOUGH A FEW OF MY PHOTOGRAPHS HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED.” “I ADD THE DOTS OF COLOR TO ENLIVEN LARGE SHAPES OF FIELDS. THE CAMERA, FOR ME, DOES NOT CAPTURE THE VARIETY OF COLOR AND EMOTIONS THAT I FEEL WHEN I LOOK UPON THE LANDSCAPE.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001005
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"WATER TRACTORS HENDERSON LAKE"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
Catalogue Number
P20190001006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"WATER TRACTORS HENDERSON LAKE"
Date
1994
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.3
Width
57.2
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER; PAINTING DEPICTS THREE WATER TRACTORS IN RED, YELLOW BLUE AND GREEN ON A LAKE IN MIDGROUND, WATER WITH REFLECTION OF WATER TRACTORS IN FOREGROUND, AND BROWN DOCK WITH GREEN GRASS AND TREES IN BACKGROUND. PAINTING HAS GRID/BORDER LINES DRAWN IN PENCIL; PAINTING IN SIGNED IN BLACK PAINT AT LOWER LEFT CORNER, “WATER TRACTORS HENDERSON LAKE, © KAREN BROWNLEE, 1994”. PAINTING HAS PENCILED TEXT ALONG LOWER EDGE, “EOW #137, IMAGE 12” X 18”, KAREN BROWNLEE, 1994 © WATER TRACTORS, H2O + GOUACHE, W+N AA+A ON 30016 ARCHES”. BACK HAS ADHESIVE TAPE RESIDUE ALONG EDGES; FRONT HAS YELLOW ADHESIVE RESIDUE FROM STICKY NOTE AT LOWER EDGE; LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES OF PAPER WERE TORN AND HAVE MINOR RESULTING FRAYING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘WATER TRACTORS, HENDERSON LAKE’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “FOR A GOOD NUMBER OF YEARS, THESE WATER TRACTORS, WERE AVAILABLE FOR RENT TO GO PADDLING AROUND HENDERSON LAKE, LETHBRIDGE. THEY HELD TWO PEOPLE (MAYBE TWO ADULTS AND A CHILD). THE TRACTORS AND THEIR REFLECTIONS WERE BRIGHTLY COLOURED BLOBS ENTICINGLY WIGGLING ON THE WATER TO CATCH THE EYES OF CHILDREN.” “I FOUND THEM A GOOD CARDIO WORKOUT TO PEDDLE. MY SON, LOGAN AND I PADDLED AROUND A BIT. AND, I COULD NEVER GO FAST ENOUGH.” “I FREQUENTLY TOOK BOTH KIDS TO THE HENDERSON LAKE PLAYGROUND, ALMOST ALWAYS WITH MY CAMERA. THIS PAINTING IS DERIVED FROM ONE OF THESE PHOTOGRAPHS, IN MY STUDIO.” “THIS PAINTING REFLECTS THE HAPPINESS I FELT ON THOSE BEAUTIFUL DAYS WITH CHILDREN, THE SUN, AND NO TIME TABLE.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001006
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"BROCKET #1"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
Catalogue Number
P20190001007
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"BROCKET #1"
Date
1996
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.5
Width
57.5
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER; PAINTING DEPICTS A BLUE, PINK, PURPLE AND WHITE SKY IN THE BACKGROUND ABOVE BLUE HILLS, WITH ORANGE, BROWN, AND GREEN HILLS, WHITE AND GREEN GRAIN ELEVATORS AND BUILDINGS IN THE MIDGROUND BESIDE THREE WHITE AND BROWN TEEPEES, AND GREEN, BROWN, AND ORANGE GRASS AROUND A WHITE FENCE AND BROWN POWER LINE IN THE FOREGROUND. PAINTING HAS GRID/BORDER LINES DRAWN IN PENCIL; PAINTING IS SIGNED IN GREY PAINT AT THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER, “KAREN BROWNLEE 1996 ©”. PAINTING HAS PENCILED TEXT ALONG LOWER EDGE/BORDER, “S16 BROCKET #1 1996 KAREN BROWNLEE ©, W+N A+AA ON 300LB ARCHES. IN REALITY THE TEEPEES WOULD APPEAR MUCH SMALLER THAN DEPICTED. THIS RESERVATION ON THE FOOTHILLS LOOKS OUT ONTO THE ROCKY MTN.’S IN THE BACKGROUND.” PAINTING HAS STAMP IN PAPER AT THE LOWER LEFT CORNER, “AQUARELLE ARCHES”. BACK OF PAINTING HAS ADHESIVE TAPE RESIDUE ALONG THE EDGES; BACK HAS MINOR BLACK STAINING; LEFT, LOWER, AND RIGHT EDGES OF PAPER WERE TORN AND HAVE MINOR RESULTING FRAYING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘BROCKET #1’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “THE BROCKET ELEVATORS, TO ME, SEEMED MAJESTIC AGAINST THE BACKDROP OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. FOR THIS PAINTING, I CIRCLED THE ELEVATORS, TAKING MANY SHOTS FROM DIFFERENT ANGLES. THIS IS A TECHNIQUE THAT I DID FOR ALL OF THE RURAL PRAIRIE COMMUNITIES PAINTINGS. OFTEN I WOULD ARRIVE WHEN THE LIGHT WAS NOT GOOD, THE CLOUDS WERE VERY THREATENING, ETC. MY TIME AVAILABILITY TO SHOOT THE ELEVATORS WERE SMALL WINDOWS FOR SEVERAL YEARS BEFORE MANY OF THE ELEVATORS WERE DEMOLISHED.” “ALL I REALLY NEEDED FROM THE PHOTOGRAPH WAS A RECORD OF THE ELEVATOR COMPANY, ITS STRUCTURES: ANNEXES, BINS, THE AGENT’S HOUSE, AND SO ON. I COULD INVENT THE LIGHT—WHICH I DO FOR ALL MY PAINTINGS.” “THIS PAINTING SHOWS A COMMUNITY VIEW OF THE BROCKET ELEVATORS. IT IS FROM THE SOUTH EAST LOOKING NORTHWEST.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001007
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"FOREMOST #1"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
Catalogue Number
P20190001009
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"FOREMOST #1"
Date
1996
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.1
Width
57.2
