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Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
No. Pieces
1
Height
107
Diameter
54.5
Description
WOODEN SPINNING WHEEL COATED WITH RED WOOD VARNISH. THE BOBBIN IS APPROX. 11.5CM IN LENGTH AND APPROX. 9CM IN DIAMETER. THERE IS SOME HANDSPUN, WHITE YARN REMAINING ON THE BOBBIN, IN ADDITION TO A SMALL AMOUNT OF GREEN YARN. THE SPINNING WHEEL IS FULLY ASSEMBLED. ON EITHER SIDE OF THE FLYER THERE ARE 10 METAL HOOKS. ON THE LEFT SIDE ONE OF THE 10 HOOKS IS PARTIALLY BROKEN OFF. ON THE FRONT MAIDEN, A WHITE STRING IS TIED AROUND A FRONT KNOB WITH A METAL WIRE BENT LIKE A HOOK (POSSIBLY TO PULL YARN THROUGH THE METAL ORIFICE ATTACHED TO FLYER). LONG SECTION OF RED YARN LOOPED AROUND THE SPINNING WHEEL (MAY BE DRIVE BAND). TREADLE IS TIED TO THE FOOTMAN WITH A DARK GREY, FLAT STRING THAT IS 5MM IN WIDTH. GOOD CONDITION. TREADLE IS WELL WORN WITH VARNISH WORN OFF AND METAL NAIL HEADS EXPOSED.
Subjects
TEXTILEWORKING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS ACQUIRED THIS SPINNING WHEEL FROM HER MOTHER AT THE SAME TIME SHE ACQUIRED THE RUG (P20160003006-GA). SHE EXPLAINS: “I ASKED HER IF I COULD USE THE SPINNING WHEEL – SHE TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN. AND SHE ALSO TAUGHT ME HOW TO WEAVE, ACTUALLY MY GRANDMOTHER DID THAT MORE SO THAN MY MOTHER. AND I BELONG TO THE WEAVERS’ GUILD, SO I THOUGHT THAT I BETTER DO SOME SPINNING. AND I DID SOME, SO THAT’S WHY I’VE GOT IT HERE AND MOTHER SAID NOT TO BOTHER BRINGING IT BECAUSE SHE WASN’T GOING TO DO ANYMORE SPINNING. SHE HAD LOTS AND LOTS OF YARN THAT SHE DID. SO IT’S BEEN SITTING HERE; IT WAS IN THE BASEMENT.” THE WHEEL WAS MADE FOR ELIZABETH KONKIN WHEN SHE WAS A CHILD IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS EXPLAINED THAT: “… [THE SPINNING WHEEL] WAS MADE ESPECIALLY FOR HER. SHE WAS VERY YOUNG. AND THAT IS THE CADILLAC OF SPINNING WHEELS… BECAUSE SHE KNEW WHO THE SPINNERS WERE, WHO THE SPINNING WHEEL CARPENTERS WERE. AND THERE WAS ONE PARTICULAR MAN AND HER MOTHER SAID, ‘WE’LL GO TO THAT ONE.’ AND THEN IN TURN, IN PAYMENT, SHE WOVE HIM ENOUGH MATERIAL TO MAKE A SUIT – A LINEN ONE… [T]HEY DIDN’T LIVE IN CASTELLAR, THEY LIVED IN ANOTHER PLACE. IT’S CALLED - IN RUSSIAN IT IS CALLED OOTISCHENIA. IT’S WHERE THE BIG – ONE OF THE BIG DAMS IS. IF YOU EVER GO ON THAT ROAD, THERE’LL BE DAMS – I THINK ABOUT 3 HUGE ONES… NEAR CASTELLAR, YEAH.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE TIME THE WHEEL WAS BUILT FOR HER MOTHER, MORRIS ANSWERED: “… [S]HE GOT IT LONG BEFORE [HER MARRIAGE].” SHE EXPLAINED THAT PRIOR TO MARRYING, GIRLS WOULD PUT TOGETHER TROUSSEAUS “AND THEY MAKE ALL KINDS OF FANCY THINGS WHICH THEY NEVER USE.” MORRIS RECALLS THE SPINNING WHEEL BEING USED WITHIN HER FAMILY’S HOME IN SHOULDICE AND IN THE LEAN-TO AREA IN THEIR HOME AT VAUXHALL: ‘WELL I THINK [THE SKILL IS] IN THE GENES ACTUALLY. BECAUSE MOST FAMILIES WOVE, AND THEY CERTAINLY SPUN, AS FAR AS I REMEMBER. I KNOW EVERY FALL THE LOOM WOULD COME OUT AND WE WERE LIVING WITH MY GRANDPARENTS ON MY DAD’S [SIDE]. WE LIVED UPSTAIRS, AND EVERY WINTER THEY’D HAUL THAT HUGE LOOM INTO THE BATHHOUSE – THE STEAM BATHHOUSE – BECAUSE THERE WAS NO ROOM ANYWHERE ELSE. AND THEY – THE LADIES SET IT UP AND IN THE SUMMERTIME. THEY TORE THE RAGS FOR THE RUGS, OR SPUN THEM. [FOR] WHATEVER THEY WERE GOING TO MAKE. MY MOM WAS SPINNING WHEN I WAS OLD. [S]HE USED MAKE MITTENS AND SOCKS FOR THE KIDS FOR MY CHILDREN AND SO WHEN SHE DIED THERE WAS A WHOLE STACK OF THESE MITTENS AND SOCKS AND I’VE BEEN GIVING IT TO MY GRAND[KIDS AND] MY GREAT GRANDKIDS” MORRIS ALSO USED THIS SPINNING WHEEL MANY TIMES HERSELF. SHE SAID, “IT WAS VERY EASY TO SPIN AND WHEN YOU TRY SOMEBODY ELSE’S SPINNING WHEEL YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE RIGHT AWAY. IT’S LIKE DRIVING A CADILLAC AND THEN DRIVING AN OLD FORD. IT’S JUST, IT’S SMOOTH. OUR SON, I TOLD YOU HE WAS VERY CLEVER, HE TRIED SPINNING AND HE SAID IT WAS JUST A VERY, VERY GOOD SPINNING WHEEL. WHEN I WAS IN THE GUILD I TRIED DOING [WHAT] MY MOTHER TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN FINE THREAD AND I WANTED HEAVY THREAD BECAUSE NOW [THEY'RE] MAKING THESE WALL HANGINGS. THEY USE THREAD AS THICK AS TWO FINGERS SO I DID THAT AND I DYED IT. I WENT OUT AND CREATED MY OWN DYES. THAT WAS FUN AND THEN I HAVE A SAMPLER OF ALL THE DYES I MADE… I STOPPED SPINNING SHORTLY BEFORE I STOPPED WEAVING… I LOVED WEAVING. FIRST OF ALL I LEARNED HOW TO EMBROIDER. I LIKED THAT THEN I LEARNED HOW CROCHET, I LIKED THAT. THEN I LEARNED HOW TO KNIT AND THAT WAS TOPS. THEN ONE DAY I WAS VISITING MY FRIEND, FRANCES, AND SHE WAS GOING TO THE BOWMAN AND I SAID, 'WHERE ARE YOU GOING?' SHE SAID 'I’M GOING THERE TO WEAVE.' I SAID, 'I DIDN’T KNOW YOU COULD WEAVE?' SHE SAID, 'OH YES,' AND I SAID ‘IS IT HARD?' SHE SAID, ‘NO,” SO I WENT THERE AND I SAW THE THINGS SHE WOVE. THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL AND SO I JOINED THE GROUP AND THEN OF COURSE I WANTED TO HAVE SOME OF THE STUFF I HAD SPUN MYSELF AND DYED MYSELF AND NOBODY ELSE WANTED. THEN I DECIDED, ‘ALRIGHT, I’VE WOVEN ALL THESE THINGS, WOVE MYSELF A SUIT, LONG SKIRT YOU NAME IT. PLACE MATS GALORE. THIS LITTLE RUNNER,’ AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH THE REST BECAUSE NOBODY WANTS HOMESPUN STUFF. THEY WANT TO GO TO WALMART OR SOME PLACE AND BUY SOMETHING READYMADE,’ SO I GAVE UP SPINNING AND WEAVING… I STOPPED AFTER I MADE MY SUIT. THAT MUST HAVE BEEN ABOUT TWENTY YEARS AGO, EASILY.” MORRIS’ MOTHER WOULD WEAVE IN SHOULDICE, BUT “[I]N VAUXHALL, NO, SHE WASN’T [WEAVING]. SHE DIDN’T HAVE A LOOM.” MORRIS SAID IN SHOULDICE, “I LEARNED HOW TO THROW THE SHUTTLE BACK AND FORTH TO WEAVE RUGS BECAUSE I USED TO SIT THERE WATCHING MY GRANDMOTHER AND SHE LET ME DO THAT, AND THEN YOU SEE WHEN I GOT SO INTERESTED IN WEAVING THAT I BOUGHT A LOOM, SITTING DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. I’VE BEEN TRYING TO SELL IT EVER SINCE AND NOBODY WANTS IT. I OFFERED TO GIVE IT FOR FREE AND NOBODY WANTS IT BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE SPACE FOR IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41
Width
36
Description
HANDMADE BAG MADE OF 3 SECTIONS OF STRIPS OF ABOUT 5 INCHES (APPROX. 13 CM) EACH. IT IS RED WITH BLUE, YELLOW, GREEN, AND RAW MATERIAL ACCENTS. THE TRIM AT THE TOP OF THE BAG IS BLUE WITH A HANDLE OF THE SAME FABRIC ON EITHER SIDE. THERE IS A STRIP OF RAW, NOT PATTERNED FABRIC AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAG. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAG HAVE THE SAME ARRANGEMENT OF PATTERNED STRIPS. THERE IS ONE SEAM CONNECTING THE FRONT AND THE BACK OF THE BAG ON BOTH SIDES. THE INSIDE IS UNLINED. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SOME STITCHING COMING LOOSE AT VARIOUS POINTS OF THE PATTERNING.