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Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
314.2
Length
4.9
Width
33.5
Description
ADJUSTABLE LADDER, SIDE RAILS COME TOGETHER TO MAKE THE LADDER MORE COMPACT (LADDER IS ONLY 8.0CM WIDE WHEN THE SIDE RAILS ARE TOGETHER). SILVER COLOURED METAL, WITH ORANGE PAINT, BLACK RUBBER, AND EIGHT RUNGS. ANTI-SLIP SAFETY SHOE ON THE BOTTOM OF BOTH SIDE RAILS. SAFETY SHOE IS BLACK RUBBER ON THE BOTTOM, WITH A PATTERN OF 10 CIRCLES PER SHOE BOTTOM. METAL TEETH ON THE FRONT OF THE SHOE. SHOES ARE ADJUSTABLE, BUT ARE VERY STIFF. BRACE COMES UP FROM THE BOTTOM AND LOCKS TO PREVENT LADDER RAILS FROM COLLAPSING BACK TOGETHER. BOTTOM OF LADDER HAS A 54.5CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT AND TOP HAS A 46.0CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT. TOP OF ONE RAIL HAS A BLACK RUBBER TOPPER. SMALL BLACK STICKER AT BOTTOM “P1” WITH SEVERAL STICKERS ON THE OPPOSITE RAIL: A ROUGHLY OVAL SHAPED, RED, BLACK, AND SILVER STICKER: “THIS IS A DUO-SAFETY LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP 519 W 9TH AVE. OSHKOSH, WIS.”; THEN A RECTANGULAR RED STICKER WITH WHITE WRITING: “THIS LADDER IS CERTIFIED TO COMPLY WITH N.F.P.A. SPEC 1931-1832; CURRENT EDITION, FOR FIRE DEPARTMENT GROUND LADDERS AND OSHA FIRE LADDER REQUIREMENTS. REFER TO DUO-SAFETY LADDER SAFETY BOOK FOR CARE – USE – MAINTENANCE ON THIS LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP. OSHKOSH, WI 54901”; THEN A WHITE STICKER WITH GOLD WRITING: “10”. THERE IS ALSO A SILVER COLOURED STICKER WITH HANDWRITING ON THIS SAME RAIL, LOCATED BETWEEN THE FIRST AND SECOND RUNGS: “TEST DATE: 25 NOV 2006. LADDER #: ATTIC #18. APPARATUS #: P1. APPARATUS #: P1.” BOTH RAILS HAVE THE FOLLOWING STICKERS, AT ROUGHLY THE MID-POINT OF THE LADDER: RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLUE BORDER, BLACK WRITING: “DANGER. FAILURE TO USE, UNDERSTAND, AND FOLLOW PROPER LADDER USAGE INSTRUCTIONS AS MADE AVAILABLE BY DUO-SAFETY LADDER, N.F.P.A., I.S.F.S.I., A.N.S.I., O.S.H.A., ETC. COULD CAUSE SERIOUS INJURY AND/OR DEATH.” RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK BORDER AND WRITING: “DANGER. WATCH FOR WIRES. THIS LADDER CONDUCTS ELECTRICITY.” RECTANGULAR, YELLOW, WITH BLACK WRITING: CAUTION. SET UP LADDER PROPERLY TO REDUCE SLIP AND OVERHEAD HAZARDS. FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS. 1. PLACE TOES AGAINST BOTTOM OF LADDER SIDE RAILS. 2. STAND ERECT. 3. EXTEND ARMS STRAIGHT OUT. 4. PALMS OF HANDS SHOULD TOUCH TOP OF RUNG AT SHOULDER LEVEL. OUT -->” STICKER ON THE INSIDE OF FOURTH RUNG FROM THE BOTTOM: WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK WRITING: “REMOVE LADDER FROM SERVICE AND TEST IF ANY HEAT SENSOR TURNS DARK -->” LADDER IS IN GOOD OVERALL CONDITION. ADJUSTABLE FEET ARE VERY STIFF. LOTS OF SCUFF MARKS ALL OVER LADDER AND SOME STICKERS HAVE BEEN PARTIALLY REMOVED/SCRATCHED.