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER; PAINTING DEPICTS A DIRT ROAD IN FOREGROUND, STREET SCENE WITH GREEN GRAIN ELEVATOR IN MIDGROUND, AND A TOWN SET AGAINST BLUE AND PURPLE SKY IN BACKGROUND. PAINTING HAS GRID/BORDER LINES DRAWN IN PENCIL; PAINTING SIGNED AT LOWER RIGHT EDGE, “FOREMOST #1, KAREN BROWNLEE 1996 ©”. PAINTING HAS PENCILED TEXT ALONG LOWER EDGE/BORDER, “S#14, FOREMOST #1, 1996 © KAREN BROWNLEE, W+N A+AA ON 300LB ARCHES. THE CO-OP GAS STATION BY THE ELEVATOR CONTAINED SEVERAL LOCAL FARMERS AND HUTTERITES—THEY HAD BROUGHT [ILLEGIBLE] OR SOME FOR GAS, OR TO TOWN ON ERRANDS. THEY SAT DISCUSSING CROPS AND MACHINERY INSIDE”. PAINTING HAS PENCILED TEXT VERTICALLY ALONG RIGHT EDGE/BORDER, “PUBLISHED AB REMEMBERS, PG 121”. LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS INVERTED STAMP IN PAPER, “AQUARELLE ARCHES”. BACK HAS TWO ROUND MARKS BELOW UPPER EDGE AND CORNERS; BACK HAS ADHESIVE TAPE RESIDUE ALONG LOWER EDGE; FRONT HAS MINOR TEAR IN PAPER ON LEFT EDGE/BORDER; LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES WERE TORN AND HAVE MINOR RESULTING FRAYING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘FOREMOST #1’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “THE UGG ELEVATOR (WHITE ONE IN THE FOREGROUND) IS THE ELEVATOR THAT MY HUSBAND, RAY BROWNLEE, USED TO HAUL GRAIN TO WHEN HE WAS YOUNG. THE VIEW IS FROM THE EAST LOOKING WEST.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001009
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE #3"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
Catalogue Number
P20190001010
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE #3"
Date
2000
Materials
PAPER, PAINT, LEAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
38.2
Width
57.5
Description
WATERCOLOUR PAINTING ON PAPER; PAINTING DEPICTS A WHITE, BLUE, AND PURPLE SKY IN THE BACKGROUND WITH “ATL” TOWER AND SURROUNDING BUILDINGS, STREET LAMPS, STREET SIGNS, AND CARS IN THE MIDGROUND, AND GRASS, A STREET LAMP, AND A CAR ON THE STREET IN THE FOREGROUND. PAINTING HAS GRID/BORDER LINES DRAWN IN PENCIL; PAINTING IS SIGNED IN WHITE PAINT AT THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER, “KAREN BROWNLEE, LETH #30596, MAY, 2000”. PAINTING HAS PENCILED TEXT ALONG THE LOWER EDGE/BORDER, “S96, KAREN BROWNLEE, LETHBRIDGE #3, MAY 2000. W+N A+AA ON 300LB ARCHES. THE VIEW OF THIS LARGE LANDMARK IS FROM THE INDUSTRIAL SECTION OF LETHBRIDGE, ON THE NORTH SIDE. THIS IS A VERY UNIQUE GRAIN TERMINAL ON THE ALBERTA PRAIRIES. FROM THE AIR OR BY LAND, IT IS VISIBLE + DISTINCTIVE”. BACK OF PAINTING HAS ADHESIVE TAPE RESIDUE; LEFT, UPPER, AND RIGHT EDGES OF PAPER WERE TORN AND HAVE MINOR RESIDUAL FRAYING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JANUARY 9, 2019, KAREN BROWNLEE SENT THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AN ARTIST’S STATEMENT DETAILING THE ARTWORKS DONATED. ON THE ‘LETHBRIDGE #3’ PAINTING, BROWNLEE WROTE, “HIGHWAY 3 GOES PAST THIS BIG WHITE GRAIN TERMINAL. MY FAMILY HOME AFTER GRADE THREE WAS ON NEARBY DIEPPE BLVD. I GREW UP ALMOST IN THE SHADOW OF THIS TERMINAL.” “THE VIEW IS FROM THE SE LOOKING NW.” BROWNLEE NOTED, ON THE PAINTINGS, “THE WATERCOLOUR PAINT USED IN THE FOLLOWING ARTWORKS: ARE ALL “AA” OR “AAA” COLORS. THE HIGHEST PERMANENCY RATING THAT THE PAINT MANUFACTURES LIST ON THE COLOR TUBES. THE PAINT MANUFACTURERS USED ARE PRIMARILY: WINSOR NEWTON AND GRUMBACHER WATERCOLOURS AND GOUACHE.” “ALL WORKS (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF #8 MASKINOGE #14) WERE CREATED EITHER ON 300 LB. OR 400 LB. ARCHES WATERCOLOUR PAPER.” AN ARTIST BIOGRAPHY TAKEN FROM BROWNLEE’S WEBSITE [“ABOUT ME” HTTPS://KARENBROWNLEE.COM/ABOUT-ME/] NOTES, “KAREN’S TIES TO THE PRAIRIES OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA GO BACK FOUR GENERATIONS, ON HER MOTHER’S SIDE, TO THE 1880’S. ON HER HUSBAND’S SIDE; HIS MOTHER’S AND FATHER’S FAMILY’S FARMING HISTORIES GOES BACK TO A SIMILAR TIME PERIOD. A STRONG INFLUENCE ON KAREN’S INTEREST IN THE HISTORIC, CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WAS ORAL STORYTELLING. BOTH HER MOTHER AND MOTHER-IN-LAW ARE AND WERE FAMILY HISTORIANS. THEY SHARED WITH HER, THEIR FAMILY EXPERIENCE WITH THE LAND, THE HARDSHIPS AND TRIUMPHS, AND THE AMUSING, ENTERTAINING RECOUNTS OF EVERYDAY PEOPLE TRYING TO MAKE A LIVING OFF THE LAND. HER PAINTINGS DEAL WITH THE LOVE OF THE LAND AND THE ENTHUSIASTIC EFFORT OF THE GENERATIONAL TOIL OF MANY FARM PIONEER FAMILIES, INCLUDING HER OWN. HER PAINTINGS SPEAK OF THE RELEVANCE AND SYMBOLISM OF MAN’S HISTORIC RELATIONSHIP WITH THE LAND. KAREN RESIDES IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. “SHE HAS AN EXTENSIVE AND VARIED ARTS BACKGROUND AS A PAINTER, ART TEACHER, ART JUROR, AND ADMINISTRATOR.” (ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS TRAVELLING EXHIBITION PROGRAM, 10TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBITION, 1996, POSTCARD PRODUCED BY THE PRAIRIE ART GALLERY, GRANDE PRAIRIE, ALBERTA) IN 1980 SHE BEGAN HER FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ARTIST PRACTICE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE ARTIST’S CV AND STATEMENT ON THE ARTWORK, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190001010
