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Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
No. Pieces
1
Height
107
Diameter
54.5
Description
WOODEN SPINNING WHEEL COATED WITH RED WOOD VARNISH. THE BOBBIN IS APPROX. 11.5CM IN LENGTH AND APPROX. 9CM IN DIAMETER. THERE IS SOME HANDSPUN, WHITE YARN REMAINING ON THE BOBBIN, IN ADDITION TO A SMALL AMOUNT OF GREEN YARN. THE SPINNING WHEEL IS FULLY ASSEMBLED. ON EITHER SIDE OF THE FLYER THERE ARE 10 METAL HOOKS. ON THE LEFT SIDE ONE OF THE 10 HOOKS IS PARTIALLY BROKEN OFF. ON THE FRONT MAIDEN, A WHITE STRING IS TIED AROUND A FRONT KNOB WITH A METAL WIRE BENT LIKE A HOOK (POSSIBLY TO PULL YARN THROUGH THE METAL ORIFICE ATTACHED TO FLYER). LONG SECTION OF RED YARN LOOPED AROUND THE SPINNING WHEEL (MAY BE DRIVE BAND). TREADLE IS TIED TO THE FOOTMAN WITH A DARK GREY, FLAT STRING THAT IS 5MM IN WIDTH. GOOD CONDITION. TREADLE IS WELL WORN WITH VARNISH WORN OFF AND METAL NAIL HEADS EXPOSED.
Subjects
TEXTILEWORKING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS ACQUIRED THIS SPINNING WHEEL FROM HER MOTHER AT THE SAME TIME SHE ACQUIRED THE RUG (P20160003006-GA). SHE EXPLAINS: “I ASKED HER IF I COULD USE THE SPINNING WHEEL – SHE TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN. AND SHE ALSO TAUGHT ME HOW TO WEAVE, ACTUALLY MY GRANDMOTHER DID THAT MORE SO THAN MY MOTHER. AND I BELONG TO THE WEAVERS’ GUILD, SO I THOUGHT THAT I BETTER DO SOME SPINNING. AND I DID SOME, SO THAT’S WHY I’VE GOT IT HERE AND MOTHER SAID NOT TO BOTHER BRINGING IT BECAUSE SHE WASN’T GOING TO DO ANYMORE SPINNING. SHE HAD LOTS AND LOTS OF YARN THAT SHE DID. SO IT’S BEEN SITTING HERE; IT WAS IN THE BASEMENT.” THE WHEEL WAS MADE FOR ELIZABETH KONKIN WHEN SHE WAS A CHILD IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS EXPLAINED THAT: “… [THE SPINNING WHEEL] WAS MADE ESPECIALLY FOR HER. SHE WAS VERY YOUNG. AND THAT IS THE CADILLAC OF SPINNING WHEELS… BECAUSE SHE KNEW WHO THE SPINNERS WERE, WHO THE SPINNING WHEEL CARPENTERS WERE. AND THERE WAS ONE PARTICULAR MAN AND HER MOTHER SAID, ‘WE’LL GO TO THAT ONE.’ AND THEN IN TURN, IN PAYMENT, SHE WOVE HIM ENOUGH MATERIAL TO MAKE A SUIT – A LINEN ONE… [T]HEY DIDN’T LIVE IN CASTELLAR, THEY LIVED IN ANOTHER PLACE. IT’S CALLED - IN RUSSIAN IT IS CALLED OOTISCHENIA. IT’S WHERE THE BIG – ONE OF THE BIG DAMS IS. IF YOU EVER GO ON THAT ROAD, THERE’LL BE DAMS – I THINK ABOUT 3 HUGE ONES… NEAR CASTELLAR, YEAH.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE TIME THE WHEEL WAS BUILT FOR HER MOTHER, MORRIS ANSWERED: “… [S]HE GOT IT LONG BEFORE [HER MARRIAGE].” SHE EXPLAINED THAT PRIOR TO MARRYING, GIRLS WOULD PUT TOGETHER TROUSSEAUS “AND THEY MAKE ALL KINDS OF FANCY THINGS WHICH THEY NEVER USE.” MORRIS RECALLS THE SPINNING WHEEL BEING USED WITHIN HER FAMILY’S HOME IN SHOULDICE AND IN THE LEAN-TO AREA IN THEIR HOME AT VAUXHALL: ‘WELL I THINK [THE SKILL IS] IN THE GENES ACTUALLY. BECAUSE MOST FAMILIES WOVE, AND THEY CERTAINLY SPUN, AS FAR AS I REMEMBER. I KNOW EVERY FALL THE LOOM WOULD COME OUT AND WE WERE LIVING WITH MY GRANDPARENTS ON MY DAD’S [SIDE]. WE LIVED UPSTAIRS, AND EVERY WINTER THEY’D HAUL THAT HUGE LOOM INTO THE BATHHOUSE – THE STEAM BATHHOUSE – BECAUSE THERE WAS NO ROOM ANYWHERE ELSE. AND THEY – THE LADIES SET IT UP AND IN THE SUMMERTIME. THEY TORE THE RAGS FOR THE RUGS, OR SPUN THEM. [FOR] WHATEVER THEY WERE GOING TO MAKE. MY MOM WAS SPINNING WHEN I WAS OLD. [S]HE USED MAKE MITTENS AND SOCKS FOR THE KIDS FOR MY CHILDREN AND SO WHEN SHE DIED THERE WAS A WHOLE STACK OF THESE MITTENS AND SOCKS AND I’VE BEEN GIVING IT TO MY GRAND[KIDS AND] MY GREAT GRANDKIDS” MORRIS ALSO USED THIS SPINNING WHEEL MANY TIMES HERSELF. SHE SAID, “IT WAS VERY EASY TO SPIN AND WHEN YOU TRY SOMEBODY ELSE’S SPINNING WHEEL YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE RIGHT AWAY. IT’S LIKE DRIVING A CADILLAC AND THEN DRIVING AN OLD FORD. IT’S JUST, IT’S SMOOTH. OUR SON, I TOLD YOU HE WAS VERY CLEVER, HE TRIED SPINNING AND HE SAID IT WAS JUST A VERY, VERY GOOD SPINNING WHEEL. WHEN I WAS IN THE GUILD I TRIED DOING [WHAT] MY MOTHER TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN FINE THREAD AND I WANTED HEAVY THREAD BECAUSE NOW [THEY'RE] MAKING THESE WALL HANGINGS. THEY USE THREAD AS THICK AS TWO FINGERS SO I DID THAT AND I DYED IT. I WENT OUT AND CREATED MY OWN DYES. THAT WAS FUN AND THEN I HAVE A SAMPLER OF ALL THE DYES I MADE… I STOPPED SPINNING SHORTLY BEFORE I STOPPED WEAVING… I LOVED WEAVING. FIRST OF ALL I LEARNED HOW TO EMBROIDER. I LIKED THAT THEN I LEARNED HOW CROCHET, I LIKED THAT. THEN I LEARNED HOW TO KNIT AND THAT WAS TOPS. THEN ONE DAY I WAS VISITING MY FRIEND, FRANCES, AND SHE WAS GOING TO THE BOWMAN AND I SAID, 'WHERE ARE YOU GOING?' SHE SAID 'I’M GOING THERE TO WEAVE.' I SAID, 'I DIDN’T KNOW YOU COULD WEAVE?' SHE SAID, 'OH YES,' AND I SAID ‘IS IT HARD?' SHE SAID, ‘NO,” SO I WENT THERE AND I SAW THE THINGS SHE WOVE. THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL AND SO I JOINED THE GROUP AND THEN OF COURSE I WANTED TO HAVE SOME OF THE STUFF I HAD SPUN MYSELF AND DYED MYSELF AND NOBODY ELSE WANTED. THEN I DECIDED, ‘ALRIGHT, I’VE WOVEN ALL THESE THINGS, WOVE MYSELF A SUIT, LONG SKIRT YOU NAME IT. PLACE MATS GALORE. THIS LITTLE RUNNER,’ AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH THE REST BECAUSE NOBODY WANTS HOMESPUN STUFF. THEY WANT TO GO TO WALMART OR SOME PLACE AND BUY SOMETHING READYMADE,’ SO I GAVE UP SPINNING AND WEAVING… I STOPPED AFTER I MADE MY SUIT. THAT MUST HAVE BEEN ABOUT TWENTY YEARS AGO, EASILY.” MORRIS’ MOTHER WOULD WEAVE IN SHOULDICE, BUT “[I]N VAUXHALL, NO, SHE WASN’T [WEAVING]. SHE DIDN’T HAVE A LOOM.” MORRIS SAID IN SHOULDICE, “I LEARNED HOW TO THROW THE SHUTTLE BACK AND FORTH TO WEAVE RUGS BECAUSE I USED TO SIT THERE WATCHING MY GRANDMOTHER AND SHE LET ME DO THAT, AND THEN YOU SEE WHEN I GOT SO INTERESTED IN WEAVING THAT I BOUGHT A LOOM, SITTING DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. I’VE BEEN TRYING TO SELL IT EVER SINCE AND NOBODY WANTS IT. I OFFERED TO GIVE IT FOR FREE AND NOBODY WANTS IT BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE SPACE FOR IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41
Width
36
Description
HANDMADE BAG MADE OF 3 SECTIONS OF STRIPS OF ABOUT 5 INCHES (APPROX. 13 CM) EACH. IT IS RED WITH BLUE, YELLOW, GREEN, AND RAW MATERIAL ACCENTS. THE TRIM AT THE TOP OF THE BAG IS BLUE WITH A HANDLE OF THE SAME FABRIC ON EITHER SIDE. THERE IS A STRIP OF RAW, NOT PATTERNED FABRIC AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAG. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAG HAVE THE SAME ARRANGEMENT OF PATTERNED STRIPS. THERE IS ONE SEAM CONNECTING THE FRONT AND THE BACK OF THE BAG ON BOTH SIDES. THE INSIDE IS UNLINED. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SOME STITCHING COMING LOOSE AT VARIOUS POINTS OF THE PATTERNING.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A STATEMENT WRITTEN BY MORRIS ATTACHED TO THE BAG STATES THAT THE MATERIAL OF THE BAG ORIGINATES FROM THE 1870S. THE STATEMENT READS: “THIS BAG WAS HAND WOVEN IN STRIPS [THAT WERE USED] TO SEW ON THE BOTTOM OF PETTICOATS. THE GIRLS AT THAT TIME HAD TO HAVE A TROUSEUA [SIC] TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE AFTER MARRIAGE THERE WOULD BE NO TIME TO MAKE CLOTHES SO WHAT THEY MADE WAS STURDY. THEY STARTED ON THEIR TROUSEUS [SIC] AS SOON AS THEY COULD HOLD A NEEDLE. WHEN IT WAS HAYING TIME THE GIRLS WENT OUT INTO THE FIELD TO RAKE THE HAY. THEY WORE PETTICOATS OF LINEN TO WHICH THESE BANDS WERE SEWN. THE LONG SKIRTS WERE PICKED UP AT THE SIDES AND TUCKED INTO THE WAISTBANDS SO THAT THE BOTTOMS OF THE PETTICOATS WERE ON DISPLAY.” “THESE BANDS WERE ORIGINALLY MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER’S WHO CAME OUT OF RUSSIA WITH THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT IN 1899. THEY WERE PASSED ON TO MY MOTHER, ELIZABETH KONKIN, WHO MADE THEM INTO A BAG IN THE 1940S” THE STRIPS THAT MAKE UP THE BAG SERVED A UTILITARIAN PURPOSE WHEN SEWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PETTICOATS. IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS EXPLAINS: “… THESE STRIPS ARE VERY STRONG. THEY’RE LIKE CANVAS. THEY WERE SEWN ONTO THE BOTTOM OF THE LADY’S PETTICOATS AND THEY WORE A SKIRT ON TOP OF THE PETTICOATS. THESE STRIPS LASTED A LIFETIME, IN FACT MORE THAN ONE LIFETIME BECAUSE I’VE GOT THEM NOW. THEY WOULD TUCK THE SKIRTS INTO THEIR WAISTBAND ON THE SIDE SO THEIR PETTICOATS SHOWED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO PRESERVE THEIR SKIRTS NOT TO GET CAUGHT IN THE GRAIN. THE GIRLS LIKED TO WEAR THEM TO SHOW OFF BECAUSE THE BOYS WERE THERE AND THEY ALWAYS WORE THEIR VERY BEST SUNDAY CLOTHES WHEN THEY WENT CUTTING WHEAT OR GRAIN." “[THE FABRIC] CAME FROM RUSSIA. WITH THE AREA WHERE THEY CAME FROM IS NOW GEORGIA AND THEY LIVED ABOUT SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE TURKISH BORDER, THE PRESENT DAY TURKISH BORDER… [THE DOUKHOBORS] CAME TO CANADA IN 1897 AND 1899.” MORRIS EXPLAINS THAT SURPLUS FABRIC WOULD HAVE BEEN BROUGHT TO CANADA FROM RUSSIA BY HER MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER FOR FUTURE USE AND TO AID THE GIRLS IN MAKING THEIR TROUSSEAUS: “THE TROUSSEAU THE GIRLS MADE HAD TO LAST THEM A LIFETIME BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T HAVE TIME BUT RAISING CHILDREN TO SEWING THINGS. SEWING MACHINES WERE UNKNOWN THEN.” THE BANDS OF FABRIC THAT MAKE UP THE BAG WOULD HAVE BEEN REMAINS NEVER USED FROM ELIZABETH KONKIN’S TROUSSEAU. SHE HAND WOVE THE BAG WHILE SHE WAS LIVING IN SHOULDICE. THE BAG WAS USED BY MORRIS’ MOTHER TO STORE HER KNITTING SUPPLIES. WHEN MORRIS ACQUIRED THE BAG IN THE 1990S, IT MAINTAINED A SIMILAR PURPOSE: “WELL I USED TO CARRY MY STUFF FOR THE WEAVER’S GUILD BUT NOW I DON’T USE IT FOR ANYTHING. IT’S VERY HANDY YOU KNOW IT DOESN’T WEAR OUT.” THERE WAS ONLY ONE BAG MADE OUT OF THESE REMNANTS BY MORRIS’ MOTHER. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HMV LISTENING STATION
Date Range From
1994
Date Range To
2017
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ALUMINIUM, GLASS, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20170004001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HMV LISTENING STATION
Date Range From
1994
Date Range To
2017
Materials
ALUMINIUM, GLASS, RUBBER
No. Pieces
4
Height
29.5
Length
20.5
Width
5.6
Description
A- LISTENING STATION FOR COMPACT DISCS (CDS) WITH A BRUSHED ALUMINUM FRONT ON BLACK HOUSING. IT HOLDS UP TO THREE DISCS. THE FRONT READS “HMV” IN A CIRCLE AREA. CIRCULAR, GLASS WINDOW TO DISPLAY THE CURRENT DISC. A CONTROL PANEL WITH BUTTONS ON THE FRONT BOTTOM SECTION OF THE LISTENING STATION. A BLACK METAL HOOK EXTENDING FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE MACHINE FOR HOLDING HEADPHONES. TWO STICKERS ON BACK: ONE READS “MB-K300.” THERE ARE HOLES IN THE BACK TO MOUNT THE MACHINE TO A SUPPORT, SUCH AS A WALL. A KEY HOLE ON THE LEFT SIDE AND HINGES ON THE RIGHT. INSIDE OF THE MACHINE INCLUDES A GREEN CIRCUIT BOARD, MACHINE INSTRUCTIONS, AND OUTLETS FOR HEADPHONES. THE SERIAL NUMBER IS “SERIAL NO. V65111019”. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SCUFFING AND DIRT ON OVERALL SURFACE. THERE IS ADHESIVE ON THE TOP LEFT EDGE OF THE MACHINE. SLIGHT SCRATCHING ON THE GLASS AND SLIGHT SCRATCHES TO THE BACK. PAIR OF HEADPHONES ARE ATTACHED TO THE LISTENING STATION. THEY ARE PRIMARILY BLACK PLASTIC WITH A PADDED HEADBAND AND EAR PADS. “RIGHT” INDICATED ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE HEADPHONES. A THICK PROTECTIVE COVERING MADE OF RUBBER COATING THE AUXILIARY CABLE. AT THE END OF THE CABLE IS A METAL HEADPHONE JACK. THE HEADPHONES ARE MARKED WITH “PRO-705”. DIAMETER OF THE EAR PADS IS 9.7 CM. THE HEADBAND LENGTH IS ADJUSTABLE WITH A 42 CM MAXIMUM. THE CABLE IS 134 CM LONG. GOOD CONDITION. GENERAL WEAR TO THE HEADPHONES. SLIGHT DUST, LOSS OF SOME BLACK FINISH OF THE HEADPHONES. AT LEAST TWO VISIBLE HOLES IN THE RUBBER COATING OF THE CABLE. B- BLACK METAL FRAME WITH 3 SLOTS TO HOLD CD CASES. ONE LENGTH END IS OPEN TO INSERT THE CDS. BACK OF THE FRAME HAS SIX SCREW HOLES (2 ON EITHER SIDE OF EACH OF THE THREE SECTIONS) FOR WALL ATTACHMENT. THE JOINTS ARE WELDED AT THE BACK. THE OVERALL DIMENSIONS ARE 44.5 X 13.2 X 1.5 CM. EACH SECTION IS 14.3 CM WIDE. EACH SECTION IS MADE WITH INDIVIDUAL PIECES OF METAL, WELDED TOGETHER AT THE BACK ON TWO METAL BANDS. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT SCRATCHES TO THE PAINT. DUST COLLECTING AT EDGES, CORNERS, AND JOINTS. GENERAL WEAR FROM USE. C- LISTENING STATION KEY. SMALL, STAINLESS STEEL KEY WITH CYLINDER END “NO 1”. HOLE AT THE BOW END. THE LONG EDGE OF THE BOW HAS 3 GROVES ON THE RIGHT SIDE. THE KEY IS 3.1 CM IN LENGTH AND 2 CM IN WIDTH. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. WEAR ON BOW. RUSTING/WEAR TO FINISH ON KEY.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
RETAIL TRADE
History
IN THE EARLY MONTHS OF 2017, THE MUSIC FRANCHISE HMV CANADA BEGAN TO THE PROCESS OF CLOSING DOWN ALL 120 OF THEIR STORES ACROSS CANADA. AFTER 30 YEARS OF BUSINESS, THE COMPANY WENT INTO RECEIVERSHIP. PARK PLACE MALL IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE HAD AN HMV LOCATION OF ITS OWN, WHICH ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ADVERTISEMENTS OPENED IN 1994. UPON THE STORE'S CLOSURE THE MUSEUM COLLECTED A LISTENING STATION FROM THE LOCATION. ON FEBRUARY 27, 2017, IN AN INTERVIEW WITH COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, THE MANAGER OF THE HMV LETHBRIDGE, BRENDAN FRIZZLEY, REFLECTED ON HIS PAST EXPERIENCE AT THE MUSIC STORE, THE SIGNIFICANCE OF MUSIC STORES, AND ON THE RECEIVERSHIP PERIOD. FRIZZLEY COMMENTED ON THE LISTENING STATION, “WELL, I THINK THE INTERESTING THING ABOUT THAT [LISTENING STATION] IS THAT IT GOT MOVED SO THAT THERE WOULD BE ROOM FOR A POSTER RACK, AND I THINK THAT THAT’S SORT OF AN INDICATION OF THE WAY THAT PEOPLE CHANGE, LISTENING TO MUSIC, BECAUSE THE LISTENING STATIONS ARE HUGE. THEY’RE A THING THAT PEOPLE WOULD COME UP TO [AND THEY] WOULDN’T HAVE ANY IDEA ABOUT AN ARTIST [THEN] THEY GOT MOVED. I THINK A LOT OF PEOPLE WERE SORT OF LIKE 'OH, WHY IS THERE LESS OF [THE STATIONS]?' BECAUSE NOBODY USED THEM ANYMORE. PEOPLE ARE ALREADY STREAMING, OR FAMILIARIZING THEMSELVES WITH ARTISTS IN AN INFINITE NUMBER OF WAYS, AND THE CD STORE IS FOR SORT OF THE END PURCHASE. YOU ALREADY MADE A DECISION AS TO WHAT YOU WANT RATHER THAN THE EXPLORATION SIDE OF IT, WHICH IS NOT HOW PEOPLE DO MUSIC ANYMORE... EVEN THE SUPPLIERS AREN’T AS INVESTED AS GETTING THESE FILLED. IT USED TO BE THAT WE WOULD GET THESE MAIL BOXES, AND IT WOULD BE FULL OF CDS. WE WOULD LOAD THEM UP, AND THEY WOULD SAY, ‘THESE ONES GO HERE AND THESE ONES GO HERE,’ AND THAT’S WHERE ALL THE PICTURES WOULD COME FROM. AND [THEN] THE BOXES GET SMALLER AND SMALLER, AND THE NUMBER OF ARTISTS THAT THEY’RE WORRIED ABOUT PROMOTING THAT WAY BECOMES FEWER AND FEWER. IT’S JUST NOT AN ANGLE THAT THEY NEEDED TO PUSH AN ARTIST ANYMORE. SO, THAT WAS IT. THERE USED TO BE SIX AND, I THINK, BY THE TIME WE’RE DONE THERE WAS THREE THAT WERE BEING CONSTANTLY UPDATED.” ACCORDING TO AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN 2001 BY STRATEGYONLINE.CA, HMV BEGAN USING LISTENING STATIONS AS A MARKETING STRATEGY IN 1988, ALSO THE YEAR THE RETAILER ARRIVED IN CANADA. FRIZZLEY WORKED AT HMV FOR 8 YEARS. HE EXPLAINED HOW HE BEGAN HIS JOB AT HMV, “I HAD HAD A JOB AT A CALL CENTER THAT HAD BEEN HERE. IT HAD SHUT DOWN, AND I HAD SORT OF GONE OFF ONE DIRECTION, AND STARTED SELLING SPEAKERS. A SORT OF CO-WORKER OF MINE STARTED MANAGING THIS PLACE AND HE WAS COMPLAINING BECAUSE HE COULDN’T FIND AN ASSISTANT MANAGER. IN MY HEAD, I HAD [A] FLASH OF, 'I COULD WORK IN A RECORD STORE,' AND HE JUST HIRED ME. UNFORTUNATELY MY OLD FRIEND [LOST HIS MANAGEMENT JOB]... SOMEBODY IMPORTANT ENOUGH FELT THAT I HAD THE RIGHT SORT OF ATTITUDE FOR THIS, AND SO THEY KEPT ME ON. THEY BROUGHT IN [A FELLOW] FROM THE MEDICINE HAT STORE AND HE ... TURNED THE STORE AROUND AND ... HE GOT PROMOTED TO GO RUN THE STORE AT SOUTH CENTER IN CALGARY, AND THIS BECAME MINE. THAT WAS ABOUT FIVE YEARS AGO.” WHEN DISCUSSING THE SHIFT IN SALES FROM THE BEGINNING OF HIS CAREER IN THE