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS ATTIC LADDER WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDER WAS “USED TO ACCESS ATTIC SPACES THROUGH SMALL ACCESS HOLES IN CEILINGS. USED WHEN WE DID NOT WANT TO PULL A CEILING DOWN AFTER A FIRE TO ENSURE THAT THE FIRE IN THE ATTIC WAS OUT.” HE CONTINUED SAYING THAT THIS LADDER WAS DECOMMISSIONED BECAUSE IT IS “OLD AND WORN OUT. ALL LADDERS MUST MEET MINIMUM ACCEPTANCE STANDARDS.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT THIS IS “WHAT WE CALL A LITTLE ATTIC LADDER, TO GET BACK INTO A TIGHT PLACE WHERE YOU COULDN’T BRING A BIG LADDER IN … YOU COULD GET IT UP INTO THE ATTIC SO YOU COULD CHECK WHAT WAS IN THE ATTIC.” LAZENBY ELABORATED: “THIS IS A FOLDING ATTIC LADDER … THE RUNGS THAT SEPARATE THE TWO BEAM SECTIONS ARE ACTUALLY HINGED IN NATURE AND SO IT FOLDS UP AND FITS IN, TYPICALLY, A LITTLE COMPARTMENT ON THE BACK END OF THE TRUCK BECAUSE HAVE SOME LONG, LATERAL STORAGE THERE. THESE SURPRISINGLY GET USED A FAIR AMOUNT, STILL.” HE CONTINUED SAYING “THEY’RE NARROW ENOUGH THAT THEY’RE ALMOST DIFFICULT TO CLIMB WITH YOUR BIG FIRE BOOTS ON.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDERS IN USE PRESENTLY ARE VERY SIMILAR TO THIS MODEL: “YOU CAN TELL BY LOOKING AT IT IT’S AN OLDER PIECE BUT THE CONSTRUCTION IS ESSENTIALLY THE SAME. THEY MIGHT BE USING SLIGHTLY LIGHTER MATERIALS NOW, BUT FROM WHAT I CAN SEE, THEY’RE BASICALLY THE SAME.” HE ADDED THAT HE WAS OFTEN THE ONE USING THE LADDER: “BECAUSE I WAS NEVER ONE OF THE BIGGER GUYS ON THE JOB, AND ESPECIALLY WHEN I STARTED I WAS PROBABLY TWENTY POUNDS LIGHTER THAN I AM NOW, IF THEY NEEDED SOMEONE TO GET INTO A SMALLER SPACE, I WAS THAT GUY, TYPICALLY, BECAUSE WHEN YOU WEIGHT 250 [POUNDS] AND YOU THROW THE SCBA ON AND ALL THE EQUIPMENT, IT’S DEFINITELY TOUGH FOR SOME OF THOSE GUYS TO GET THROUGH THAT ACCESS. SO, YES, I’VE BEEN IN MY FAIR SHARE OF ATTICS AND THAT’S THE ONLY MEANS TO GET UP THERE.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THE IMPORTANCE OF USING THE LADDER: “ANY TIME A FIRE VENTS OUT OF A WINDOW AND TOUCHES ANY PART OF THE SOFFIT, IT’S INCUMBENT THAT YOU HAVE TO ABSOLUTELY CHECK THAT BECAUSE IF YOU DON’T AND YOU’RE OPERATING UNDERNEATH AN ATTIC FIRE, THAT’S A VERY, VERY UNSAFE PLACE TO BE.” DZUREN ADDED: “THAT’S A COLLAPSIBLE LADDER. IT’S KIND OF LIKE A SCISSOR TYPE OF LADDER. IT WAS VERY COMPACT, YOU COULD STORE IT ON ONE OF YOUR VEHICLES WITHOUT IT TAKING UP TOO MUCH ROOM … YOU’D CARRY THAT INTO YOUR HOUSE IF AN OFFICER WANTED YOU TO GO UP INTO AN ATTIC … IT WAS EASY TO TRANSPORT AND ONCE YOU GOT IT INTO THE OPENING YOU COULD JUST GIVE IT A SWITCH AND IT WOULD OPEN UP AND YOU COULD JUST CLIMB RIGHT UP TO THE SPOT THERE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PIERCING NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS, RUBBER, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20150010006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PIERCING NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Materials