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOD, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20170033001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY
Date
2011
Materials
COTTON, WOOD, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
65
Width
42
Description
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY IN MATTE AND FRAME. EMBROIDERY COMPLETED IN BROWN ON WHITE FABRIC, AND SHOWS THE 1910 GALT HOSPITAL FRONT. EMBROIDERY INSIDE BROWN AND GREY MATTE AND BROWN WOOD FRAME WITH GLASS OVER. FRONT OF FRAME HAS BLACK ENGRAVED PLAQUE ON BOTTOM EDGE READING “GALT HOSPITAL/MUSEUM & ARCHIVES, 1910, DESIGNED AND STITCHED, 2011, BELINDA CROWSON”. BACK OF FRAME COVERED IN BROWN PAPER WITH SILVER WIRE ATTACHED FOR HANGING. BACK OF FRAME HAS WHITE LABEL WITH TEXT “LA GALLERY CUSTOM FRAMING & ART, 421-5TH ST. SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE, AB T1J 2B6, PH. 380.4556, FAX 380.4562, WEBSITE WWW.THELAGALLERY.COM, EMAIL INFO@THELAGALLERY.COM, W/O # H0761, ASSEMBLED BY CM”” WITH CHECK BOXES ON LABEL FOR “MOUNTING METHOD” AND “GLASS”, “NON-GLARE GLASS” CHECKED. FRAME HAS CHIPS ON FRONT EDGES; BACK HAS TEARS IN PAPER BACKING. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON NOVEMBER 16, 2017 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BELINDA CROWSON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A MUNICIPAL CAMPAIGN SIGN AND BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY PIECE. CROWSON WAS EMPLOYED WITH THE GALT MUSEUM AS THE MUSEUM EDUCATOR, WITH A REPUTATION AS A RENOWNED LOCAL HISTORIAN, UNTIL HER ELECTION TO CITY OF LETHBRIDGE COUNCIL IN 2017. ON THE BLACK EMBROIDERY PIECE, CROWSON RECALLED, “SHARING [THIS] WAS HARD, BECAUSE THIS WAS THE FIRST [PIECE] I DESIGNED…AND I VERY MUCH KNOW THE MEANING. IT WAS HANGING IN THE CLASSROOM [AT THE GALT MUSEUM] FOR YEARS, BUT IT WAS VERY HARD [TO GIVE UP], BECAUSE I DESIGNED IT; I STITCHED IT; AND IT’S A PIECE OF MYSELF.” “IT IS SOMETHING THAT I ACTUALLY DESIGNED, AND I HAD NEVER DESIGNED A PIECE BEFORE. I HAD TO LEARN HOW TO DESIGN IT, SO I ACTUALLY HAD A PICTURE AND GRAPH PAPER. I LEARNED HOW TO TAKE A PHOTOGRAPH, AND TURN IT INTO BLACKWORK STITCHES, EVEN THOUGH, OF COURSE, IT’S DONE IN BROWN, AND NOT BLACK. THE NAME DOESN’T ACTUALLY MEAN THE COLOR.” “BLACKWORK COMES FROM THE ELIZABETHAN TIME, AND IT WAS DONE WHEN LACE WAS REALLY EXPENSIVE. THEY WOULD TAKE BLACK THREAD ON WHITE MATERIAL. IF YOU DO BLACKWORK PROPERLY, IT’S ABSOLUTELY REVERSIBLE. IF YOU DID IT ON CUFFS OR COLLARS IT WOULD ALMOST LOOK LIKE LACE, AND BE REVERSIBLE FROM BOTH SIDES. IT’S A TYPE OF EMBROIDERY THAT USES PRIMARILY STRAIGHT LINES. I TAUGHT A CLASS TO PEOPLE AT THE GALT MUSEUM [ON] HOW TO DO BLACKWORK. I ACTUALLY TAUGHT AN EMBROIDERY CLASS IN THIS DESIGN, WHICH IS A VERY SIMPLE TYPE OF EMBROIDERY TO DO, BUT CAN CREATE INCREDIBLY ELABORATE DESIGNS.” “I COMPLETED [THIS PIECE] IN 2011 AND HAD IT FRAMED THAT SAME YEAR. IT’S SUEDE AROUND THE PICTURE MATTE.” “SOMETHING LIKE THIS SIZE OF PICTURE, IN BLACKWORK, PROBABLY ONLY TOOK ME ABOUT 2 WEEKS TO STITCH. IT’S A VERY QUICK DESIGN, BUT IT FILLS IN – AND, IF I WAS TO REDO IT AGAIN, I’D FILL IN MORE OF THE BLANK SPACES. [BLACKWORK IS] SUPPOSED TO LOOK AS COMPLETE AS POSSIBLE, BUT I WANTED TO MAKE THE COLUMNS STICK OUT, SO IT MAY HAVE WORKED IN THAT REGARD.” CROWSON ELABORATED ON HER BACKGROUND DOING EMBROIDERY, NOTING, “I HAVE BEEN DOING EMBROIDERY SINCE [I WAS] A KID. IT’S SOMETHING MY GRANDMOTHER KNEW; MY MOTHER KNEW; IT’S SOMETHING I WAS TAUGHT, AND, OF MY SIBLINGS, I’M THE ONLY ONE WHO DOES IT. THE OTHERS LIKE TO DO MORE STITCHING WITH MACHINES. I LOVE THE HAND-STITCHING, AND I HAVE LONG BEEN THINKING ABOUT DESIGNING. I ALSO HAVE A PASSION FOR HISTORIC BUILDINGS. I HAD DONE A BLACKWORK PIECE, WHICH WAS A PATTERN THAT I HAD BOUGHT AND I ABSOLUTELY LOVED IT. IT’S A REALLY NICE WAY OF DOING EMBROIDERY, SO I THOUGHT “THERE’S A WAY OF CAPTURING HISTORIC BUILDINGS IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY.” I MADE MYSELF A CHALLENGE OF FIGURING IT OUT, AND, OF COURSE, THE WAY I DO MANY THINGS, I DIDN’T ACTUALLY RESEARCH HOW TO DESIGN. I JUST TAUGHT MYSELF, AND IT TOOK ME A WEEKEND. I THREW AWAY ABOUT 3 DESIGNS, UNTIL I REALIZED YOU’VE GOT TO START IN THE CENTER AND WORK OUT. THE NICE THING ABOUT THE GALT HOSPITAL—BECAUSE I DID THE FAÇADE OF THE HOSPITAL [IN THIS PIECE]—IS THAT IT IS SO BEAUTIFULLY SYMMETRICAL, IT MADE IT EASIER. I HAD…THE VARIEGATED THREAD, AND THE MATERIAL TO STITCH ON. THEN IT WAS A MATTER OF ACTUALLY CREATING IT. THE PATTERN HAD A LOT OF ERASING DONE ON IT, AS I CHANGED THINGS. I’M VERY PROUD OF THE WINDOWS…MY GOODNESS, THAT BUILDING HAS A LOT OF WINDOWS! IT WAS FUN, AND THIS WAS THE FIRST ONE [I MADE]. SINCE THEN I HAVE DONE GALBRAITH SCHOOL, THE BOWMAN, AND THE POST OFFICE. THE GALBRAITH SCHOOL IS HANGING AT GALBRAITH SCHOOL, THE BOWMAN IS IN MY HOUSE, AND THE POST OFFICE WAS RAFFLED OFF TO HELP RAISE MONEY FOR CHINATOWN.” “I REMEMBER, AS A KID, I WAS NOT