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A STATEMENT WRITTEN BY MORRIS ATTACHED TO THE BAG STATES THAT THE MATERIAL OF THE BAG ORIGINATES FROM THE 1870S. THE STATEMENT READS: “THIS BAG WAS HAND WOVEN IN STRIPS [THAT WERE USED] TO SEW ON THE BOTTOM OF PETTICOATS. THE GIRLS AT THAT TIME HAD TO HAVE A TROUSEUA [SIC] TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE AFTER MARRIAGE THERE WOULD BE NO TIME TO MAKE CLOTHES SO WHAT THEY MADE WAS STURDY. THEY STARTED ON THEIR TROUSEUS [SIC] AS SOON AS THEY COULD HOLD A NEEDLE. WHEN IT WAS HAYING TIME THE GIRLS WENT OUT INTO THE FIELD TO RAKE THE HAY. THEY WORE PETTICOATS OF LINEN TO WHICH THESE BANDS WERE SEWN. THE LONG SKIRTS WERE PICKED UP AT THE SIDES AND TUCKED INTO THE WAISTBANDS SO THAT THE BOTTOMS OF THE PETTICOATS WERE ON DISPLAY.” “THESE BANDS WERE ORIGINALLY MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER’S WHO CAME OUT OF RUSSIA WITH THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT IN 1899. THEY WERE PASSED ON TO MY MOTHER, ELIZABETH KONKIN, WHO MADE THEM INTO A BAG IN THE 1940S” THE STRIPS THAT MAKE UP THE BAG SERVED A UTILITARIAN PURPOSE WHEN SEWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PETTICOATS. IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS EXPLAINS: “… THESE STRIPS ARE VERY STRONG. THEY’RE LIKE CANVAS. THEY WERE SEWN ONTO THE BOTTOM OF THE LADY’S PETTICOATS AND THEY WORE A SKIRT ON TOP OF THE PETTICOATS. THESE STRIPS LASTED A LIFETIME, IN FACT MORE THAN ONE LIFETIME BECAUSE I’VE GOT THEM NOW. THEY WOULD TUCK THE SKIRTS INTO THEIR WAISTBAND ON THE SIDE SO THEIR PETTICOATS SHOWED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO PRESERVE THEIR SKIRTS NOT TO GET CAUGHT IN THE GRAIN. THE GIRLS LIKED TO WEAR THEM TO SHOW OFF BECAUSE THE BOYS WERE THERE AND THEY ALWAYS WORE THEIR VERY BEST SUNDAY CLOTHES WHEN THEY WENT CUTTING WHEAT OR GRAIN." “[THE FABRIC] CAME FROM RUSSIA. WITH THE AREA WHERE THEY CAME FROM IS NOW GEORGIA AND THEY LIVED ABOUT SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE TURKISH BORDER, THE PRESENT DAY TURKISH BORDER… [THE DOUKHOBORS] CAME TO CANADA IN 1897 AND 1899.” MORRIS EXPLAINS THAT SURPLUS FABRIC WOULD HAVE BEEN BROUGHT TO CANADA FROM RUSSIA BY HER MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER FOR FUTURE USE AND TO AID THE GIRLS IN MAKING THEIR TROUSSEAUS: “THE TROUSSEAU THE GIRLS MADE HAD TO LAST THEM A LIFETIME BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T HAVE TIME BUT RAISING CHILDREN TO SEWING THINGS. SEWING MACHINES WERE UNKNOWN THEN.” THE BANDS OF FABRIC THAT MAKE UP THE BAG WOULD HAVE BEEN REMAINS NEVER USED FROM ELIZABETH KONKIN’S TROUSSEAU. SHE HAND WOVE THE BAG WHILE SHE WAS LIVING IN SHOULDICE. THE BAG WAS USED BY MORRIS’ MOTHER TO STORE HER KNITTING SUPPLIES. WHEN MORRIS ACQUIRED THE BAG IN THE 1990S, IT MAINTAINED A SIMILAR PURPOSE: “WELL I USED TO CARRY MY STUFF FOR THE WEAVER’S GUILD BUT NOW I DON’T USE IT FOR ANYTHING. IT’S VERY HANDY YOU KNOW IT DOESN’T WEAR OUT.” THERE WAS ONLY ONE BAG MADE OUT OF THESE REMNANTS BY MORRIS’ MOTHER. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
No. Pieces
2
Height
29.5
Width
15
Description
A: HANDMADE DOLL. THE “ESKIMO” DOLL IS MADE WITH LIGHT BLUE, FELT-LIKE FABRIC WITH WHITE FABRIC ACCENTS. THE FACE IS MADE OUT OF A LIGHTER FABRIC THAT IS PEACH-COLOURED. THE FACIAL DETAILS ARE HAND PAINTED. THE DOLL HAS BLUE EYES, EYEBROWS, NOSTRILS, RED LIPS, AND ROSY CHEEKS. THE LIGHT BLUE FABRIC THAT MAKES UP THE MAJORITY OF THE DOLL’S BODY IS ENCOMPASSING THE DOLL’S FACE LIKE A HOOD. THE DOLL’S TORSO IS COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. TWO HEART-SHAPED ARMS, MADE OF THE SAME MATERIAL, ARE ATTACHED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE BODY. THE DOLLS UPPER LEG AND FEET ARE COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. FROM THE KNEES TO THE ANKLES, A LIGHTER, WHITE FABRIC IS COVERING THE LEGS. B: DOLL SKIRT. AROUND THE DOLL’S WAIST IS A DETACHABLE SKIRT MADE OF THE SAME FABRIC AND A WHITE WAISTBAND. POOR CONDITION. ALL FABRIC IS WELL-WORN AND THREADBARE IN MULTIPLE PLACES. THE DOLL’S RED STUFFING IS VISIBLE THROUGH PARTS OF THE FABRIC. THERE IS DISCOLORATION (YELLOWING) OVERALL. THE STUFFING IS NOT EVENLY DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT THE DOLL. THE SEAMS AT THE ARMS ARE FRAGILE. THE PAINT FOR THE DOLL’S FACE IS SEVERELY FADED.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
LEISURE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THE FAMILY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. THIS DOLL BELONGED TO MORRIS AS A CHILD. SHE EXPLAINS, “THIS CAME FROM A GREAT AUNT WHO CAME TO VISIT US AND SHE ALWAYS BROUGHT GIFTS AND THIS ONE WAS MINE AND I LOVED THIS DOLL… I REMEMBER PLAYING WITH IT, IT WAS SOFT AND CUDDLY WHEN I HAD IT… MY DAUGHTER WENT THROUGH IT AND MY GRANDDAUGHTER AND THEN I PUT A STOP TO IT BEFORE THEY ATE IT UP OR DID SOMETHING… THEY LOVED IT AND THEY, YOU KNOW LITTLE KIDS, THEY’RE CARELESS SO I’LL KEEP IT...” IN A PHONE CALL WITH COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK ON OCTOBER 24, 2017, MORRIS SAID SHE RECIEVED THE DOLL FROM HER GREAT AUNT WHO HAD BROUGHT IT FROM VISITING BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS PLAYED WITH THE DOLL AS A CHILD, AS DID MORRIS' CHILDREN. THE DOLL WAS LOVED BY MULTIPLE GENERATIONS IN MORRIS' FAMILY AS HER GRANDCHILDREN AND GREAT GRANDCHILDREN WOULD ALSO PLAY WITH THE DOLL WHEN THEY CAME TO VISIT. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
314.2
Length
4.9
Width
33.5
Description
ADJUSTABLE LADDER, SIDE RAILS COME TOGETHER TO MAKE THE LADDER MORE COMPACT (LADDER IS ONLY 8.0CM WIDE WHEN THE SIDE RAILS ARE TOGETHER). SILVER COLOURED METAL, WITH ORANGE PAINT, BLACK RUBBER, AND EIGHT RUNGS. ANTI-SLIP SAFETY SHOE ON THE BOTTOM OF BOTH SIDE RAILS. SAFETY SHOE IS BLACK RUBBER ON THE BOTTOM, WITH A PATTERN OF 10 CIRCLES PER SHOE BOTTOM. METAL TEETH ON THE FRONT OF THE SHOE. SHOES ARE ADJUSTABLE, BUT ARE VERY STIFF. BRACE COMES UP FROM THE BOTTOM AND LOCKS TO PREVENT LADDER RAILS FROM COLLAPSING BACK TOGETHER. BOTTOM OF LADDER HAS A 54.5CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT AND TOP HAS A 46.0CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT. TOP OF ONE RAIL HAS A BLACK RUBBER TOPPER. SMALL BLACK STICKER AT BOTTOM “P1” WITH SEVERAL STICKERS ON THE OPPOSITE RAIL: A ROUGHLY OVAL SHAPED, RED, BLACK, AND SILVER STICKER: “THIS IS A DUO-SAFETY LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP 519 W 9TH AVE. OSHKOSH, WIS.”; THEN A RECTANGULAR RED STICKER WITH WHITE WRITING: “THIS LADDER IS CERTIFIED TO COMPLY WITH N.F.P.A. SPEC 1931-1832; CURRENT EDITION, FOR FIRE DEPARTMENT GROUND LADDERS AND OSHA FIRE LADDER REQUIREMENTS. REFER TO DUO-SAFETY LADDER SAFETY BOOK FOR CARE – USE – MAINTENANCE ON THIS LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP. OSHKOSH, WI 54901”; THEN A WHITE STICKER WITH GOLD WRITING: “10”. THERE IS ALSO A SILVER COLOURED STICKER WITH HANDWRITING ON THIS SAME RAIL, LOCATED BETWEEN THE FIRST AND SECOND RUNGS: “TEST DATE: 25 NOV 2006. LADDER #: ATTIC #18. APPARATUS #: P1. APPARATUS #: P1.” BOTH RAILS HAVE THE FOLLOWING STICKERS, AT ROUGHLY THE MID-POINT OF THE LADDER: RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLUE BORDER, BLACK WRITING: “DANGER. FAILURE TO USE, UNDERSTAND, AND FOLLOW PROPER LADDER USAGE INSTRUCTIONS AS MADE AVAILABLE BY DUO-SAFETY LADDER, N.F.P.A., I.S.F.S.I., A.N.S.I., O.S.H.A., ETC. COULD CAUSE SERIOUS INJURY AND/OR DEATH.” RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK BORDER AND WRITING: “DANGER. WATCH FOR WIRES. THIS LADDER CONDUCTS ELECTRICITY.” RECTANGULAR, YELLOW, WITH BLACK WRITING: CAUTION. SET UP LADDER PROPERLY TO REDUCE SLIP AND OVERHEAD HAZARDS. FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS. 1. PLACE TOES AGAINST BOTTOM OF LADDER SIDE RAILS. 2. STAND ERECT. 3. EXTEND ARMS STRAIGHT OUT. 4. PALMS OF HANDS SHOULD TOUCH TOP OF RUNG AT SHOULDER LEVEL. OUT -->” STICKER ON THE INSIDE OF FOURTH RUNG FROM THE BOTTOM: WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK WRITING: “REMOVE LADDER FROM SERVICE AND TEST IF ANY HEAT SENSOR TURNS DARK -->” LADDER IS IN GOOD OVERALL CONDITION. ADJUSTABLE FEET ARE VERY STIFF. LOTS OF SCUFF MARKS ALL OVER LADDER AND SOME STICKERS HAVE BEEN PARTIALLY REMOVED/SCRATCHED.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS ATTIC LADDER WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDER WAS “USED TO ACCESS ATTIC SPACES THROUGH SMALL ACCESS HOLES IN CEILINGS. USED WHEN WE DID NOT WANT TO PULL A CEILING DOWN AFTER A FIRE TO ENSURE THAT THE FIRE IN THE ATTIC WAS OUT.” HE CONTINUED SAYING THAT THIS LADDER WAS DECOMMISSIONED BECAUSE IT IS “OLD AND WORN OUT. ALL LADDERS MUST MEET MINIMUM ACCEPTANCE STANDARDS.