BRASS, RUBBER, STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Length
151.1
Width
10.2
Diameter
6.3
Description
PIERCING NOZZLE. BRASS, WITH CHROME PLATE, STEEL, AND BLACK RUBBER. CYLINDRICAL END OF NOZZLE HEAD IS THREADED, TO ALLOW A HOSE TO BE CONNECTED. TEXTURED EDGE NEAR THREADING. THROUGH THIS OPENING A BLACK RUBBER RING AND METAL MESH ARE VISIBLE. ADJUSTABLE HANDLE EMBOSSED ON ONE SIDE WITH “AKRON BRASS” AND “1 1/2 4 WAP” ON THE OTHER. (NOTE: WAP IS A BEST GUESS, LETTERS HAVE LOST THEIR DEFINITION.) BELOW HANDLE, STAMPED INTO THE METAL BODY OF THE NOZZLE IS “SHUT FOG OPEN”. HANDLE MARKS CHANGE IN SHAPE FROM CYLINDRICAL TO TRIANGULAR. TRIANGULAR PORTION HAS A BLACK STICKER “Q2” AND A STRIPE OF YELLOW PAINT, NEAR THE CONNECTION WITH THE PIPE. A SMALL RECTANGULAR PUSH BUTTON ALLOWS THE NOZZLE TO BE DISCONNECTED FROM THE PIPE. SMALL HOLE THROUGH THE NOZZLE HEAD VISIBLE AT THE CONNECTION OF THE PIPE AND HEAD, WHICH OPENS AND CLOSES WITH THE OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE HANDLE. NEAR THE CONNECTION OF THE PIPE AND HEAD STAMPED INTO THE METAL OF THE PIPE “LFD 62”, WITH THE STAMP BEING PARTIALLY FILLED IN WITH WHITE PAINT. TWO SECTIONS OF STEEL PIPING HAVE BEEN PERMANENTLY THREADED TOGETHER. END OF PIPE HAS THREE SETS OF TWELVE HOLES EACH AROUND THE PIPE, 13.5CM FROM THE END. TIP OF PIPE IS ANGLED, TO CREATE A SHARP END TO PENETRATE THROUGH WALLS. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. WELL-WORN. CHROME PLATING HAS WORN AWAY, ESPECIALLY ON THE EDGES OF THE HANDLE. LOTS OF SCRATCHES AND SCUFF MARKS ALL OVER. VARIOUS BLACK STAINS ON THE PIPE SECTION.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS PIERCING NOZZLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS NOZZLE WAS “USED TO PUT WATER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF A WALL, FLOOR, OR CEILING. ALSO USED TO PUT WATER INSIDE OF A HAYSTACK.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004) AND TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994). BROWN EXPLAINED SAYING: “IT HAS A METAL PROBE ON ONE END OF IT WITH LITTLE HOLES DRILLED INTO IT. MOSTLY WE USED IT FOR BALE FIRES, JAMMING IT INTO THE HAYSTACK OR BALE … ONCE IN A WHILE, WE’D USE IT FOR INSIDE A WALL, BUT VERY SELDOM.” LAZENBY ADDED: “THIS PIECE OF EQUIPMENT … HAS A NUMBER OF NAMES … IT’S BEEN CALLED ANYTHING FROM A CELLAR NOZZLE … TO AN ATTIC NOZZLE, TO A PIERCING NOZZLE … THE POINT ON THE END OF THIS WAS ACTUALLY QUITE SHARP, AND