MUSIC STORE TO THE CLOSING OF THE FRANCHISE, FRIZZLEY SAID, “I FEEL THAT SHIFT WAS ALREADY OCCURRING WHEN I STARTED. I [HEARD STORIES FROM] EVEN THREE, FOUR YEARS BEFORE I STARTED [WHEN] THEY WOULD PULL ALL THE MANAGERS FROM EVERY HMV INTO A SORT OF PERSONAL CONCERT OF [THE] CANADIAN MUSIC INDUSTRY... THERE WOULD BE THIS MEET-AND-GREET WITH ALL THE EXECUTIVES AND PRIVATE CONCERTS FROM THE TOP ARTISTS. THAT WAS THE IDEA OF WHAT A MUSIC STORE WAS AND HOW IMPORTANT IT WAS TO THE MARKETING OF MUSIC. THE SHIFT THAT WAS STARTING TO HAPPEN ALREADY WAS THIS IDEA THAT THE MUSIC STORE WASN’T RESPONSIBLE FOR MARKETING ANYMORE. IT MAY HAVE BEEN RESPONSIBLE FOR SELLING [MUSIC], AND I DON’T THINK THAT EVER CHANGED." "PEOPLE ALWAYS WANTED TO TELL ME HOW CDS WERE DYING AND TO AN EXTENT - SURE - BUT NO MORE THAN ANYTHING PHYSICAL. [CDS] STILL HAVE THEIR AUDIENCE, AND THAT WAS TRUE IN 2009 WHEN I STARTED... THERE’S STILL A MARKET FOR THEM... BUT, THE IDEA THAT CD STORES DROVE CUSTOMER’S PURCHASING IS ON THE WAY OUT, AND I THINK THAT THERE WOULD BE LESS PUSH FROM THE LABELS... IN SETTING UP BIG BANNERS [TO MARKET MUSIC]. WHEN I STARTED, MUSICIANS AND THE MUSIC SIDE OF IT HAD PAID FOR THE BANNERS, AND BY THE TIME [OF THE CLOSURE], IT WAS BANNERS FOR MOVIES THAT WE WEREN’T EVEN SELLING. WE WERE THE ‘YOU’VE ALREADY DECIDED WHAT YOU’RE BUYING. COME IN HERE IF YOU ARE BUYING CDS OR RECORDS AND YOU BUY THEM,’ AND THAT’S REALLY DIFFERENT THAN MYSELF, OR ANY OF MY STAFF HERE, CURATING PEOPLE’S MUSIC EXPERIENCE, WHICH I THINK EVERYONE, FROM A CERTAIN AGE, HAS HAD THAT EXPERIENCE OF GOING TO A RECORD STORE, AND A RECORD STORE EMPLOYEE TELLING THEM WHAT TO LISTEN TO... I THINK THAT THAT DIED WELL BEFORE I WAS HERE, BUT I THINK THE LABEL SLOWLY RESPONDED TO THE FACT THAT THAT WAS JUST REALITY. THE LISTENING POST IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF THAT SORT OF LIMPING OUT FROM THAT SORT OF EXPERIENCE, WHERE A MUSIC STORE DEFINED WHAT PEOPLE WERE LISTENING TO - AS MUCH AS A RADIO STATION DID - TO JUST A PLACE WHERE YOU BOUGHT MUSIC…" "I THINK THE NATURE OF PEOPLE’S RELATIONSHIP WITH THE MUSIC STORE IS REALLY DIFFERENT AND SO PEOPLE WOULD GET VERY PERSONALLY OFFENDED AS THE CHANGES HAPPENED. AND, FOR ME, I ALWAYS KEPT IN MY MIND THAT THE STORE, NO MATTER WHAT THE CHANGES HAPPENED - THE TOYS AND ALL THAT OTHER STUFF - FACILITATED ME BEING ABLE TO HAVE A CD SELECTION; FACILITATED THE ABILITY FOR ME TO SAY, 'HEY, YOU SHOULD CHECK THIS OUT. I DON’T EVEN CARRY IT IN THE STORE, BUT I CAN ORDER IT FOR YOU, AND YOU’RE GOING TO LOVE IT.' SO, AS THE SHIFT STARTED TO HAPPEN, WE PULLED BACK FROM CDS A LITTLE BIT, ESPECIALLY IN THE GENRES THAT JUST STOPPED SELLING, AND THAT SORT OF HAPPENED SLOWLY.” FRIZZLEY RECALLS THE EVENTS THAT TOOK PLACE LEADING UP TO AND AFTER THE COMPANY ANNOUNCED IT HAD WENT INTO RECEIVERSHIP. WHEN ASKED IF HE HAD ANY INDICATION THAT HIS STORE - ALONG WITH EVERY HMV STORE IN CANADA - WOULD BE CLOSING, FRIZZLEY ANSWERED, “NONE WHATSOEVER. IT WAS A SLOWER CHRISTMAS FROM A MALL PERSPECTIVE. IT’S DIFFICULT BECAUSE CORPORATE FINANCIALS ARE VERY DIFFERENT THAN STORE FINANCIALS. BUT WHEN I WAS LOOKING AT MY NUMBERS IT WAS CERTAINLY A STORE THAT COULD’VE CONTINUED TO HAVE RUN. THERE WAS NO INDICATION WHATSOEVER. THERE WAS SOME SLIGHT BUYING DIFFERENCES, AS IN THE PRODUCT THAT WAS COMING [INTO] THE STORE. LOOKING BACK ON IT NOW, IT WAS PROBABLY BECAUSE OF THE DETERIORATING RELATIONSHIPS WE HAD WITH OUR SUPPLIERS. BUT IT WAS ANOTHER PROFITABLE YEAR FOR ME. I MEAN, EVERY YEAR THAT I’VE RUN THIS STORE, I’VE BEEN IN TOP FIVE MOST PROFITABLE STORES IN TERMS OF A PERCENTAGE OF EVERY DOLLAR THAT COMES IN - WHAT BECOMES PROFIT... IF YOU LOOK AT THE CONDITIONS THAT RESULTED IN US CEASING TO EXIST, IT’S A SPECIFIC WAY THAT IT CAME ABOUT. [FROM] THE RESTRUCTURING TO THE PURCHASE [OF THE COMPANY] BACK IN 2011 WHEN WE ACTUALLY ALL THOUGHT THAT WE WERE ALL LOSING OUR JOBS… [HMV WAS] HEMORRHAGING MONEY FOR A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT REASONS. THE CANADIAN ARM WAS NOT DOING PARTICULARLY WELL EITHER, AND THEY NEEDED CASH TO PROVE TO THE BANK THAT [IT COULD] REPAY [ITS] DEBTS. THEY HAD ENOUGH SALES; THEY HAD ENOUGH BUSINESS; EVERYTHING WAS FINE, EXCEPT THEY DIDN’T HAVE ENOUGH CASH ON HAND – SO THEY JUST NEEDED TO HAVE MONEY IN AN ACCOUNT SOMEWHERE. SO, THEY SOLD HMV CANADA OFF FOR BASICALLY A SONG, TO THIS COMPANY CALLED HILCO. HILCO IS A RESTRUCTURING COMPANY... THEY ARE SO GOOD AT LIQUIDATING COMPANIES, THAT THEY, ODDLY, BECAME RIGHT DOWN THE CHAIN SOME WAYS, AND STARTED THEIR WORK TO DO IT… THIS COMPANY BOUGHT US IN 2011. [WE THOUGHT,] 'THAT’S THE END OF US – THEY ARE GOING TO LIQUIDATE US, AND THAT WILL BE THAT.' WE HAD SOME VERY PASSIONATE PEOPLE INVOLVED, AND THEY PITCHED THIS IDEA AS TO WHAT HMV COULD BE AND THAT WAS TO HAVE THE VIDEO GAME SIDE OF IT AND THE MERCHANDISE STUFF. AND WE DID IT. IT DID PHENOMENAL FOR US… WE ALSO WORKED WITH ALL THE SUPPLIERS TO GET BETTER MARGINS; SO, IN FACT, A CD COST $10.00, INSTEAD OF THE $20.00 IT TRADITIONALLY DID, WHEN I STARTED HERE. THAT’S A THING THAT THEY SORT OF NEGOTIATED IN WITH OUR SUPPLIERS." REMEMBERING THE DAY THAT FRIZZLEY LEARNED THE NEWS OF THE COMPANY’S CLOSURE, HE SAID, “SO, I WOKE UP AND CHECKED MY PHONE, AND I SEE THAT I AM REMOVED FROM BEING AN ADMINISTRATOR ON THE STORE’S FACEBOOK PAGE. I’M SORT OF THROWN BY THAT. I DON’T POST A LOT ON THE STORE’S FACEBOOK PAGE, BUT WHEN I DO THERE’S SOME JOKES IN THERE AND I SHOW OFF THE NEW STUFF. I POSTED SOMETHING ON THERE FOR THE FIRST TIME IN A WHILE, AND I GOT A LOT OF LIKES AND SHARES, AND IT’S ALL GOOD... I WAKE UP, AND I’M NOT THE ADMINISTRATOR ON THAT PAGE ANYMORE… I’M SORT OF THROWN BY THAT, AND I’M LIKE, 'WHY WOULD THEY EVER MOVE ME? ARE THEY GETTING RID OF ALL OF THESE?” I LOOK, 'NO, THE PAGE IS STILL THERE.' SEEMS STRANGE. IT OCCURS TO ME THAT MAYBE SOMEBODY DIDN’T GET THE JOKE THAT I MADE, FROM HEAD OFFICE OR SOMETHING… AND, SO I AM CONFUSED. I’M THINKING I MAY HAVE TO ARGUE WITH SOME SORT OF HEAD OFFICE PERSON WHEN I COME TO WORK THAT AFTERNOON. SO I COME IN AND JOHN TELLS ME THAT 'SHIT’S HIT THE FAN.' AND I’M CONFUSED, AND I’M LIKE, 'IS THERE AN E-MAIL FOR ME ABOUT THIS, THAT I’M GOING TO HAVE TO FIGHT WITH?' AND I’M READY TO PICK UP THE PHONE AND START ARGUING WHEN HE SAID, 'NO, LOOK AT THIS NEWS ARTICLE.' AND, THAT IS HOW WE HEARD … [THE] BREAKING THE NEWS. AND MY BOSS AT THE TIME [SAID], 'I WILL FIND OUT WHAT’S GOING ON. I DON’T KNOW ANYTHING EITHER.' MY BOSS WAS ONE OF FIVE REGIONAL MANAGERS, SO HE IS VERY HIGH UP. HE CALLED TO FIND OUT WHAT WAS GOING ON, THAT’S WHEN THEY TOLD HIM HE DIDN’T HAVE A JOB ANYMORE... TO BE FAIR, THIS WAS FLOWING FROM A POINT OF SECURE DEBT, FORCED TO LIQUIDATION. NOBODY HAD ANY IDEA... ALL OF US HERE FOUND OUT THAT DAY, AND IT WAS REAL LATER IN THAT EVENING, AT THAT POINT I WAS SELLING GIFT CARDS, SUGGESTING TO CUSTOMERS THAT THEY REDEEM THEIR PEER POINTS AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE, THAT WE KNEW. [IN] THREE DAYS’ TIME, THE GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALE STARTED… I’M A MUSIC GUY, BUT I’M ALSO VERY WORRIED ABOUT MY STAFF. THAT’S ALWAYS BEEN A THING THAT I’VE BEEN WIRED TO, AND SO IT WAS MAKING SURE THAT PEOPLE [GOT] PAID - HOW TO DO THIS. SOME E-MAILS THAT I GOT SENT WERE VERY VAGUE… SO, IT’S A LOT OF MOVING PARTS, BECAUSE THERE IS A RECEIVERSHIP, WHICH IS THE COMPANY LEGALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR MANAGING THE FINANCIALS, AND THEY SOLICIT A LIQUIDATOR, WHICH IS THE PEOPLE THAT ACTUALLY KNOW HOW TO PROPERLY SHUT DOWN A STORE, BUT NOBODY IS WORKING FOR HMV PROPER ANYMORE, BECAUSE HMV DOESN’T REALLY EXIST, AT SOME FUNDAMENTAL LEVEL. THERE’S A LOT OF PARTS EVERYONE WOULD LIKE TO PASS ON TO EVERYONE ELSE, AS TO THINGS LIKE SEVERANCES, BONUSES, AND THINGS LIKE THAT. NOBODY [WANTED] TO COMMIT TO ANYTHING.” ACCORDING TO HMV’S WEBSITE THE FINAL DAY OF ALL STORES WAS APRIL 14, 2017 WITH SOME STORES CLOSING THEIR DOORS PRIOR TO THAT. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ARTICLES REGARDING THE RECEIVERSHIP AND LIQUIDATION OF HMV CANADA.
Catalogue Number
P20170004001
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
No. Pieces
2
Height
29.5
Width
15
Description
A: HANDMADE DOLL. THE “ESKIMO” DOLL IS MADE WITH LIGHT BLUE, FELT-LIKE FABRIC WITH WHITE FABRIC ACCENTS. THE FACE IS MADE OUT OF A LIGHTER FABRIC THAT IS PEACH-COLOURED. THE FACIAL DETAILS ARE HAND PAINTED. THE DOLL HAS BLUE EYES, EYEBROWS, NOSTRILS, RED LIPS, AND ROSY CHEEKS. THE LIGHT BLUE FABRIC THAT MAKES UP THE MAJORITY OF THE DOLL’S BODY IS ENCOMPASSING THE DOLL’S FACE LIKE A HOOD. THE DOLL’S TORSO IS COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. TWO HEART-SHAPED ARMS, MADE OF THE SAME MATERIAL, ARE ATTACHED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE BODY. THE DOLLS UPPER LEG AND FEET ARE COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. FROM THE KNEES TO THE ANKLES, A LIGHTER, WHITE FABRIC IS COVERING THE LEGS. B: DOLL SKIRT. AROUND THE DOLL’S WAIST IS A DETACHABLE SKIRT MADE OF THE SAME FABRIC AND A WHITE WAISTBAND. POOR CONDITION. ALL FABRIC IS WELL-WORN AND THREADBARE IN MULTIPLE PLACES. THE DOLL’S RED STUFFING IS VISIBLE THROUGH PARTS OF THE FABRIC. THERE IS DISCOLORATION (YELLOWING) OVERALL. THE STUFFING IS NOT EVENLY DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT THE DOLL. THE SEAMS AT THE ARMS ARE FRAGILE. THE PAINT FOR THE DOLL’S FACE IS SEVERELY FADED.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
LEISURE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THE FAMILY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. THIS DOLL BELONGED TO MORRIS AS A CHILD. SHE EXPLAINS, “THIS CAME FROM A GREAT AUNT WHO CAME TO VISIT US AND SHE ALWAYS BROUGHT GIFTS AND THIS ONE WAS MINE AND I LOVED THIS DOLL… I REMEMBER PLAYING WITH IT, IT WAS SOFT AND CUDDLY WHEN I HAD IT… MY DAUGHTER WENT THROUGH IT AND MY GRANDDAUGHTER AND THEN I PUT A STOP TO IT BEFORE THEY ATE IT UP OR DID SOMETHING… THEY LOVED IT AND THEY, YOU KNOW LITTLE KIDS, THEY’RE CARELESS SO I’LL KEEP IT...” IN A PHONE CALL WITH COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK ON OCTOBER 24, 2017, MORRIS SAID SHE RECIEVED THE DOLL FROM HER GREAT AUNT WHO HAD BROUGHT IT FROM VISITING BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS PLAYED WITH THE DOLL AS A CHILD, AS DID MORRIS' CHILDREN. THE DOLL WAS LOVED BY MULTIPLE GENERATIONS IN MORRIS' FAMILY AS HER GRANDCHILDREN AND GREAT GRANDCHILDREN WOULD ALSO PLAY WITH THE DOLL WHEN THEY CAME TO VISIT. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CASSETTE TAPE
Date Range From
1985
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20180029005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CASSETTE TAPE
Date Range From
1985
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
No. Pieces
3
Height
1.7
Length
11
Width
7
Description
A. CASSETTE TAPE CASE, 11 CM LONG X 7 CM WIDE X 1.7 CM TALL. CLEAR PLASTIC RECTANGULAR CASE WITH TWO PLASTIC PRONGS INSIDE. CASE FRONT HAS EMBOSSED STAMP IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER “TDK, MADE IN JAPAN”. RIGHT SIDE HAS INDENT FOR OPENING; CASE IS HINGED ON LEFT SIDE. CASE IS SCRATCHED AND SCUFFED, WITH BLACK STAINING ON FRONT, BACK, AND LEFT SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CASSETTE TAPE, 10 CM LONG X 6.4 CM WIDE X 0.7 CM TALL. TAPE IS BLACK PLASTIC WITH TWO HOLES THROUGH CASSETTE; TAPE HAS CLEAR PLASTIC WINDOW BETWEEN HOLES SHOWING TAPE INSIDE; BOTTOM EDGE OF TAPE HAS FIVE SQUARE OPENINGS SHOWING BROWN TAPE. TAPE HAS WHITE TEXT ON FRONT AND BACK; FRONT TEXT “AC DC * BACK IN BLACK, HELLS BELLS/SHOOT TO THRILL/, WHAT DO YOU DO FOR MONEY HONEY, GIVE THE DOG A BONE/LET ME PUT MY LOVE IN YOU, CP 1, DOLBY SYSTEM, XCS 16018, ATLANTIC”, LOWER LABEL HAS WHITE TEXT BILUNGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] “MANUFACTURED & DISTRIBUTED BY WEA MUSIC OF CANADA LTD., 810 BIRCHMOUNT RD SCARBOROUGH ONTARIO, A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY”. TOP EDGE OF TAPE HAS EMBOSSED TEXT “MADE IN CANADA”. BACK OF TAPE HAS WHITE TEXT “AC DC * BACK IN BLACK, BACK IN BLACK/YOU SHOOK ME ALL NIGHT LONG, HAVE A DRINK ON ME, SHAKE A LEG/ROCK AND ROLL AIN’T NOISE POLLUTION, CP 2, DOLBY SYSTEM, XCS 16018, ATLANTIC”, LOWER LABEL HAS WHITE TEXT BILINGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] “MANUFACTURED & DISTRIBUTED BY WEA MUSIC OF CANADA LTD., 810 BIRCHMOUNT RD SCARBOROUGH ONTARIO, A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY”. TEXT ON TAPE IS WORN AND FADED; LOWER EDGE OF TAPE IS SCUFFED AND STAINED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. PAPER INSERT FOR CASSETTE TAPE, 10.3 CM LONG X 6.6 CM WIDE X 1.4 CM TALL. PAPER BOOKLET WITH BLACK COVER AND WHITE TEXT; FRONT OF COVER HAS TEXT “AC DC, BACK IN BLACK, ATLANTIC, SUPER CASSETTE”; SIDE OF COVER HAS TEXT “AC/DC, BACK IN BLACK, DOLBY SYSTEM, XCS-16018, SUPER CASSETTE”; BACK OF COVER HAS TEXT INCLUDING TRACK LIST FOR “SIDE ONE/SIDE TWO” AND PHOTOGRAPH OF MAN PLAYING GUITAR, TEXT BELOW PHOTOGRAPH “1980 LEIDSPELEIN PRESSE B.V., UNAUTHORIZED REPRODUCTION OF THIS RECORDING IS PROHIBITED BY LAW AND SUBJECT TO CRIMINAL PROSECUTION”, TEXT BELOW IS BILINGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] “MANUFACTURED & DISTRIBUTED BY, WEA MUSIC OF CANADA LTD., 1810 BIRCHMOUNT RD. SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO, A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY”. INSIDE OF COVER WHITE WITH BLACK TEXT “ALL SONGS WRITTEN BY YOUNG, YOUNG AND JOHNSON, PRODUCED BY ROBERT JOHN “MUTT” LANGE, ENGINEERED BY TONY PLATT, ASSISTANT ENGINEERS: JACK NEWBER, BENJI ARMBRISTER, RECORDED AT COMPASS POINT STUDIOS, APRIL-MAY 1980, MIXING ENGINEER: BRAD SAMUELSON, ART DIRECTION: BOB DEFRIN, PHOTOS: ROBERT ELLIS”, WITH “THANKS” BELOW, TEXT BELOW “FOR MORE INFORMATION ON AC/DC’S FAN CLUB AND MERCHANDISING, PLEASE SEND A SELF-ADDRESSED ENVELOPE TO: AC/DC FAN CLUB, 18 WATSON CLOSE, BURY ST. EDMUNDS, SUFFOLK ENGLAND, ALBERT PRODUCTIONS”. BACK INSIDE INCLUDES TEXT ON “NEW LEVELS OF EXCELLENCE” IN ENGLISH AND FRENCH. BACK OF BOOKLET HAS TWO HOLES PUNCHED THROUGH; COVER IS WORN AND FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIEWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. ON THE CASSETTE TAPE, MACLEAN ELABORATED, “I WOULD THINK IT’S…IN THE WINTER OF GRADE 10 THAT I FOUND AC/DC AND THE SONG WAS, “FOR THOSE ABOUT TO ROCK”. I REMEMBER LISTENING TO IT WITH A BUDDY IN KALISPELL AND PLAYING ARCADE GAMES IN THE HOTEL AND THINKING, “OH, MY GOD, THIS IS THE COOLEST.”” “[BECAUSE] I’M A CATHOLIC KID…WE WERE PRETTY INNOCENT KIDS, AND [LISTENING TO BANDS LIKE AC/DC AND IRON MAIDEN] WOULD BE LIKE, “OH, I’M NOT GONNA GO THERE.” IT’S JUST TOO GRAPHIC…I THOUGHT IT DIDN’T REPRESENT ANYTHING GOOD. AC/DC CAME FIRST [FOR ME].” “THE OTHER THING THAT ATTRACTED ME TO AC/DC…THIS IS 1985, SO PART OF [MY INTEREST] IS THAT THEY’RE QUITE BLUE COLLAR…THE GLAM-ROCK THING…NEVER DID AS MUCH FOR ME. BUT THESE GUYS LOOK LIKE ORDINARY, WORKING-CLASS GUYS WHICH…IN TERMS OF WANTING TO FIT IN AND NOT HAVE A LOOK THAT STANDS OUT THEN, THERE WAS SOME APPEAL TO THESE GUYS, TOO.” “THIS, “BACK IN BLACK”, I’M CARRYING IN MY JEAN JACKET IN THE LEFT BREAST POCKET. WHEN I GO TO PARTIES, EVERY SINGLE WEEKEND, I HAD THIS TAPE BECAUSE IF PEOPLE DIDN’T HAVE “BACK IN BLACK” IN THEIR HOUSE, THEN I HAD IT. THEY COULD PLAY IT WHILE WE WERE PARTYING.” MACLEAN RECALLED HIS INTEREST IN MUSIC IN THE 1980S, NOTING, “[MY] DAD LISTENED TO COUNTRY MUSIC, CHARLEY PRIDE AND WILLIE NELSON, WHICH I WASN’T REALLY GETTING ANYTHING OUT OF. MY MOM, THOUGH, HAS ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN CONTEMPORARY STUFF, WHATEVER THAT WORLD MIGHT BE. SHE IS THE ONE IN THE FAMILY WHO’S PROBABLY BUYING MOST OF THE RECORDS AND WHO IS LISTENING TO MUSIC LOTS, IN THE HOUSEHOLD. SHE DID JAZZERCISE STUFF SO SHE TAUGHT CLASSES. THERE’S LOTS OF VINYL IN THE HOUSE WHEN I’M GROWING UP. AT SOME POINT IN TIME, I DON’T KNOW HOW IT HAPPENED, BUT THERE WAS A RECORD PLAYER THAT WENT INTO MY BEDROOM AND INITIALLY, [BECAUSE] IT’S PROBABLY THE ONLY TIME I LISTENED TO VINYL, IT WAS MOM AND DAD’S KENNY ROGERS RECORD. I THINK I LIKED IT [BECAUSE] I COULD SING TO IT.” “IN ABOUT 1983, I WOULD HAVE AN ALLOWANCE. I START BUYING MUSIC AND THAT’S ALL I WANTED MONEY FOR; TO BUY MUSIC AND TO BUY A TAPE BACK THEN BECAUSE TAPES [WERE] COMPETING WITH VINYL RECORDS. WHERE I HAVE FRIENDS WHO ARE YOUNGER THAN ME OR WHO ARE THE SAME AGE AS ME WHO ARE BUYING VINYL, IT’S GENERALLY, I WOULD SAY, BECAUSE THEY HAVE SIBLINGS WHO ARE ALSO BUYING VINYL. THEY’RE DOING THE RECORD PLAYER THING BUT I WENT RIGHT TO CASSETTE.” “WHEN I FIRST STARTED BUYING MUSIC, THE FIRST [CASSETTE] I BOUGHT WAS MICHAEL JACKSON “THRILLER”; THAT WAS THE FIRST ONE. ALMOST AT THE EXACT SAME TIME, I BOUGHT DURAN DURAN “RIO” AND I THINK MY THIRD TAPE WAS EDDY GRANT; IT WAS A SONG CALLED “ELECTRIC AVENUE”. WHEN I’M BUYING MUSIC, I’M COMING INTO LETHBRIDGE. I REMEMBER THERE WAS A MUSIC STORE—THERE [WAS] NO PARK PLACE MALL—IN THE LETHBRIDGE CENTRE MALL.” “MY COUSIN, WHO’S LIVING WITH US—REG—IS SIX YEARS OLDER THAN ME. HE [HAS] A TAPE CASE BEFORE I BUY MY FIRST TAPE CASE. HIS MUSIC IS PREDOMINANTLY CANADIAN ROCK FROM THE EARLY ‘80S. SO, BANDS THAT WERE ALL COMING OUT AT THE SAME TIME LIKE STREETHEART, TORONTO, CHILLIWACK, HEADPINS, PRISM, THE STUFF THAT RON SAKAMOTO, THE PROMOTER, WAS BRINGING INTO THE SPORTSPLEX. BUT I WAS NOT INTERESTED IN ROCK. I WANTED POP MUSIC AND I REMEMBER SHARING MY LOVE OF MY POP MUSIC WITH MY FRIENDS. I REMEMBER WHEN I GOT DURAN DURAN “RIO”, I WOULD CALL UP MY FRIEND ON THE ROTARY DIAL PHONE AND WITH MY VIKING CASSETTE RECORDER/TAPE PLAYER PUSH ‘PLAY’ AND HOLD THE RECEIVER OVER SO THAT HE COULD HEAR THIS MUSIC THAT I WAS SO EXCITED TO SHARE.” “WHEN I BUY, WHEN I TELL MY NEIGHBOUR FRIEND, [I ASK], “IS THIS OKAY? IS THIS A GOOD ONE?” AND THE ONE TIME, I REMEMBER HIM GOING, “YEAH, THAT’S A GOOD CHOICE.” IT WAS A BAND CALLED, THE TUBES. THAT WOULD BE GRADE 8 AND PROBABLY INTO GRADE 9 AND MY TAPE CASE WOULD BE FULL OF STUFF THAT WOULD BE POP, DURAN DURAN AND MICHAEL JACKSON.” “[IN] GRADE 9, RIGHT BEFORE HIGH SCHOOL, I FIND TWISTED SISTER…THIS WOULD BE BY THE SUMMER OF ’84. [THEIR] VIDEO WAS GETTING TO BE A BIG DEAL…THERE WAS, “WE’RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT” WHICH IS REBELLION FROM YOUR PARENTS AND THE DAD IS LIKE A DRILL SERGEANT. THEN [THE KIDS] ALL TURN INTO TWISTED SISTER. I LOVED THIS TAPE. I PLAYED IT OVER AND OVER AGAIN. [IT WAS] MY FIRST ROCK TAPE AND IT WAS LIFE-CHANGING BECAUSE THEN, ALL THIS POP THAT HAD BEEN IN MY TAPE CASE…I SOLD TO JACK PEACOCK BY GRADE 10. I GOT RID OF ALL MY POP, SO WHERE THAT POP HAD BEEN DEFINING…ALL OF A SUDDEN IT’S LIKE, “I’M NOT THAT, ANYMORE.” IT WAS LIKE A LIGHT SWITCH WENT ON…IN GRADE 10.” “I WAS WEARING A JEAN JACKET IN GRADE 11…WHICH IS ABOUT AS MUCH AS, IN TERMS OF ME AND MY DRESS, HOW I’M REFLECTING [MY IDENTITY]. THIS IS A BIG DEAL BECAUSE WHERE MAYBE YOU DON’T WANT, IN YOUR OWN PARTICULAR DRESS, TO BE WEARING CAMOUFLAGE, YOU COULD THEN OPEN UP A TAPE CASE AND, BY PEOPLE SEEING WHAT’S IN YOUR TAPE CASE, THAT IS SPEAKING TO WHO YOU ARE.” “LISTENING TO MUSIC HASN’T NECESSARILY BEEN CONSISTENT BECAUSE THERE WERE YEARS WHEN WE WERE [AT HOME] THAT WE DIDN’T HAVE A STEREO SYSTEM BECAUSE IT JUST DIDN’T FEEL LIKE IT WAS THE RIGHT THING TO DO AT THE TIME. I WOULD HAVE BEEN LISTENING TO [TAPES] MORE IN MY VEHICLE. WHEN WE GOT OUR…SYSTEM BACK, THEN ALL OF A SUDDEN I’M LISTENING TO IT A LOT, AGAIN. BUT, THERE’S NO QUESTION, IT’S BEEN A MAINSTAY.” “MAYBE IT’S BECAUSE MY EYES ARE SO CRAPPY, [I ASK] IF YOU HAD TO CHOOSE BETWEEN YOUR EYESIGHT AND YOUR HEARING, WHAT WOULD YOU CHOOSE? DO I REALLY WANT TO LOSE MY HEARING? I WANT MONEY TO BUY MUSIC. THAT’S ALL I WANT MONEY FOR. NOTHING ELSE…THE FUNNY PART WITH THAT, TOO, THAT I LEARNED WAS THAT YOU NEVER WANTED TO BUY TOO MUCH MUSIC AT THE SAME TIME. IF YOU DID, YOU DIDN’T LISTEN TO A TAPE AS INTENSELY BECAUSE YOU HAD TWO OR THREE TAPES, SO YOU WOULDN’T APPRECIATE THEM EQUALLY. I LEARNED EARLY, YOU SHOULD ONLY BUY ONE RECORD OR ONE TAPE AT A TIME AND LISTEN TO IT OVER AND OVER AND OVER AGAIN.” “I SWITCHED OVER TO CD’S IN THE SUMMER OF ’89. MY TAPE LISTENING WOULD BE A VERY SHORT TIME. TAPES DON’T LAST VERY LONG. CASSETTE TAPES DON’T LAST. WHEN YOU THINK OF CD’S, WHICH YOU CAN STILL GO AND BUY AND THEY WERE BEING SOLD BY, AT LEAST LOCALLY, FOR SURE, BY 1987, AND THEY’RE STILL BEING SOLD, CASSETTE TAPES [DIDN’T LAST LONG]. FOR ME, [I’M BUYING CASSETTE TAPES FROM] ’83 TO ’88. SIX YEARS.” “IT’S FUNNY, BECAUSE [MY TAPE CASE] WOULD HAVE BEEN FULL AND, FOR SOME REASON, I CHOSE TO GET RID OF THE OTHER TAPES. PROBABLY BECAUSE I WASN’T LISTENING TO THEM AND I THOUGHT, ‘OH, I CAN TAKE THEM TO A USED PLACE,’ BUT I SHOULDN’T HAVE DONE THAT. I SHOULD HAVE ACTUALLY KEPT IT FULL. I WISH I HAD [BECAUSE] I HAD ALL THE AC/DC’S. BUT YOU CAN TELL BY WHAT I KEPT, I OBVIOUSLY KNEW THAT THIS WAS A REALLY IMPORTANT TAPE; TWISTED SISTER [AND] “BACK IN BLACK”. THOSE ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT…” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029005
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20150038001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Materials
COTTON, SILK, LEATHER
No. Pieces
8
Length
61.0
Width
87.5
Description
KALOCSA/KALOCSAI STYLE OF HUNGARIAN DRESS. .1: BLOUSE. IVORY COLOURED, SHORT SLEEVED, SLIGHTLY SQUARE NECKLINE, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE DETAILS. BLOUSE CLOSES WITH FOUR METAL SNAPS AT SHOULDER, TWO SNAPS ON EITHER SIDE OF NECKLINE. SLIGHT A-LINE SHAPE TO BLOUSE. FLOWER SHAPED CROCHETED LACE DETAILING AT CUFFS AND AROUND NECKLINE. EACH OF THE LACE FLOWERS HAS FIVE PETALS ALONG SLEEVE CUFF. CROCHET LACE DETAILING AT NECKLINE IS SMALLER AND FLOWERS ONLY HAVE FOUR PETALS. COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY AT FRONT OF NECKLINE AND JUST ABOVE SLEEVE CUFFS. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. L: 61.0CM W: 87.5CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT YELLOWING AROUND NECKLINE AND AT ARMPITS. SEAM HAS LET LOOSE UNDER WEARER’S RIGHT ARM. VERY SMALL DARK BROWN STAIN ON BACK, BELOW WEARER’S RIGHT ARM. .2: UNDER SKIRT. IVORY COLOURED, APPROXIMATELY KNEE LENGTH, WITH MACHINE-MADE LACE DETAILING ALONG HEM. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH TWO VERY LONG IVORY COLOURED TWILL TAPE TIES. GATHERED AT WAIST BAND, CREATING A FULL SKIRT. TWO PIECE SKIRT WITH SEAMS AT FRONT AND BACK. TIES ARE EACH APPROXIMATELY 137.0 CM LONG. L: 60.8CM W: 145.0CM (AT HEM) OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. DARK GREY LINE APPROXIMATELY 21.5 CM DOWN FROM WAISTBAND CIRCLES THE ENTIRE SKIRT. .3: OVER SKIRT. BURGUNDY, HEAVY, SILKY MATERIAL WITH A REPEATING SQUARE PATTERN WOVEN INTO THE FABRIC (PATTERN CONSISTS OF FOUR VERY SMALL SQUARES, WHICH MAKE UP A SLIGHTLY LARGE SQUARE, REPEATED IN A VERTICLE STRIPE). ACCORDION PLEATS MAKE FOR A VERY FULL SKIRT. THERE IS A 9.5 CM STRIP OF MACHINE-MADE, IVORY LACE APPROXIMATELY 18.7 CM UP FROM THE HEM. INSIDE OF SKIRT IS LINED WITH A PINK FLORAL PATTERNED SILKY FABRIC, APPROXIMATELY 18.0 CM UP FROM THE HEM. THIS PINK FLORAL PATTERNED MATERIAL IS ALSO VISIBLE FOR 2.4 CM ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE SKIRT AT THE HEM. SKIRT CLOSES AT WAIST WITH LONG BURGUNDY BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 120.1 CM LONG, THE SECOND IS 135.5 CM LONG. WIDTH OF SKIRT IS MEASURED ALONG HEM. THE SKIRT IS 46.0 CM WIDE WITH THE PLEATS PRESSED CLOSELY TOGETHER. SKIRT IS 203.0 CM WIDE WHEN THE PLEATS ARE FLATTENED. L: 65.5CM W: 203.0CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. LACE HAS YELLOWED CONSIDERABLY. .4: VEST. IVORY COLOURED, CROPPED VEST, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE DETAILS CLOSES AT FRONT WITH 6 SILVER COLOURED METAL SNAPS. FLOWER SHAPED CROCHET LACE DETAILING AROUND THE WHOLE VEST, EXCEPT AT THE CLOSURE, WHERE THERE IS DETAILING ON THE WEARER’S RIGHT SIDE ONLY. EACH OF THE LACE FLOWERS HAS FIVE PETALS. LARGE COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY ALL OVER VEST. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. VEST MAY HAVE BEEN MADE BIGGER AT ONE POINT: THERE IS A STRIP OF WHITER MATERIAL UNDER BOTH ARMS, EACH STRIP IS APPROXIMATELY 3.0CM WIDE, AT THE SIDE SEAMS. L: 47.5CM W: 57.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .5: APRON. IVORY COLOURED, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE AND CUTWORK LACE DETAILING AROUND EDGE. SIDES AND BOTTOM OF APRON HAVE BOTH CUTWORK AND CROCHETED LACE DETAILING. THE CUTWORK LACE DETAILING IS COMPOSED OF TWO DIFFERENT FLOWERS, IN A REPEATING PATTERN. EACH OF THESE LARGE FLOWERS IS APPROXIMATELY 7.0 CM IN DIAMETER. BETWEEN THE LARGE FLOWERS ARE SQUARE SHAPED SECTIONS OF CROCHETED LACE. JUST INSIDE THE LACE DETAILING ARE 10 SECTIONS OF EMBROIDERED FLOWERS, MADE UP OF FIVE PAIRS OF FLOWERS. THE MAIN PORTION OF THE APRON IS ALSO EMBROIDERED, SHOWING FLOWERS INCLUDING TWO-TONED RED ROSES, TWO-TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO-TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO-TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. THERE ARE ALSO GROUPS OF PEPPERS OR POSSIBLY CARROTS (THEY ARE RED AND ORANGE). LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. WAIST TIES EACH HAVE A SMALL SECTION OF EMBROIDERY AND CROCHETED LACE. L: 56.0CM W: 119.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .6: CAP. IVORY COLOURED, EMBROIDERED. BRIMLESS. SCALLOPED EDGE ALONG WEARER’S FOREHEAD. GATHERED IN BACK WITH ELASTIC AT THE BASE OF THE NECK. COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY ALL OVER CAP. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. THERE ARE ALSO TWO SECTIONS OF BABY BLUE RIBBON: ONE NEAR THE FRONT OF THE HAT IS LONGER AND THE SECOND SECTION OF RIBBON MAKES A HORSESHOE SHAPE AT THE BACK OF THE HEAD. L: 24.0CM W: 28.2CM OVERALL IN EXCELLENT CONDITION. .7 SHOE. MANUFACTURED. LEFT SHOE. RED CORDUROY, SLIP ON, KITTEN HEEL, EMBROIDERED, MULE-STYLE SHOE, WITH ENCLOSED TOES. RED TOE PORTION OF SHOE HAS A BLUE FLOWER, WITH YELLOW CENTRE, EMBROIDERED. NEXT TO EMBROIDERY IS A WHITE POM-POM. INSOLE OF SHOE IS TAN COLOURED LEATHER, STAMPED AT THE HEEL WITH A GOLD STAMP: “MADE IN HUNGARY SZOMBATHELY.” EMBOSSED ON SOLE OF SHOE “270.” SOLE OF HEEL IS BLACK RUBBER AND SOLE OF TOE PORTION IS LEATHER. H: 7.0CM L: 27.7CM W: 8.7CM OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SOLE IS WORN AT TOE, ESPECIALLY, WHERE THE LEATHER HAS WORN AWAY. GOLD STAMP ON INSOLE IS ALSO WORN AWAY. .8 SHOE. MANUFACTURED. RIGHT SHOE. RED CORDUROY, SLIP ON, KITTEN HEEL, EMBROIDERED, MULE-STYLE SHOE, WITH ENCLOSED TOES. RED TOE PORTION OF SHOE HAS AN EMBROIDERED BLUE FLOWER, WITH YELLOW CENTRE. NEXT TO EMBROIDERY IS A WHITE POM-POM. INSOLE OF SHOE IS TAN COLOURED LEATHER, STAMPED AT THE HEEL WITH A GOLD STAMP: “MADE IN HUNGARY SZOMBATHELY.” EMBOSSED ON SOLE OF SHOE “270.” SOLE OF HEEL IS BLACK RUBBER AND SOLE OF TOE PORTION IS LEATHER. H: 7.0CM L: 27.7CM W: 8.7CM OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SOLE IS WORN AT TOE, ESPECIALLY, WHERE THE LEATHER HAS WORN AWAY. GOLD STAMP ON INSOLE IS ALSO WORN AWAY.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A VARIETY OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, MARIA JOKUTY, AND A BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY.” A DESCRIPTION OF MARIA’S EMBROIDERY AND SEWING WORK, THE HISTORY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THE JOKUTY’S JOURNEY TO CANADA CAN BE FOUND BELOW THE HISTORY OF THE ARTIFACTS. MARIA MADE THIS COSTUME FOR HERSELF AND IS DONE IN THE STYLE OF THE KALOSCAI PROVINCE. IN AN INTERIVEW CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN DECEMBER 2015, MARIA SAID THAT THIS DRESS WAS BETTER THAN THE OTHERS “BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE THIS PART (POINTING TO MACHINE EMBROIDERY).” MARIA WOULD WEAR HER EMBROIDERED DRESS AT SPECIAL EVENTS: “WHEN WE HAD SPECIAL – EVEN WHEN WE HAD HERITAGE DAY – I DRESS UP. CANADA DAY. AND THEN WE USED TO HAVE [CELEBRATIONS] IN THE GALT GARDEN, YOU KNOW, MUSIC, DANCE, BUT I WEAR IT. BUT NOT DANCING OKAY, JUST PUT IT ON. AND MANY, MANY TIMES I DID. AND WE HAD DINNER AND DANCE – I PUT IT ON.” .2 UNDER SKIRT: MARIA SAID THAT THIS UNDER SKIRT GAVE FULLNESS TO THE OUTFIT: "YOU HAVE TO HAVE A FULLNESS. BECAUSE THAT WOULD BE JUST TOO PLAIN. BUT WHEN YOU HAVE THIS SKIRT, IT’S KIND OF FULL, YOU CAN SEE, AND IT’S 100% COTTON, AND THAT GIVES YOU KIND OF MORE FULLNESS AND YOU CAN SEE THE BEAUTY OF THE PLEATED SKIRT." .6 CAP: MARIA SAID ONLY MARRIED WOMEN WOULD WEAR THIS TYPE OF CAP: "SO THE GIRLS WHEN THEY ARE YOUNG, THEY WEARING THIS OUTFIT, OKAY. BUT THEN THE WOMEN, IF THEY GOT MARRIED, THEY HAVE TO WEAR A CAP! SO WHOEVER SEE YOU, 'OH, SHE’S MARRIED.' AND, BUT DON’T YOU THINK SHE’S BEAUTIFUL?” .7 & .8: SHOES: MARIA INDICATED THAT THE SHOES WERE PURCHASED IN HUNGARY AND THAT SHE DID NOT DO THE EMBROIDERY ON THE TOE: "THAT’S HOW WE BOUGHT IN HUNGARY. THEY MADE IT OVER THERE. WE WENT IN HUNGARY WITH MY HUSBAND I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PAIRS WE BOUGHT TO THE GIRLS. AND THE GIRLS, WHEN THEY WERE DANCING THEY HAVE ALL THE SAME PAIR OF DIFFERENT SIZES." MARIA BEGAN WORKING ON 16 DANCE OUTFITS IN 1977 AND IT TOOK HER “THREE-FOUR YEARS TO DO IT. BECAUSE YOU KNOW, I DESIGNED THE FLOWERS, AND THEN YOU KNOW THE EMBROIDERY, AND TO PUT IT TOGETHER WAS A VERY HARD JOB.” MAKING THE DANCE COSTUMES WAS IMPORTANT TO MARIA “BECAUSE [SHE] WAS PROUD OF BEING HUNGARIAN AND [SHE] WANTED TO SHOW SOMETHING DIFFERENT.” SHE LEARNED TO EMBROIDER AT THE AGE OF 12/13 FROM A NEIGHBOUR NAMED MARISSA IN HUNGARY. MARIA THINKS THAT MARISSA WAS ABOUT 25/26 YEARS OLD WHEN SHE TAUGHT MARIA HOW TO EMBROIDER. MARIA GETS A GREAT DEAL OF ENJOYMENT SEEING HER CREATIONS ON DANCERS WHILE THEY COMPETE: “VERY IMPORTANT. YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME. YOU PUT ALL ENERGY INTO IT TO BE ABLE TO FINISH IT AND THAT – BECAUSE HAPPINESS WAS WHEN THE GIRLS, THEY WAS DANCING ON A STAGE AND THEY’VE ALL GOT THE COSTUMES. YOU KNOW WHAT, WOW! YOU JUST CAN’T EX – I CAN’T EXPLAIN TO YOU.” MARIA GOT SOME OF HER PATTERNS FOR EMBROIDERY FROM THE EDMONTON HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY AND LATER RETURNED TO HUNGARY TO IMPROVE HER SKILLS, AS WELL AS TO LEARN HOW TO DO MACHINE EMBROIDERY. MARIA AND, AND HER HUSBAND, CHESTER, RETURNED TO HUNGARY ABOUT 3 TIMES, STAYING EACH TIME FOR ABOUT 2 MONTHS SO THAT MARIA COULD IMPROVE HER SKILLS. IN ADDITION TO CREATING THE COSTUMES, MARIA ALSO CARED FOR THEM, ENSURING THEY WERE AVAILABLE WHEN A DANCER WOULD NEED TO WEAR THEM: “YES, I WAS IN CHARGE. DRY CLEANING, WASHING, AND EVERYTHING. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS, LONG YEARS UNTIL WE MOVED AND THEN WE DIDN’T HAVE NO ROOM, AND THEN SOMEBODY ELSE, YOU KNOW. AND THEN WE HAD A MEETING AND THE DANCERS, THEY WAS LOOKING FOR SOMEBODY ELSE WHO WOULD TAKE CARE OF THEM, ‘CAUSE YOU SHOULD’VE SEEN THE GIRLS THEY WAS LIKE, YOU KNOW, “NO, MRS. JOKUTY, YOU TAKE GOOD CARE!” AND I DID.” ACCORDING TO CHESTER (GEZA) JOKUTY’S OBITUARY, CHESTER AND MARIA WERE MARRIED IN HUNGARY ON OCTOBER 3, 1949. CHESTER SERVED IN THE HUNGARIAN ARMY IN 1940, WAS TAKEN PRISONER BY THE RUSSIANS IN 1945, AND HELD PRISONER IN RUSSIA FOR THREE AND A HALF YEARS. IN THE BOOKLET “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY” MARIA INDICATES THAT CHESTER WAS NOT KEEN TO REMAIN IN HUNGARY FOLLOWING THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION, BECAUSE OF HIS TREATMENT AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIANS: CHESTER “SPENT THREE AND A HALF YEARS AS A P.O.W. IN ODESSA WHERE PRISONERS WERE USED AS SLAVE LABOUR. CHESTER WAS NOT A BIG MAN AND BECAUSE OF THE CONDITIONS, WAS EXTREMELY WEAK. DURING THIS TIME IF THE PRISONERS WERE NOT ABLE TO KEEP UP OR DO WHAT WAS REQUIRED OF THEM, THE RUSSIAN GUARDS SENT THEIR DOGS IN TO FORCE THE PRISONERS TO MOVE. HE HAD WITNESSED SO MUCH DEATH AND SUFFERING AND HAD SUFFERED SO BADLY IN THE COLD, AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIAN SOLDIERS, HE VOWED NEVER TO BE TAKEN BY THEM AGAIN.” MARIA CONTINUED IN THIS BOOKLET TO RECOUNT THEIR DECISION TO LEAVE HUNGARY: “SO, ON NOVEMBER 4TH [1956], WE DECIDED WE WOULD LEAVE … SO WE GATHERED OUR FAMILY AND MY MOTHER AND BEGAN WALKING AS FAST AS POSSIBLE TOWARDS AUSTRIA – ONLY ABOUT AN HOUR’S WALK FROM WHERE WE LIVED.” THE JOKUTY FAMILY REMAINED IN AUSTRIA FOR 6 MONTHS, WHERE MARIA RECALLS BEING WELL TREATED. THEY LEFT AUSTRIA AND ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN, NB AFTER A 12 DAY CROSSING, ON APRIL 22, 1957. AFTER A LONG TRAIN RIDE, THEY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. SHORTLY AFTER THEIR ARRIVAL THEY BEGAN WORK AS FARM LABOURERS IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON OCTOBER 29, 1979 HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY ABOUT THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION: “DESCRIBED SIMPLY, THE REVOLUTION ESTABLISHED A GOVERNMENT THAT TRIED TO MOVE AWAY FROM THE SOVIET UNION’S INFLUENCE. THE SOVIET UNION, SUBSEQUENTLY, SENT ARMED TROOPS INTO HUNGARY TO REASSERT ITS INFLUENCE. IN THE AFTERMATH, MANY PEOPLE FLED, ABOUT 37,000 TO CANADA ACCORDING TO FEDERAL DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION STATISTICS … CHESTER JOKUTY OF THE ASSOCIATION SAID ABOUT 2,000 PERSONS OF HUNGARIAN ORIGINS LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE AND THE SURROUNDING AREA.” MARIA INDICATED