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT THIS IS “WHAT WE CALL A LITTLE ATTIC LADDER, TO GET BACK INTO A TIGHT PLACE WHERE YOU COULDN’T BRING A BIG LADDER IN … YOU COULD GET IT UP INTO THE ATTIC SO YOU COULD CHECK WHAT WAS IN THE ATTIC.” LAZENBY ELABORATED: “THIS IS A FOLDING ATTIC LADDER … THE RUNGS THAT SEPARATE THE TWO BEAM SECTIONS ARE ACTUALLY HINGED IN NATURE AND SO IT FOLDS UP AND FITS IN, TYPICALLY, A LITTLE COMPARTMENT ON THE BACK END OF THE TRUCK BECAUSE [THEY] HAVE SOME LONG, LATERAL STORAGE THERE. THESE SURPRISINGLY GET USED A FAIR AMOUNT, STILL.” HE CONTINUED SAYING “THEY’RE NARROW ENOUGH THAT THEY’RE ALMOST DIFFICULT TO CLIMB WITH YOUR BIG FIRE BOOTS ON.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDERS IN USE PRESENTLY ARE VERY SIMILAR TO THIS MODEL: “YOU CAN TELL BY LOOKING AT IT IT’S AN OLDER PIECE BUT THE CONSTRUCTION IS ESSENTIALLY THE SAME. THEY MIGHT BE USING SLIGHTLY LIGHTER MATERIALS NOW, BUT FROM WHAT I CAN SEE, THEY’RE BASICALLY THE SAME.” HE ADDED THAT HE WAS OFTEN THE ONE USING THE LADDER: “BECAUSE I WAS NEVER ONE OF THE BIGGER GUYS ON THE JOB, AND ESPECIALLY WHEN I STARTED I WAS PROBABLY TWENTY POUNDS LIGHTER THAN I AM NOW, IF THEY NEEDED SOMEONE TO GET INTO A SMALLER SPACE, I WAS THAT GUY, TYPICALLY, BECAUSE WHEN YOU WEIGHT 250 [POUNDS] AND YOU THROW THE SCBA ON AND ALL THE EQUIPMENT, IT’S DEFINITELY TOUGH FOR SOME OF THOSE GUYS TO GET THROUGH THAT ACCESS. SO, YES, I’VE BEEN IN MY FAIR SHARE OF ATTICS AND THAT’S THE ONLY MEANS TO GET UP THERE.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THE IMPORTANCE OF USING THE LADDER: “ANY TIME A FIRE VENTS OUT OF A WINDOW AND TOUCHES ANY PART OF THE SOFFIT, IT’S INCUMBENT THAT YOU HAVE TO ABSOLUTELY CHECK THAT BECAUSE IF YOU DON’T AND YOU’RE OPERATING UNDERNEATH AN ATTIC FIRE, THAT’S A VERY, VERY UNSAFE PLACE TO BE.” DZUREN ADDED: “THAT’S A COLLAPSIBLE LADDER. IT’S KIND OF LIKE A SCISSOR TYPE OF LADDER. IT WAS VERY COMPACT, YOU COULD STORE IT ON ONE OF YOUR VEHICLES WITHOUT IT TAKING UP TOO MUCH ROOM … YOU’D CARRY THAT INTO YOUR HOUSE IF AN OFFICER WANTED YOU TO GO UP INTO AN ATTIC … IT WAS EASY TO TRANSPORT AND ONCE YOU GOT IT INTO THE OPENING YOU COULD JUST GIVE IT A SWITCH AND IT WOULD OPEN UP AND YOU COULD JUST CLIMB RIGHT UP TO THE SPOT THERE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PIERCING NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS, RUBBER, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20150010006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PIERCING NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Materials
BRASS, RUBBER, STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Length
151.1
Width
10.2
Diameter
6.3
Description
PIERCING NOZZLE. BRASS, WITH CHROME PLATE, STEEL, AND BLACK RUBBER. CYLINDRICAL END OF NOZZLE HEAD IS THREADED, TO ALLOW A HOSE TO BE CONNECTED. TEXTURED EDGE NEAR THREADING. THROUGH THIS OPENING A BLACK RUBBER RING AND METAL MESH ARE VISIBLE. ADJUSTABLE HANDLE EMBOSSED ON ONE SIDE WITH “AKRON BRASS” AND “1 1/2 4 WAP” ON THE OTHER. (NOTE: WAP IS A BEST GUESS, LETTERS HAVE LOST THEIR DEFINITION.) BELOW HANDLE, STAMPED INTO THE METAL BODY OF THE NOZZLE IS “SHUT FOG OPEN”. HANDLE MARKS CHANGE IN SHAPE FROM CYLINDRICAL TO TRIANGULAR. TRIANGULAR PORTION HAS A BLACK STICKER “Q2” AND A STRIPE OF YELLOW PAINT, NEAR THE CONNECTION WITH THE PIPE. A SMALL RECTANGULAR PUSH BUTTON ALLOWS THE NOZZLE TO BE DISCONNECTED FROM THE PIPE. SMALL HOLE THROUGH THE NOZZLE HEAD VISIBLE AT THE CONNECTION OF THE PIPE AND HEAD, WHICH OPENS AND CLOSES WITH THE OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE HANDLE. NEAR THE CONNECTION OF THE PIPE AND HEAD STAMPED INTO THE METAL OF THE PIPE “LFD 62”, WITH THE STAMP BEING PARTIALLY FILLED IN WITH WHITE PAINT. TWO SECTIONS OF STEEL PIPING HAVE BEEN PERMANENTLY THREADED TOGETHER. END OF PIPE HAS THREE SETS OF TWELVE HOLES EACH AROUND THE PIPE, 13.5CM FROM THE END. TIP OF PIPE IS ANGLED, TO CREATE A SHARP END TO PENETRATE THROUGH WALLS. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. WELL-WORN. CHROME PLATING HAS WORN AWAY, ESPECIALLY ON THE EDGES OF THE HANDLE. LOTS OF SCRATCHES AND SCUFF MARKS ALL OVER. VARIOUS BLACK STAINS ON THE PIPE SECTION.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS PIERCING NOZZLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS NOZZLE WAS “USED TO PUT WATER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF A WALL, FLOOR, OR CEILING. ALSO USED TO PUT WATER INSIDE OF A HAYSTACK.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004) AND TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994). BROWN EXPLAINED SAYING: “IT HAS A METAL PROBE ON ONE END OF IT WITH LITTLE HOLES DRILLED INTO IT. MOSTLY WE USED IT FOR BALE FIRES, JAMMING IT INTO THE HAYSTACK OR BALE … ONCE IN A WHILE, WE’D USE IT FOR INSIDE A WALL, BUT VERY SELDOM.” LAZENBY ADDED: “THIS PIECE OF EQUIPMENT … HAS A NUMBER OF NAMES … IT’S BEEN CALLED ANYTHING FROM A CELLAR NOZZLE … TO AN ATTIC NOZZLE, TO A PIERCING NOZZLE … THE POINT ON THE END OF THIS WAS ACTUALLY QUITE SHARP, AND IF YOU WANTED TO, IF YOU HAD AN ATTIC FIRE, YOU COULD EASILY POKE THIS FROM BELOW UP THROUGH YOUR DRYWALL AND YOUR INSULATION … AND THERE WERE A BUNCH OF SMALL HOLES DRILLED INTO THE VERY END SO THAT WHEN YOU DID OPEN IT, THE WATER WOULD COME OUT IN A FOG PATTERN.” HE CONTINUED, SAYING: “THE ADVANTAGE OF THAT IS THAT YOU DIDN’T NECESSARILY HAVE TO PULL THE CEILING DOWN … YOU COULD DO SOME SUPPRESSION UP THERE BEFORE YOU DECIDED TO PULL THAT CEILING DOWN AND SORT OF MAKE CONDITIONS BETTER BEFORE YOU EXPOSED YOURSELF TO THEM. SO FOR THE ATTIC USE, IT WORKED REALLY, REALLY WELL FROM WHAT I HEARD. I’VE NEVER DEPLOYED ONE OF THESE IN THAT SITUATION.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED FURTHER: “THE OTHER USE … IF YOU GOT TO A STRUCTURE AND THE BASEMENT WAS ON FIRE, SAME IDEA, JUST DIFFERENT DIRECTION … IF YOU SHOVED THE NOZZLE DOWN AND OPENED IT UP, YOU’RE GETTING AUTOMATIC SUPPRESSION BEFORE YOU SENT A TEAM DOWN THERE INTO THAT ATMOSPHERE. I WAS EVEN TOLD THAT YOU COULD USE THESE ON AN ENGINE FIRE … SOME OF THESE WERE BUILT WITH A STRIKING SECTION ON THEM SO THAT IF YOU HAD A HAMMER YOU COULD HIT THE TOP OF IT – THIS WOULD ACTUALLY PIERCE THE HOOD OF THE VEHICLE, ENTER THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT, YOU COULD TURN THE NOZZLE ON, AND IT WOULD SUPPRESS THE FIRE WITHOUT EVER HAVING TO LIFE THE HOOD. … I DON’T THINK THAT WE EVER USED THIS TOOL MAYBE AS OFTEN AS WE SHOULD HAVE. I THINK THAT WE, AT TIMES, COULD HAVE MADE BETTER USE AND ACTUALLY MADE CONDITIONS A LITTLE BIT BETTER FOR OURSELVES BEFORE WE PUT OURSELVES INTO THAT SPACE OR ATMOSPHERE.” WHEN ASKED IF THIS TYPE OF NOZZLE IS STILL IN USE, LAZENBY REPLIED: “WE HAVE ONE OF THESE ON OUR ENGINE DOWNTOWN … OURS BREAKS DOWN INTO A COUPLE OF PIECES SO IT STORES EASIER … BUT FUNDAMENTALLY IT’S THE SAME TOOL, SLIGHT MODIFICATIONS FOR EASE OF USE, BUT YEAH, THEY’RE STILL AROUND.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010006
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PIKE HOOK
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20150010008
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PIKE HOOK
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Materials
METAL, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Length
323
Width
11.5
Diameter
4.2
Description