IF YOU WANTED TO, IF YOU HAD AN ATTIC FIRE, YOU COULD EASILY POKE THIS FROM BELOW UP THROUGH YOUR DRYWALL AND YOUR INSULATION … AND THERE WERE A BUNCH OF SMALL HOLES DRILLED INTO THE VERY END SO THAT WHEN YOU DID OPEN IT, THE WATER WOULD COME OUT IN A FOG PATTERN.” HE CONTINUED, SAYING: “THE ADVANTAGE OF THAT IS THAT YOU DIDN’T NECESSARILY HAVE TO PULL THE CEILING DOWN … YOU COULD DO SOME SUPPRESSION UP THERE BEFORE YOU DECIDED TO PULL THAT CEILING DOWN AND SORT OF MAKE CONDITIONS BETTER BEFORE YOU EXPOSED YOURSELF TO THEM. SO FOR THE ATTIC USE, IT WORKED REALLY, REALLY WELL FROM WHAT I HEARD. I’VE NEVER DEPLOYED ONE OF THESE IN THAT SITUATION.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED FURTHER: “THE OTHER USE … IF YOU GOT TO A STRUCTURE AND THE BASEMENT WAS ON FIRE, SAME IDEA, JUST DIFFERENT DIRECTION … IF YOU SHOVED THE NOZZLE DOWN AND OPENED IT UP, YOU’RE GETTING AUTOMATIC SUPPRESSION BEFORE YOU SENT A TEAM DOWN THERE INTO THAT ATMOSPHERE. I WAS EVEN TOLD THAT YOU COULD USE THESE ON AN ENGINE FIRE … SOME OF THESE WERE BUILT WITH A STRIKING SECTION ON THEM SO THAT IF YOU HAD A HAMMER YOU COULD HIT THE TOP OF IT – THIS WOULD ACTUALLY PIERCE THE HOOD OF THE VEHICLE, ENTER THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT, YOU COULD TURN THE NOZZLE ON, AND IT WOULD SUPPRESS THE FIRE WITHOUT EVER HAVING TO LIFE THE HOOD. … I DON’T THINK THAT WE EVER USED THIS TOOL MAYBE AS OFTEN AS WE SHOULD HAVE. I THINK THAT WE, AT TIMES, COULD HAVE MADE BETTER USE AND ACTUALLY MADE CONDITIONS A LITTLE BIT BETTER FOR OURSELVES BEFORE WE PUT OURSELVES INTO THAT SPACE OR ATMOSPHERE.” WHEN ASKED IF THIS TYPE OF NOZZLE IS STILL IN USE, LAZENBY REPLIED: “WE HAVE ONE OF THESE ON OUR ENGINE DOWNTOWN … OURS BREAKS DOWN INTO A COUPLE OF PIECES SO IT STORES EASIER … BUT FUNDAMENTALLY IT’S THE SAME TOOL, SLIGHT MODIFICATIONS FOR EASE OF USE, BUT YEAH, THEY’RE STILL AROUND.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010006
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FIRE HOSE JACKET
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010013
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FIRE HOSE JACKET
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
1990
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
20.0
Length
32.9
Width
15.3
Description
RED METAL FIRE HOSE JACKET. EMBOSSED ON BOTH SIDES WITH “AKRON 77”. EACH END OF THE HOSE JACKET IS OPEN, TO ALLOW A HOSE TO GO THROUGH THE JACKET. HOSE JACKET IS HINGED ON THE TOP, HAS A HANDLE ON THE BOTTOM, AND ALSO OPENS FROM THE BOTTOM. A HINGED RECTANGULAR PIECE LIFTS UP TO ALLOW THE JACKET TO BE OPENED AND REVEALS THREE SQUARE OPENINGS. THERE ARE THREE SETS OF TWO RECTANGLES THAT FORM THREE SQUARES. WHEN CLOSED, THIS LARGE RECTANGLE WITH THREE SQUARE OPENINGS FITS OVER THE THREE RECTANGLE PAIRS. WHEN OPEN, THE JACKET REVEALS A BLACK RUBBER LINING. EMBOSSED ONTO THE RUBBER: “AKRON STYLE 77 HOSE JACKET LINER. - TO REPLACE LINER - 1. LIFT DOVETAILS FROM DOVETAIL SLOTS. 