SUPPOSED TO, BUT I WENT THROUGH ONE OF MY MOM’S JEWELRY BOXES. IN THERE WAS THE WORK SHE HAD DONE AS A KID. SHE HAD BEEN PRACTICING HER STITCHES. THAT STUCK WITH ME, AND I REMEMBER HER TALKING ABOUT HOW SHE HAD BEEN TAUGHT FROM HER MOM. MY GRANDMOTHER KEPT CROSS-STITCHING EMBROIDERY UNTIL HER ARTHRITIS GOT TOO BAD. WHEN I DO IT, I REALLY DO FEEL I AM PART OF THAT CHAIN, BECAUSE I DO HAVE EMBROIDERY THAT BOTH MY MOM AND MY GRANDMOTHER HAVE DONE. IT IS INTERESTING BECAUSE, FROM THE MENNONITE TRADITION ESPECIALLY, A LOT OF THE STITCHES I HAVE COME FROM THAT TRADITION, SO IT’S VERY MUCH A PART OF THAT. I WOULD LIKE TO SIT DOWN, ONE DAY WHEN I GET TIME, WITH MY MOM’S COUSIN, WHO DOES WHAT’S CALLED 3-D EMBROIDERING. IN MY FAMILY, PEOPLE ACTUALLY HAVE THE ORDERED EVERY DAY TEA TOWELS, THEY HAVE THE BED TOWELS. IT’S SUCH A PART OF THE SOUTHERN ART, SO MY [WORKS ARE] A LITTLE MORE MODERN INTERPRETATION OF SOME OF THAT. MY GREAT-GRANDMOTHER WOULD HAVE SAT IN RUSSIA, DOING THE SAME STITCHES.” “I DON’T KNOW [HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE REGION ARE DOING BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY]. I TAUGHT THE CLASS IN … EMBROIDERY, BUT I DON’T THINK A LOT OF PEOPLE ARE PICKING UP BLACKWORK. IT’S INTERESTING, WHEN I MENTION THIS, TALKING TO SOME PEOPLE ONLINE, ONE OF MY FRIENDS WHO HAS A HISTORIC HOUSE IS LIKE, “COULD I PAY YOU TO DESIGN MY HOUSE?” [BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY] IS A FUN WAY FOR ME TO TAKE THOSE TWO IDEAS I LOVE-–OF STITCHING, AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS-–BECAUSE PHOTOGRAPHY, WITH WHAT PEOPLE HAVE TODAY, IS RELATIVELY EASY. YOU CAN TAKE POINT-AND-SHOOT. SOME PEOPLE ARE MUCH BETTER AT IT--THEY’RE ARTISTIC-–BUT THIS IS A WAY OF CAPTURING A BUILDING. YOU HAVE TO, VERY PERSONALLY, SIT THERE, AND BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO MEASURE EVERYTHING OUT, EVEN TO DESIGN IT, YOUR APPRECIATION OF THE ARCHITECTURE IS VERY DIFFERENT THAN A POINT-AND-SHOOT CAMERA.” “I’VE DONE FIVE BUILDINGS NOW, AND I HAVE SEEN EACH ONE IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY. I REMEMBER THINKING, WITH THE POST OFFICE, WHEN YOU ACTUALLY LOOK AT THE HEIGHT OF THE CLOCK TOWER COMPARED TO THE BASE OF THE BUILDING, [YOU SEE THE] PHENOMENAL ARCHITECTURE, [BUT] IT’S ONLY WHEN YOU ARE STITCHING IT THAT YOU REALIZE THAT THE BASE OF THAT BUILDING ISN’T STRAIGHT. THE BUILDING GOES WITH THE SLANT OF THE SIDEWALK, AND I HAD TO TAKE AN ARTISTIC EYE, AND MAKE THE BOTTOM OF THE BUILDING STRAIGHT FROM THE FRONT. THE OTHER THING, WITH THE POST OFFICE, THERE’S ALMOST NO HISTORIC [PHOTOGRAPHS] OF IT STRAIGHT-ON; IT’S ALWAYS ON THE CORNER, BECAUSE THAT’S EASIER. I CAN’T CROSS-STITCH MY BUILDING ON THE CORNER, SO I HAD TO ACTUALLY TAKE MY OWN PHOTOGRAPHS, INSTEAD OF HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS. THIS HAS REALLY GIVEN ME A NEW APPRECIATION OF THE BUILDINGS, BECAUSE I HAD TO LOOK AT THEM SO CAREFULLY. WITH THE BOWMAN—WITH ALL THESE BUILDINGS--YOU HAD TO THINK WHAT TIME PERIOD YOU WANTED TO DISPLAY. SO THE ONE OF THE BOWMAN, I HAVE THE UNION JACK FLYING [IN] THE PICTURE, BECAUSE I WANTED [TO CAPTURE] IT BACK WHEN IT WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED.” “IT’S AN ADDICTION. YOU SIT IN FRONT OF THE TELEVISION, AND SOMETIMES A WEEKEND PASSES AND YOU HAVEN’T DONE MUCH. WHEN YOU’RE WORKING ON A PROJECT, FOR MYSELF, IT’S LIKE, “I’M GOING TO GET IT DONE.” THEN YOU TAKE A BREAK BEFORE YOU PICK UP THE NEXT PROJECT, SO YOU CAN DO ALL THE OTHER STUFF. TRYING TO PUT [AN ESTIMATE OF TIME SPENT CREATING] IT, I WOULDN’T HAVE A CLUE.” “I THINK EVERYBODY [HAS] MULTI-FACETS IN THEIR BRAINS, AND I USE DIFFERENT PARTS OF IT. IT’S ALWAYS FUN TO CHALLENGE, TO TRY NEW THINGS. ONE OF THE THINGS I’D LIKE TO DO…I’VE SEEN PEOPLE WHO ARE CROSS-STITCHING ON METAL [PUTTING HOLES IN]. IN THE SPRING, I WILL BE DOING A CROSS-STITCH PATTERN ON ‘PAGE WIRE’, THAT [ATTACHES] TO A FENCE, SO IT WILL BE OUTDOOR CROSS-STITCH. I LOVE WORKING WITH MY SILKS, AND MY REALLY DELICATE STUFF, BUT THE BEAUTIFUL THING ABOUT EMBROIDERY IS YOU CAN TAKE IT DIFFERENT WAYS. WHY SHOULD KNITTERS HAVE ALL THE FUN WHEN THEY GO ‘YARN-BOMBING’? WE CAN DO ‘CROSS-STITCH BOMBING’, TOO. IT’S ONE OF THOSE THINGS WHERE YOU CAN TAKE A VERY OLD FORM, AND MAKE IT VERY MODERN.” “IT WAS A HARD DECISION [TO DONATE IT]. I HAVE THE PATTERN. I CAN ALWAYS RECREATE IT. IT WOULD NEVER BE THE SAME. I DON’T CARE IF YOU RECREATE SOMETHING, IT’S NEVER THE SAME THING. BUT I HAD TO LET THE LOGICAL PART OF MY BRAIN HANDLE THIS DECISION, BECAUSE IT DID HANG IN THE CLASSROOM AND YOU POINTED TO THIS THING A LOT WHEN WE DISCUSSED THE BUILDING. FOR A LOT OF STUDENTS THIS WAS THE PICTURE OF THE BUILDING THAT THEY REMEMBER SEEING, SO THE CONNECTION TO MY JOB JUST MADE IT SUCH A STRONG [POINT]. THE OTHER THING IS, AS AN ARTIST…I GET TO SAY I’M AN ART-PIECE IN A MUSEUM. THAT’S QUITE THE HONOR. IT WASN’T CHOSEN AS AN ART-PIECE, BUT STILL I CAN MAKE THAT WORK. [I SPENT] PROBABLY A WEEK TALKING TO FAMILY MEMBERS AS WELL, BECAUSE I HAVE A LOT OF CROSS-STITCH