PIKE POLE. LONG, CYLINDRICAL WOODEN HANDLE, WITH A METAL HEAD. THE HEAD IS IN THE SHAPE OF A LOWER CASE 'R', WITH A STRAIGHT AND HOOKED POKER. TWO METAL RIVETS HOLD THE METAL HEAD ON THE WOODEN POLE. NO MARKINGS. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. METAL HAS RUSTED. WOOD IS WELL USED AND HAS SEVERAL GOUGES/SLIVERS MISSING. WOOD IS VERY DARK FROM USE. WOOD ESPECIALLY DARK AT JUNCTION WITH METAL HEAD.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS PIKE POLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT IT WAS “USED TO PULL CEILINGS FROM BELOW DURING OVERHAUL. ALSO USED TO FORCE CEILINGS DOWN DURING VENTILATION. THE SAME TYPE OF TOOL IS IN USE TODAY.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004) AND TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994). BROWN EXPLAINED “THAT WAS PRETTY IMPORTANT … WHEN YOU HAD A FIRE, AND THE FIRE WAS STILL GOING, BUT MOST OF IT WAS OUT, THE CEILINGS – IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW IF THE FIRE WAS OUT IN THE CEILING, YOU’D TAKE THE PIKE POLE, AND YOU CAN SEE HOW YOU WOULD POKE IT IN … THAT WAS A VERY DESTRUCTIVE TOOL, YOU COULD DO A LOT OF DAMAGE WITH THAT. BUT IF THERE WAS SOMETHING THAT YOU HAD TO GET INTO THE CEILING TO CHECK, AND WE’D OPEN A HOLE IN THE CEILING TO GET UP ON THE LADDER TO LOOK … POKING AROUND TO MAKE SURE THE FIRE WAS OUT.” LAZENBY ADDED: “THIS IS PROBABLY AS CLASSIC A TOOL, A HAND TOOL, AS MAYBE THE PICK HEADED AXE … AS FAR AS FIREFIGHTING GOES. THIS IS A GREAT SALVAGE AND OVERHAUL TOOL … IF YOU HAD A FIRE GO UP INSIDE THE WALLS AND YOU THOUGHT MAYBE THERE WAS FIRE IN THE ATTIC, YOU WOULD NEED TO PULL DOWN THE PLASTER BOARD OR THE LATH OR THE DRYWALL TO … DO A VISUAL INSPECTION OF THAT SPACE.” HE CONTINUED, EXPLAINING ITS USE: “THE POINTY END WAS PERFECT FOR BREAKING THROUGH THE DRYWALL AND ONCE YOU MADE THAT INCISION, FOR LACK OF A BETTER TERM, IF YOU TURNED IT NINETY DEGREES, NOW ALL OF A SUDDEN, THE HOOK IS POINTING TOWARDS A FRESH PORTION OF THE DRYWALL AND AS YOU PULLED, IT WOULD COME DOWN IN RELATIVELY LARGE CHUNKS. AND YOU CAN OPEN UP A FAIR AMOUNT OF CEILING IN A SHORT TIME WITH THIS.” LAZENBY DESCRIBED THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THIS PIKE POLE AND MORE MODERN VERSIONS: “THE CONNECTION POINT BETWEEN THE METAL HEAD AND WOODEN HANDLE WOULD WEAKEN AND SOMETIMES THE HEADS WOULD ROCK A LITTLE BIT; THEY WERE TOUGH TO KEEP TIGHT, THEY WOULD RUST A LITTLE BIT. THEY’RE BEING MADE OUT OF DIFFERENT MATERIALS NOW, MOST NOTABLY, THE HANDLES HAVE GONE TO FIBERGLASS. THEY DON’T CONDUCT ELECTRICITY WELL, WHICH IS GOOD. NEITHER DID THE WOOD, BUT AGAIN, NO SPLINTERS, NO SLIVERS, THAT KIND OF THING.” HE REITERATED THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS TOOL: “IT’S ANOTHER GO-TO TOOL FOR US: AXE, HALLIGAN, AND I WOULD SAY PIKE POLE ARE PROBABLY THE THREE MOST COMMONLY USED HAND TOOLS … AND ACTUALLY, IF YOU LOOK, MOST FIRE SERVICE BADGES THAT PEOPLE WEAR – YOU’VE GOT A PIKE POLE AND LADDER – THEY’RE SYNONYMOUS WITH THE FIRE SERVICE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010008
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20150038001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Materials
COTTON, SILK, LEATHER
No. Pieces
8
Length
61.0
Width
87.5
Description
KALOCSA/KALOCSAI STYLE OF HUNGARIAN DRESS. .1: BLOUSE. IVORY COLOURED, SHORT SLEEVED, SLIGHTLY SQUARE NECKLINE, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE DETAILS. BLOUSE CLOSES WITH FOUR METAL SNAPS AT SHOULDER, TWO SNAPS ON EITHER SIDE OF NECKLINE. SLIGHT A-LINE SHAPE TO BLOUSE. FLOWER SHAPED CROCHETED LACE DETAILING AT CUFFS AND AROUND NECKLINE. EACH OF THE LACE FLOWERS HAS FIVE PETALS ALONG SLEEVE CUFF. CROCHET LACE DETAILING AT NECKLINE IS SMALLER AND FLOWERS ONLY HAVE FOUR PETALS. COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY AT FRONT OF NECKLINE AND JUST ABOVE SLEEVE CUFFS. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. L: 61.0CM W: 87.5CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT YELLOWING AROUND NECKLINE AND AT ARMPITS. SEAM HAS LET LOOSE UNDER WEARER’S RIGHT ARM. VERY SMALL DARK BROWN STAIN ON BACK, BELOW WEARER’S RIGHT ARM. .2: UNDER SKIRT. IVORY COLOURED, APPROXIMATELY KNEE LENGTH, WITH MACHINE-MADE LACE DETAILING ALONG HEM. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH TWO VERY LONG IVORY COLOURED TWILL TAPE TIES. GATHERED AT WAIST BAND, CREATING A FULL SKIRT. TWO PIECE SKIRT WITH SEAMS AT FRONT AND BACK. TIES ARE EACH APPROXIMATELY 137.0 CM LONG. L: 60.8CM W: 145.0CM (AT HEM) OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. DARK GREY LINE APPROXIMATELY 21.5 CM DOWN FROM WAISTBAND CIRCLES THE ENTIRE SKIRT. .3: OVER SKIRT. BURGUNDY, HEAVY, SILKY MATERIAL WITH A REPEATING SQUARE PATTERN WOVEN INTO THE FABRIC (PATTERN CONSISTS OF FOUR VERY SMALL SQUARES, WHICH MAKE UP A SLIGHTLY LARGE SQUARE, REPEATED IN A VERTICLE STRIPE). ACCORDION PLEATS MAKE FOR A VERY FULL SKIRT. THERE IS A 9.5 CM STRIP OF MACHINE-MADE, IVORY LACE APPROXIMATELY 18.7 CM UP FROM THE HEM. INSIDE OF SKIRT IS LINED WITH A PINK FLORAL PATTERNED SILKY FABRIC, APPROXIMATELY 18.0 CM UP FROM THE HEM. THIS PINK FLORAL PATTERNED MATERIAL IS ALSO VISIBLE FOR 2.4 CM ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE SKIRT AT THE HEM. SKIRT CLOSES AT WAIST WITH LONG BURGUNDY BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 120.1 CM LONG, THE SECOND IS 135.5 CM LONG. WIDTH OF SKIRT IS MEASURED ALONG HEM. THE SKIRT IS 46.0 CM WIDE WITH THE PLEATS PRESSED CLOSELY TOGETHER. SKIRT IS 203.0 CM WIDE WHEN THE PLEATS ARE FLATTENED. L: 65.5CM W: 203.0CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. LACE HAS YELLOWED CONSIDERABLY. .4: VEST. IVORY COLOURED, CROPPED VEST, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE DETAILS CLOSES AT FRONT WITH 6 SILVER COLOURED METAL SNAPS. FLOWER SHAPED CROCHET LACE DETAILING AROUND THE WHOLE VEST, EXCEPT AT THE CLOSURE, WHERE THERE IS DETAILING ON THE WEARER’S RIGHT SIDE ONLY. EACH OF THE LACE FLOWERS HAS FIVE PETALS. LARGE COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY ALL OVER VEST. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. VEST MAY HAVE BEEN MADE BIGGER AT ONE POINT: THERE IS A STRIP OF WHITER MATERIAL UNDER BOTH ARMS, EACH STRIP IS APPROXIMATELY 3.0CM WIDE, AT THE SIDE SEAMS. L: 47.5CM W: 57.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .5: APRON. IVORY COLOURED, EMBROIDERED, WITH CROCHETED LACE AND CUTWORK LACE DETAILING AROUND EDGE. SIDES AND BOTTOM OF APRON HAVE BOTH CUTWORK AND CROCHETED LACE DETAILING. THE CUTWORK LACE DETAILING IS COMPOSED OF TWO DIFFERENT FLOWERS, IN A REPEATING PATTERN. EACH OF THESE LARGE FLOWERS IS APPROXIMATELY 7.0 CM IN DIAMETER. BETWEEN THE LARGE FLOWERS ARE SQUARE SHAPED SECTIONS OF CROCHETED LACE. JUST INSIDE THE LACE DETAILING ARE 10 SECTIONS OF EMBROIDERED FLOWERS, MADE UP OF FIVE PAIRS OF FLOWERS. THE MAIN PORTION OF THE APRON IS ALSO EMBROIDERED, SHOWING FLOWERS INCLUDING TWO-TONED RED ROSES, TWO-TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO-TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO-TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. THERE ARE ALSO GROUPS OF PEPPERS OR POSSIBLY CARROTS (THEY ARE RED AND ORANGE). LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. WAIST TIES EACH HAVE A SMALL SECTION OF EMBROIDERY AND CROCHETED LACE. L: 56.0CM W: 119.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .6: CAP. IVORY COLOURED, EMBROIDERED. BRIMLESS. SCALLOPED EDGE ALONG WEARER’S FOREHEAD. GATHERED IN BACK WITH ELASTIC AT THE BASE OF THE NECK. COLOURFUL FLORAL EMBROIDERY ALL OVER CAP. FLOWERS INCLUDE LARGE TWO TONE RED ROSES, TWO TONED PURPLE VIOLETS, AS WELL AS BLUE FLOWERS WITH YELLOW CENTRES, TWO TONED PINK FLOWERS, AND TWO TONED YELLOW FLOWERS. LOTS OF GREEN LEAVES THROUGHOUT. COLOURS INCLUDE MEDIUM AND DARK RED, MEDIUM BLUE, MEDIUM AND DARK GREEN, PINK, ORANGE, YELLOW, AND MEDIUM AND DARK PURPLE. THERE ARE ALSO TWO SECTIONS OF BABY BLUE RIBBON: ONE NEAR THE FRONT OF THE HAT IS LONGER AND THE SECOND SECTION OF RIBBON MAKES A HORSESHOE SHAPE AT THE BACK OF THE HEAD. L: 24.0CM W: 28.2CM OVERALL IN EXCELLENT CONDITION. .7 SHOE. MANUFACTURED. LEFT SHOE. RED CORDUROY, SLIP ON, KITTEN HEEL, EMBROIDERED, MULE-STYLE SHOE, WITH ENCLOSED TOES. RED TOE PORTION OF SHOE HAS A BLUE FLOWER, WITH YELLOW CENTRE, EMBROIDERED. NEXT TO EMBROIDERY IS A WHITE POM-POM. INSOLE OF SHOE IS TAN COLOURED LEATHER, STAMPED AT THE HEEL WITH A GOLD STAMP: “MADE IN HUNGARY SZOMBATHELY.” EMBOSSED ON SOLE OF SHOE “270.” SOLE OF HEEL IS BLACK RUBBER AND SOLE OF TOE PORTION IS LEATHER. H: 7.0CM L: 27.7CM W: 8.7CM OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SOLE IS WORN AT TOE, ESPECIALLY, WHERE THE LEATHER HAS WORN AWAY. GOLD STAMP ON INSOLE IS ALSO WORN AWAY. .8 SHOE. MANUFACTURED. RIGHT SHOE. RED CORDUROY, SLIP ON, KITTEN HEEL, EMBROIDERED, MULE-STYLE SHOE, WITH ENCLOSED TOES. RED TOE PORTION OF SHOE HAS AN EMBROIDERED BLUE FLOWER, WITH YELLOW CENTRE. NEXT TO EMBROIDERY IS A WHITE POM-POM. INSOLE OF SHOE IS TAN COLOURED LEATHER, STAMPED AT THE HEEL WITH A GOLD STAMP: “MADE IN HUNGARY SZOMBATHELY.” EMBOSSED ON SOLE OF SHOE “270.” SOLE OF HEEL IS BLACK RUBBER AND SOLE OF TOE PORTION IS LEATHER. H: 7.0CM L: 27.7CM W: 8.7CM OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SOLE IS WORN AT TOE, ESPECIALLY, WHERE THE LEATHER HAS WORN AWAY. GOLD STAMP ON INSOLE IS ALSO WORN AWAY.