2. SQUEEZE SIDES OF LINER TOGETHER. 3. PULL LINER FROM HOUSING. 4. INSERT ONE END OF NEW LINER OVER PINS IN BOTTOM END OF HOUSING. 5. INSERT OTHER END OF LINER OVER PINS AT OPPOSITE END OF HOUSING. 6. INSERT DOVETAILS INTO DOVETAIL SLOTS. 7-29-011” ONE SIDE HAS A “Q1” STICKER ABOVE THE “N” IN “AKRON” STRUCTURALLY IN GOOD CONDITION, BUT THE FINISH IS VERY WORN AND HAS FLAKED OFF IN MANY PLACES. THE FINISH IS LOOSE AND CONTINUES TO FLAKE OFF.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE HOSE JACKET WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS JACKET IS A “HINGED TWO PART DEVICE TO BE PLACED OVER OR ON A 65MM HOSE LINE THAT HAS A LEAK IN IT. IT HAS RUBBER SEALS ON THE ENDS TO KEEP THE WATER IN. IT WAS KEPT ON EVERY FIRE ENGINE. WE STOPPED USING THEM WHEN WE REGULARLY STARTED TESTING HOSES AND FOUND LEAKY HOSES BEFORE A FIRE. SO [WE] NO LONGER HAD USE FOR THEM.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004) AND TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994). BROWN ADDED THAT HOSES GET “RAGGED AND TATTERED, DRAGGED ALONG THE PAVEMENT AND DRAGGED ALONG THE CURBS, [WHICH] WEARS IT OUT. IF THE HOSE EVER BURSTS, RATHER THAN CHANGING THE HOSE, BECAUSE SOMETIMES TO CHANGE A HOSE YOU’VE GOT TO PUT TWO HOSES ON AND SHUT THE WATER OFF, AND IF THE GUYS AREN’T THERE, OR THEY’RE IN THE BUILDING, YOU CAN’T SHUT THE WATER OFF, SO THAT JUST GOES OVER LIKE A SLEEVE AND CLAMPS DOWN.” LAZENBY ELABORATED, SAYING: “THE USE WAS THAT ANY TIME YOU’RE FLOWING WATER UNDER PRESSURE, THERE IS A POSSIBILITY THAT SOMETHING IS GOING TO BURST … SO YOU WOULD HAVE A BURST HOSE LENGTH. AND IF IT WASN’T IRREPARABLY DAMAGED OR IF THERE WAS A LEAK FROM A CERTAIN AREA OF THE HOSE, THIS HAD A RUBBER LINER THAT WAS BUILT IN EXACTLY LIKE A PERFECT CIRCLE THAT YOU WOULD BASICALLY ENCAPSULATE THE LEAK INSIDE OF THIS HOSE JACKET … NOWADAYS IF WE HAVE A BURST LENGTH, WE JUST REPLACE THE LENGTH. WE’LL SHUT THAT HOSE LINE DOWN; WE’LL TAKE TWO LENGTHS TO REPLACE ONE BECAUSE SOMETIMES AS HOSES ARE DAMAGED, THEY’LL CUT 8 FEET OFF … SO YOU HAVE A 42 FOOT HOSE INSTEAD OF 50 FEET … [WHICH LEAVES YOU] SHORT, SO THAT’S WHY YOU ALWAYS TAKE TWO LENGTHS TO REPLACE ONE … I THINK ONE OF THE REASONS WE WENT AWAY FROM THESE IS THAT WE HAVE A VERY STRINGENT HOSE TESTING PROCESS IN PLACE NOW. OUR HOSES GET TESTED EVERY YEAR TO THEIR MAXIMUM OPERATING PRESSURE AND BEYOND TO MAKE SURE THAT THEY CAN WITHSTAND PRESSURES THAT WE PUT THROUGH THEM … I WANT TO SAY THAT THOSE WERE ON THE TRUCKS ALMOST UP TO 10 YEARS AFTER I STARTED, SO UP TO A DOZEN YEARS AGO WE STILL SAW THESE [IN SERVICE].” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010013