IN MY HOUSE, FROM PATTERNS AND DIFFERENT THINGS. I REMIND THEM I’M NOT GOING TO DIE SOON, BUT SOME OF MY NIECES HAVE TOLD ME WHICH ONES THEY WANT WHEN I’M DEAD. SO I ALSO NEEDED TO TALK TO FAMILY, AND MAKE SURE THAT NOBODY WAS GOING TO BE CRINGING TO FIND IT WAS GONE. IT IS INTERESTING HOW THINGS THAT YOU CREATE [HAVE] A SENSE OF OWNERSHIP FOR OTHER PEOPLE TOO, SO I HAD TO DOUBLE CHECK WITH OTHER PEOPLE TOO.” “IT WAS JULY OR AUGUST OF 2000, WHEN I WAS INTERVIEWED BY WILMA WOODS, AND I WAS BETWEEN TEACHING [JOBS]…AND GETTING CLOSE TO THE START OF SCHOOL. I DIDN’T REALLY WANT TO SUB, AND IT WAS A TEMPORARY SIX MONTH POSITION. I APPLIED, AND WILMA INTERVIEWED ME ON THE MAIN FLOOR, IN THE HALF OF WHAT’S NOW THE FRIEND’S BOARDROOM. THAT IS WHERE HER OFFICE WAS, AND WHERE SHE DID THE INTERVIEW. I PREPPED. I WENT TO B. MACCABEE’S BOOKSTORE AND BOUGHT THE CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND READ THE ENTIRE BOOK…BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. I WASN’T REALLY THINK ABOUT WHETHER I’D GET THE JOB, SO I GAVE REFERENCES TO HER AND REALIZED I HADN’T ACTUALLY LET THE REFERENCES KNOW. I CALLED THEM AFTER I GOT HOME, WHICH WAS GOOD, BECAUSE I GUESS SHE CALLED FIVE MINUTES AFTERWARDS BECAUSE SHE WAS PRETTY QUICK. I STARTED [AT THE GALT MUSEUM] SEPTEMBER 1, 2000, WITH THE EXHIBIT ON THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT AND ITS CENTENNIAL. IT WAS A SIX MONTH GRANT POSITION. I WAS SUPPOSED TO BE A TEMPORARY POSITION, BECAUSE AT THAT POINT THE E. TEAM HAD GEARED DOWN ON STAFF AT THE MUSEUM. SO I STARTED THERE, AND…JANUARY AND FEBRUARY OF THE YEAR, THEY WENT TO CITY COUNCIL AND ASKED FOR IT TO BE MADE A FULL-TIME PERMANENT POSITION. IT HAD TO BE POSTED, BUT I APPLIED AND GOT THE FULL-TIME PERMANENT POSITION IN MARCH 2001. I MADE THE DECISION, BUT WITHOUT REALLY THINKING ABOUT IT, THAT TEMPORARY POSITION TURNED INTO A SEVENTEEN YEAR JOB.” “[OF THE WORKS I’VE DONE] IT’S DEFINITELY ONE OF THE BIG ONES. THERE [WERE] A FEW OTHER THINGS I TOOK OUT OF MY OFFICE THAT HAVE BEEN WITH ME FROM THE BEGINNING…THE REASON I STITCHED THIS BUILDING WAS MY CONNECTION TO THE BUILDING. IT’S NOT ONLY A PHENOMENAL BUILDING, BUT THIS WAS ‘HOME’ FOR 17 YEARS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170033001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170033001
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
37
Length
36.4
Width
20
Description
A. BUTTON ACCORDION, 37 CM TALL X 36.4 CM LONG X 20 CM WIDE. ACCORDION IS BROWN POLISHED WOOD WITH BLACK AND LIGHT BROWN TRIM; ACCORDION HAS BLACK PLASTIC BELLOWS AND SILVER PLATE OVER THREE ROWS OF WHITE BUTTONS AT SIDE; OPOPSITE END OF ACCORDION HAS FOUR ROWS OF WHITE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS SET IN SILVER PLATE ABOVE BLACK LEATHER STRAP. TOP OF ACCORDION HAS TWO SILVER BASS/TREBLE SWITCHES. BORDERS AROUND BELLOWS HAVE PEAL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID. ACCORDION IS MISSING BUTTON FROM FOURTH ROW OF BUTTONS, AND HAS TWO WOODEN SUBSTITUTE BUTTONS IN SECOND AND FOURTH ROWS. FRONT OF ACCORDION HAS WINDOW ABOVE BELLOWS WITH GLASS PLATE OVER WHITE PAPER AND BLACK TEXT “C. DALLAPE, TRENTO (ITALIA)”. ACCORDION HAS FOUR BRASS FEET ON SIDE WITH FOUR ROWS OF BUTTONS. WOOD IS WORN AT HANDLES AND EDGES; METAL PLATES AND ACCENTS HAVE CORROSION. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BLUE COTTON BAG, 72 CM LONG X 53 CM WIDE. BAG HAS HANDLE ATTACHED TO COVER FLAP; COVER FLAP HAS THREE BUTTON HOLES. BAG HAS TWO BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS ON FRONT ALONG TOP EDGE. BAG HAS PATCHES STITCHED WITH BLACK THREAD ON FRONT UPPER LEFT CORNER, ON BACK IN THE CENTER OF BAG, AND ON THE BACK BESIDE LEFT CORNER OF HANDLE. BAG IS TORN IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER AND FRAYED; BAG IS TORN ALONG LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES AND ON FRONT AT UPPER RIGHT EDGE; BACK HAS TORN HOLES AT BOTTOM. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LESLIE MORTON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A BUTTON ACCORDION. THE ACCORDION WAS OWNED AND PLAYED BY MORTON’S GRANDFATHER, GIUSEPPE (JOSEPH) "FABRO" BRIDAROLLI, AND WAS LATER OWNED BY HER UNCLE, SYLVIO "SYL" BRIDAROLLI, BEFORE BECOMING IN HER POSSESSION. MORTON DISCUSSED HER MEMORIES OF THE ACCORDION IN HER HOME, STATING, “IT’S A BUTTON ACCORDION…THERE’S BUTTON ACCORDIONS AND PIANO ACCORDIONS, AND I PLAY THE PIANO. IF I HAD A PIANO ACCORDION, I COULD AT LEAST PICK OUT THE NOTES BECAUSE I COULD READ THE MUSIC. THIS IS SOMETHING DIFFERENT. YOU HAVE TO BE A REAL MUSICIAN TO PLAY A BUTTON ACCORDION BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY BY EAR. THERE’S THE MELODY SIDE AND THE CHORD SIDE AND YOU JUST DO IT BY EAR. IF YOU LISTEN TO HIS TAPE [IN ARCHIVES]…HE WAS JUST TURNING 81 WHEN HE MADE THIS TAPE AND HE WAS TRYING TO REMEMBER SOME OF THE SONGS HE KNEW. ONE CAME OUT REALLY GOOD AND THEN HE GOT THE MELODY OF SOMETHING. HE WAS PICKING IT OUT AND HE WAS INTO THINGS HE WAS MORE FAMILIAR WITH. HE WAS VERY MUSICAL AND HAD A REAL EAR. IT’S SORT OF LIKE AN IRISH BUTTON ACCORDION BUT NOT QUITE. IT’S BIGGER.” “WHAT I REMEMBER [MY GRANDPARENTS] TELLING ME IS WHEN HE WAS HERE, HE HAD IT MADE FOR HIM IN ITALY AND IT WAS SENT OVER TO CANADA WHEN HE LIVED HERE. I ALSO UNDERSTOOD HE PLAYED IN ITALY BUT THIS ACCORDION WAS MADE FOR HIM THERE AND SENT OVER [IN THE 1920S].” “IT’S A TREASURE. I WOULD SAY OF ALL THE THINGS I FOUND IN MY PARENTS’ HOME AND ALL THE THINGS I’VE HAD TO FIND HOMES FOR, ALL THE THINGS THAT WOULD REMIND ME OF MY CHILDHOOD, THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING. EVER. IT EVOKES REALLY STRONG MEMORIES. THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT MUSIC IN A FAMILY. IF YOU CAN MEET TOGETHER AND YOU CAN SHARE MUSIC, WHICH OUR FAMILY DID, IT LEAVES AN IMPRESSION THAT YOU DON’T EVER FORGET.” “[THE ACCORDION] REALLY WAS FOR MY GRANDFATHER [GIUESEPPE “JOSEPH” BRIDAROLLI]. IT WAS FROM HIM. THAT’S WHERE THE [LOVE OF] MUSIC CAME FROM FOR ALL [MY FAMILY].” “WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL, WE WOULD GO OVER TO [MY GRANDPARENTS’] HOUSE AT 909 - 8TH STREET NORTH, [MY GRANDFATHER] ALWAYS PLAYED. HE’D JUST SIT IN HIS KITCHEN AND HE’D PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. HE WOULD SIT ON A BENCH BY THE BACK DOOR OUTSIDE AND HE WOULD PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. AT CHRISTMAS, MY GRANDPARENTS WOULD COME OVER [TO OUR HOME] AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. MY MOTHER WOULD PLAY THE VIOLIN, MY SISTER THE PIANO. SHE WAS BETTER THAN ME AND WE WOULD ALL SING CAROLS. FOR MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE THE SAME. HE ALWAYS WAS THERE PLAYING HIS ACCORDION. WHEN MY UNCLE AND AUNT CAME TO VISIT, IT WAS THE SAME THING. HE’D PLAY.” ON HER FAMILY’S HISTORY AND CONNECTION TO THE ACCORDION, MORTON ELABORTED, “[MY GRANDFATHER] STOPPED WORKING IN THE MINES IN THE FIFTIES. HE WAS STILL DOING IT IN THE FIFTIES. WHEN THEY CAME OVER FOR SUNDAY DINNER OR WE WENT OVER THERE [MY GRANDFATHER WOULD PLAY]. [WHEN] MY GRANDMOTHER WAS WELL ENOUGH, WE WOULD ALTERNATE [HOMES FOR DINNERS]. THEN WHEN IT GOT HARDER FOR HER [SUNDAY DINNER] WAS ALWAYS IN OUR HOME. I MADE A TAPE WHEN MY PARENTS WENT TO INDIA IN 1971, AND THAT’S WHEN MY UNCLE GOT MARRIED AS WELL. WE CORRESPONDED BY CASSETTE TAPE. THAT SOUNDS VERY ANTIQUATED NOWADAYS. THERE WAS NO EMAIL. PHONES WERE DIFFICULT WHEN YOU TRIED TO PHONE INDIA AND [WE] HAD TO YELL INTO THE PHONE. SO WE DECIDED TO MAKE CASSETTE TAPES…I WENT DOWN SEPTEMBER THE 5TH, 1971…AND I HAD HIM PLAY THE ACCORDION SO THAT I COULD SEND THIS TAPE TO MY PARENTS. [THIS TAPE HAS] HIS VOICE A LITTLE BIT IN THE BACKGROUND AND MINE A TINY BIT BUT IT’S HIS MUSIC THAT’S IMPORTANT. IT WAS SENT OVER TO INDIA FOR THEM AND WE’VE KEPT IT EVER SINCE. HE DIED IN ’72 AND WE PLAYED THAT ACCORDION TAPE A HUNDRED MILLION TIMES. MY UNCLE ALSO HAD ONE OF COURSE. HE WAS ALWAYS PLAYING. MY MOTHER TELLS A STORY, ALTHOUGH IT’S NOT A FAMILY ONE BUT SHE SAID THAT FRIENDS OF HIS, WHEN IT WAS THEIR BIRTHDAY, HE WOULD GO OVER SIT UNDER THEIR WINDOW AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. HE WOULD PLAY AT GATHERINGS OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY. HE PLAYED AT DANCES.” “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN SEPTEMBER 7TH 1890 AND MY GRANDMOTHER [MARIA BERTE] WAS JANUARY 9TH, 1893. THEY WERE FROM CAVENDINE, ITALY, WHICH IS IN THE PROVINCE OF TRENTO AND THAT’S WHERE THIS ACCORDION WAS MANUFACTURED…THEY WERE VERY POOR OVER THERE…I FOUND A PAPER IN THE MIDDLE OF THE FAMILY DOCUMENTS THAT, I DON’T SPEAK ITALIAN, BUT IT LOOKED LIKE A POVERTY DOCUMENT THAT HAS MY GRANDFATHER—HIS FATHER’S NAME ON IT. THEY WERE VERY POOR AND THEY WOULD HAVE COME HERE TO MAKE A BETTER LIFE FOR HIS FAMILY.” “I UNDERSTAND THAT MY GRANDFATHER CAME OVER BY HIMSELF PRIOR TO 1920. HE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE AND SIZED THINGS UP. HE WENT BACK TO ITALY AND GOT MARRIED TO MY GRANDMOTHER IN 1920. MY MOTHER WAS BORN OVER THERE. IT WAS 1924, IN OCTOBER WHEN HE BROUGHT HIS WIFE AND HIS YOUNG DAUGHTER, ANN, OVER. THEY CAME ON A BOAT AND LANDED IN THE MARITIMES, AND THEY MADE THEIR WAY TO LETHBRIDGE. THEY STARTED IN COALHURST FOR A SHORT WHILE…AND THEN THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. MY UNCLE WAS BORN HERE IN 1926.” “I CAN GUESS [MY GRANDPARENTS MOVED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA] BECAUSE [OF] MILLIE LUCIANI—THERE WERE BERTE FAMILIES HERE AND MY GRANDMOTHER WAS A BERTE. MILLIE LUCICANI’S FATHER[WAS A BERTE AND HE WAS A COUSIN OF MY [GRAND]MOTHER] … THERE WAS COMMUNICATION THERE THAT THIS WAS THE PLACE TO COME BECAUSE THEY WERE ALREADY HERE.” “WHEN MY GRANDFATHER DIED IN 1972, I HAD THIS ACCORDION AND THEN, AT A CERTAIN POINT I GAVE IT TO MY UNCLE, HIS SON, SYL. HE HAD IT IN FERNIE THEN IN MERRITT. HE DIED IN 2011 AND MY AUNT SENT IT TO ME. WE TALKED ABOUT LEAVING IT TO THE MUSEUM BUT I DIDN’T WANT TO LET GO OF IT YET. WHAT HAS SPURRED IT ON IS THAT THERE IS NOBODY ELSE TO PASS IT ON TO.” “I WAS GIVEN THIS BECAUSE, WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL I JUST LOVED IT. HE PLAYED AND I LOVED IT. MY UNCLE LOVED IT TOO, HE DIDN’T LIVE HERE AND BECAUSE IT WAS EASY AND MY PARENTS HAD TO LEAVE FOR INDIA, I GOT IT TEMPORARILY. IT DID BELONG MORE TO MY MOM AND MY UNCLE THAN TO ME, BUT I HAD IT FIRST FOR QUITE A WHILE.” “MY SISTER AND I WERE TALKING AND WE THOUGHT, WELL REALLY IT WAS MORE [OUR UNCLE’S] THAN OURS. THAT’S WHY [I GAVE IT TO HIM]. BY GOING TO ME IT WENT TO MY MOM AND SHE WAS THE ELDEST. BUT WHEN MY MOTHER WAS GETTING REALLY SICK AND HE WAS COMING TO VISIT HER AND SHE WASN’T GOING TO LIVE, THEN IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IT GO TO THE NEXT PERSON WHICH REALLY WOULD BE MY UNCLE. WE THOUGHT IT WAS THE RIGHT THING AND HE WAS ENCHANTED. IT WAS REALLY HIS AT THAT POINT.” “I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY IT SO I TRIED, BUT I HAD ARTHRITIS IN MY SHOULDERS SO I COULDN’T. I WOULD TAKE [IT] OUT EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE AND TRY TO PLAY “SILENT NIGHT”. I JUST TOOK IT WHEREVER I WENT AND TRIED TO LOOK AFTER IT.” “IT WOULD BE [ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN MY HOME] AND I’M SURE FOR MY UNCLE TOO. PICTURES ARE REALLY IMPORTANT TO OUR FAMILY AND TO ME. I KNOW TO MY UNCLE SYL AS WELL THIS WOULD BE [IMPORTANT] BECAUSE WE ALL REMEMBERED [MY GRANDFATHER] PLAYING ALL THE TIME. HE NEVER SAT DOWN WITHOUT IT ON HIS LAP. TO MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE EVEN STRONGER BECAUSE, OF COURSE, HE GREW UP WITH HIS FATHER PLAYING THE ACCORDION.” “MY GRANDPARENTS HAD TWO CHILDREN, MY MOTHER ANN, AND HER BROTHER SYL. SYL NEVER HAD ANY CHILDREN, THEY ADOPTED A GIRL ONCE BUT THAT WAS LONG AGO [AND] SHE’S OUT OF THE PICTURE. THERE’S MY AUNT, HIS WIFE, AND THERE’S ME. MY PARENTS HAVE PASSED AWAY AND MY SISTER, LAUREL, PASSED AWAY IN 2009 IN GENEVA. IF SOMETHING HAPPENS TO ME, THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO WAY THIS BRIDAROLLI FAMILY WILL CARRY ON. THE ANDERSON FAMILY [MY FATHER’S FAMILY] THERE WERE EIGHT OF THEM. THERE’S NOBODY ELSE. THERE’S ME AND I FEEL A LITTLE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE IT’S POSSIBLE THAT THE JOSEPH BRIDAROLLI FAMILY IS IN SOME WAY REMEMBERED. MY GRANDFATHER WAS A COAL MINER IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE ALSO WAS A PART OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY AND THEY WEREN’T RICH; THEY WEREN’T POWERFUL. THEY DIDN’T HOLD POSITIONS BUT I THINK THEIR STORY IS VERY IMPORTANT AS IMMIGRANTS FROM ITALY AND I’D LIKE TO TELL THEIR STORY. THAT’S THE REASON I BROUGHT IT. I THINK IT WOULD BE REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IN SOME WAY IT IS PERPETUATED BOTH FOR MY UNCLE AND MY MOTHER AS WELL AS HER PARENTS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180011000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1951
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, BRONZE, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20180026000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1951
Materials
LEATHER, BRONZE, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
76
Width
7
Description
DOUBLE-BUCKLED BROWN LEATHER BELT, FLOWER IN CENTER WITH FILIGREE DESIGN. TWO BUCKLES STAMPED “SOLID BRONZE.” 38 CM FROM BUCKLE TO BUCKLE ON ONE SIDE. BELT IS 2 CM IN WIDTH ON BACK AND MOST OF FRONT, FRONT CENTER DESIGN IS 7 CM AT WIDEST POINT. MINOR WEAR ON LEATHER AROUND BUCKLES FROM BENDING. FOUR BUCKLE HOLES ON EACH SIDE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
ON NOVEMBER 28, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MIRIAM SMITH REGARDING HER DONATION OF A LEATHER BELT. THE BELT WAS GIVEN TO SMITH BY A RESEARCH STATION CO-WORKER NAMED ALEC JOHNSON, WHO DID LEATHER WORK. ON THE BELT, SMITH RECALLED, “[I FIRST ACQUIRED THE BELT] WHEN I WAS WORKING AT THE RESEARCH STATION. NOW, I THINK I GRADUATED IN’47, ’48…AND MY FIRST JOB WAS WITH THE ROYAL BANK. I WORKED THERE FOR A YEAR AND THEN I WENT OUT TO THE RESEARCH STATION. I WORKED FOR A FELLA BY THE NAME OF ARNOLD PLATT…I WAS IN THE RESEARCH STATION AND ALEC JOHNSON WORKED OVER IN THE EXPERIMENTAL FARM, WE USED TO CALL IT AT THE TIME, AND HE WAS DOING TOOL LEATHER WORK AND HE MADE ME THIS BELT AS A GIFT…” “WE WERE MORE RELAXED, WE DIDN’T DO THE THINGS THAT [THE OTHER WORKERS] DID…I ALWAYS REMEMBER ALEC JOHNSON, HE WAS A TALL, GOOD-LOOKING RED-HEADED FELLOW AND I USED TO THINK HE WAS PRETTY CUTE…HE MADE ME THIS BELT…I ASKED HIM [TO MAKE ME THIS BELT]…IT WOULD HAVE TO BE ’50, ’51…BUT HE WAS DOING TOOL LEATHER AND IT WAS REALLY VERY NICE, AND HE SHOWED ME AND I ASKED IF HE’D MAKE ME A BELT AND HE DID. HE DIDN’T EVEN CHARGE ME FOR IT. “[I WOULDN’T HAVE MUCH CONTACT WITH ALEC] BECAUSE HE WORKED ON THE EXPERIMENTAL SIDE, AND YOU KNOW MAYBE HE STOPPED IN ONCE IN A WHILE TO VISIT WITH ARNOLD PLATT OR SOMEBODY THAT WORKED THERE.” “I WORE [THE BELT] QUITE A LOT A LONG TIME AGO, BUT BELTS USED TO BE THE IN THING…I [HAVE] A DRAWER FULL OF BELTS AND I DON’T WEAR THEM…I USED TO WEAR IT WHEN I WENT TO WORK