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A VARIETY OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, MARIA JOKUTY, AND A BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY.” A DESCRIPTION OF MARIA’S EMBROIDERY AND SEWING WORK, THE HISTORY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THE JOKUTY’S JOURNEY TO CANADA CAN BE FOUND BELOW THE HISTORY OF THE ARTIFACTS. MARIA MADE THIS COSTUME FOR HERSELF AND IS DONE IN THE STYLE OF THE KALOSCAI PROVINCE. IN AN INTERIVEW CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN DECEMBER 2015, MARIA SAID THAT THIS DRESS WAS BETTER THAN THE OTHERS “BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE THIS PART (POINTING TO MACHINE EMBROIDERY).” MARIA WOULD WEAR HER EMBROIDERED DRESS AT SPECIAL EVENTS: “WHEN WE HAD SPECIAL – EVEN WHEN WE HAD HERITAGE DAY – I DRESS UP. CANADA DAY. AND THEN WE USED TO HAVE [CELEBRATIONS] IN THE GALT GARDEN, YOU KNOW, MUSIC, DANCE, BUT I WEAR IT. BUT NOT DANCING OKAY, JUST PUT IT ON. AND MANY, MANY TIMES I DID. AND WE HAD DINNER AND DANCE – I PUT IT ON.” .2 UNDER SKIRT: MARIA SAID THAT THIS UNDER SKIRT GAVE FULLNESS TO THE OUTFIT: "YOU HAVE TO HAVE A FULLNESS. BECAUSE THAT WOULD BE JUST TOO PLAIN. BUT WHEN YOU HAVE THIS SKIRT, IT’S KIND OF FULL, YOU CAN SEE, AND IT’S 100% COTTON, AND THAT GIVES YOU KIND OF MORE FULLNESS AND YOU CAN SEE THE BEAUTY OF THE PLEATED SKIRT." .6 CAP: MARIA SAID ONLY MARRIED WOMEN WOULD WEAR THIS TYPE OF CAP: "SO THE GIRLS WHEN THEY ARE YOUNG, THEY WEARING THIS OUTFIT, OKAY. BUT THEN THE WOMEN, IF THEY GOT MARRIED, THEY HAVE TO WEAR A CAP! SO WHOEVER SEE YOU, 'OH, SHE’S MARRIED.' AND, BUT DON’T YOU THINK SHE’S BEAUTIFUL?” .7 & .8: SHOES: MARIA INDICATED THAT THE SHOES WERE PURCHASED IN HUNGARY AND THAT SHE DID NOT DO THE EMBROIDERY ON THE TOE: "THAT’S HOW WE BOUGHT IN HUNGARY. THEY MADE IT OVER THERE. WE WENT IN HUNGARY WITH MY HUSBAND I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PAIRS WE BOUGHT TO THE GIRLS. AND THE GIRLS, WHEN THEY WERE DANCING THEY HAVE ALL THE SAME PAIR OF DIFFERENT SIZES." MARIA BEGAN WORKING ON 16 DANCE OUTFITS IN 1977 AND IT TOOK HER “THREE-FOUR YEARS TO DO IT. BECAUSE YOU KNOW, I DESIGNED THE FLOWERS, AND THEN YOU KNOW THE EMBROIDERY, AND TO PUT IT TOGETHER WAS A VERY HARD JOB.” MAKING THE DANCE COSTUMES WAS IMPORTANT TO MARIA “BECAUSE [SHE] WAS PROUD OF BEING HUNGARIAN AND [SHE] WANTED TO SHOW SOMETHING DIFFERENT.” SHE LEARNED TO EMBROIDER AT THE AGE OF 12/13 FROM A NEIGHBOUR NAMED MARISSA IN HUNGARY. MARIA THINKS THAT MARISSA WAS ABOUT 25/26 YEARS OLD WHEN SHE TAUGHT MARIA HOW TO EMBROIDER. MARIA GETS A GREAT DEAL OF ENJOYMENT SEEING HER CREATIONS ON DANCERS WHILE THEY COMPETE: “VERY IMPORTANT. YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME. YOU PUT ALL ENERGY INTO IT TO BE ABLE TO FINISH IT AND THAT – BECAUSE HAPPINESS WAS WHEN THE GIRLS, THEY WAS DANCING ON A STAGE AND THEY’VE ALL GOT THE COSTUMES. YOU KNOW WHAT, WOW! YOU JUST CAN’T EX – I CAN’T EXPLAIN TO YOU.” MARIA GOT SOME OF HER PATTERNS FOR EMBROIDERY FROM THE EDMONTON HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY AND LATER RETURNED TO HUNGARY TO IMPROVE HER SKILLS, AS WELL AS TO LEARN HOW TO DO MACHINE EMBROIDERY. MARIA AND, AND HER HUSBAND, CHESTER, RETURNED TO HUNGARY ABOUT 3 TIMES, STAYING EACH TIME FOR ABOUT 2 MONTHS SO THAT MARIA COULD IMPROVE HER SKILLS. IN ADDITION TO CREATING THE COSTUMES, MARIA ALSO CARED FOR THEM, ENSURING THEY WERE AVAILABLE WHEN A DANCER WOULD NEED TO WEAR THEM: “YES, I WAS IN CHARGE. DRY CLEANING, WASHING, AND EVERYTHING. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS, LONG YEARS UNTIL WE MOVED AND THEN WE DIDN’T HAVE NO ROOM, AND THEN SOMEBODY ELSE, YOU KNOW. AND THEN WE HAD A MEETING AND THE DANCERS, THEY WAS LOOKING FOR SOMEBODY ELSE WHO WOULD TAKE CARE OF THEM, ‘CAUSE YOU SHOULD’VE SEEN THE GIRLS THEY WAS LIKE, YOU KNOW, “NO, MRS. JOKUTY, YOU TAKE GOOD CARE!” AND I DID.” ACCORDING TO CHESTER (GEZA) JOKUTY’S OBITUARY, CHESTER AND MARIA WERE MARRIED IN HUNGARY ON OCTOBER 3, 1949. CHESTER SERVED IN THE HUNGARIAN ARMY IN 1940, WAS TAKEN PRISONER BY THE RUSSIANS IN 1945, AND HELD PRISONER IN RUSSIA FOR THREE AND A HALF YEARS. IN THE BOOKLET “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY” MARIA INDICATES THAT CHESTER WAS NOT KEEN TO REMAIN IN HUNGARY FOLLOWING THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION, BECAUSE OF HIS TREATMENT AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIANS: CHESTER “SPENT THREE AND A HALF YEARS AS A P.O.W. IN ODESSA WHERE PRISONERS WERE USED AS SLAVE LABOUR. CHESTER WAS NOT A BIG MAN AND BECAUSE OF THE CONDITIONS, WAS EXTREMELY WEAK. DURING THIS TIME IF THE PRISONERS WERE NOT ABLE TO KEEP UP OR DO WHAT WAS REQUIRED OF THEM, THE RUSSIAN GUARDS SENT THEIR DOGS IN TO FORCE THE PRISONERS TO MOVE. HE HAD WITNESSED SO MUCH DEATH AND SUFFERING AND HAD SUFFERED SO BADLY IN THE COLD, AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIAN SOLDIERS, HE VOWED NEVER TO BE TAKEN BY THEM AGAIN.” MARIA CONTINUED IN THIS BOOKLET TO RECOUNT THEIR DECISION TO LEAVE HUNGARY: “SO, ON NOVEMBER 4TH [1956], WE DECIDED WE WOULD LEAVE … SO WE GATHERED OUR FAMILY AND MY MOTHER AND BEGAN WALKING AS FAST AS POSSIBLE TOWARDS AUSTRIA – ONLY ABOUT AN HOUR’S WALK FROM WHERE WE LIVED.” THE JOKUTY FAMILY REMAINED IN AUSTRIA FOR 6 MONTHS, WHERE MARIA RECALLS BEING WELL TREATED. THEY LEFT AUSTRIA AND ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN, NB AFTER A 12 DAY CROSSING, ON APRIL 22, 1957. AFTER A LONG TRAIN RIDE, THEY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. SHORTLY AFTER THEIR ARRIVAL THEY BEGAN WORK AS FARM LABOURERS IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON OCTOBER 29, 1979 HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY ABOUT THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION: “DESCRIBED SIMPLY, THE REVOLUTION ESTABLISHED A GOVERNMENT THAT TRIED TO MOVE AWAY FROM THE SOVIET UNION’S INFLUENCE. THE SOVIET UNION, SUBSEQUENTLY, SENT ARMED TROOPS INTO HUNGARY TO REASSERT ITS INFLUENCE. IN THE AFTERMATH, MANY PEOPLE FLED, ABOUT 37,000 TO CANADA ACCORDING TO FEDERAL DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION STATISTICS … CHESTER JOKUTY OF THE ASSOCIATION SAID ABOUT 2,000 PERSONS OF HUNGARIAN ORIGINS LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE AND THE SURROUNDING AREA.” MARIA INDICATED SEVERAL TIMES THROUGH THE COURSE OF HER INTERVIEW THAT LIFE WAS VERY DIFFICULT FOR THE JOKUTY FAMILY WHEN THEY FIRST ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. THE FAMILY’S FIRST ACCOMMODATIONS LEFT LITTLE TO BE DESIRED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE RUNNING WATER, TOILET, WE HAVE TO PULL THE WATER FROM THINGS, YOU KNOW, AND CHOP THE WOOD TO MAKE BREAKFAST. AND WINTERTIME, WE WAS SCARED TO DEATH THAT KIDS, WE’LL FREEZE TO DEATH. SOMETIMES I HAVE TO STAY UP, OR MY HUSBAND DID TO BE SURE THE WOOD, YOU KNOW THE STOVE IN THE KITCHEN – ONLY THING – THAT GIVE US A LITTLE BIT WARMTH. IT WAS VERY, VERY HARD.” MARIA RECALLS HAVING TO HITCH HIKE TO GET GROCERIES AND RELIED ON THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS TO GET HOME AGAIN: “AND NO CAR. YOU KNOW WHAT I DID? WE WAS SO HUNGRY, SO I SAID I HAVE TO TAKE A CHANCE. MY HUSBAND WAS WORKING AND KIDS WAS IN MCNALLY SCHOOL AND THEN I WENT ON THE ROAD, PUT MY HAND UP, AND WHATEVER HAPPENED, HAPPENED ... THEY