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010010
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
16.0
Length
50.3
Width
27.6
Description
FIRE-HOSE NOZZLE. SILVER COLOURED METAL, BLACK RUBBER AND PLASTIC. TWO LARGE BLACK RUBBER HANDLES COME OUT FROM THE CYLINDRICAL PORTION OF THE NOZZLE, MAKING A ROUNDED-CORNER SQUARE, WITH THE BODY OF THE NOZZLE GOING DOWN THE MIDDLE. "L" SHAPED METAL HANDLE WHERE BLACK RUBBER HANDLE MEETS BODY OF NOZZLE. DARK GREY COUPLING IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NOZZLE ALLOWS THE LOWER HANDLE PORTION TO BE REMOVED. STAMPED INTO THE DARK GREY METAL: "AKRON NPSH". SILVER METAL ADJUSTABLE HANDLE ALLOWS THE NOZZLE TO BE OPENED OR CLOSED AND IS EMBOSSED WITH "CLOSED" AND "OPEN" ON OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE HANDLE. STAMPED INTO THE METAL NEAR THIS OPEN/CLOSE LEVER IS "AKRON" AND THERE IS ALSO A BLACK STICKER OF "A1". ON THE UNDERSIDE OF THIS LEVER IS A SQUARE PATCH OF MEDIUM BLUE PAINT AND SCRATCHED INTO THE METAL IS "16 B". ABOVE THIS IS AN ADJUSTABLE RING, STAMPED WITH THE FOLLOWING MEASUREMENTS: "120 3/4; 150 7/8; 200 1; 250 1 1/8" (THESE MEASUREMENTS INDICATE HOW MANY GALLONS OF WATER PER MINUTE THE NOZZLE WILL EXPEL). IT IS ALSO STAMPED WITH: "FLUSH" AND "AKRON TURBOJET". THIS RING HAS 24 RAISED SQUARES FOR GRIPPING. BEYOND THIS IS ANOTHER ADJUSTABLE RING, STAMPED WITH "I V V", WHERE THE FIRST 'V' IS EXAGERATED AND EXTRA WIDE. (ADJUSTING THIS RING ADJUST THE FLOW OF WATER FROM A STRAIGHT STREAM TO A MIST OR FOG). THE BACKGROUND OF THESE STAMPS IS RED. BLACK RUBBER ABUTS THE ADJUSTABLE RING. THE RUBBER SECTION IS 7.7CM LONG AND IS TEXTURED, FIRST WITH A WIDE SET OF LINES, THEN ON THE VERY EDGE OF THE NOZZLE WITH A VERY CLOSE SET SECTION OF LINES. EMBOSSED ON THIS RUBBER SECTION IS: "US PAT. 3,387,791 - CAN PATENTED 1969". THE VERY END OF THE NOZZLE, WHERE THE WATER COMES OUT, HAS 24 BLACK PLASTIC TEETH. OVERALL IN VERY GOOD CONDITION. SIGNS OF WEAR ON THE SILVER FINISH, ESPECIALLY ON ADJUSTABLE OPEN/CLOSED HANDLE AND THE "L" SHAPED HANDLE.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE-HOSE NOZZLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT THIS NOZZLE WAS “PROBABLY ONE OF THE MOST DANGEROUS WEAPONS WE’VE GOT ON THAT DEPARTMENT. YOU HAD TO HAVE TWO GUYS HOLDING THAT THING … IT WAS FOR LARGER FIRES. YOU DIDN’T TAKE THAT INTO FIRES, BECAUSE YOU COULDN’T CONTROL IT. YOU’D TAKE IT MAYBE TO A DOOR OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT. THIS HERE NOZZLE – YOU’D TURN – IT WOULD BE A SPRAY OR A STRAIGHT STREAM. IF YOU PUT IT ON NON-STRAIGHT STREAM, IT WOULD DRAG YOU ALL OVER THE GROUND. I CAN REMEMBER SEEING GUYS ON THIS NOZZLE, SNAKING BACK AND FORTH LIKE THAT, AND THEM HANGING ONTO THE NOZZLE BEFORE THEY COULD