WITH A SKIRT YOU KNOW YOU…IT WAS LIKE A PIECE OF A NECKLACE.” SMITH ELABORATED ON HER TIME WORKING WITH THE RESEARCH STATION, NOTING, “THE REASON I WENT TO THE RESEARCH STATION IS MY GIRLFRIEND, HER NAME WAS IRA DORE, AND HER DAD, JOHN DORE, WORKED THERE AND ALICE HARPER, SHE WAS ALICE WAHL AT THAT TIME, HER AND I HAD BEEN FRIENDS FOR A LONG TIME AND THAT’S HOW I APPLIED AND GOT THE JOB AND IT WAS A VERY NICE JOB. GOT PICKED UP AT HOME AT 8:00[AM] GOT DRIVEN HOME AT 4:00[PM] OR 4:30[PM] AND WAS JUST REALLY A NICE PLACE. MET LOTS OF NICE PEOPLE…I WAS MARRIED IN ’52 AND IF I REMEMBER CORRECTLY, WHEN YOU GOT MARRIED, AND IF YOU WORKED FOR THE GOVERNMENT ONCE YOU WERE MARRIED, YOU DIDN’T WORK FOR THE GOVERNMENT ANYMORE, SO IT WOULD BE MAYBE IN [1949-1951] THAT I WORKED OUT THERE…[DOING] SECRETARIAL WORK.” “[THE RESEARCH STATION WAS WORKING ON] CEREALS, AND THEY WOULD PLANT DIFFERENT TYPES OF WHEAT AND BARLEY…AND CHECK IT AND SEE…I WAS IN THE...SCIENCE RESEARCH BUILDING BUT A LOT OF OUR WORKERS WERE OVER IN THE EXPERIMENTAL FARM…” “[THE RESEARCH STATION] WAS JUST A PLEASANT PLACE TO WORK. EVERYBODY WAS RELAXED AND PLANNED, THERE WAS A CAFETERIA [RUN BY NORA HAHN]…” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180026000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180026000
Acquisition Date
2018-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160044002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
9.5
Width
0.6
Description
SMALL, METAL MECHANICAL PENCIL WITH ADJUSTABLE BALL CHAIN ATTACHMENT. PENCIL HAS RAISED FILIGREE-DESIGN ELEMENTS THAT IS DETACHABLE. GOOD CONDITION: OVERALL TARNISHING OF METAL
Subjects
WRITTEN COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
DOMESTIC
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS PENCIL CAME FROM THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS ALICE SAVED FROM THE ANDERSON SISTERS ERA. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE: RUTH EXPLAINS, “[THIS IS] A TINY LITTLE MECHANICAL PENCIL USED TO BE SITTING ON MOM’S MUSIC STAND, SO THAT IF THERE WAS A NOTATION OR SOMETHING THEY WANTED TO DO [SHE COULD WRITE IT DOWN]. [IT] WAS SOMETHING USEFUL, BUT VERY PRETTY TO BE UP WHERE THEY WERE DOING THEIR MUSIC. THEY TREATED THEIR SPACE ON STAGE VERY SPECIALLY AND THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT WAS ON HER MUSIC STAND ALL THESE YEARS.” PROFESSIONALISM IN HOW THEY PRESENTED THEMSELVES WAS IMPORTANT TO THE GROUP, THE SISTERS EXPLAINED, INCLUDING RIGHT DOWN TO THE SMALL DETAILS, SUCH AS THE PENCIL. MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING THIS PENCIL, WERE KEPT TOGETHER IN ONE OF ALICE’S TRUNKS. WHEN RUTH AND ELEANOR WERE HELPING THEIR MOTHER SORT HER THINGS, SHE EXPLAINED THE ITEMS IN THE TRUNK TO THEM. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044002
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BAKELITE
Catalogue Number
P20160044004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Materials
BAKELITE
No. Pieces
1
Height
3
Length
8.3
Width
0.7
Description
RED TRANSLUCENT BAKELITE KEY CASE. OVAL-SHAPED KEY HOLDER WITH FADED GOLD METALLIC TEXT ON ONE SIDE WHICH READS, “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA." SLOTS ALONG BOTH SIDES TO HOLD TWO KEYS. GOOD CONDITION: MODERATE LOSS OF GOLD PAINT OF TEXT. OVERALL SCUFFING.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
LEISURE
DOMESTIC
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS KEY HOLDER CAME TO THE MUSEUM WITH A NOTE THAT STATED, “EACH OF THE SISTERS HAD A KEY HOLDER. THIS ONE IS ALICE’S.” IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. IN THE INTERVIEW, RUTH EXPLAINED THE KEY HOLDER WAS FROM THE EARLY 1940S (1940-41) AND ORIGINATED IN THE ERA THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS PERFORMING FREQUENTLY. “MOM SAID THAT EACH OF [THE SISTERS] HAD ONE OF THE KEY HOLDERS,” RUTH STATED, “YOU CAN SEE THROUGH IT [AND] THERE’S A LITTLE PLACE THAT A LITTLE KEY CAN BE KIND OF FOLDED IN OR TWO KEYS. I’M NOT SURE IF THE REASON THEY EVEN HAD ONE TO START WITH WAS SOMEONE THINKING THAT MAYBE THEY’D WANT TO SELL A BUNCH [TO] MAYBE MARKET AT THEIR CONCERTS, BUT THAT WASN’T SOMETHING THEY DID. THEY WERE THERE TO SELL MUSIC NOT ITEMS. THEY DIDN’T SELL ANYTHING BUT TICKETS.” “SO, THEY ALL ENDED UP WITH [A KEY HOLDER]. I BELIEVE MOM [WAS] THE ONLY ONE WHO HAD HERS STILL. THEY WERE ALWAYS GETTING APPROACHED WITH A MARKETING IDEA. I THINK UNLESS IT WAS SOMETHING THAT GRANDPA FELT COMPLIMENTED THINGS THEY DIDN’T GET INTO DOING THAT, WHICH MAYBE WAS A MISTAKE WHEN YOU THINK OF IT FROM A MARKETING STAND POINT. BUT THEY LOOKED AT THE MUSIC FIRST, AND THE TRINKETS WEREN’T SOMETHING THEY EVER REALLY GOT INTO.” MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING THIS KEY HOLDER, WERE KEPT TOGETHER IN ONE OF ALICE’S TRUNKS. WHEN RUTH AND ELEANOR WERE HELPING THEIR MOTHER SORT HER THINGS, SHE EXPLAINED THE ITEMS IN THE TRUNK TO THEM. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044004
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

87 records – page 1 of 5.