SEVERAL TIMES THROUGH THE COURSE OF HER INTERVIEW THAT LIFE WAS VERY DIFFICULT FOR THE JOKUTY FAMILY WHEN THEY FIRST ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. THE FAMILY’S FIRST ACCOMMODATIONS LEFT LITTLE TO BE DESIRED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE RUNNING WATER, TOILET, WE HAVE TO PULL THE WATER FROM THINGS, YOU KNOW, AND CHOP THE WOOD TO MAKE BREAKFAST. AND WINTERTIME, WE WAS SCARED TO DEATH THAT KIDS, WE’LL FREEZE TO DEATH. SOMETIMES I HAVE TO STAY UP, OR MY HUSBAND DID TO BE SURE THE WOOD, YOU KNOW THE STOVE IN THE KITCHEN – ONLY THING – THAT GIVE US A LITTLE BIT WARMTH. IT WAS VERY, VERY HARD.” MARIA RECALLS HAVING TO HITCH HIKE TO GET GROCERIES AND RELIED ON THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS TO GET HOME AGAIN: “AND NO CAR. YOU KNOW WHAT I DID? WE WAS SO HUNGRY, SO I SAID I HAVE TO TAKE A CHANCE. MY HUSBAND WAS WORKING AND KIDS WAS IN MCNALLY SCHOOL AND THEN I WENT ON THE ROAD, PUT MY HAND UP, AND WHATEVER HAPPENED, HAPPENED ... THEY DROP ME ON 5TH AVENUE SOMEWHERE, OR SAFEWAY, THEY DROP ME OVER THERE, BUT I HEARD THAT LOTS OF HUNGARIAN BACHELORS AND PEOPLE GO TO THE GARDEN HOTEL DRINKING BEER. SO WHEN I WENT OVER THERE, I COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, SO THEN I LISTENED TO THE LANGUAGES WHERE I HEAR THE HUNGARIAN LANGUAGES. SO THEN I HEARD IT, AND I WENT AND I INTRODUCED MYSELF, WHO I AM, AND, “WE ARE ON THE SUGAR BEETS SOWING, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US? I NEED A GROCERY, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US …?” AND THEY FIND US SOMEBODY WHO WAS DRIVING, AND I DON’T KNOW WHAT THE NAME, WHAT THE NAME WAS, BECAUSE LONG TIME AGO, THEY GOT MY GROCERY IN THE CAR AND TOOK ME TO THE FARM FREE. CAN YOU IMAGINE? I WISH I COULD GIVE HIM A BIG HUG AND THANKFUL.” CHESTER’S OBITUARY INDICATES THAT HE “WAS A VERY PROUD HUNGARIAN AND A FOUNDING LIFETIME MEMBER OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA IN 1977 AND SERVED AS PRESIDENT FOR TEN YEARS. HE ALSO WAS A FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ETHNIC ASSOCIATION IN 1977.” IN A HERALD ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON NOVEMBER 14, 1989, MARGARET GUGYELKA (SECRETARY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY) INDICATED THAT THE SOCIETY STARTED IN 1977: “’THERE WAS AN OLDTIMERS’ GROUP BEFORE THAT, BUT IT WAS MORE LIKE A FRATERNITY … THE SOCIETY WAS STARTED BY A SMALL GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO WANTED TO CARRY ON HUNGARIAN TRADITIONS.’” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2, 1983 INDICATES THAT THE SOCIETY ALSO PARTICIPATED IN THE WESTERN CANADIAN HUNGARIAN FOLK DANCE FESTIVAL. IN THE ARTICLE, CHESTER SAID THAT THE “FESTIVAL IS NOT A COMPETITION BUT RATHER AN EVENT DESIGNED TO KEEP CULTURAL HERITAGE ALIVE AND DANCE GROUPS IN TOUCH … JOKUTY SAYS HUNGARIAN DANCING HAS PROVEN ‘VERY, VERY POPULAR’ BECAUSE OF THE VARIETY OF DANCES – 46 IN ALL OF AT THE 1982 FESTIVAL HELD IN LETHBRIDGE – AND THE COLOURFUL COSTUMES UNIQUE TO EACH PROVINCE. THE COSTUMES HAVE PROVEN TO BE A BIG EXPENSE FOR THE SOCIETY SINCE ONE OUTFIT CAN COST UP TO $600 TO MAKE. MADE TO MEASURE BOOTS FROM MONTREAL ARE AS MUCH AS $150.” MARIA LAMENTS THAT THE SOCIETY ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE. SHE EXPLAINED THAT THERE SIMPLY ISN’T THE VOLUNTEER LABOUR FORCE TO CONTINUE DOING ALL THAT THE SOCIETY USED TO: “WHEN WE USED TO MAKE – EVERY YEAR BEFORE CHRISTMAS WE USED TO MAKE FOUR THOUSAND, FIVE THOUSAND CABBAGE ROLLS AND WE ADVERTISE, WE LET THE PEOPLE KNOW YOU HAVE TO PUT THE NAME AHEAD AND YOU HAVE TO COME PICK. ALL DAY WE WAS WORKING, BUT FIVE O’CLOCK, SIX O’CLOCK PEOPLE CAME AND TAKE [THE CABBAGE ROLLS] BECAUSE WE USED TO HAVE IT IN A BILL KERGAN CENTER, AND OVER THERE IS WALK-IN COLDER. BUT NOW, THIS YEAR [2015], NO CABBAGE ROLLS AND PEOPLE ARE DISAPPOINTED, BUT WE DON’T HAVE NO VOLUNTEERS. YOU KNOW, GOLDEN YEARS CATCH UP WITH PEOPLE.” SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY" AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20150038001
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150038002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
5
Length
68.9
Width
106.5
Description
MEZOSEGI STYLE OF DRESS. .1: BLOUSE. MANUFACTURED. WHITE, THREE-QUARTER LENGTH SLEEVE, BUTTON-UP, TRIMMED IN LACE. BAND COLLAR, TRIMMED WITH A THIN BAND OF WHITE LACE. SLEEVES HEMMED WITH TWO RUFFLES OF WHITE LACE AND EACH BAND OF LACE IS 12.5 CM WIDE. BLOUSE CLOSES IN THE FRONT WITH 5 BUTTONS. PLACKET TRIMMED WITH THE SAME LACE FOUND AT THE COLLAR. REMNANTS OF A BLACK LABEL FOUND AT THE BACK OF NECK, INSIDE BLOUSE. L: 68.9CM W: 106.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .2: UNDERSKIRT. HANDMADE. IVORY COLOURED, APPROXIMATELY KNEE LENGTH, WITH MACHINE-MADE LACE DETAILING ALONG HEM. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH TWO VERY LONG IVORY COLOURED BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 109.0 CM LONG, THE OTHER IS 136.0 CM LONG. TO INCREASE FULLNESS OF THE UNDERSKIRT, THERE IS A 27.5 CM WIDE RUFFLE ALONG THE BOTTOM OF THE SKIRT. THIS RUFFLE AND THE HEM LINE ARE BOTH TRIMMED IN A FLORAL PATTERNED LACE. L: 56.2CM W: 87.7CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. LACE TRIM HAS COME UNDONE AT THE FRONT OF THE SKIRT, ON THE UPPER RUFFLE AND ESPECIALLY ON THE LOWER RUFFLE. .3: VEST. HANDMADE. PINK AND YELLOW FLOWERS WITH GREENERY ON MAROON BACKGROUND, CLOSES IN FRONT WITH BLACK VELCRO, CROPPED LENGTH. TRIMMED WITH PINK CREPE AROUND NECKLINE AND AROUND ARMS. BAND OF PINK CREPE AROUND EACH SHOULDER STRAP, CREATING A SLIGHT SWEETHEART NECKLINE. THE SAME PINK CREPE IS ON THE INSIDE OF THE VEST AT THE HEM. L: 46.0CM W: 48.2CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .4: OVERSKIRT. HANDMADE. PINK AND YELLOW FLOWERS WITH GREENERY ON MAROON BACKGROUND, SEVERAL STRIPS OF FABRIC OR RIBBON ALONG HEMLINE OF SKIRT. ACCORDION PLEATS MAKE FOR A VERY FULL SKIRT. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH WHITE VELCRO AND MAROON BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 91.5 CM LONG, THE OTHER IS 92.5 CM LONG. STRIPES OF FABRIC OR RIBBON START 24.0 CM FROM BOTTOM OF SKIRT. THE FIRST STRIP IS MADE OF YELLOW SATIN FABRIC, THEN A THIN SECTION OF THE SKIRT FABRIC. NEXT IS A 10.7 CM WIDE STRIP OF PINK: A THIN SATIN RIBBON OF LIGHT PINK IS SEWN ONTO THE TOP AND BOTTOM OF A PIECE OF DARKER PINK CREPE, MUCH LIKE THAT FOUND ON THE TRIM OF THE VEST (P20150038002.3). BELOW THE TWO-TONED PINK STRIPE IS ANOTHER STRIP OF SKIRT FABRIC. THEN THERE IS A STRIP OF YELLOW SATIN RIBBON, BABY BLUE SATIN RIBBON, AND FINALLY AT THE VERY BOTTOM OF THE HEMLINE, A STRIP OF RED SATIN RIBBON. WIDTH OF SKIRT IS MEASURED ALONG HEM. THE SKIRT IS 69.0 CM WIDE WITH THE PLEATS PRESSED CLOSELY TOGETHER. SKIRT IS 287.5 CM WIDE WHEN THE PLEATS ARE FLATTENED. L: 65.0CM W: 287.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .5 APRON. HANDMADE. WHITE, EYELET LACE, COTTON, TWO VERTICAL RIBBON STRIPS ON FRONT. THREE PANEL CONSTRUCTION. FLORAL PATTERNED EYELET LACE, WITH MORE FLOWERS TOWARDS THE HEMLINE OF THE APRON. CENTRE PANEL IS SOLID FABRIC AT THE WAISTBAND. SIDE PANELS ARE EYELET LACE. SIDES AND BOTTOM OF APRON HAVE A SCALLOPED CUTOUT LACE EDGING. VERTICAL STRIPS ARE WHITE RIBBON WITH MACHINE EMBROIDERED RED ROSES. WAISTBAND TIES HAVE SAME EYELET LACE AND SCALLOPING. L:53.2CM W: 185.0CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. YELLOW STAINING ON FRONT OF APRON BETWEEN THE TWO VERTICAL STRIPES, AS WELL AS ON THE WEARER’S LEFT SIDE, TOWARDS THE HEMLINE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A VARIETY OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, MARIA JOKUTY, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN DECEMBER 2015, AND A BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY.” A DESCRIPTION OF MARIA’S EMBROIDERY AND SEWING WORK, THE HISTORY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THE JOKUTY’S JOURNEY TO CANADA CAN BE FOUND BELOW THE HISTORY OF THE ARTIFACTS. .1: BLOUSE. MARIA INDICATED THAT THIS ITEM OF CLOTHING IS THE ONLY ONE THAT SHE DIDN'T MAKE HERSELF. SHE DID ADD THE LACE RUFFLE TO THE SLEEVE. .4: OVER SKIRT. MARIA INDICATED IN HER INTERVIEW THAT THE PLEATING ALLOWED THE SKIRT TO FLARE WHEN THE DANCER SPINS: "THE SKIRT, WHEN YOU DANCE WITH THE SKIRT, WHEN YOU SPIN, THE GIRL SPINNING, YOU KNOW, IT’S SO BEAUTIFUL. BECAUSE THIS IS ALSO EVERYTHING HOMEMADE. I MADE IT, OKAY, AND SENT IT TO MONTREAL FOR SPECIAL PRESSING, YOU KNOW, BUT LOOK AT THAT.” MARIA BEGAN WORKING ON THIS OUTFIT (AND 15 OTHER DANCE OUTFITS) IN 1977 AND IT TOOK HER “THREE-FOUR YEARS TO DO IT. YOU KNOW, I DESIGNED THE FLOWERS, AND THEN YOU KNOW THE EMBROIDERY, AND TO PUT IT TOGETHER WAS A VERY HARD JOB.” MAKING THE DANCE COSTUMES WAS IMPORTANT TO MARIA “BECAUSE [SHE] WAS PROUD OF BEING HUNGARIAN AND [SHE] WANTED TO SHOW SOMETHING DIFFERENT.” SHE LEARNED TO EMBROIDER AT THE AGE OF 12/13 FROM A NEIGHBOUR NAMED MARISSA IN HUNGARY. MARIA THINKS THAT MARISSA WAS ABOUT 25/26 YEARS OLD WHEN SHE TAUGHT MARIA HOW TO EMBROIDER. MARIA GETS A GREAT DEAL OF ENJOYMENT SEEING HER CREATIONS ON DANCERS WHILE THEY COMPETE: “VERY IMPORTANT. YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME. YOU PUT ALL ENERGY INTO IT TO BE ABLE TO FINISH IT AND THAT – BECAUSE HAPPINESS WAS WHEN THE GIRLS, THEY WAS DANCING ON A STAGE AND THEY’VE ALL GOT THE COSTUMES. YOU KNOW WHAT, WOW! YOU JUST CAN’T EX – I CAN’T EXPLAIN TO YOU.” MARIA GOT SOME OF HER PATTERNS FOR EMBROIDERY FROM THE EDMONTON HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY AND LATER RETURNED TO HUNGARY TO IMPROVE HER SKILLS, AS WELL AS TO LEARN HOW TO DO MACHINE EMBROIDERY. MARIA AND HER HUSBAND, CHESTER, RETURNED TO HUNGARY ABOUT 3 TIMES, STAYING EACH TIME FOR ABOUT 2 MONTHS SO THAT MARIA COULD IMPROVE HER SKILLS. IN ADDITION TO CREATING THE COSTUMES, MARIA ALSO CARED FOR THEM, ENSURING THEY WERE AVAILABLE WHEN A DANCER WOULD NEED TO WEAR THEM: “YES, I WAS IN CHARGE. DRY CLEANING, WASHING, AND EVERYTHING. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS, LONG YEARS UNTIL WE MOVED AND THEN WE DIDN’T HAVE NO ROOM, AND THEN SOMEBODY ELSE, YOU KNOW. AND THEN WE HAD A MEETING AND THE DANCERS, THEY WAS LOOKING FOR SOMEBODY ELSE WHO WOULD TAKE CARE OF THEM, ‘CAUSE YOU SHOULD’VE SEEN THE GIRLS THEY WAS LIKE, YOU KNOW, “NO, MRS. JOKUTY, YOU TAKE GOOD CARE!” AND I DID.” ACCORDING TO CHESTER (GEZA) JOKUTY’S OBITUARY, CHESTER AND MARIA WERE MARRIED IN HUNGARY ON OCTOBER 3, 1949. CHESTER SERVED IN THE HUNGARIAN ARMY IN 1940, WAS TAKEN PRISONER BY THE RUSSIANS IN 1945, AND HELD PRISONER IN RUSSIA FOR THREE AND A HALF YEARS. IN THE BOOKLET “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY” MARIA INDICATES THAT CHESTER WAS NOT KEEN TO REMAIN IN HUNGARY FOLLOWING THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION, BECAUSE OF HIS TREATMENT AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIANS: CHESTER “SPENT THREE AND A HALF YEARS AS A P.O.W. IN ODESSA WHERE PRISONERS WERE USED AS SLAVE LABOUR. CHESTER WAS NOT A BIG MAN AND BECAUSE OF THE CONDITIONS, WAS EXTREMELY WEAK. DURING THIS TIME IF THE PRISONERS WERE NOT ABLE TO KEEP UP OR DO WHAT WAS REQUIRED OF THEM, THE RUSSIAN GUARDS SENT THEIR DOGS IN TO FORCE THE PRISONERS TO MOVE. HE HAD WITNESSED SO MUCH DEATH AND SUFFERING AND HAD SUFFERED SO BADLY IN THE COLD, AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIAN SOLDIERS, HE VOWED NEVER TO BE TAKEN BY THEM AGAIN.” MARIA CONTINUED IN THIS BOOKLET TO RECOUNT THEIR DECISION TO LEAVE HUNGARY: “SO, ON NOVEMBER 4TH [1956], WE DECIDED WE WOULD LEAVE … SO WE GATHERED OUR FAMILY AND MY MOTHER AND BEGAN WALKING AS FAST AS POSSIBLE TOWARDS AUSTRIA – ONLY ABOUT AN HOUR’S WALK FROM WHERE WE LIVED.” THE JOKUTY FAMILY REMAINED IN AUSTRIA FOR 6 MONTHS, WHERE MARIA RECALLS BEING WELL TREATED. THEY LEFT AUSTRIA AND ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN, NB AFTER A 12 DAY CROSSING, ON APRIL 22, 1957. AFTER A LONG TRAIN RIDE, THEY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. SHORTLY AFTER THEIR ARRIVAL THEY BEGAN WORK AS FARM LABOURERS IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON OCTOBER 29, 1979 HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY ABOUT THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION: “DESCRIBED SIMPLY, THE REVOLUTION ESTABLISHED A GOVERNMENT THAT TRIED TO MOVE AWAY FROM THE SOVIET UNION’S INFLUENCE. THE SOVIET UNION, SUBSEQUENTLY, SENT ARMED TROOPS INTO HUNGARY TO REASSERT ITS INFLUENCE. IN THE AFTERMATH, MANY PEOPLE FLED, ABOUT 37,000 TO CANADA ACCORDING TO FEDERAL DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION STATISTICS … CHESTER JOKUTY OF THE ASSOCIATION SAID ABOUT 2,000 PERSONS OF HUNGARIAN ORIGINS LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE AND THE SURROUNDING AREA.” MARIA INDICATED SEVERAL TIMES THROUGH THE COURSE OF HER INTERVIEW THAT LIFE WAS VERY DIFFICULT FOR THE JOKUTY FAMILY WHEN THEY FIRST ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. THE FAMILY’S FIRST ACCOMMODATIONS LEFT LITTLE TO BE DESIRED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE RUNNING WATER, TOILET, WE HAVE TO PULL THE WATER FROM THINGS, YOU KNOW, AND CHOP THE WOOD TO MAKE BREAKFAST. AND WINTERTIME, WE WAS SCARED TO DEATH THAT KIDS, WE’LL FREEZE TO DEATH. SOMETIMES I HAVE TO STAY UP, OR MY HUSBAND DID TO BE SURE THE WOOD, YOU KNOW THE STOVE IN THE KITCHEN – ONLY THING – THAT GIVE US A LITTLE BIT WARMTH. IT WAS VERY, VERY HARD.” MARIA RECALLS HAVING TO HITCH HIKE TO GET GROCERIES AND RELIED ON THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS TO GET HOME AGAIN: “AND NO CAR. YOU KNOW WHAT I DID? WE WAS SO HUNGRY, SO I SAID I HAVE TO TAKE A CHANCE. MY HUSBAND WAS WORKING AND KIDS WAS IN MCNALLY SCHOOL AND THEN I WENT ON THE ROAD, PUT MY HAND UP, AND WHATEVER HAPPENED, HAPPENED. SO THEY DROP ME ON 5TH AVENUE SOMEWHERE, OR SAFEWAY, THEY DROP ME OVER THERE, BUT I HEARD THAT LOTS OF HUNGARIAN BACHELORS AND PEOPLE GO TO THE GARDEN HOTEL DRINKING BEER. SO WHEN I WENT OVER THERE, I COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, SO THEN I LISTENED TO THE LANGUAGES WHERE I HEAR THE HUNGARIAN LANGUAGES. SO THEN I HEARD IT, AND I WENT AND I INTRODUCED MYSELF, WHO I AM, AND, “WE ARE ON THE SUGAR BEETS SOWING, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US? I NEED A GROCERY, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US …?” AND THEY FIND US SOMEBODY WHO WAS DRIVING, AND I DON’T KNOW WHAT THE NAME, WHAT THE NAME WAS, BECAUSE LONG TIME AGO, THEY GOT MY GROCERY IN THE CAR AND TOOK ME TO THE FARM FREE. CAN YOU IMAGINE? I WISH I COULD GIVE HIM A BIG HUG AND THANKFUL.” CHESTER’S OBITUARY INDICATES THAT HE “WAS A VERY PROUD HUNGARIAN AND A FOUNDING LIFETIME MEMBER OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA IN 1977 AND SERVED AS PRESIDENT FOR TEN YEARS. HE ALSO WAS A FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ETHNIC ASSOCIATION IN 1977.” IN A HERALD ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON NOVEMBER 14, 1989, MARGARET GUGYELKA (SECRETARY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY) INDICATED THAT THE SOCIETY STARTED IN 1977: “’THERE WAS AN OLDTIMERS’ GROUP BEFORE THAT, BUT IT WAS MORE LIKE A FRATERNITY … THE SOCIETY WAS STARTED BY A SMALL GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO WANTED TO CARRY ON HUNGARIAN TRADITIONS.’” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2, 1983 INDICATES THAT THE SOCIETY ALSO PARTICIPATED IN THE WESTERN CANADIAN HUNGARIAN FOLK DANCE FESTIVAL. IN THE ARTICLE, CHESTER SAID THAT THE “FESTIVAL IS NOT A COMPETITION BUT RATHER AN EVENT DESIGNED TO KEEP CULTURAL HERITAGE ALIVE AND DANCE GROUPS IN TOUCH … JOKUTY SAYS HUNGARIAN DANCING HAS PROVEN ‘VERY, VERY POPULAR’ BECAUSE OF THE VARIETY OF DANCES – 46 IN ALL OF AT THE 1982 FESTIVAL HELD IN LETHBRIDGE – AND THE COLOURFUL COSTUMES UNIQUE TO EACH PROVINCE. THE COSTUMES HAVE PROVEN TO BE A BIG EXPENSE FOR THE SOCIETY SINCE ONE OUTFIT CAN COST UP TO $600 TO MAKE. MADE TO MEASURE BOOTS FROM MONTREAL ARE AS MUCH AS $150.” MARIA LAMENTS THAT THE SOCIETY ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE. SHE EXPLAINED THAT THERE SIMPLY ISN’T THE VOLUNTEER LABOUR FORCE TO CONTINUE DOING ALL THAT THE SOCIETY USED TO: “WHEN WE USED TO MAKE – EVERY YEAR BEFORE CHRISTMAS WE USED TO MAKE FOUR THOUSAND, FIVE THOUSAND CABBAGE ROLLS AND WE ADVERTISE, WE LET THE PEOPLE KNOW YOU HAVE TO PUT THE NAME AHEAD AND YOU HAVE TO COME PICK. ALL DAY WE WAS WORKING, BUT FIVE O’CLOCK, SIX O’CLOCK PEOPLE CAME AND TAKE [THE CABBAGE ROLLS] BECAUSE WE USED TO HAVE IT IN A BILL KERGAN CENTER, AND OVER THERE IS WALK-IN COOLER.. BUT NOW, THIS YEAR [2015], NO CABBAGE ROLLS AND PEOPLE ARE DISAPPOINTED, BUT WE DON’T HAVE NO VOLUNTEERS. YOU KNOW, GOLDEN YEARS CATCH UP WITH PEOPLE.” SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY" AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20150038002
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.