GET THEIR BALANCE TO SHUT IT OFF … YOU HAD TO HAVE TWO GUYS ON IT, AND IF BY CHANCE, THEY FELL OFF IT, AND THEY LET IT LOOSE, WELL, YOU CAN IMAGINE. THAT THING PROBABLY WEIGHED … I’M GUESSING 40 POUNDS; IT WAS A VERY HEAVY NOZZLE. IF IT HIT ANYBODY … IT WOULD BE PRETTY HARD. SO, IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE TWO GUYS ON THAT NOZZLE, YOU’D TAKE IT AND YOU’D MAKE A CIRCLE ON IT, AND YOU’D SIT ON THE CIRCLE WITH THE NOZZLE LIKE THAT, AND JUST THAT LITTLE CIRCLE WOULD SORT OF KNOCK THE PRESSURE, SO IT DIDN’T ALL COME OUT OF THE NOZZLE. IT WOULD BE BACK IN THAT LITTLE CIRCLE SO ONE GUY COULD HOLD IT. BUT YOU’D PRETTY WELL HAVE TO SIT ON THAT NOZZLE. AND, AFTER YOU WERE ON THAT NOZZLE FOR ABOUT 15 MINUTES, YOU WERE JUST WIPED. IT WAS LIKE FIGHTING A TOUGH LITTLE CALF. BUT THAT WAS JUST MORE OR LESS FOR THE BIG FIRES, AND FOR THE FIRES YOU COULDN’T GET INTO.” LAZENBY EXPANDED SAYING: “IT’S A TWO AND A HALF INCH NOZZLE AND THIS WAS NEARING THE END OF ITS LIFE SPAN WHEN I WAS HIRED. THIS IS A FOG NOZZLE, WHICH MEANS THAT YOU CAN CHANGE THE PATTERN OF THE WATER FROM A RELATIVELY SMOOTH OR STRAIGHT STREAM INTO A 75 DEGREE FOG FOR YOUR PROTECTION. BEING A TWO AND HALF INCH NOZZLE, THIS CAN FLOW AN AWFUL LOT OF WATER … I BELIEVE THE ERGONOMIC PLASTIC HANDLES WERE JUST FOR ERGONOMICS AND EASE OF HOLDING ON TO THAT. THIS HOSE WAS BIG ENOUGH THAT TYPICALLY ONE PERSON WOULDN’T WANT TO OPERATE THAT BY THEMSELVES, UNLESS YOU’RE A REALLY BIG, STRONG GUY. EVEN EMPLOYING WHAT WAS CALLED THE KEENAN HOSE LOOP AND ACTUALLY ROTATE THE NOZZLE UNDERNEATH, AROUND AND UNDERNEATH ITSELF, UNDER THE HOSE AND YOU WOULD SIT ON THE CROSS OF THE HOSE SO THAT WOULD BEAR ALL THE NOZZLE REACTION AND ALL YOU WOULD HAVE TO DO IS DIRECT THE STREAM … GOOD NOZZLE, BUT QUITE HEAVY AND WE WERE GOING AWAY FROM THESE IN FAVOUR OF A NEWER, PISTOL-GRIP STYLE OF NOZZLE WHERE IT WAS ACTUALLY LIKE A PISTOL HANDLE WITH THE BALE FIXED ON TOP THAT IT JUST GAVE YOU A LITTLE BIT EASIER USE, LESS CUMBERSOME … I NEVER ACTUALLY USED ONE OF THESE EXCEPT FOR IN TRAINING, BUT THEY WERE ON OUR BACKUP ENGINES – THEY WEREN’T FRONT LINE, BUT THEY WERE ON THE BACKUP ENGINES WHEN I STARTED.” DZUREN ADDED: “THERE’S USUALLY EITHER TWO OR THREE GUYS, DEPENDING ON WHERE YOU WERE USING IT. BECAUSE THE PRESSURE ON THAT, YOU HAD TO HAVE FAIRLY HIGH PRESSURE TO HAVE THAT EVEN FUNCTION PROPERLY. SO YOU WOULD NEED TO HAVE ONE GUY THAT WOULD OPERATE THIS TRIGGER VALVE HERE, OR THE SPRAY VALVE, AND SOMEBODY WOULD BE BEHIND YOU MAKING SURE THAT IT DIDN’T GET AWAY ON YOU, BECAUSE IF A HOSE GOT AWAY ON YOU WITH IT RUNNING, IT WOULD … IT COULD BREAK A PERSON’S LEG OR KILL A PERSON … IF IT GOT AWAY FROM THEM.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010010
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail