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Date Range From
1976
Date Range To
1977
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, LEATHER, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20190023002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1976
Date Range To
1977
Materials
PLASTIC, LEATHER, COTTON
No. Pieces
3
Height
7
Diameter
9.5
Description
A. COVER FOR STAND, 4.3CM TALL X 8CM WIDE. PLASTIC DOME COVER FOR FITTING TO DISPLAY STAND; CLEAR PLASTIC. YELLOWED WITH SCUFF MARKS ON TOP OF DOME; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BASEBALL, 6.5CM WIDE. BALL IS WHITE WITH RED STITCHING AT EDGES; BASEBALL IS STAMPED WITH LOGO, “THE CUSHIONED CORK CENTER, SPALDING, REG. U.S. PAT. OFF., MADE IN U.S.A., SEWN IN HAITI”. BASEBALL IS STAMPED WITH FADED TEXT, “OFFICIAL BALL, NATIONAL LEAGUE, CHARLES S. FEENEY PRES.”. BASEBALL IS SIGNED BY: RON KITTLE, DOUG HOGAN, DENNIS [ILLEGIBLE], DEAN CRAIG, DANNY COULON, MIGUEL FRANJAL, MIKE HOWARD, GAIL HENLEY, MIKE ZOURAS, DAMON MIDDLETON, JERRY BASS, JIM NOBLES, DOUGLAS FOSTER, JOHN BUSH, ROCKY CORDOVA, LARRY WRIGHT, JACK LITTRELL, KEN LIKEWISE, DON LEJOHN, TIM JONES, MARK ELLIOTT, MITCH WEBSTER, JESSE BAY, ERIC SCHMIDT, MIKE HOLT. BALL IS YELLOWED; TEXT IS FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. DISPLAY STAND, 7CM TALL X 9.5 CM DIAMETER. STAND HAS GOLD-PAINTED BASE WITH HALF OF CLEAR PLASTIC CASING FOR BASEBALL. BOTTOM OF BASE HAS EMBOSSED TEXT, “SPORTS PRODUCTS CORP., A SUB OF LAICH INDUSTRIES, CLEVELAND, OHIO”. BASE HAS CUT-OUT FOR BOTTOM OF CLEAR PLASTIC CASE. PLASTIC CASE IS YELLOWED; BASE HAS GRIME AND RESIDUE BUILD-UP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SPORTS EQUIPMENT
Historical Association
SPORTS
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON SEPTEMBER 12, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LEE PRINDLE REGARDING HIS DONATION OF LETHBRIDGE BASEBALL MEMORABILIA. ON THE SIGNED BASEBALL, PRINDLE RECALLED, “I WAS [WITH THE TEAM IN] ‘76/’77…I DID NOT SIGN [THE BALL]. [THE PLAYERS] SIGNED [THE BALL] AND GAVE IT TO ME. I WASN’T A PLAYER; I WASN’T ON THE TEAM…THEY DO IT AT THE END OF THE YEAR. THEY DO THAT…FOR COACHES…AND FOR EACH OTHER! EACH OF THE BALL PLAYERS THERE WILL HAVE A BALL THAT’S PROBABLY SIGNED. THEY’LL SIT DOWN WITH THE BOXES OF BALLS AND THE ORGANIZATION WILL PROVIDE THE BALLS FOR NOTHING, OF COURSE, AND THEY’LL SIT DOWN AND DO THAT.” “[OF THE TEAM PLAYERS] I REALLY LIKED CANDY MALDONADO; HE WAS GOOD. BUT, I LIKED THIS MITCH WEBSTER, TOO. NICK HOLT—SOME OF THESE GUYS I CAN BARELY REMEMBER. SOME WERE PITCHERS. I REMEMBER ROCKY CORDOVA…[HE] HAD A GREAT CURVE BALL…LARRY WRIGHT…” “[THE BALL HAS] BEEN ON A SHELF.” ON HIS CONNECTIONS TO BASEBALL AND THE DODGERS, PRINDLE SHARED, “…I HAD WATCHED A LOT OF BASEBALL GAMES…I’M A BASEBALL FAN AND I HAD ALWAYS BEEN A DODGERS FAN…[I WAS WATCHING LOCAL GAMES] AT HENDERSON.” “I GREW UP IN SUNBURST, MONTANA. I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1967 TO TEACH AT THE COLLEGE…[I] TAUGHT THERE ‘TIL I RETIRED…I WAS WATCHING BASEBALL AND THE [DODGERS] OR THE BASEBALL ORGANIZATION HERE, WHICH WAS WITH THE EXPOS AND THE DODGERS, HAD ABOUT TWENTY GUYS THAT PUT IN A THOUSAND DOLLARS EACH TO START THE TEAM, HEADED BY RENO LIZZI, OF COURSE…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN 1975, I THINK, WHEN THEY STARTED…THEY GOT INTO THE LEAGUE, AND THE EXPOS WERE JUST STARTING. THEY NEEDED [A] PLACE FOR THEIR FARM CLUBS…SO THE EXPOS CAME HERE FIRST AND I CAN REMEMBER WALT HRINIAK WAS THE FIELD MANAGER WHEN I CAME IN…THE EXPOS CAME UNDER THIS ORGANIZATION…ONE OF THE TWENTY GUYS THAT SEEN ME AT…A NUMBER OF BALLGAMES…SAID, ‘WE’RE LOOKING FOR A GENERAL MANAGER,’ AND BECAUSE I WAS A COLLEGE TEACHER, I HAD SOME TIME OFF IN THE SUMMER SO THAT KIND OF FIT IN WITH MY SCHEDULE…I APPLIED FOR THE JOB, INTERVIEWED, AND THEN I TALKED TO THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS [AT THE COLLEGE] ‘CAUSE I FIGURED THEY NEEDED SOME PERMISSION TO GET OFF BECAUSE IN THE SPRING…IT TAKES A LITTLE BIT AWAY FROM YOUR JOB. THEY SAID, ‘YEAH, GO FOR IT,’ SO THEY GAVE ME THE JOB [OF] GENERAL MANAGER.” “THE GENERAL MANAGER HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH BRINGING IN THE TEAM TO THE ROOKIE LEAGUES. THE MAIN ORGANIZATION, THE VICE PRESIDENT…AND THE GENERAL MANAGER OF THE…DODGERS BRING THEM IN. SO THEY BRING IN THE TEAMS BUT I HAD TO LOOK AFTER EVERYTHING, LIKE BALL BOYS AND LAUNDRY AND TICKETS AND BUS TRIPS AND HOTELS…SO THAT’S WHAT I DID. BUT I HIRED ALL THE STAFF THAT WORKED AT THE BALLPARK, AT HENDERSON; WE WERE ALWAYS AT HENDERSON…I TOOK CARE OF THE MONEY. PAID THE GUYS THEIR MEAL MONEY. WHEN THEY WENT ON THE ROAD THEY GET THEIR MEAL MONEY ALLOWANCE…I DID IT FOR—FIRST YEAR WERE [WITH] THE EXPOS, THE NEXT YEAR WAS WITH THE DODGERS AND THEN I WAS OUT A YEAR AND SOMEBODY ELSE DID IT. THEY WANTED ME BACK SO I CAME BACK FOR ANOTHER YEAR. BOTH YEARS THAT I WAS GENERAL MANAGER, WE WON THE PENNANT. HENLEY WAS A REALLY, REALLY GOOD FIELD MANAGER. HE WAS ACTUALLY ONE OF THE CHIEF SCOUTS FOR THE DODGERS BUT HE WAS A GOOD FIELD MANAGER AND SO I WON IT…I GOT TWO, NICE, REAL PENNANT RINGS FROM THE DODGERS BUT, UNFORTUNATELY, WHEN MY HOUSE WAS BROKEN IN, THEY WERE STOLEN…” “I WORKED—I ENJOYED IT, REALLY. I MET A LOT OF BALL PLAYERS. I MET BALL PLAYERS THAT WENT ON AND PLAYED IN THE MAJORS…LIKE GREG BROCK…I [USED TO] GO TO SPRING TRAINING IN ARIZONA ALL THE TIME AND I’D SEE SOMEBODY DOWN—LIKE GREG BROCK [WHO] WAS PLAYING THEN FOR MILWAUKEE, I THINK, AND I’D…GO TALK TO HIM.” “…THERE WAS BASEBALL UP HERE [IN LETHBRIDGE] BEFORE [THE DODGERS]…I ONLY CAME HERE IN ’67 BUT I KNOW THERE WAS BASEBALL HERE BEFORE AND THE CULTURE OF BASEBALL IS STILL HERE…WE HAVE THE BULLS HERE…THEY BELONG TO THE SOUTHWESTERN BASEBALL LEAGUE [WESTERN CANADIAN BASEBALL LEAGUE] THEY GET GOOD ATTENDANCE…” “I THINK [BASEBALL] HAS [DONE WELL IN LETHBRIDGE] AND ONE OF THE REASONS IS WE HAVE THIS [LEAGUE]…WHERE THE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY STUDENTS COME [PRAIRIE BASEBALL LEAGUE]…THERE’S A LOT OF INTEREST HERE. OUR LITTLE LEAGUE TEAMS HAVE ALWAYS DONE WELL…[THE KIDS IN THE LITTLE LEAGUE] HAVE HOCKEY AND SOCCER AND A LOT OF STUFF BUT [OUR LITTLE LEAGUE TEAMS HAVE] ALWAYS DONE [WELL]…MY GRANDSON WAS ON A JUNIOR LITTLE LEAGUE TEAM THAT WENT ALL THE WAY TO THE CANADIAN NATIONALS…THERE’S A PRETTY GOOD BASEBALL CULTURE HERE, I THINK. I THINK IT HOLDS ITS WEIGHT…I THINK THE SIZE OF THE COMMUNITY IS GOOD FOR BASEBALL…AFTER WE GOT INTO PIONEER LEAGUE THEN CALGARY DECIDED TO GET INTO IT, TOO…” “RENO LIZZI WAS A HUGE BASEBALL FAN AND A DODGER. IF YOU CUT IN, LIKE TOMMY LASORDA WOULD SAY, HE ‘BLED BLUE’, DODGER BLUE…THE DODGERS AT ONE TIME HAD A FARM CLUB IN SPOKANE. AND [LIZZI] WOULD GO DOWN THERE AND HE’D MEET THESE GUYS. HE MET “BUZZIE” BAVASI, ONE OF THE EARLIER GENERAL MANAGERS…HE JUST TALKED TO ‘EM…[LIZZI] WOULD INVITE THOSE PEOPLE UP HERE TO SPORTSMEN CENTRES…WE COULDN’T GET THE DODGERS AT THAT TIME. I BELIEVE THEY WERE IN GREAT FALLS AT THAT TIME BUT WHEN HE PUT UP THE MONEY, THEN HE JUST PUT OUT SOME FEELERS AND [THE] EXPOS WERE LOOKING FOR A PLACE, THEY GOT IN TOUCH WITH LIZZI, THE BOARD, THEY THOUGHT THIS WOULD BE A GOOD PLACE TO START, AND THEY CAME…AFTER THAT, FINALLY, RENO GOT HIS BELOVED DODGERS TO COME TO LETHBRIDGE…ALTHOUGH THEY HAD BASEBALL HERE BEFORE, IN SOME OTHER KIND OF MIXED LEAGUES…I THINK LIZZI WAS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF IT. I GIVE HIM CREDIT FOR THAT.” “ONE OF THE VICE PRESIDENTS…HAD TROUBLE SENDING STUFF ACROSS THE LINE. HE DIDN’T WANT TO PAY ANY DUTY ON IT AND STUFF WOULD COME—[ON] BUSES—THEY WOULD TRY TO ACTUALLY…GO TO GREAT FALLS TO [AN] AWAY GAME AND PUT [A] BUNCH OF NEW BASEBALLS IN AND COME ACROSS THE LINE AND THE CUSTOMS PEOPLE DON’T LIKE THAT AND SO HE WAS HAVING TROUBLE PAYING THAT…THEY HAD PROBLEM WITH THE CROSSING OF THE LINE, THE DIFFERENCE IN DOLLAR…YOU’RE PAYING THESE KIDS LESS…THEY EVENTUALLY LEFT AND THEN OF COURSE, EVENTUALLY…WHEN ARIZONA STARTED…WE HAD A FARM CLUB HERE WITH THE ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS.” “WE’RE PART OF THE SOUTHWEST SASKATCHEWAN LEAGUE…WITH THE LETHBRIDGE BULLS AND THEY GET GOOD ATTENDANCE AND THEY HAVE DECIDED, WITH HELP WITH SOME SPONSORS, LIKE SPITZ…THEY MAKE A NICE BASEBALL STADIUM OUT OF IT, OVER THERE. IT’S JUST A NICE THING TO DO; TO GO OVER AND SIT THERE BY THE LAKE IN THE EVENING IN THE SUMMERTIME AND WATCH A BASEBALL GAME.” “FOR ME [THE GOLDEN ERA FOR BASEBALL IN LETHBRIDGE], OF COURSE, IT WOULD HAVE BEEN THE TWO YEARS WE WON THE PENNANT…WE HAD A GOOD AVERAGE…GAIL HENLEY HAD A…AFTER THE GAME, WE’D GET TOGETHER WITH THE COACHES, WE’D GO DOWN FOR A PIZZA SOMEWHERE…AND TALK ABOUT THE GAME AND THEY WOULD SAY, ‘WELL –‘, I’D SAY, ‘GEEZ, YOU KNOW THAT FIRST BASEMAN FUMBLED A LOT.’ AND THEY’D SAY, ‘NO, NO, HE’S REALLY GOOD.’ I JUST LIKED THE WAY THAT THEY COULD ANALYZE BALL PLAYERS BECAUSE THEY’RE LOOKING—THESE BALL PLAYERS THAT CAME HERE, THEIR FUTURE, HOPEFULLY, IS IN THE MAJOR LEAGUES; THAT’S WHERE THEY WANNA BE…SOME OF THEM THEY COULD SUMMARIZE RIGHT AWAY AND SOME OF THEM, THEY DIDN’T, BUT THERE’S GUYS LIKE RON KITTLE THAT PLAYED HERE. I NEVER THOUGHT HE’D MAKE IT BUT HE HAD SEVENTEEN HOME RUNS IN HIS CAREER AGAINST BOSTON…IT WAS NICE TO MEET THOSE KIDS…ANDRE DAWSON PLAYED HERE. THAT WAS 1975 SO I DIDN’T KNOW HIM BUT I WATCHED HIM PLAY A LOT…SOME OF THE GUYS THAT PLAYED HERE, WENT ON AND BECAME FAMOUS. ANDRE DAWSON, OF COURSE, IS IN THE HALL OF FAME, SO, I THINK THAT’S GOOD.” AN APRIL 22, 1976 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE REFERENCES RENO LIZZI AS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LETHBRIDGE EXPOS MONTREAL’S PIONEER LEAGUE FRANCHISE, WITH PRINDLE REFERENCED AS THE GENERAL MANAGER OF THE LETHBRIDGE EXPOS. ACCORDING TO A MARCH 14, 1979 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, PRINDLE BEGIN AS GENERAL MANAGER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE EXPOS IN 1976, AND REMAINED GENERAL MANAGER WHEN THE LETHBRIDGE DODGERS WERE FORMED IN 1977. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND INFORMATION ON JIM GILLIAM, PLEASE SEEN THE PERMANENT FILE P20190023001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190023002