DROP ME ON 5TH AVENUE SOMEWHERE, OR SAFEWAY, THEY DROP ME OVER THERE, BUT I HEARD THAT LOTS OF HUNGARIAN BACHELORS AND PEOPLE GO TO THE GARDEN HOTEL DRINKING BEER. SO WHEN I WENT OVER THERE, I COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, SO THEN I LISTENED TO THE LANGUAGES WHERE I HEAR THE HUNGARIAN LANGUAGES. SO THEN I HEARD IT, AND I WENT AND I INTRODUCED MYSELF, WHO I AM, AND, “WE ARE ON THE SUGAR BEETS SOWING, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US? I NEED A GROCERY, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US …?” AND THEY FIND US SOMEBODY WHO WAS DRIVING, AND I DON’T KNOW WHAT THE NAME, WHAT THE NAME WAS, BECAUSE LONG TIME AGO, THEY GOT MY GROCERY IN THE CAR AND TOOK ME TO THE FARM FREE. CAN YOU IMAGINE? I WISH I COULD GIVE HIM A BIG HUG AND THANKFUL.” CHESTER’S OBITUARY INDICATES THAT HE “WAS A VERY PROUD HUNGARIAN AND A FOUNDING LIFETIME MEMBER OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA IN 1977 AND SERVED AS PRESIDENT FOR TEN YEARS. HE ALSO WAS A FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ETHNIC ASSOCIATION IN 1977.” IN A HERALD ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON NOVEMBER 14, 1989, MARGARET GUGYELKA (SECRETARY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY) INDICATED THAT THE SOCIETY STARTED IN 1977: “’THERE WAS AN OLDTIMERS’ GROUP BEFORE THAT, BUT IT WAS MORE LIKE A FRATERNITY … THE SOCIETY WAS STARTED BY A SMALL GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO WANTED TO CARRY ON HUNGARIAN TRADITIONS.’” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2, 1983 INDICATES THAT THE SOCIETY ALSO PARTICIPATED IN THE WESTERN CANADIAN HUNGARIAN FOLK DANCE FESTIVAL. IN THE ARTICLE, CHESTER SAID THAT THE “FESTIVAL IS NOT A COMPETITION BUT RATHER AN EVENT DESIGNED TO KEEP CULTURAL HERITAGE ALIVE AND DANCE GROUPS IN TOUCH … JOKUTY SAYS HUNGARIAN DANCING HAS PROVEN ‘VERY, VERY POPULAR’ BECAUSE OF THE VARIETY OF DANCES – 46 IN ALL OF AT THE 1982 FESTIVAL HELD IN LETHBRIDGE – AND THE COLOURFUL COSTUMES UNIQUE TO EACH PROVINCE. THE COSTUMES HAVE PROVEN TO BE A BIG EXPENSE FOR THE SOCIETY SINCE ONE OUTFIT CAN COST UP TO $600 TO MAKE. MADE TO MEASURE BOOTS FROM MONTREAL ARE AS MUCH AS $150.” MARIA LAMENTS THAT THE SOCIETY ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE. SHE EXPLAINED THAT THERE SIMPLY ISN’T THE VOLUNTEER LABOUR FORCE TO CONTINUE DOING ALL THAT THE SOCIETY USED TO: “WHEN WE USED TO MAKE – EVERY YEAR BEFORE CHRISTMAS WE USED TO MAKE FOUR THOUSAND, FIVE THOUSAND CABBAGE ROLLS AND WE ADVERTISE, WE LET THE PEOPLE KNOW YOU HAVE TO PUT THE NAME AHEAD AND YOU HAVE TO COME PICK. ALL DAY WE WAS WORKING, BUT FIVE O’CLOCK, SIX O’CLOCK PEOPLE CAME AND TAKE [THE CABBAGE ROLLS] BECAUSE WE USED TO HAVE IT IN A BILL KERGAN CENTER, AND OVER THERE IS WALK-IN COLDER. BUT NOW, THIS YEAR [2015], NO CABBAGE ROLLS AND PEOPLE ARE DISAPPOINTED, BUT WE DON’T HAVE NO VOLUNTEERS. YOU KNOW, GOLDEN YEARS CATCH UP WITH PEOPLE.” SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY" AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20150038001
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150038002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1977
Date Range To
2000
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
5
Length
68.9
Width
106.5
Description
MEZOSEGI STYLE OF DRESS. .1: BLOUSE. MANUFACTURED. WHITE, THREE-QUARTER LENGTH SLEEVE, BUTTON-UP, TRIMMED IN LACE. BAND COLLAR, TRIMMED WITH A THIN BAND OF WHITE LACE. SLEEVES HEMMED WITH TWO RUFFLES OF WHITE LACE AND EACH BAND OF LACE IS 12.5 CM WIDE. BLOUSE CLOSES IN THE FRONT WITH 5 BUTTONS. PLACKET TRIMMED WITH THE SAME LACE FOUND AT THE COLLAR. REMNANTS OF A BLACK LABEL FOUND AT THE BACK OF NECK, INSIDE BLOUSE. L: 68.9CM W: 106.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .2: UNDERSKIRT. HANDMADE. IVORY COLOURED, APPROXIMATELY KNEE LENGTH, WITH MACHINE-MADE LACE DETAILING ALONG HEM. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH TWO VERY LONG IVORY COLOURED BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 109.0 CM LONG, THE OTHER IS 136.0 CM LONG. TO INCREASE FULLNESS OF THE UNDERSKIRT, THERE IS A 27.5 CM WIDE RUFFLE ALONG THE BOTTOM OF THE SKIRT. THIS RUFFLE AND THE HEM LINE ARE BOTH TRIMMED IN A FLORAL PATTERNED LACE. L: 56.2CM W: 87.7CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. LACE TRIM HAS COME UNDONE AT THE FRONT OF THE SKIRT, ON THE UPPER RUFFLE AND ESPECIALLY ON THE LOWER RUFFLE. .3: VEST. HANDMADE. PINK AND YELLOW FLOWERS WITH GREENERY ON MAROON BACKGROUND, CLOSES IN FRONT WITH BLACK VELCRO, CROPPED LENGTH. TRIMMED WITH PINK CREPE AROUND NECKLINE AND AROUND ARMS. BAND OF PINK CREPE AROUND EACH SHOULDER STRAP, CREATING A SLIGHT SWEETHEART NECKLINE. THE SAME PINK CREPE IS ON THE INSIDE OF THE VEST AT THE HEM. L: 46.0CM W: 48.2CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .4: OVERSKIRT. HANDMADE. PINK AND YELLOW FLOWERS WITH GREENERY ON MAROON BACKGROUND, SEVERAL STRIPS OF FABRIC OR RIBBON ALONG HEMLINE OF SKIRT. ACCORDION PLEATS MAKE FOR A VERY FULL SKIRT. CLOSES AT WAIST WITH WHITE VELCRO AND MAROON BIAS TAPE TIES, ONE OF WHICH IS 91.5 CM LONG, THE OTHER IS 92.5 CM LONG. STRIPES OF FABRIC OR RIBBON START 24.0 CM FROM BOTTOM OF SKIRT. THE FIRST STRIP IS MADE OF YELLOW SATIN FABRIC, THEN A THIN SECTION OF THE SKIRT FABRIC. NEXT IS A 10.7 CM WIDE STRIP OF PINK: A THIN SATIN RIBBON OF LIGHT PINK IS SEWN ONTO THE TOP AND BOTTOM OF A PIECE OF DARKER PINK CREPE, MUCH LIKE THAT FOUND ON THE TRIM OF THE VEST (P20150038002.3). BELOW THE TWO-TONED PINK STRIPE IS ANOTHER STRIP OF SKIRT FABRIC. THEN THERE IS A STRIP OF YELLOW SATIN RIBBON, BABY BLUE SATIN RIBBON, AND FINALLY AT THE VERY BOTTOM OF THE HEMLINE, A STRIP OF RED SATIN RIBBON. WIDTH OF SKIRT IS MEASURED ALONG HEM. THE SKIRT IS 69.0 CM WIDE WITH THE PLEATS PRESSED CLOSELY TOGETHER. SKIRT IS 287.5 CM WIDE WHEN THE PLEATS ARE FLATTENED. L: 65.0CM W: 287.5CM OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. .5 APRON. HANDMADE. WHITE, EYELET LACE, COTTON, TWO VERTICAL RIBBON STRIPS ON FRONT. THREE PANEL CONSTRUCTION. FLORAL PATTERNED EYELET LACE, WITH MORE FLOWERS TOWARDS THE HEMLINE OF THE APRON. CENTRE PANEL IS SOLID FABRIC AT THE WAISTBAND. SIDE PANELS ARE EYELET LACE. SIDES AND BOTTOM OF APRON HAVE A SCALLOPED CUTOUT LACE EDGING. VERTICAL STRIPS ARE WHITE RIBBON WITH MACHINE EMBROIDERED RED ROSES. WAISTBAND TIES HAVE SAME EYELET LACE AND SCALLOPING. L:53.2CM W: 185.0CM OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. YELLOW STAINING ON FRONT OF APRON BETWEEN THE TWO VERTICAL STRIPES, AS WELL AS ON THE WEARER’S LEFT SIDE, TOWARDS THE HEMLINE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A VARIETY OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, MARIA JOKUTY, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN DECEMBER 2015, AND A BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY.” A DESCRIPTION OF MARIA’S EMBROIDERY AND SEWING WORK, THE HISTORY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THE JOKUTY’S JOURNEY TO CANADA CAN BE FOUND BELOW THE HISTORY OF THE ARTIFACTS. .1: BLOUSE. MARIA INDICATED THAT THIS ITEM OF CLOTHING IS THE ONLY ONE THAT SHE DIDN'T MAKE HERSELF. SHE DID ADD THE LACE RUFFLE TO THE SLEEVE. .4: OVER SKIRT. MARIA INDICATED IN HER INTERVIEW THAT THE PLEATING ALLOWED THE SKIRT TO FLARE WHEN THE DANCER SPINS: "THE SKIRT, WHEN YOU DANCE WITH THE SKIRT, WHEN YOU SPIN, THE GIRL SPINNING, YOU KNOW, IT’S SO BEAUTIFUL. BECAUSE THIS IS ALSO EVERYTHING HOMEMADE. I MADE IT, OKAY, AND SENT IT TO MONTREAL FOR SPECIAL PRESSING, YOU KNOW, BUT LOOK AT THAT.” MARIA BEGAN WORKING ON THIS OUTFIT (AND 15 OTHER DANCE OUTFITS) IN 1977 AND IT TOOK HER “THREE-FOUR YEARS TO DO IT. YOU KNOW, I DESIGNED THE FLOWERS, AND THEN YOU KNOW THE EMBROIDERY, AND TO PUT IT TOGETHER WAS A VERY HARD JOB.” MAKING THE DANCE COSTUMES WAS IMPORTANT TO MARIA “BECAUSE [SHE] WAS PROUD OF BEING HUNGARIAN AND [SHE] WANTED TO SHOW SOMETHING DIFFERENT.” SHE LEARNED TO EMBROIDER AT THE AGE OF 12/13 FROM A NEIGHBOUR NAMED MARISSA IN HUNGARY. MARIA THINKS THAT MARISSA WAS ABOUT 25/26 YEARS OLD WHEN SHE TAUGHT MARIA HOW TO EMBROIDER. MARIA GETS A GREAT DEAL OF ENJOYMENT SEEING HER CREATIONS ON DANCERS WHILE THEY COMPETE: “VERY IMPORTANT. YOU WOULDN’T BELIEVE ME. YOU PUT ALL ENERGY INTO IT TO BE ABLE TO FINISH IT AND THAT – BECAUSE HAPPINESS WAS WHEN THE GIRLS, THEY WAS DANCING ON A STAGE AND THEY’VE ALL GOT THE COSTUMES. YOU KNOW WHAT, WOW! YOU JUST CAN’T EX – I CAN’T EXPLAIN TO YOU.” MARIA GOT SOME OF HER PATTERNS FOR EMBROIDERY FROM THE EDMONTON HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY AND LATER RETURNED TO HUNGARY TO IMPROVE HER SKILLS, AS WELL AS TO LEARN HOW TO DO MACHINE EMBROIDERY. MARIA AND HER HUSBAND, CHESTER, RETURNED TO HUNGARY ABOUT 3 TIMES, STAYING EACH TIME FOR ABOUT 2 MONTHS SO THAT MARIA COULD IMPROVE HER SKILLS. IN ADDITION TO CREATING THE COSTUMES, MARIA ALSO CARED FOR THEM, ENSURING THEY WERE AVAILABLE WHEN A DANCER WOULD NEED TO WEAR THEM: “YES, I WAS IN CHARGE. DRY CLEANING, WASHING, AND EVERYTHING. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS, LONG YEARS UNTIL WE MOVED AND THEN WE DIDN’T HAVE NO ROOM, AND THEN SOMEBODY ELSE, YOU KNOW. AND THEN WE HAD A MEETING AND THE DANCERS, THEY WAS LOOKING FOR SOMEBODY ELSE WHO WOULD TAKE CARE OF THEM, ‘CAUSE YOU SHOULD’VE SEEN THE GIRLS THEY WAS LIKE, YOU KNOW, “NO, MRS. JOKUTY, YOU TAKE GOOD CARE!” AND I DID.” ACCORDING TO CHESTER (GEZA) JOKUTY’S OBITUARY, CHESTER AND MARIA WERE MARRIED IN HUNGARY ON OCTOBER 3, 1949. CHESTER SERVED IN THE HUNGARIAN ARMY IN 1940, WAS TAKEN PRISONER BY THE RUSSIANS IN 1945, AND HELD PRISONER IN RUSSIA FOR THREE AND A HALF YEARS. IN THE BOOKLET “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY” MARIA INDICATES THAT CHESTER WAS NOT KEEN TO REMAIN IN HUNGARY FOLLOWING THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION, BECAUSE OF HIS TREATMENT AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIANS: CHESTER “SPENT THREE AND A HALF YEARS AS A P.O.W. IN ODESSA WHERE PRISONERS WERE USED AS SLAVE LABOUR. CHESTER WAS NOT A BIG MAN AND BECAUSE OF THE CONDITIONS, WAS EXTREMELY WEAK. DURING THIS TIME IF THE PRISONERS WERE NOT ABLE TO KEEP UP OR DO WHAT WAS REQUIRED OF THEM, THE RUSSIAN GUARDS SENT THEIR DOGS IN TO FORCE THE PRISONERS TO MOVE. HE HAD WITNESSED SO MUCH DEATH AND SUFFERING AND HAD SUFFERED SO BADLY IN THE COLD, AT THE HANDS OF THE RUSSIAN SOLDIERS, HE VOWED NEVER TO BE TAKEN BY THEM AGAIN.” MARIA CONTINUED IN THIS BOOKLET TO RECOUNT THEIR DECISION TO LEAVE HUNGARY: “SO, ON NOVEMBER 4TH [1956], WE DECIDED WE WOULD LEAVE … SO WE GATHERED OUR FAMILY AND MY MOTHER AND BEGAN WALKING AS FAST AS POSSIBLE TOWARDS AUSTRIA – ONLY ABOUT AN HOUR’S WALK FROM WHERE WE LIVED.” THE JOKUTY FAMILY REMAINED IN AUSTRIA FOR 6 MONTHS, WHERE MARIA RECALLS BEING WELL TREATED. THEY LEFT AUSTRIA AND ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN, NB AFTER A 12 DAY CROSSING, ON APRIL 22, 1957. AFTER A LONG TRAIN RIDE, THEY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. SHORTLY AFTER THEIR ARRIVAL THEY BEGAN WORK AS FARM LABOURERS IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON OCTOBER 29, 1979 HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY ABOUT THE HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION: “DESCRIBED SIMPLY, THE REVOLUTION ESTABLISHED A GOVERNMENT THAT TRIED TO MOVE AWAY FROM THE SOVIET UNION’S INFLUENCE. THE SOVIET UNION, SUBSEQUENTLY, SENT ARMED TROOPS INTO HUNGARY TO REASSERT ITS INFLUENCE. IN THE AFTERMATH, MANY PEOPLE FLED, ABOUT 37,000 TO CANADA ACCORDING TO FEDERAL DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION STATISTICS … CHESTER JOKUTY OF THE ASSOCIATION SAID ABOUT 2,000 PERSONS OF HUNGARIAN ORIGINS LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE AND THE SURROUNDING AREA.” MARIA INDICATED SEVERAL TIMES THROUGH THE COURSE OF HER INTERVIEW THAT LIFE WAS VERY DIFFICULT FOR THE JOKUTY FAMILY WHEN THEY FIRST ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. THE FAMILY’S FIRST ACCOMMODATIONS LEFT LITTLE TO BE DESIRED: “WE DIDN’T HAVE RUNNING WATER, TOILET, WE HAVE TO PULL THE WATER FROM THINGS, YOU KNOW, AND CHOP THE WOOD TO MAKE BREAKFAST. AND WINTERTIME, WE WAS SCARED TO DEATH THAT KIDS, WE’LL FREEZE TO DEATH. SOMETIMES I HAVE TO STAY UP, OR MY HUSBAND DID TO BE SURE THE WOOD, YOU KNOW THE STOVE IN THE KITCHEN – ONLY THING – THAT GIVE US A LITTLE BIT WARMTH. IT WAS VERY, VERY HARD.” MARIA RECALLS HAVING TO HITCH HIKE TO GET GROCERIES AND RELIED ON THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS TO GET HOME AGAIN: “AND NO CAR. YOU KNOW WHAT I DID? WE WAS SO HUNGRY, SO I SAID I HAVE TO TAKE A CHANCE. MY HUSBAND WAS WORKING AND KIDS WAS IN MCNALLY SCHOOL AND THEN I WENT ON THE ROAD, PUT MY HAND UP, AND WHATEVER HAPPENED, HAPPENED. SO THEY DROP ME ON 5TH AVENUE SOMEWHERE, OR SAFEWAY, THEY DROP ME OVER THERE, BUT I HEARD THAT LOTS OF HUNGARIAN BACHELORS AND PEOPLE GO TO THE GARDEN HOTEL DRINKING BEER. SO WHEN I WENT OVER THERE, I COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, SO THEN I LISTENED TO THE LANGUAGES WHERE I HEAR THE HUNGARIAN LANGUAGES. SO THEN I HEARD IT, AND I WENT AND I INTRODUCED MYSELF, WHO I AM, AND, “WE ARE ON THE SUGAR BEETS SOWING, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US? I NEED A GROCERY, WOULD YOU PLEASE HELP US …?” AND THEY FIND US SOMEBODY WHO WAS DRIVING, AND I DON’T KNOW WHAT THE NAME, WHAT THE NAME WAS, BECAUSE LONG TIME AGO, THEY GOT MY GROCERY IN THE CAR AND TOOK ME TO THE FARM FREE. CAN YOU IMAGINE? I WISH I COULD GIVE HIM A BIG HUG AND THANKFUL.” CHESTER’S OBITUARY INDICATES THAT HE “WAS A VERY PROUD HUNGARIAN AND A FOUNDING LIFETIME MEMBER OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA IN 1977 AND SERVED AS PRESIDENT FOR TEN YEARS. HE ALSO WAS A FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ETHNIC ASSOCIATION IN 1977.” IN A HERALD ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON NOVEMBER 14, 1989, MARGARET GUGYELKA (SECRETARY OF THE HUNGARIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY) INDICATED THAT THE SOCIETY STARTED IN 1977: “’THERE WAS AN OLDTIMERS’ GROUP BEFORE THAT, BUT IT WAS MORE LIKE A FRATERNITY … THE SOCIETY WAS STARTED BY A SMALL GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO WANTED TO CARRY ON HUNGARIAN TRADITIONS.’” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2, 1983 INDICATES THAT THE SOCIETY ALSO PARTICIPATED IN THE WESTERN CANADIAN HUNGARIAN FOLK DANCE FESTIVAL. IN THE ARTICLE, CHESTER SAID THAT THE “FESTIVAL IS NOT A COMPETITION BUT RATHER AN EVENT DESIGNED TO KEEP CULTURAL HERITAGE ALIVE AND DANCE GROUPS IN TOUCH … JOKUTY SAYS HUNGARIAN DANCING HAS PROVEN ‘VERY, VERY POPULAR’ BECAUSE OF THE VARIETY OF DANCES – 46 IN ALL OF AT THE 1982 FESTIVAL HELD IN LETHBRIDGE – AND THE COLOURFUL COSTUMES UNIQUE TO EACH PROVINCE. THE COSTUMES HAVE PROVEN TO BE A BIG EXPENSE FOR THE SOCIETY SINCE ONE OUTFIT CAN COST UP TO $600 TO MAKE. MADE TO MEASURE BOOTS FROM MONTREAL ARE AS MUCH AS $150.” MARIA LAMENTS THAT THE SOCIETY ISN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE. SHE EXPLAINED THAT THERE SIMPLY ISN’T THE VOLUNTEER LABOUR FORCE TO CONTINUE DOING ALL THAT THE SOCIETY USED TO: “WHEN WE USED TO MAKE – EVERY YEAR BEFORE CHRISTMAS WE USED TO MAKE FOUR THOUSAND, FIVE THOUSAND CABBAGE ROLLS AND WE ADVERTISE, WE LET THE PEOPLE KNOW YOU HAVE TO PUT THE NAME AHEAD AND YOU HAVE TO COME PICK. ALL DAY WE WAS WORKING, BUT FIVE O’CLOCK, SIX O’CLOCK PEOPLE CAME AND TAKE [THE CABBAGE ROLLS] BECAUSE WE USED TO HAVE IT IN A BILL KERGAN CENTER, AND OVER THERE IS WALK-IN COOLER.. BUT NOW, THIS YEAR [2015], NO CABBAGE ROLLS AND PEOPLE ARE DISAPPOINTED, BUT WE DON’T HAVE NO VOLUNTEERS. YOU KNOW, GOLDEN YEARS CATCH UP WITH PEOPLE.” SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE BOOKLET ENTITLED “REMEMBRANCES OF OUR JOURNEY" AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW.
Catalogue Number
P20150038002
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FIRE HOSE JACKET
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010013
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FIRE HOSE JACKET
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
2005
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
20.0
Length
32.9
Width
15.3
Description
RED METAL FIRE HOSE JACKET. EMBOSSED ON BOTH SIDES WITH “AKRON 77”. EACH END OF THE HOSE JACKET IS OPEN, TO ALLOW A HOSE TO GO THROUGH THE JACKET. HOSE JACKET IS HINGED ON THE TOP, HAS A HANDLE ON THE BOTTOM, AND ALSO OPENS FROM THE BOTTOM. A HINGED RECTANGULAR PIECE LIFTS UP TO ALLOW THE JACKET TO BE OPENED AND REVEALS THREE SQUARE OPENINGS. THERE ARE THREE SETS OF TWO RECTANGLES THAT FORM THREE SQUARES. WHEN CLOSED, THIS LARGE RECTANGLE WITH THREE SQUARE OPENINGS FITS OVER THE THREE RECTANGLE PAIRS. WHEN OPEN, THE JACKET REVEALS A BLACK RUBBER LINING. EMBOSSED ONTO THE RUBBER: “AKRON STYLE 77 HOSE JACKET LINER. - TO REPLACE LINER - 1. LIFT DOVETAILS FROM DOVETAIL SLOTS. 2. SQUEEZE SIDES OF LINER TOGETHER. 3. PULL LINER FROM HOUSING. 4. INSERT ONE END OF NEW LINER OVER PINS IN BOTTOM END OF HOUSING. 5. INSERT OTHER END OF LINER OVER PINS AT OPPOSITE END OF HOUSING. 6. INSERT DOVETAILS INTO DOVETAIL SLOTS. 7-29-011” ONE SIDE HAS A “Q1” STICKER ABOVE THE “N” IN “AKRON” STRUCTURALLY IN GOOD CONDITION, BUT THE FINISH IS VERY WORN AND HAS FLAKED OFF IN MANY PLACES. THE FINISH IS LOOSE AND CONTINUES TO FLAKE OFF.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE HOSE JACKET WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS JACKET IS A “HINGED TWO PART DEVICE TO BE PLACED OVER OR ON A 65MM HOSE LINE THAT HAS A LEAK IN IT. IT HAS RUBBER SEALS ON THE ENDS TO KEEP THE WATER IN. IT WAS KEPT ON EVERY FIRE ENGINE. WE STOPPED USING THEM WHEN WE REGULARLY STARTED TESTING HOSES AND FOUND LEAKY HOSES BEFORE A FIRE. SO [WE] NO LONGER HAD USE FOR THEM.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004) AND TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994). BROWN ADDED THAT HOSES GET “RAGGED AND TATTERED, DRAGGED ALONG THE PAVEMENT AND DRAGGED ALONG THE CURBS, [WHICH] WEARS IT OUT. IF THE HOSE EVER BURSTS, RATHER THAN CHANGING THE HOSE, BECAUSE SOMETIMES TO CHANGE A HOSE YOU’VE GOT TO PUT TWO HOSES ON AND SHUT THE WATER OFF, AND IF THE GUYS AREN’T THERE, OR THEY’RE IN THE BUILDING, YOU CAN’T SHUT THE WATER OFF, SO THAT JUST GOES OVER LIKE A SLEEVE AND CLAMPS DOWN.” LAZENBY ELABORATED, SAYING: “THE USE WAS THAT ANY TIME YOU’RE FLOWING WATER UNDER PRESSURE, THERE IS A POSSIBILITY THAT SOMETHING IS GOING TO BURST … SO YOU WOULD HAVE A BURST HOSE LENGTH. AND IF IT WASN’T IRREPARABLY DAMAGED OR IF THERE WAS A LEAK FROM A CERTAIN AREA OF THE HOSE, THIS HAD A RUBBER LINER THAT WAS BUILT IN EXACTLY LIKE A PERFECT CIRCLE THAT YOU WOULD BASICALLY ENCAPSULATE THE LEAK INSIDE OF THIS HOSE JACKET … NOWADAYS IF WE HAVE A BURST LENGTH, WE JUST REPLACE THE LENGTH. WE’LL SHUT THAT HOSE LINE DOWN; WE’LL TAKE TWO LENGTHS TO REPLACE ONE BECAUSE SOMETIMES AS HOSES ARE DAMAGED, THEY’LL CUT 8 FEET OFF … SO YOU HAVE A 42 FOOT HOSE INSTEAD OF 50 FEET … [WHICH LEAVES YOU] SHORT, SO THAT’S WHY YOU ALWAYS TAKE TWO LENGTHS TO REPLACE ONE … I THINK ONE OF THE REASONS WE WENT AWAY FROM THESE IS THAT WE HAVE A VERY STRINGENT HOSE TESTING PROCESS IN PLACE NOW. OUR HOSES GET TESTED EVERY YEAR TO THEIR MAXIMUM OPERATING PRESSURE AND BEYOND TO MAKE SURE THAT THEY CAN WITHSTAND PRESSURES THAT WE PUT THROUGH THEM … I WANT TO SAY THAT THOSE WERE ON THE TRUCKS ALMOST UP TO 10 YEARS AFTER I STARTED, SO UP TO A DOZEN YEARS AGO WE STILL SAW THESE [IN SERVICE].” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010013
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
2 1/2 INCH FOG NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1995
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010010
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
2 1/2 INCH FOG NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1995
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
16.0
Length
50.3
Width
27.6
Description
FIRE-HOSE NOZZLE. SILVER COLOURED METAL, BLACK RUBBER AND PLASTIC. TWO LARGE BLACK RUBBER HANDLES COME OUT FROM THE CYLINDRICAL PORTION OF THE NOZZLE, MAKING A ROUNDED-CORNER SQUARE, WITH THE BODY OF THE NOZZLE GOING DOWN THE MIDDLE. "L" SHAPED METAL HANDLE WHERE BLACK RUBBER HANDLE MEETS BODY OF NOZZLE. DARK GREY COUPLING IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NOZZLE ALLOWS THE LOWER HANDLE PORTION TO BE REMOVED. STAMPED INTO THE DARK GREY METAL: "AKRON NPSH". SILVER METAL ADJUSTABLE HANDLE ALLOWS THE NOZZLE TO BE OPENED OR CLOSED AND IS EMBOSSED WITH "CLOSED" AND "OPEN" ON OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE HANDLE. STAMPED INTO THE METAL NEAR THIS OPEN/CLOSE LEVER IS "AKRON" AND THERE IS ALSO A BLACK STICKER OF "A1". ON THE UNDERSIDE OF THIS LEVER IS A SQUARE PATCH OF MEDIUM BLUE PAINT AND SCRATCHED INTO THE METAL IS "16 B". ABOVE THIS IS AN ADJUSTABLE RING, STAMPED WITH THE FOLLOWING MEASUREMENTS: "120 3/4; 150 7/8; 200 1; 250 1 1/8" (THESE MEASUREMENTS INDICATE HOW MANY GALLONS OF WATER PER MINUTE THE NOZZLE WILL EXPEL). IT IS ALSO STAMPED WITH: "FLUSH" AND "AKRON TURBOJET". THIS RING HAS 24 RAISED SQUARES FOR GRIPPING. BEYOND THIS IS ANOTHER ADJUSTABLE RING, STAMPED WITH "I V V", WHERE THE FIRST 'V' IS EXAGERATED AND EXTRA WIDE. (ADJUSTING THIS RING ADJUSTS THE FLOW OF WATER FROM A STRAIGHT STREAM TO A MIST OR FOG). THE BACKGROUND OF THESE STAMPS IS RED. BLACK RUBBER ABUTS THE ADJUSTABLE RING. THE RUBBER SECTION IS 7.7CM LONG AND IS TEXTURED, FIRST WITH A WIDE SET OF LINES, THEN ON THE VERY EDGE OF THE NOZZLE WITH A VERY CLOSE SET SECTION OF LINES. EMBOSSED ON THIS RUBBER SECTION IS: "US PAT. 3,387,791 - CAN PATENTED 1969". THE VERY END OF THE NOZZLE, WHERE THE WATER COMES OUT, HAS 24 BLACK PLASTIC TEETH. OVERALL IN VERY GOOD CONDITION. SIGNS OF WEAR ON THE SILVER FINISH, ESPECIALLY ON ADJUSTABLE OPEN/CLOSED HANDLE AND THE "L" SHAPED HANDLE.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE-HOSE NOZZLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT THIS NOZZLE WAS “PROBABLY ONE OF THE MOST DANGEROUS WEAPONS WE’VE GOT ON THAT DEPARTMENT. YOU HAD TO HAVE TWO GUYS HOLDING THAT THING … IT WAS FOR LARGER FIRES. YOU DIDN’T TAKE THAT INTO FIRES, BECAUSE YOU COULDN’T CONTROL IT. YOU’D TAKE IT MAYBE TO A DOOR OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT. THIS HERE NOZZLE – YOU’D TURN – IT WOULD BE A SPRAY OR A STRAIGHT STREAM. IF YOU PUT IT ON NON-STRAIGHT STREAM, IT WOULD DRAG YOU ALL OVER THE GROUND. I CAN REMEMBER SEEING GUYS ON THIS NOZZLE, SNAKING BACK AND FORTH LIKE THAT, AND THEM HANGING ONTO THE NOZZLE BEFORE THEY COULD GET THEIR BALANCE TO SHUT IT OFF … YOU HAD TO HAVE TWO GUYS ON IT, AND IF BY CHANCE, THEY FELL OFF IT, AND THEY LET IT LOOSE, WELL, YOU CAN IMAGINE. THAT THING PROBABLY WEIGHED … I’M GUESSING 40 POUNDS; IT WAS A VERY HEAVY NOZZLE. IF IT HIT ANYBODY … IT WOULD BE PRETTY HARD. SO, IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE TWO GUYS ON THAT NOZZLE, YOU’D TAKE IT AND YOU’D MAKE A CIRCLE ON IT, AND YOU’D SIT ON THE CIRCLE WITH THE NOZZLE LIKE THAT, AND JUST THAT LITTLE CIRCLE WOULD SORT OF KNOCK THE PRESSURE, SO IT DIDN’T ALL COME OUT OF THE NOZZLE. IT WOULD BE BACK IN THAT LITTLE CIRCLE SO ONE GUY COULD HOLD IT. BUT YOU’D PRETTY WELL HAVE TO SIT ON THAT NOZZLE. AND, AFTER YOU WERE ON THAT NOZZLE FOR ABOUT 15 MINUTES, YOU WERE JUST WIPED. IT WAS LIKE FIGHTING A TOUGH LITTLE CALF. BUT THAT WAS JUST MORE OR LESS FOR THE BIG FIRES, AND FOR THE FIRES YOU COULDN’T GET INTO.” LAZENBY EXPANDED SAYING: “IT’S A TWO AND A HALF INCH NOZZLE AND THIS WAS NEARING THE END OF ITS LIFE SPAN WHEN I WAS HIRED. THIS IS A FOG NOZZLE, WHICH MEANS THAT YOU CAN CHANGE THE PATTERN OF THE WATER FROM A RELATIVELY SMOOTH OR STRAIGHT STREAM INTO A 75 DEGREE FOG FOR YOUR PROTECTION. BEING A TWO AND HALF INCH NOZZLE, THIS CAN FLOW AN AWFUL LOT OF WATER … I BELIEVE THE ERGONOMIC PLASTIC HANDLES WERE JUST FOR ERGONOMICS AND EASE OF HOLDING ON TO THAT. THIS HOSE WAS BIG ENOUGH THAT TYPICALLY ONE PERSON WOULDN’T WANT TO OPERATE THAT BY THEMSELVES, UNLESS YOU’RE A REALLY BIG, STRONG GUY. EVEN EMPLOYING WHAT WAS CALLED THE KEENAN HOSE LOOP AND ACTUALLY ROTATE THE NOZZLE UNDERNEATH, AROUND AND UNDERNEATH ITSELF, UNDER THE HOSE AND YOU WOULD SIT ON THE CROSS OF THE HOSE SO THAT WOULD BEAR ALL THE NOZZLE REACTION AND ALL YOU WOULD HAVE TO DO IS DIRECT THE STREAM … GOOD NOZZLE, BUT QUITE HEAVY AND WE WERE GOING AWAY FROM THESE IN FAVOUR OF A NEWER, PISTOL-GRIP STYLE OF NOZZLE WHERE IT WAS ACTUALLY LIKE A PISTOL HANDLE WITH THE BALE FIXED ON TOP THAT IT JUST GAVE YOU A LITTLE BIT EASIER USE, LESS CUMBERSOME … I NEVER ACTUALLY USED ONE OF THESE EXCEPT FOR IN TRAINING, BUT THEY WERE ON OUR BACKUP ENGINES – THEY WEREN’T FRONT LINE, BUT THEY WERE ON THE BACKUP ENGINES WHEN I STARTED.” DZUREN ADDED: “THERE’S USUALLY EITHER TWO OR THREE GUYS, DEPENDING ON WHERE YOU WERE USING IT. BECAUSE THE PRESSURE ON THAT, YOU HAD TO HAVE FAIRLY HIGH PRESSURE TO HAVE THAT EVEN FUNCTION PROPERLY. SO YOU WOULD NEED TO HAVE ONE GUY THAT WOULD OPERATE THIS TRIGGER VALVE HERE, OR THE SPRAY VALVE, AND SOMEBODY WOULD BE BEHIND YOU MAKING SURE THAT IT DIDN’T GET AWAY ON YOU, BECAUSE IF A HOSE GOT AWAY ON YOU WITH IT RUNNING, IT WOULD … IT COULD BREAK A PERSON’S LEG OR KILL A PERSON … IF IT GOT AWAY FROM THEM.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010010
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 1.