Acquisition Date
2019-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
R.N. CUFFLINKS
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GOLD, IMITATION PEARL
Catalogue Number
P20190011001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.N. CUFFLINKS
Date
1965
Materials
METAL, GOLD, IMITATION PEARL
No. Pieces
2
Length
2.2
Width
1.9
Description
PAIR OF GOLD CUFFINKS WITH ROUND, FLAT CUFFLINK FACES; CUFFLINK FACES HAVE IMITATION PEARL INLAY SET IN GOLD FRAME, WITH GOLD MEDICAL CADUCEUS SYMBOL SET IN PEARL AND LETTERS “RN” AROUND CADUCEUS. CUFFLINKS HAVE GOLD METAL BACK PLATES, POSTS, HINGE PINS, AND TOGGLES; INSIDE LOWER POST HAS ENGRAVED TEXT, “FOSTER”; INSIDE UPPER POST HAS ENGRAVED TEXT, “PET. PEND. U.S.A.”. CUFFLINKS HAVE MINOR STAINING ON TOGGLES AND POSTS; CUFFLINK FACES HAVE MINOR STAINING ON GOLD FRAMES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE CUFFLINKS, KIMERY RECALLED, “THE CUFFLINKS…WERE GRADUATING GIFTS…[WHEN I GRADUATED IN 1965 AS] SHARON GEORGESON…THEY WERE GIVEN TO US WHEN WE GRADUATED…WE WORE LONG SLEEVES, AND SO THESE WERE CUFFLINKS ON THE LONG SLEEVES.” “[THE GRADUATION UNIFORM] WAS ALL WHITE…WHITE BIB. WHITE LONG SLEEVES. WHITE SKIRT [I WORE THE CUFFLINKS WITH THE GRADUATION UNIFORM].” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011001
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1961
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, BRASS, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190011002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1961
Date Range To
1965
Materials
METAL, BRASS, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
5
Width
1.5
Description
BRASS METAL BROOCH WITH BAR-PIN CLASP; BROOCH HAS GOLD-COLOURED RECTANGULAR BAR FOR FRONT, WITH BLUE CROSS IN CENTER. CROSS HAS GOLD BANNER RUNNING ACROSS THE FRONT WITH BLUE TEXT “S M H”. BACK OF BROOCH HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “STER 3 OF G, G.F.”. BROOCH HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND POSTS OF BAR-PIN AND ON BACK OF CROSS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE BROOCH, KIMERY RECALLED, “YOU [GOT THE BROOCH] AFTER YOUR FIRST YEAR. IT’S CALLED A BANDING BARRING CEREMONY AND IT FASTENED AT THE TOP OF YOUR COLLAR OF YOUR UNIFORM. AND THAT JUST SHOWED THAT YOU MADE IT THROUGH THE FIRST YEAR AND THAT YOU HAVE A BAND AND A BROOCH NOW…YOU WORE IT UNTIL YOU GRADUATED.” “[IT SIGNIFIED RANK AND SENIORITY] BECAUSE YOUR FIRST YEAR YOU DON’T HAVE ANYTHING, YOU DON’T HAVE A BAND ON THE CAP, YOU DON’T HAVE ANYTHING. AFTER FIRST YEAR YOU GET THIS AND A YELLOW BAND AND THEN A BLUE ONE AND THEN A BLACK.” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011002
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD, METAL, ENAMEL
Catalogue Number
P20190011003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1965
Materials
GOLD, METAL, ENAMEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.5
Diameter
2.9
Description
GOLD PIN WITH BAR-PIN CLASP ON BACK; PIN IS ROUND WITH SHIELD IN CENTER ON FRONT. FRONT OF PIN HAS BLUE ENAMEL BORDER WITH GOLD TEXT, “SCIENCE, SERVICE, SANCTITY, ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING”; FRONT OF PIN HAS BLUE ENAMEL CROSS WITH SHIELD OVERLAID IN CENTER; SHIELD IN CENTER HAS BLUE ENAMEL TOP BAR WITH GOLD LAMP, AND WHITE MID-SECTION WITH A BLUE CROSS AND OVERLAID RED SHIELD IN THE CENTER WITH A GOLD CROSS. BACK OF THE PIN HAS ENGRAVED TEXT IN THE CENTER, “F. GEORGESON 1965” AND ENGRAVED TEXT AT LOWER EDGE, “[ILLEGIBLE] 10 K”. BACK OF PIN HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND POSTS OF BAR-PIN; FRONT OF PIN HAS CHIPPED ENAMEL AND MINOR TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE PIN, KIMERY RECALLED, “THE PIN YOU DIDN’T GET ‘TIL YOU GRADUATED…THAT WENT ON THE UNIFORM WHEN YOU GRADUATED…[THE GRADUATION UNIFORM] WAS ALL WHITE…WHITE BIB. WHITE LONG SLEEVES. WHITE SKIRT…” “I WORE THE PIN WHEN I WORKED IN THE O.R. WHEN I GRADUATED. I WORKED IN THE O.R. FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AFTER I GRADUATED…WE WORE IT ON OUR UNIFORMS IN THE O.R…I ONLY WORE IT ONE YEAR.” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011003
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD, ONYX
Catalogue Number
P20190011004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL
Date
1965
Materials
GOLD, ONYX
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.6
Length
2
Width
1.3
Description
GOLD RING WITH RECTANGULAR ONYX RING FACE; RING HAS NARROW BAND AND TEXT ENGRAVED ON THE INSIDE, “10 K, 8”. RING FACE HAS RECTANGULAR ONYX STONE SET IN GOLD FRAME, WITH GOLD LETTERS ON ONYX “S M H”; RING BAND SPLITS INTO TWO PRONGS AT THE SIDES OF THE RING FACE, AND DUAL PRONGS ATTACH TO THE RING FACE. RING HAS MINOR STAINING INSIDE FRONT DUAL PRONGS; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL RING, KIMERY RECALLED, “THE CUFFLINKS…AND THE RING WITH ‘SMH’… WERE GRADUATING GIFTS…[WHEN I GRADUATED FROM ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING IN 1965 AS] SHARON GEORGESON.” “I [WORE THE RING] UNTIL…THE OTHER ONE [THE O.R. RING] WAS MADE…[IN] I’M GOING TO SAY, ‘70 BECAUSE I WAS BACK [IN LETHBRIDGE] THEN.” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011004
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1967
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD
Catalogue Number
P20190011005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1967
Materials
GOLD
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.5
Length
1.8
Width
1.9
Description
GOLD RING WITH TAPERED BANDS AND OVAL FACE; THE RING FACE HAS AN OVAL WITH THE EMBOSSED PROFILE OF A NURSE, AND WIDE BANDS THAT TAPER FROM SIDES OF THE RING FACE. BAND HAS TWO SMALL, ENGRAVED LEAVES ON SIDES OF THE RING FACE. INSIDE RING BAND HAS MINOR STAINING AND WEAR; RING FACE HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND THE EMBOSSED PROFILE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE O.R. NURSE’S RING, KIMERY RECALLED, “IT WAS JUST MADE BECAUSE WE JUST WANTED PEOPLE TO KNOW THAT WE WERE O.R. NURSES, A SELECT BRAND OF NURSES THAT HAD CHOSEN THIS PATH. AND WE WANTED IT NOT TO BE FOR EVERYONE SO SOMEONE SAID, ‘WELL, LET’S GET SOMETHING DESIGNED.’ SO WE THOUGHT THE BEST DESIGN WOULD BE AN O.R. HEAD WITH THE MASK AND THE TURBAN. SO WE TOOK IT TO FOSTER’S JEWELRY AND THEY MADE THIS UP FOR US. NOW I KNOW THAT PROBABLY EVERY O.R. NURSE AT ST. MIKE’S AT THAT TIME BOUGHT ONE. I’M NOT SO SURE THAT IT WENT TO THE GALT OR ANYWHERE ELSE. I CAN’T VOUCH FOR THAT. I JUST KNOW THAT THE STAFF, AT THAT TIME, WE ALL GOT ONE JUST BECAUSE IT WAS A SIGNATURE OF WHAT WE WERE AND WHAT WE DID.” “[THERE WERE] 15, APPROXIMATELY [MADE]…[THE RING IS] 10 CARAT [GOLD]…I THINK ONE PERSON DESIGNED IT AND SAID, ‘WHAT DO YOU THINK?’ AND WE SAID, ‘GOOD, PERFECT.’ SO SHE WENT AHEAD WITH IT.” “[I WORE THE RING] ALL THE TIME…SOCIALLY, WEAR IT TO WORK, PUT IT ON THE SHELF, PUT IT BACK ON WHEN YOU LEFT WORK, 24-7…WHEN YOU’RE OUT AND ABOUT…WE WORE THEM ALL THE TIME.” “I DON’T KNOW WHEN I STOPPED [WEARING THE RING]. I PRESUME WHEN I WENT TO MONTREAL I STOPPED. AND I PROBABLY WORE IT WHEN I CAME BACK…IT WAS IN A BOX WITH THE OTHER [PIECES FROM MY TIME AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING].” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011005
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20130012001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
23
Height
8.3
Length
13.4
Width
3
Description
A. CARDBOARD BOX, BROWN PRINTED WITH YELLOW BACKGROUND, BLUE BORDERS AND IMAGES, AND BLUE TEXT, 13.4CM LONG X 3CM WIDE X 8.3CM TALL. FRONT OF BOX HAS FRONT HAS TEXT “ “SUPER-CLEAN, SMOKELESS, MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA” PRINTED WITH “C-I-L” LOGO. LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES OF BOX HAS WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BLUE BACKGROUND “TWENTY “DOMINION” .303 BRITISH COPPER POINT” AND BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “SMOKELESS, HIGH VELOCITY, 180 GRAIN BULLET, “SUPER-CLEAN””. BACK OF BOX HAS IMAGE OF BULLET WITH TEXT “DOMINION .303 BRITISH COPPER POINT” PRINTED ON IMAGE IN BLUE AND WHITE. FRONT OF BOX HAS TEXT “TWENTY .303 BRITISH, COPPER POINT, HIGH VELOCITY” IN WHITE ON BLUE BACKGROUND AROUND BULLET. BACK HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “”SUPER-CLEAN”, SMOKELESS, THESE “SUPER-CLEAN” CARTRIDGES ARE GUARANTEED TO BE OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY, POWERFUL, ACCURATE TO EXTREME RANGES AND “ALWAYS DEPENDABLE.” ALL “DOMINION” CARTRIDGES HAVE “SUPER-CLEAN” NON-MERCURIC PRIMING AND NON-FOULING BULLETS, WHICH KEEP THE RIFLE BORE IN PERFECT CONDITION. “MADE IN CANADA””. TOP OF BOX HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND, BESIDE “C-I-L” LOGO, “SUPER-CLEAN, ADAPTED TO, B.S.A., ROSS, LEE-METFORD, GIBBS, GREENER, REMINGTON, LEE-ENFIELD, AND WINCHESTER RIFLES., (WILL NOT INTERCHANGE WITH .303 SAVAGE)”. TOP HAS BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON INSIDE FLAP, “NOTE, BE SURE TO RETURN THIS CARTON WITH SAMPLE CARTRIDGE IF COMMUNICATING WITH US ON THE CONTENTS OF THIS PACKAGE. A SPECIAL TREATMENT OF THE NECK OF THESE CARTRIDGES PROTECTS THEM FROM DETERIORATION, ENSURES UNIFORM CRIMPING, GREATER ACCURACY AND LONGER LIFE.” INSIDE OF TOP FLAP HAS BLACK STAMPED TEXT “A.A.H.H.S., IP 51”. INSIDE OF TOP FLAP HAS BLACK RESIDUE FROM CARTRIDGES IN ROWS OF CIRCLES. INSIDE OF BOX IS BROWN CARDBOARD AND IS STAINED. OUTSIDE OF BOX IS STAINED WITH GREY; EDGES OF BOX ARE WORN AND FRAYED. BASE OF BOX HAS TEARS IN CARDBOARD AND CREASES AT CORNERS. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. C. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. D. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET HAS MINOR DARK STAINING WITH FINGERPRINT IMPRESSIONS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET IS TARNISHED; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. F. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. G. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. H. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. I. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET SHOWS MINOR CORROSION AND TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. J. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET HAS MINOR DARK STAINING WITH FINGERPRINT IMPRESSIONS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. K. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. L. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING AND CORROSION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. M. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING AND CORROSION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. N. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. O. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. P. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. Q. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. R. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. S. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. T. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. U. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; BASE OF SLIT HAS CREASE THAT RUNS DOWN FRONT OF CARDBOARD. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. V. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. W. CARDBOARD INSERT, 14CM LONG X 7.4CM WIDE. TOP OF INSERT HAS 9 SLITS WITH ROUNDED POINTS BETWEEN SLITS. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK AND GREY ALONG POINTS ON FRONT AND BACK. FRONT HAS CREASE RUNNING FROM SLIT TO LOWER EDGE ON LEFT SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FROM MARCH 20-31, 2018, THE AMMUNITION WAS LOANED TO DUANE KING OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA TO BE DEACTIVATED. THE AMMUNITION WAS DEACTIVATED AND RETURNED. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE AND DOCUMENTATION OF THE LOAN FOR DEACTIVATION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012001
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20130012002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.6
Length
6.9
Width
3
Description
CARDBOARD AMMUNITION BOX WITH 49 CARTRIDGES INSIDE. BOX IS BROWN CARDBOARD ON THE INSIDE, WITH OUTSIDE PRINTED YELLOW WITH BLUE BORDERS AND TEXT. BOX LID HAS TEXT “.22 LONG, SMOKELESS, DRY LUBRICATED BULLETS” BESIDE IMAGE OF A BULLET WITH “.22 LONG” PRINTED ON IMAGE. TEXT BELOW IMAGE, “SUPER-CLEAN” IN WHITE ON BLUE BACKGROUND BESIDE “C-I-L” LOGO, WITH TEXT BELOW “MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES HAVE BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND, “SUPER-CLEAN, .22 LONG, 50 R.F., SMOKELESS” AND “C-I-L” LOGO. FRONT OF BOX HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “THESE CARTRIDGES ARE PRIMED WITH “SUPER-CLEAN” NON-RUSTING PRIMING. IF THE RIFLE HAS FIRST BEEN THOROUGHLY CLEANED AS “DOMINION” “SUPER-CLEAN” .22’S ARE USED EXCLUSIVELY, THEY WILL NOT RUST OR CORRODE THE BORE.” BACK HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “76, 305” AND BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. TOP FLAP HAS BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON INSIDE “DANGEROUS WITHIN ONE MILE”. BOX IS WORN AT EDGES AND FADED; TOP FLAP HAS TEARS ON RIGHT SIDE, AND HEAVY WEAR AT LOWER EDGE.TOP FLAP IS CREASED ALONG LOWER LEFT CORNER; FRONT OF BOX IS STAINED WITH BLACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. CARTRIDGES INSIDE BOX ARE COMPRISED OF BRASS JACKET AND GREY POINT. JACKET HAS ENGRAVED “D” ON BASE; POINT OF CARTRIDGES HAVE THREE RINGS ENGRAVED ABOVE JACKET. CARTRIDGES OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FROM MARCH 20-31, 2018, THE AMMUNITION WAS LOANED TO DUANE KING OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA TO BE DEACTIVATED. THE AMMUNITION WAS DEACTIVATED AND RETURNED. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE AND DOCUMENTATION OF THE LOAN FOR DEACTIVATION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012002
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20130012003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
13
Height
11.6
Length
10.8
Width
6.6
Description
A. CARDOARD TOP, 10.3CM LONG X 6.3CM WIDE. TOP FLAP OF CARDBOARD BOX; BROWN INSIDE WITH RED, YELLOW, AND BLACK TEXT AND BACKGROUND PRINTED ON TOP. TOP HAS RED BORDER ALONG UPPER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT “CANUCK HEAVY LOAD” AND BLACK TEXT BELOW “12 GAUGE, 2 5/8 INCH, 25 SHOT SHELLS”. TOP HAS RED “C-I-L” LOGO PRINTED. TEXT BELOW PRINTED IN BOXES WITH BLACK BORDERS, FIRST BOX HAS RED BACKGROUND AND WHITE TEXT “HEAVY LOAD” AND BLACK TEXT INSIDE NEXT THREE BOXES, “OZ SHOT 1 1/8”, “SIZE OF SHOT, 5 HS”, “CODE DN, IA H6XX”. FRONT FLAP HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED “NOTE, BE SURE TO RETURN THIS BOX WITH SAMPLE CARTRIDGE IS COMMUNICATING WITH US CONCERNING THE CONTENTS OF THIS PACKAGE. 128 P63”. BACK OF CARDBOARD HAS LOSS IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER; FLAP IS CREASED FRONT AND BACK AND WORN AT EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CARDBOARD AMMUNITION BOX, 10.8CM LONG X 6.6CM WIDE X 11.6CM TALL. FRONT OF BOX PRINTED WITH RED AND BLACK IMAGE OF A SHOTGUN SHELL, AND RED BORDER ALOG TOP EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT “CANUCK HEAVY LOAD”; FRONT HAS BLACK TEXT BESIDE IMAGE “2 5/8 12 GAUGE, “SUPER-CLEAN”, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION” WITH RED “C-I-L- PRINTED; LOWER EDGE OF FRONT HAS RED BORDER WITH WHITE TEXT “WATERPROOFED, FINISHED IN “DUCO””. LEFT SIDE OF BOX HAS RED BORDERS AT TOP AND LOWER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BORDERS, AND BLACK TEXT PRINTED BETWEEN BORDERS, TEXT “”DOMINION”, BACKED BY MORE THAN HALF A CENTURY OF EXPERIENCE IN MANUFACTURING AMMUNITION FOR CANADIAN SPORTSMEN…” WITH COMPANY STATEMENT ON QUALITY. RIGHT SIDE OF BOX HAS RED BORDERS AT TOP AND LOWER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BORDERS, AND BLACK TEXT PRINTED BETWEEN BORDERS; TEXT “”CANUCK”, 12 GAUGE, 2 5/8 INCH, HEAVY LOAD SHOT SHELLS, CHOICE OF SHOT SIZES 2,4,5,6, 7 1/2, BB…” WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SHOT SIZES AND PURPOSES, AND “CAUTION, DO NOT USE THESE SHELLS EXCEPT IN GUNS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH MODERN HEAVY LOAD SMOKELESS POWDER SHOT SHELLS…” AND STORING INSTRUCTIONS. BACK OF BOX HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED IN BOX WITH RED BORDERS; TEXT “”CANUCK”, CANADA’S MOST POPULAR SHOT SHELL, IDEAL FOR THE SPORTSMAN WHO DESIRES A MODERATELY-PRICED “ALL-PURPOSE” SHOT SHELL, THE “CANUCK” HAS BEEN CANADA’S FAVOURITE FOR MORE THAN TWENTY-FIVE YEARS…” WITH DETAILS ON FEATURES OF THE SHELLS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR USE WITH FIREARMS. BASE OF BOX HAS RED BORDER ALONG TOP WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED “CNUCK HEAVY LOAD”; BASE HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED “12 GAUGE 2 5/8 INCH, 25 SHELL SHOTS, MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. TOP FLAPS OVER BOX OPENING PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT; LEFT FLAP HAS TEXT “WARNING: IT IS DANGEROUS TO PLACE: 16 GAUGE SHELLS IN 10 GAUGE GUNS, 20 GAUGE SHELLS IN 12 GAUGE GUNS, 28 GAUGE SHELLS IN 16 OR 20 GAUGE GUNS.”; RIGHT FLAP HAS TEXT “BECAUSE: THE SMALLER SHELL WILL PASS THROUGH THE CHAMBER AND LODGE IN THE BARREL. IF, WITH THE BARREL THUS OBSTRUCTED, ANOTHER SHELL IS FIRED IN IT, THE BARREL MAY BURST WITH POSSIBLE SERIOUS INJURY TO THE SHOOTER AND BY-STANDERS. BEFORE LOADING YOUR GUN MAKE SURE THE BARREL IS NOT OBSTRUCTED.” INSIDE OF BOX IS STAINED BLACK AND GREY; FRONT OF BOX HAS GREY SQUARE PENCIL DRAWINGS; RIGHT SIDE OF BOX HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE INK “20347.5, 20230, 117”. BOX IS WORN AT EDGES AND CREASED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS SCRATCHED AND TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. E. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS SCRATCHED AND TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. F. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. G. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. H. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. I. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. J. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. K. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. L. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. M. CARDBOARD FLAP, 3.4CM LONG X 2CM WIDE. FLAP DETACHED FROM BOX; FLAP HAS FLAT EDGE AT BASE AND ROUNDED TOP. EDGES ARE WORN AND FLAP HAS CREASE ACROSS THE MIDDLE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FROM MARCH 20-31, 2018, THE AMMUNITION WAS LOANED TO DUANE KING OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA TO BE DEACTIVATED. THE AMMUNITION WAS DEACTIVATED AND RETURNED. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE AND DOCUMENTATION OF THE LOAN FOR DEACTIVATION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012003
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
12
Height
55.5
Length
28.5
Width
10
Description
A: RIGHT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN METAL NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. N…ON CO. SYRACCUSE N.Y. U.S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN ON THE TOE AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. A CUT IN THE LEATHER SITS ABOVE THE TOE. THE STITCHING AT THE BACK OF THE BOOT HAS TORN OPEN AND AT THE TOP OF THE BOOT, NEXT TO THE LEATHER PULL, THE BOOT IS SPLIT NEXT TO THE SEAM. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.5CM, W: 10 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. B: THE TOE-SHAPED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT-SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R”. THE VARNISH IS CHIPPED AND DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. C: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “R” AND “6 R…”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, JUST AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. D: THE BACK PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “R”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. E: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, MINIMALLY SCRATCHED BUT DENTED AND DIMPLED. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.2 CM, L: 2.2 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. F: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 55 CM, L: 1.6 CM, W: 8.5 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. G: THE LEFT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN SILVER NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. NETTLET… CO. S…SE N.Y. ...S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN OVER THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE SIDE OF THE HEEL, AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.8 CM, W: 9.7 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. H: THE TOE SHAPED PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. I: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “L” AND “6 LEFT”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, MOSTLY AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. DIMENSIONS: H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. J: THE BACK PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. K: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, SCRATCHED AND WORN IN PLACES. A KNOT IN THE WOOD HAS FALLEN OUT AND LEFT A HOLE IN THE TOP OF THE INSERT. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.3 CM, L: 2.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. L: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R” WITH TWO LINES DRAWN OVER IT. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE INSERT IS A NAIL, THE TOP GRINDED DOWN. DIMENSIONS: H: 55.5 CM, L: 1.9 CM, W: 8.6 CM. CONDITION: GOOD.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
MILITARY
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
THIS PAIR OF RIDING BOOTS BELONGED TO MURRAY NELSON, THE BROTHER DONOR KATHRYN HINMAN. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THESE BOOTS AND THEIR OWNER, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HINMAN AT THE MUSEUM ON MARCH 20, 2017. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “THE PREVIOUS OWNER OF THESE BOOTS WAS MY BROTHER, MURRAY [NELSON],” HINMAN BEGAN, “HE PASSED AWAY AT THE END OF NOVEMBER 2015… HE WAS A LOCAL MUSICIAN. HE CAME INTO THE POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS FROM MY GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, WHO WAS LIEUTENANT COLONEL GEORGE S. BROWN. MY GRANDDAD WAS A GREAT FRIEND OF BRIGADIER GENERAL STEWART. GRANDDAD CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS AT SOME POINT FROM DR. STEWART AND WHEN MY BROTHER WAS ABOUT EIGHTEEN, MY GRANDFATHER PASSED THEM ON TO HIM.” “[MURRAY DID] TELL ME THAT HE WAS IN THE GARAGE OUT AT THE FARM, WHICH IS ACTUALLY BROWN ROAD JUST OFF THE COUTTS’ HIGHWAY AND THAT WAS WHERE MY GRANDFATHER’S ACREAGE WAS. ON THAT ACREAGE, THERE WAS A GARAGE [AMONG] MANY BUILDINGS. MURRAY HAD SAID GRANDDAD HAD TAKEN HIM INTO THE GARAGE AND WHEN MURRAY EXPRESSED AN INTEREST IN [THE BOOTS THERE] GRANDDAD SAID, ‘YUP, YOU CAN HAVE THEM. THEY WERE GENERAL STEWART’S FROM THE BOER WAR. TAKE GOOD CARE OF THEM.’” “[MY BROTHER] USED TO WEAR THEM PLAYING IN BANDS WHEN HE WAS EIGHTEEN AND UP,” HINMAN CONTINUED, “[THEY WERE] PART OF HIS DRESS CODE… THEY’RE LOVELY BOOTS. THE STORY WAS THAT THEY WERE FROM THE BOER WAR, WHICH PUTS THEM OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS OLD… [MY BROTHER] PROBABLY ACQUIRED [THESE BOOTS WHEN] MY GRANDFATHER PASSED AWAY IN 1968. MURRAY WOULD HAVE BEEN EIGHTEEN [THAT YEAR]. HE WAS IN HIS ELEMENT PLAYING WITH THE BANDS, EXPERIMENTING WITH ALL DIFFERENT KINDS OF MUSIC [AT THAT TIME]. I REMEMBER HIM LOOKING VERY COOL WEARING THEM. ALTHOUGH THESE ARE A VERY SMALL SIZE, RIGHT? SO I’M SURE THEY WERE A LITTLE PINCHEY.” “[MY BROTHER HAD] LONG HAIR – WELL EVERYBODY HAD LONG HAIR IN THE 60’S AND 70’S. [HE WAS] VERY COOL AND AT THAT POINT TOO MY DAD (BILL NELSON) HAD ACQUIRED A SMALL MGA, BURGUNDY-COLOURED, AND [MY BROTHER] USED TO BOMB AROUND AND GO TO BAND PRACTICE IN THAT. OH YEAH, HE WAS NOTORIOUS,” HINMAN LAUGHED, REMEMBERING. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER BROTHER, HINMAN REPLIED, “MY BROTHER WAS BORN IN 1950. HE WAS JUST A LITTLE OVER SIXTY-FIVE WHEN HE PASSED AWAY. HE WAS AN ACTIVE MUSIC TEACHER AND LOCAL GUITAR TEACHER IN TOWN. YOU COULD SEE HIM BUSKING ON THE STREETS IN FRONT OF THE PENNY COFFEE HOUSE AND IN FRONT OF ESQUIRE’S COFFEE HOUSE. EVERYBODY KNEW HIM. HE USED TO BUSK AT THE FARMER’S MARKET ON FIFTH STREET ON FIRST FRIDAYS. HE PLAYED IN BANDS FOREVER.” “[HE WAS IN A] ROCK’N ROLL BAND. HE WAS IN SO MANY BANDS OVER THE YEARS AND I DON’T KNOW THE NAMES OF THE EARLY BANDS. ONE OF [THE BANDS HE PLAYED WITH] WAS KRANDEL’S KLOUD MACHINE, ONE OF THEM WAS THE SHAMAN, AND THEN HE MOVED TO VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AND PLAYED IN VANCOUVER – UP AND DOWN THE WEST COAST. WHEN HE CAME BACK FROM THE COAST, HE JUST PLAYED EVERYWHERE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH VARIOUS PEOPLE… ANYWAY HE WAS VERY WELL KNOWN IN THE BAND SCENE AND HE HAD A RECORDING STUDIO. THAT WAS A PASSION. HE CALLED HIS RECORDING STUDIO, AARDVARK RECORDINGS. HE HAD HIS FIRST RECORDING STUDIO IN THE BASEMENT OF KRUEGER’S MUSIC, WHERE HE TAUGHT MUSIC FOR BILL KRUEGER. THEN HE MOVED ALL HIS STUFF OVER AND HE WAS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE TRIANON FOR YEARS TEACHING RECORDING AND THEN HE GOT INVOLVED IN TECHNOLOGY, SO HE STARTED FIXING COMPUTERS AND DID COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. HE KIND OF USED TECHNOLOGY IN THE RECORDING STUDIO. HE HAD THIS HUGE SOUND BOARD WITH ALL THE SWITCHES AND WHATEVER AND HE HAD TONS OF LIKE STACKS OF MACHINES [FOR RECORDING],” HINMAN REMEMBERED. “[MY BROTHER] HAD A REPUTATION,” HINMAN WENT ON, “[PEOPLE WOULD SAY TO ME], ‘OH YOUR MURRAY’S SISTER.’ IT WAS GREAT AND ACTUALLY MY HUSBAND WAS BORN IN CARDSTON AND HE HAD A BAND THAT HE USED TO PLAY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH. WE HAVE AN ACTUAL RECORDING FROM THE BASEMENT RECORDING STUDIO AT KRUEGER’S, WHEN [MY BROTHER] RECORDED WITH MY HUSBAND’S BAND. IT WAS GREAT.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE MUSICAL INFLUENCE WITHIN HER FAMILY, HINMAN EXPLAINED, “MY MOM (MARGARET NELSON) WAS A LOCAL MUSIC TEACHER. SHE WAS A PIANO TEACHER. MY DAD’S MOTHER WAS KATE MARQUIS NELSON, WHO WAS A LOCAL PIANO TEACHER SO [WE HAD INFLUENCE] FROM BOTH ENDS. WE ALL GREW UP IN OUR HOUSEHOLD WITH MUSIC. I HAVE A DEGREE IN MUSIC AND I’M A MUSIC TEACHER AND MY YOUNGER BROTHER, MARK, PLAYS CLASSICAL GUITAR. WE HAD MUSIC EVERYWHERE. I HAVE SOME PICTURES AT HOME OF THE THREE KIDS WITH A DRUM SET AND I’M ON THE KEYBOARD AND MURRAY IS PLAYING GUITAR AND, EVEN A PICTURE OF MY MOM SITTING AT THE DRUMS TAKING PART IN THE MERRIMENT IN OUR BASEMENT.” “MY DAD PLAYED IN THE SYMPHONY. IN FACT, MY MOM AND DAD REVIVED THE SYMPHONY IN THE EARLY ‘60S. SO IT WAS JUST NATURAL FOR MURRAY TO [BE MUSICAL]. HE PLAYED EVERYTHING. HE PLAYED BANJO WITH MUSICAL THEATRE ONE YEAR, AND TAUGHT BANJO. HE THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ‘ONLY’ BANJO TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. HE [ALSO] THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ONLY REAL GOOD GUITARIST TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE TOO,” HINMAN LAUGHED. “SO ANYWAY,” SHE CONTINUED, “IT WAS A STRUGGLE FINANCIALLY. MUSIC IS NOT AN EASY, AN EASY PROFESSION TO BE IN, A PERFORMING MUSICIAN. HE QUIT HIGH SCHOOL WHEN HE WAS PROBABLY SIXTEEN, BUT IN HIS MID TO LATE TWENTIES, HE FINISHED HIS DIPLOMA AND HE STARTED NURSING AT THE COLLEGE. HE DID PRETTY WELL [THERE], BUT HE DIDN’T DEAL WELL WITH AUTHORITY, SO HE DIDN’T FINISH IT. BUT [THROUGH THAT HE] GOT A LOT OF GOOD PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE. [AFTERWARDS] PROCEEDED TO PURSUE HIS PASSION, WHICH WAS MUSIC. IN THE LAST FEW YEARS OF HIS LIFE HE FIXED THOSE COMPUTER SIGNS THAT SIT ON THE SIDE OF THE ROAD. HE WOULD FIX THE MOTHER BOARD… HE JUST DID WHAT HE WANTED. HE LIVED IS LIFE HIS WAY.” TO THE QUESTION OF WHY HER GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, RECEIVED THE BOOTS FROM GENERAL JOHN SMITH STEWART, HINMAN ANSWERED, “THE ONLY REASON I CAN THINK OF IS THAT BECAUSE THEY WERE GREAT FRIENDS… [IF GENERAL STEWART PASSED AWAY IN THE 1970S], THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN AFTER MY GRANDFATHER [DIED]. I KNOW THAT THEY WERE INVOLVED IN THE MILITARY STUFF LOCALLY. ELLA STEWART AND MY GRANDMOTHER WERE GREAT FRIENDS. SOMEHOW [THESE BOOTS WERE] JUST PASSED ALONG TO GRANDDAD.” “WHEN MURRAY WAS DIAGNOSED WITH THE CANCER IN JUNE OF 2015, I KNEW THAT THERE WAS SOME ITEMS THAT HE HAD THAT I NEEDED TO RETRIEVE BECAUSE THEY WERE FAMILY HISTORY,” HINMAN REMEMBERED, “[AMONG THOSE TREASURED THINGS WERE] GENERAL STEWART’S BOOTS, SO I RETRIEVED THEM IN JULY… [MURRAY SAID], ‘TAKE THEM. DO WHAT YOU NEED TO DO WITH THEM.’” “[ONE REASON MY BROTHER HELD ON TO THE BOOTS WAS] HE WAS VERY CLOSE TO MY GRANDPARENTS, BECAUSE HE USED TO SPEND A LOT OF TIME OUT AT THE FARM,” HINMAN EXPLAINED, “I THINK THAT HE JUST COULDN’T BRING HIMSELF TO PART WITH THEM, BECAUSE THEY WERE PART OF HIS FAMILY HISTORY. IT WAS A SPECIAL KIND OF THING BECAUSE GRANDDAD HAD ACTUALLY PASSED THEM TO HIM.” MURRAY NELSON’S OBITUARY WAS PUBLISHED ON THE MARTIN BROTHERS FUNERAL CHAPELS WEBSITE. IT STATES, “WILLIAM MURRAY NELSON, AGE 65, PASSED AWAY PEACEFULLY AT THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL HOSPITAL ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2015, AFTER A VALIANT BATTLE WITH CANCER. MUSICIAN, PERFORMER, TEACHER, MENTOR, SOUND GUY, RECORDING GUY, VIDEO GUY, COMPUTER GUY, SIGN GUY; HE WAS A MAN WHO LIVED LIFE HIS WAY, ON HIS TERMS, DOING WHAT HE LOVED.” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON DECEMBER 9, 2015, SHORTLY AFTER THE MUSICIAN’S DEATH STATES THAT AT A LOCAL MUSIC SHOW, PROMINENT LEHTBRIDGE SONGWRITER, LEEROY STAGGER, BEGAN THE SHOW WITH A TRIBUTE TO NELSON. TO FURTHER UNDERSCORE NELSON’S REPUTATION IN THE CITY, A DECEMBER 23, 2015 ARTICLE TITLED, “2015 WAS A MEMORABLE YEAR FOR CITY MUSIC SCENE,” WRITTEN FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD BY RICHARD AMERY STATED, “LETHBRIDGE SAID GOODBYE TO MURRAY NELSON, WHO PASSED AWAY FROM CANCER THIS YEAR. NELSON WAS ONE OF THE SCENE’S MORE PROMINENT PERFORMERS ON STAGE PERFORMING SOLO AND WITH A VARIETY OF BANDS AS WELL AS BUSKING ON THE STREETS ALL OVER LETHBRIDGE…HIS MEMORY WILL LIVE ON IN THE STUDENTS HE TAUGHT AND THE SOULS HE TOUCHED ON STAGE OR JUST CHATTING AT VARIOUS WATER HOLES.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND THE COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REFERENCED.
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20140049006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING"
Date
1979
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
8.5
Length
12
Diameter
8.9
Description
A CREAM-COLOURED CERAMIC MUG. ON ONE SIDE IS THE INSIGNIA OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING, WHICH IS COLOURED YELLOW, GREEN, AND RED. IN THE CENTER OF THE INSIGNIA IS A RED CROSS. THE TEXT READS “GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING, LETHBRIDGE ALTA”, “FESTINA LENTE”, AND “1910-1979”. AROUND THE LIP OF THE MUG RUNS A GOLD RING. THE BOTTOM OF THE MUG READS “DECORATED IN CANADA BY …EMORE CHINA & GLASS” AND “CREEMORE, ONT”. VERY GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT WEAR TO GOLD RIM.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
COMMEMORATIVE
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY, “THIS IS A COFFEE CUP COMMEMORATING THE CLOSING OF THE NURSING SCHOOL. THE ALUMNAE PURCHASED THEM AND SOLD THEM… [THE MUGS] WERE DESIGNED AND MADE IN 1979.” IT CONTINUES, “[THE] GALT GRADS BOUGHT THESE MUGS… [AS] A MEMENTO OF THE CLOSING OF THE SCHOOL.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049006
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"A7 RANCHE 100 ANNIVERSARY"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20140032002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"A7 RANCHE 100 ANNIVERSARY"
Date
1986
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
19.5
Diameter
5.7
Description
BROWN GLASS BEER BOTTLE WITH A LIP FOR A TWIST-OFF CAP (NO CAP). "85" IS IN RAISED LETTERS OF GLASS AT THE BASE OF THE BOTTLE. THERE IS A SEAM VISIBLE DOWN THE CENTER HALVES OF THE BOTTLE WHERE IT HAS BEEN FUSED TOGETHER. CREAM-COLOURED RECTANGULAR LABEL WITH GOLD TRIM PASTED TO ONE SIDE OF THE BOTTLE. LABEL READS "a7" WITHIN A RED DIAGONAL STRIPE RUNNING UP THE WIDTH OF THE LABEL WITH "BEER" PRINTED BELOW. THE BOTTOM OF THE LABEL READS: "BREWED AND BOTTLED IN CARLING O'KEEFE BREWERIES CALGARY, ALBERTA" IN ALTERNATING BLACK AND RED FONT. THERE IS A STAMP THAT STATES "100 YEAR ANNIVERSARY 1886-1986" IN THE UPPER LEFT SECTION OF THE LABEL. CONDITION: SLIGHT WRINKLE VERTICALLY DOWN THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE LABEL. SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE GLASS OF BOTTLE.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
INDUSTRY
History
A NOTE ABOUT THIS BOTTLE WAS WRITTEN BY THE DONOR, FRANK LIGHTBOUND, AND PROVIDED TO THE MUSEUM AT THE TIME OF DONATION STATES: “THE SPECIAL LABEL ON THIS BOTTLE IS ONE OF A FEW HUNDRED PRINTED TO HELP CELEBRATE THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY (1886-1986) OF THE A7 RANCHE (OLD SPELLING), THE SOUTHERN PORTION OF WHICH BORDERS THE OLDMAN RIVER NORTH OF LUNDBRECK IN THE MAYCROFT AREA. THE RANCH WAS ESTABLISHED BY A. E. CROSS OF BIG 4 STAMPEDE FAME AND THE FORMER CALGARY BREWING/MALTING CO. (HORSESHOE AND BUFFALO LABEL). THE RANCH IS STILL OWNED BY THE CROSS FAMILY. THE BEER WAS SERVED DURING THE CELEBRATION BAR-B-Q AND THIS BOTTLE WAS GIVEN TO ME BY VAL DENNIS, SOUTH RANCH FOREMAN AT THE TIME.” ON 22 MARCH 2017, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LIGHTBOUND ABOUT HIS DONATION OF THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATIVE BOTTLE FROM A7 RANCHE BREWERY. THIS BOTTLE COMMEMORATES THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE A7 RANCHE. OF THAT, LIGHTBOUND STATES, “WELL, I MUST HAVE ACQUIRED IT SOON AFTER THAT THEN – IN 1986. IT WASN’T GIVEN TO ME DIRECTLY. I KNEW THE FOREMAN OF THE SOUTHERN BRANCH OF THE A7 RANCHE [VAL DENNIS], AND HE HAD SEVERAL OF THEM, AND HE GAVE ME ONE...THE DENNIS FAMILY HAVE A RANCH ON THE OLD MAN RIVER JUST OUTSIDE THE FOREST RESERVE, WHICH IS ACROSS THE ROAD FROM THE A7 RANCHE.” THE BOTTLE WAS GIVEN TO LIGHTBOUND EMPTY. WHEN ASKED WHY HE WAS COMPELLED TO SAVE IT, LIGHTBOUND REPLIED, “WELL, [IT REPRESENTS] AN INTERESTING PART OF THE COUNTRY. I WAS AT THE GAP RANGER STATION FOR FIVE YEARS AND THE DENNIS FAMILY HAD THE FIRST RANCH EAST OF THE FOREST RESERVE, ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE ROAD, BETWEEN THE ROAD AND THE RIVER. I GOT TO KNOW THE FAMILY BACK AROUND 1965 AND THIS WAS [FROM] 1985. I STILL VISIT WITH THEM AND I HELPED THEM WITH THEIR RANCHING OPERATION...I SAW ALL THE FAMILY GROW UP, ALL THE KIDS GROW UP. VAL WAS ONE. WHEN I FIRST MET HIM, HE WAS A KID IN GRADE SCHOOL, AND NOW I THINK HE’S ABOUT 60 YEARS OLD, AND HE’S NEARING RETIREMENT AS AN RCMP OFFICER. SO A LOT OF YEARS HAVE PASSED. SO, OUT OF THE GOODNESS OF HIS HEART, HE THOUGHT I’D LIKE TO HAVE THAT BOTTLE AND I TOOK IT, AND I HAD IT DISPLAYED—IT WASN’T IN THE LIVING ROOM—BUT IT WAS IN THE CUPBOARD AREA IN THE DINING AREA.” ACCORDING TO THE A7 RANCHE HISTORY PROVIDED ON THEIR WEBSITE (ACCESSED ON 4 MAY 2018), THE RANCH’S FOUNDER – ALFRED ERNEST CROSS – “PICKED THE ‘A7’ BRAND TO SYMBOLIZE HIMSELF AND HIS SIX SIBLINGS. IT IS SAID TO BE THE OLDEST RANCH IN CANADA STILL IN THE HANDS OF THE ORIGINAL OWNERS, RIGHT THROUGH TO PRESENT-DAY OWNER JOHN CROSS.” THE WEBSITE CONTINUES, “A. E. CROSS IS BEST KNOWN FOR BEING ONE OF THE “BIG FOUR” CATTLEMEN WHO FOUNDED THE CALGARY STAMPEDE IN 1912. HOWEVER, HE HAD MANY OTHER BUSINESS, PUBLIC, AND CHARITABLE INTERESTS, LIKE THE CALGARY BREWING AND MALTING COMPANY, OIL AND GAS, AND THE BUDDING MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY. CROSS ALSO SERVED AS THE MLA FOR EAST CALGARY IN THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF THE NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES...” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, A7 HISTORY AND DONOR’S NOTE.
Catalogue Number
P20140032002
Acquisition Date
2014-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
37
Length
36.4
Width
20
Description
A. BUTTON ACCORDION, 37 CM TALL X 36.4 CM LONG X 20 CM WIDE. ACCORDION IS BROWN POLISHED WOOD WITH BLACK AND LIGHT BROWN TRIM; ACCORDION HAS BLACK PLASTIC BELLOWS AND SILVER PLATE OVER THREE ROWS OF WHITE BUTTONS AT SIDE; OPOPSITE END OF ACCORDION HAS FOUR ROWS OF WHITE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS SET IN SILVER PLATE ABOVE BLACK LEATHER STRAP. TOP OF ACCORDION HAS TWO SILVER BASS/TREBLE SWITCHES. BORDERS AROUND BELLOWS HAVE PEAL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID. ACCORDION IS MISSING BUTTON FROM FOURTH ROW OF BUTTONS, AND HAS TWO WOODEN SUBSTITUTE BUTTONS IN SECOND AND FOURTH ROWS. FRONT OF ACCORDION HAS WINDOW ABOVE BELLOWS WITH GLASS PLATE OVER WHITE PAPER AND BLACK TEXT “C. DALLAPE, TRENTO (ITALIA)”. ACCORDION HAS FOUR BRASS FEET ON SIDE WITH FOUR ROWS OF BUTTONS. WOOD IS WORN AT HANDLES AND EDGES; METAL PLATES AND ACCENTS HAVE CORROSION. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BLUE COTTON BAG, 72 CM LONG X 53 CM WIDE. BAG HAS HANDLE ATTACHED TO COVER FLAP; COVER FLAP HAS THREE BUTTON HOLES. BAG HAS TWO BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS ON FRONT ALONG TOP EDGE. BAG HAS PATCHES STITCHED WITH BLACK THREAD ON FRONT UPPER LEFT CORNER, ON BACK IN THE CENTER OF BAG, AND ON THE BACK BESIDE LEFT CORNER OF HANDLE. BAG IS TORN IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER AND FRAYED; BAG IS TORN ALONG LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES AND ON FRONT AT UPPER RIGHT EDGE; BACK HAS TORN HOLES AT BOTTOM. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LESLIE MORTON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A BUTTON ACCORDION. THE ACCORDION WAS OWNED AND PLAYED BY MORTON’S GRANDFATHER, GIUSEPPE (JOSEPH) "FABRO" BRIDAROLLI, AND WAS LATER OWNED BY HER UNCLE, SYLVIO "SYL" BRIDAROLLI, BEFORE BECOMING IN HER POSSESSION. MORTON DISCUSSED HER MEMORIES OF THE ACCORDION IN HER HOME, STATING, “IT’S A BUTTON ACCORDION…THERE’S BUTTON ACCORDIONS AND PIANO ACCORDIONS, AND I PLAY THE PIANO. IF I HAD A PIANO ACCORDION, I COULD AT LEAST PICK OUT THE NOTES BECAUSE I COULD READ THE MUSIC. THIS IS SOMETHING DIFFERENT. YOU HAVE TO BE A REAL MUSICIAN TO PLAY A BUTTON ACCORDION BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY BY EAR. THERE’S THE MELODY SIDE AND THE CHORD SIDE AND YOU JUST DO IT BY EAR. IF YOU LISTEN TO HIS TAPE [IN ARCHIVES]…HE WAS JUST TURNING 81 WHEN HE MADE THIS TAPE AND HE WAS TRYING TO REMEMBER SOME OF THE SONGS HE KNEW. ONE CAME OUT REALLY GOOD AND THEN HE GOT THE MELODY OF SOMETHING. HE WAS PICKING IT OUT AND HE WAS INTO THINGS HE WAS MORE FAMILIAR WITH. HE WAS VERY MUSICAL AND HAD A REAL EAR. IT’S SORT OF LIKE AN IRISH BUTTON ACCORDION BUT NOT QUITE. IT’S BIGGER.” “WHAT I REMEMBER [MY GRANDPARENTS] TELLING ME IS WHEN HE WAS HERE, HE HAD IT MADE FOR HIM IN ITALY AND IT WAS SENT OVER TO CANADA WHEN HE LIVED HERE. I ALSO UNDERSTOOD HE PLAYED IN ITALY BUT THIS ACCORDION WAS MADE FOR HIM THERE AND SENT OVER [IN THE 1920S].” “IT’S A TREASURE. I WOULD SAY OF ALL THE THINGS I FOUND IN MY PARENTS’ HOME AND ALL THE THINGS I’VE HAD TO FIND HOMES FOR, ALL THE THINGS THAT WOULD REMIND ME OF MY CHILDHOOD, THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING. EVER. IT EVOKES REALLY STRONG MEMORIES. THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT MUSIC IN A FAMILY. IF YOU CAN MEET TOGETHER AND YOU CAN SHARE MUSIC, WHICH OUR FAMILY DID, IT LEAVES AN IMPRESSION THAT YOU DON’T EVER FORGET.” “[THE ACCORDION] REALLY WAS FOR MY GRANDFATHER [GIUESEPPE “JOSEPH” BRIDAROLLI]. IT WAS FROM HIM. THAT’S WHERE THE [LOVE OF] MUSIC CAME FROM FOR ALL [MY FAMILY].” “WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL, WE WOULD GO OVER TO [MY GRANDPARENTS’] HOUSE AT 909 - 8TH STREET NORTH, [MY GRANDFATHER] ALWAYS PLAYED. HE’D JUST SIT IN HIS KITCHEN AND HE’D PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. HE WOULD SIT ON A BENCH BY THE BACK DOOR OUTSIDE AND HE WOULD PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. AT CHRISTMAS, MY GRANDPARENTS WOULD COME OVER [TO OUR HOME] AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. MY MOTHER WOULD PLAY THE VIOLIN, MY SISTER THE PIANO. SHE WAS BETTER THAN ME AND WE WOULD ALL SING CAROLS. FOR MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE THE SAME. HE ALWAYS WAS THERE PLAYING HIS ACCORDION. WHEN MY UNCLE AND AUNT CAME TO VISIT, IT WAS THE SAME THING. HE’D PLAY.” ON HER FAMILY’S HISTORY AND CONNECTION TO THE ACCORDION, MORTON ELABORTED, “[MY GRANDFATHER] STOPPED WORKING IN THE MINES IN THE FIFTIES. HE WAS STILL DOING IT IN THE FIFTIES. WHEN THEY CAME OVER FOR SUNDAY DINNER OR WE WENT OVER THERE [MY GRANDFATHER WOULD PLAY]. [WHEN] MY GRANDMOTHER WAS WELL ENOUGH, WE WOULD ALTERNATE [HOMES FOR DINNERS]. THEN WHEN IT GOT HARDER FOR HER [SUNDAY DINNER] WAS ALWAYS IN OUR HOME. I MADE A TAPE WHEN MY PARENTS WENT TO INDIA IN 1971, AND THAT’S WHEN MY UNCLE GOT MARRIED AS WELL. WE CORRESPONDED BY CASSETTE TAPE. THAT SOUNDS VERY ANTIQUATED NOWADAYS. THERE WAS NO EMAIL. PHONES WERE DIFFICULT WHEN YOU TRIED TO PHONE INDIA AND [WE] HAD TO YELL INTO THE PHONE. SO WE DECIDED TO MAKE CASSETTE TAPES…I WENT DOWN SEPTEMBER THE 5TH, 1971…AND I HAD HIM PLAY THE ACCORDION SO THAT I COULD SEND THIS TAPE TO MY PARENTS. [THIS TAPE HAS] HIS VOICE A LITTLE BIT IN THE BACKGROUND AND MINE A TINY BIT BUT IT’S HIS MUSIC THAT’S IMPORTANT. IT WAS SENT OVER TO INDIA FOR THEM AND WE’VE KEPT IT EVER SINCE. HE DIED IN ’72 AND WE PLAYED THAT ACCORDION TAPE A HUNDRED MILLION TIMES. MY UNCLE ALSO HAD ONE OF COURSE. HE WAS ALWAYS PLAYING. MY MOTHER TELLS A STORY, ALTHOUGH IT’S NOT A FAMILY ONE BUT SHE SAID THAT FRIENDS OF HIS, WHEN IT WAS THEIR BIRTHDAY, HE WOULD GO OVER SIT UNDER THEIR WINDOW AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. HE WOULD PLAY AT GATHERINGS OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY. HE PLAYED AT DANCES.” “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN SEPTEMBER 7TH 1890 AND MY GRANDMOTHER [MARIA BERTE] WAS JANUARY 9TH, 1893. THEY WERE FROM CAVENDINE, ITALY, WHICH IS IN THE PROVINCE OF TRENTO AND THAT’S WHERE THIS ACCORDION WAS MANUFACTURED…THEY WERE VERY POOR OVER THERE…I FOUND A PAPER IN THE MIDDLE OF THE FAMILY DOCUMENTS THAT, I DON’T SPEAK ITALIAN, BUT IT LOOKED LIKE A POVERTY DOCUMENT THAT HAS MY GRANDFATHER—HIS FATHER’S NAME ON IT. THEY WERE VERY POOR AND THEY WOULD HAVE COME HERE TO MAKE A BETTER LIFE FOR HIS FAMILY.” “I UNDERSTAND THAT MY GRANDFATHER CAME OVER BY HIMSELF PRIOR TO 1920. HE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE AND SIZED THINGS UP. HE WENT BACK TO ITALY AND GOT MARRIED TO MY GRANDMOTHER IN 1920. MY MOTHER WAS BORN OVER THERE. IT WAS 1924, IN OCTOBER WHEN HE BROUGHT HIS WIFE AND HIS YOUNG DAUGHTER, ANN, OVER. THEY CAME ON A BOAT AND LANDED IN THE MARITIMES, AND THEY MADE THEIR WAY TO LETHBRIDGE. THEY STARTED IN COALHURST FOR A SHORT WHILE…AND THEN THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. MY UNCLE WAS BORN HERE IN 1926.” “I CAN GUESS [MY GRANDPARENTS MOVED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA] BECAUSE [OF] MILLIE LUCIANI—THERE WERE BERTE FAMILIES HERE AND MY GRANDMOTHER WAS A BERTE. MILLIE LUCICANI’S FATHER[WAS A BERTE AND HE WAS A COUSIN OF MY [GRAND]MOTHER] … THERE WAS COMMUNICATION THERE THAT THIS WAS THE PLACE TO COME BECAUSE THEY WERE ALREADY HERE.” “WHEN MY GRANDFATHER DIED IN 1972, I HAD THIS ACCORDION AND THEN, AT A CERTAIN POINT I GAVE IT TO MY UNCLE, HIS SON, SYL. HE HAD IT IN FERNIE THEN IN MERRITT. HE DIED IN 2011 AND MY AUNT SENT IT TO ME. WE TALKED ABOUT LEAVING IT TO THE MUSEUM BUT I DIDN’T WANT TO LET GO OF IT YET. WHAT HAS SPURRED IT ON IS THAT THERE IS NOBODY ELSE TO PASS IT ON TO.” “I WAS GIVEN THIS BECAUSE, WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL I JUST LOVED IT. HE PLAYED AND I LOVED IT. MY UNCLE LOVED IT TOO, HE DIDN’T LIVE HERE AND BECAUSE IT WAS EASY AND MY PARENTS HAD TO LEAVE FOR INDIA, I GOT IT TEMPORARILY. IT DID BELONG MORE TO MY MOM AND MY UNCLE THAN TO ME, BUT I HAD IT FIRST FOR QUITE A WHILE.” “MY SISTER AND I WERE TALKING AND WE THOUGHT, WELL REALLY IT WAS MORE [OUR UNCLE’S] THAN OURS. THAT’S WHY [I GAVE IT TO HIM]. BY GOING TO ME IT WENT TO MY MOM AND SHE WAS THE ELDEST. BUT WHEN MY MOTHER WAS GETTING REALLY SICK AND HE WAS COMING TO VISIT HER AND SHE WASN’T GOING TO LIVE, THEN IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IT GO TO THE NEXT PERSON WHICH REALLY WOULD BE MY UNCLE. WE THOUGHT IT WAS THE RIGHT THING AND HE WAS ENCHANTED. IT WAS REALLY HIS AT THAT POINT.” “I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY IT SO I TRIED, BUT I HAD ARTHRITIS IN MY SHOULDERS SO I COULDN’T. I WOULD TAKE [IT] OUT EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE AND TRY TO PLAY “SILENT NIGHT”. I JUST TOOK IT WHEREVER I WENT AND TRIED TO LOOK AFTER IT.” “IT WOULD BE [ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN MY HOME] AND I’M SURE FOR MY UNCLE TOO. PICTURES ARE REALLY IMPORTANT TO OUR FAMILY AND TO ME. I KNOW TO MY UNCLE SYL AS WELL THIS WOULD BE [IMPORTANT] BECAUSE WE ALL REMEMBERED [MY GRANDFATHER] PLAYING ALL THE TIME. HE NEVER SAT DOWN WITHOUT IT ON HIS LAP. TO MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE EVEN STRONGER BECAUSE, OF COURSE, HE GREW UP WITH HIS FATHER PLAYING THE ACCORDION.” “MY GRANDPARENTS HAD TWO CHILDREN, MY MOTHER ANN, AND HER BROTHER SYL. SYL NEVER HAD ANY CHILDREN, THEY ADOPTED A GIRL ONCE BUT THAT WAS LONG AGO [AND] SHE’S OUT OF THE PICTURE. THERE’S MY AUNT, HIS WIFE, AND THERE’S ME. MY PARENTS HAVE PASSED AWAY AND MY SISTER, LAUREL, PASSED AWAY IN 2009 IN GENEVA. IF SOMETHING HAPPENS TO ME, THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO WAY THIS BRIDAROLLI FAMILY WILL CARRY ON. THE ANDERSON FAMILY [MY FATHER’S FAMILY] THERE WERE EIGHT OF THEM. THERE’S NOBODY ELSE. THERE’S ME AND I FEEL A LITTLE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE IT’S POSSIBLE THAT THE JOSEPH BRIDAROLLI FAMILY IS IN SOME WAY REMEMBERED. MY GRANDFATHER WAS A COAL MINER IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE ALSO WAS A PART OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY AND THEY WEREN’T RICH; THEY WEREN’T POWERFUL. THEY DIDN’T HOLD POSITIONS BUT I THINK THEIR STORY IS VERY IMPORTANT AS IMMIGRANTS FROM ITALY AND I’D LIKE TO TELL THEIR STORY. THAT’S THE REASON I BROUGHT IT. I THINK IT WOULD BE REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IN SOME WAY IT IS PERPETUATED BOTH FOR MY UNCLE AND MY MOTHER AS WELL AS HER PARENTS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180011000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20180010001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
38.9
Length
48.5
Width
31.5
Description
TRANSMITTER RADIO WITH SILVER STEEL FRONT AND METAL MESH BODY. FRONT PANEL HAS METER GAUGE IN UPPER LEFT CORNER WITH BLACK FRAMING AND CLEAR COVER, LABEL ABOVE IN WHITE “EXCITER BUFFER, MULT.—DRIVER GRID” AND BLACK LABEL ON METER “D.C. MILLIAMPERES, STARK, SERIAL MODEL 46”; METER GAUGE IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER HAS BLACK FRAMING AND CLEAR COVER, WITH WHITE LABEL ABOVE “R.F. FINAL, POWER AMPLIFIER PLATE” AND BLACK LABEL ON METER “D.C. MILLIAMPERES, TRIPLET, MODEL 327-T, PATENT 2,346,521, 2,364,724 OTHERS PENDING”. RED PLATE AT TOP EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT “ED REDEKOPP” ABOVE WHITE LABEL “TRANSMITTER, VAR. FREQ. OSC.”; CENTER METER GAUGE FRAMED IN BLACK WITH CLEAR COVER AND BLACK KNOB WITH SILVER TRIM BENEATH, METER HAS BLACK LABEL TEXT “NATIONAL CO. INC, MALDEN, MASS, NATIONAL VELVET VERNIER DIAL, TYPE LCN, PATENT [ILLEGIBLE], J475-3”. FRONT HAS BLACK DIAL WITH SILVER ENGRAVED PLATE AROUND ON LEFT SIDE WITH WHITE LABEL “EXCITATION CONTROL”; DIAL ON RIGHT SIDE HAS BLACK HANDLE AND SILVER ENGRAVED PLATE AROUND WITH WHITE LABEL “P.A. PLATE TUNING”. BOTTOM OF FRONT HAS SIX DIALS WITH GREY KNOBS AND SILVER PLATES AROUND, WITH WHITE LABELS ABOVE READING, LEFT TO RIGHT, “METER SWITCH, DR. PLATE TUNING, V.F.O., TEST—OPERATE C.W. A.M., BAND SWITCH HIGH LOW, ANT. COUPLING”. LOWER LEFT CORNER HAS BLACK DIAL WITH SILVER ENGRAVED PLATE AROUND AND WHITE LABEL ABOVE “DR. GRID TUNING”. BOTTOM CENTER OF FRONT HAS THREE SILVER SWITCHES WITH WHITE LABELS, LEFT TO RIGHT, “FILS./CEF, LOW/OFF, HIGH/OFF”. BACK LOWER EDGE HAS SILVER PLATE WITH THREE BLACK PLUGS-INS AND TWO FITTINGS; LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS WHITE PLASTIC MOUNT WITH FIVE SILVER SCREWS, HANDWRITTEN PENCIL TEXT WRITTEN BESIDE SCREWS ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES, LEFT FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, “GOD, B+, GRID” AND RIGHT “H.COV”. LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS TWO METAL FITTINGS WITH HANDWRITTEN PENCIL TEXT BELOW “KEYER, VFO” AND BRASS KNOB ABOVE. TRANSMITTER SHOWS MINOR SIGN OF WEAR AT BACK; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE RADIO TRANSMITTER, REDEKOPP NOTED, “THE TRANSMITTER HAD TO BE SERVICED REGULARLY…I WOULD SAY PROBABLY ’53 [I BUILT THIS RADIO], MID TO LATE ‘50S.” “I WOULD SAY [I USED THIS] PROBABLY SIX YEARS, GIVE OR TAKE. IT’S SOMETHING THAT I COULD HAVE USED FOR A LONG TIME BUT HAD TO GIVE UP…” “THERE’S SEVERAL DIFFERENT REASONS FOR DIALS. [ONE DIAL] IS FOR TUNING THE PLATE. THERE’S A LIGHTBULB IN THERE THAT YOU THROW ON THAT REDUCES THE AC INPUT VOLTAGE TO A LOW VOLTAGE SO THAT YOU CAN TUNE THE PLATE OUTPUT. IF YOU DON’T GET THAT PLATE OUTPUT TUNED QUICKLY, THAT 813 FINAL TUBE WILL JUST GLOW RED HOT AND MELT AND COLLAPSE. HIGH POWER, HIGH WATTAGE. THAT’S THE KEY. I USUALLY KNOW WHERE IT HAS TO BE, AND THEN IT’LL GIVE ME THE READING [ON A METER]. [ONE DIAL] IS THE FREQUENCY. YOU GOTTA WORK FOUR DIFFERENT BANDS, AND THE CERTAIN FREQUENCIES THAT YOU COVER, YOU GOTTA BE RIGHT IN THERE, DEAD ON. YOU CAN’T BE OUT OF CERTAIN FREQUENCIES THAT ARE GOVERNMENT ALLOCATED FOR AMATEUR RADIO ONLY. EIGHTY METERS STARTS AT 3.5 MEGACYCLES AND YOU GOTTA WORK WITHIN THAT AND UP. IF YOU’RE BELOW OR ABOVE WHAT YOU’RE SUPPOSED TO BE, YOU CAN BE IN BIG TROUBLE.” “THERE’S A TUBE IN THE BOTTOM…YOU CAN’T SEE [IT]. THERE’S A FAN AT THE BOTTOM TO COOL THE THING ’CAUSE IT GETS HOT! THERE’S ALL THESE THINGS TO CONSIDER, BUT THAT’S ALL BEEN TAKEN CARE OF BY THE ENGINEER, AND I DESIGNED IT ACCORDING TO SPECIFICATIONS. THAT 813 IS CAPABLE OF 500 WATTS. IT’S A POWERFUL TUBE; IT’S A BIG BOTTLE. BUT, I DON’T HAVE A…POWER TO DRIVE IT. I’VE GOT OIL FILTER CAPACITORS WHICH ARE ALL WAR SURPLUS. I GOT [THEM] FOR CHEAP AND THEY’RE HIGH VOLTAGE-–HIGHER THAN YOUR STANDARD YOU CAN BUY FOR RADIOS; YOU COULD NEVER USE THEM. EVEN NOW, I DON’T KNOW WHETHER YOU COULD EVER BUY AN OIL FILTER CAPACITOR; THAT WAS ALL WAR SURPLUS STUFF.” “A LOT OF THE STUFF AT THE TIME WAS STILL WAR SURPLUS STUFF. THEY USED TO HAVE WAR SURPLUS STORES. YOU COULD BUY STUFF CHEAP! A DIAL SCALE LIKE [THOSE ON THE TRANSMITTER] OR METERS…YOU [WILL] PAY THE PRICE. THERE WERE SO MANY OTHER THINGS THAT WERE CHEAP. A PERSON TOOK ADVANTAGE OF IT AT THE TIME, BUT THAT’S PASSÉ. THAT’S FINISHED; NO MORE.” “[WHEN YOU’RE DIALING SOMEONE TO TALK] IT GOES THROUGH THE MODULATOR…THROUGH THE TRANSMITTER AND AT THAT FREQUENCY. THEY’LL HEAR YOU AT THAT FREQUENCY. YOU’LL HEAR AMATEUR RADIO STATIONS CALLING TO TALK TO SOMEBODY LIKE, “CQ, CQ” MEANS ‘CALLING,’ AND THEN YOU SIGN YOUR STATION. THESE CALLS, IN CANADA, GO NUMERICALLY. V7S ARE ALL [BRITISH COLUMBIA]; V6S ARE ALBERTANS; V5, SASKATCHEWAN; AND V4 AND SO ON DOWN THE LINE.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010001
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, ALUMINUM
Catalogue Number
P20180010002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, ALUMINUM
No. Pieces
1
Height
22.5
Diameter
12.8
Description
RADIO MICROPHONE FIXED TO BLACK PLASTIC CORD WITH SILVER STEEL FITTINGS. MICROPHONE BASE IS GREY METAL WITH FIXED WOODEN STAND PAINTED GREY. MICROPHONE HAS GREY METAL CASING WITH SILVER GRILL FITTED OVER MICROPHONE; PLATE AT BASE OF MICROPHONE HEAD IS SILVER AND BLACK METAL WITH SILVER TEXT “CANADIAN ASTATIC LIMITED, TORONTO, CANADA, MADE IN CANADA, JT 40, PATENT NOTICE INSIDE”. BLACK CORD IS ATTACHED TO BACK BASE OF MICROPHONE CASING WITH SCREW FITTING. WOODEN STAND HAS PAINT CHIPPED; GREY BASE IS SCUFFED AND STAINED; STEEL FITTING AT END OF CORD IS TARNISHED AND STEEL FITTING SECURED TO MICRORPHONE ON CORD IS CORRODED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE MICROPHONE, REDEKOPP NOTED, “[IT WAS] JUST A CRYSTAL MICROPHONE. CHEAP MICROPHONE. CRYSTALS WERE CHEAP. A DYNAMIC MICROPHONE GETS A LITTLE BIT MORE INVOLVED. THIS IS THE CHEAPEST WAY OF GOING, AND IT’S A HIGH OUTPUT, AND IT’S NOT OF HIGH QUALITY. MICROPHONES-–THE HIGHS ARE A BIT PEAKISH. THERE ARE DIFFERENT LEVELS. IT’S A GOOD MICROPHONE FOR CONVERSATION.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010002
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CODE KEY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180010003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CODE KEY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.5
Length
28.5
Width
10.1
Description
MORSE CODE KEY ATTACHED TO COMPRESSED WOOD BOARD; KEY CODE HAS SILVER UNFINISHED STEEL BODY WITH STEEL FITTINGS AND BAR ATTACHED BLACK METAL KEY. SILVER BAR ATTACHED TO BLACK KEY HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AT BASE “IOF/556”. WOOD BOARD HAS HOLE DRILLED THROUGH ALONG RIGHT EDGE. BOARD HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER IN PENCIL “E.K. REDEKOPP”. BOARD IS STRATCHED ON TOP AND HAS BLACK STAINING BELOW BLACK KEY; BACK OF BOARD HAS STAINING AND DISCOLORATION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE CODE KEY, REDEKOPP NOTED, “LATER ON, I JUST DROPPED [USING THIS] HAND KEY AND WENT TO [THE] DOW KEY.” “MORSE CODE, WE HAD TO LEARN. THAT WAS A MUST. IN AMATEUR RADIO, YOU STARTED WITH IT. YOU DIDN’T START WITH [THE MICROPHONE] AT ALL. IN FACT, IN SECOND CLASS YOU COULDN’T USE A MICROPHONE; YOU HAD TO USE THE KEY ONLY IN MORSE CODE. [THE DOW KEY] IS WHAT I USED BECAUSE MY AWKWARD HAND WOULD NOT HANDLE THAT [HAND KEY]. [IT] DIDN’T WORK VERY WELL FOR ME. I DON’T KNOW HOW ANYONE CAN SEND FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THAT THING AND THAT’S WHAT THEY USE.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010003
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QSL CARD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180010004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QSL CARD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
14
Width
9
Description
WHITE PAPER CARD WITH BLUE IMAGE IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF ALBERTA AND SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA WITH LABELLED CITIES “EDMONTON, CALGARY, LETHBRIDGE, VANCOUVER” AND LETHBRIDGE, SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA SHADED. CARD HAS RED LINES BORDER RUNNING DOWN LEFT SIDE; FRONT OF CARD HAS RED TEXT “LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA, 825-6TH STREET SOUTH, VE6ZS, “THE HEART OF THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY”, RADIO CONFIRMING QSO OF 19, AT P.M., A.M., M.S.T., UR. MC. CW. PHONE, SIGS RST, XMTR, PWR, W.INP. RCVR., QSL. VY 73, EDWARD K. REDEKOPP, OPR”. BACK OF CARD HAS BLUE BLEED IN UPPER LEFT CORNER AND SMALL STAINS; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE QSL CODE, REDEKOPP NOTED, “MY CALL WAS VE6ZS. IT’S ONE OF THE OLDER CALLS-–JUST TWO-LETTER CALLS. LATER ON, THEY RAN OUT OF TWO-LETTER CALLS AND YOU COULD GO INTO THREE-LETTER CALLS…I WAS ONE OF THE EARLY ONES AND IT WAS A NICE, SHORT CALL AND YOU WANT TO KEEP IT. NOW, WHEN YOU FORFEIT IT, SOMEONE ELSE GETS THAT CALL. IT’S BEEN GOING AROUND THE THING MORE THAN ONCE ALREADY. SEVERAL OTHERS HAVE HAD IT SINCE. BUT IF I’D HAVE KEPT MY FEE UP, I WOULD STILL BE VE6ZS.” “[THE CARDS CAN BE MADE AT SHOPS WHERE THEY] PRINT WHATEVER YOU WANT. YOU JUST GIVE [PRINTERS] AN IDEA, AND TELL THEM WHAT YOU WANT ON, ALL THE DETAILS YOU HAVE TO GIVE THEM, AND THEN THEY’LL PRINT [A CARD] UP FOR YOU IN THEIR FANCIFUL WAY, NOT MINE. THEY DID A GOOD JOB. IT’S ACCEPTABLE. BUT IF YOU LOOK AT OTHER ACKNOWLEDGMENT CARDS YOU CAN SEE THAT [IT’S] ABSOLUTELY WILD WHAT SOME PEOPLE HAVE. SOME ARE HILARIOUS; THEY’RE COMICAL. OTHERS ARE DIFFERENT.” “[I WOULDN’T MAIL CARDS OUT] EVERY DAY, NECESSARILY, BUT EVERY WEEK [I WOULD] SEND SOME. THERE’S TWO DIFFERENT WAYS OF SENDING THEM, TOO. PEOPLE WILL SEND TO [A DISTRIBUTOR] LIKE BILL SAVAGE [WHO]…RECEIVED THE CARDS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD AND HE WAS A DISTRIBUTOR OF LETHBRIDGE TO ALL THE AMATEURS WHEN THEY GET THEM IN. YOU’D PICK THEM UP EVERY SO OFTEN. LIKE THE RUSSIANS. THEY WENT TO MOSCOW-–BOX 88, WAS IT? EVERYTHING WENT THROUGH MOSCOW. YOU COULD TALK DIRECTLY TO SOMEBODY BUT YOU NEVER COULD GET A CARD DIRECTLY FROM THEM. ALWAYS THROUGH MOSCOW ’CAUSE MOSCOW CENSORED EVERYTHING.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010004
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"THE RADIO AMATEUR'S HANDBOOK"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180010005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"THE RADIO AMATEUR'S HANDBOOK"
Date
1957
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
4
Height
3.2
Length
24.3
Width
17
Description
A. BOOK, 24.3 CM LONG X 17 CM WIDE X 3.2 CM TALL. BOOK HAS RED COVER AND SILVER TEXT “34TH EDITION, 1957, THE RADIO AMATEUR’S HANDBOOK, THE STANDARD MANUAL OF AMATEUR RADIO COMMUNICATION, $3.50 U.S.A. PROPER, PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE”; COVER HAS SILVER IMAGE OF RADIO TOWER OVER A HOUSE ROOF AND TREES IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER. SPINE HAS SILVER TEXT PRINTED “1957, THE RADIO AMATEUR’S HANDBOOK, THIRTY-FOURTH EDITION”. INSIDE FRONT PAGE HAS TEXT WRITTEN IN PENCIL IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER “E.K. REDEKOPP, 305-7 AVE. A. SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE, OCTOBER 16, 1957”. INSIDE TITLE PAGE HAS BLACK PRINTED TEXT “THE RADIO AMATEUR’S HANDBOOK, BY THE HEADQUARTERS STAFF OF THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE, WEST HARTFORD, CONN., U.S.A.”; BACK OF TITLE PAGE HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED “COPYRIGHT 1957 BY THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE…LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CATALOG CARD NUMER: 41-3345…THE RUMFORD PRESS, CONCORD, NEW HAMPSIRE, U.S.A.”. INSIDEOF BOOK HAS HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON PAGES. SPINE IS DAMAGED AND LIFTING FROM PAGES INSIDE; COVER IS WORN AND SCRATCHED ON FRONT AND SPINE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. PAPER INSERT, 22.2 CM LONG X 10.2 CM WIDE. LIGHT BROWN PAPER WITH BLACK TEXT ON FRONT; FRONT HAS DARK BROWN BORDER ALONG UPPER EDGE WITH LIGHT BROWN TEXT “Q CODES”; BELOW BORDER ON FRONT IS LISTING OF Q CODES IN BLACK INK WITH THEIR DEFINITIONS, INCLUDES “SPECIAL ABBREVIATIONS ADOPTED BY ARRL”. FRONT OF CARD SHOWS 35 CODES PRINTED AND ONE HANDWRITTEN AT TOP IN PENCIL “QRA-WHAT IS THE NAME OF IN ST.? NAME OF THE ST”. CARD HAS PENCIL MARKS MADE BESIDE CERTAIN CODES ON LIFT. BACK OF CARD IS PRINTED WITH BROWN TEXT ON LIGHT BROWN BACKGROUND “SSR” AND THREE BLACK BANNERS ACROSS PAPER WITH LIGHT BROWN TEXT “LESS DISTORTION, MORE TALKING POWER, DECREASAED BANDWIDTH”. CARD IS SEVERELY DISCOLOURED WITH FADING ON BACK; BACK IS CREASED AND HAS TEAR IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER; BACK AND FRONT ARE STAINED; FRONT HAS ADHESIVE STAIN ALONG UPPER EDGE; CARD IS SEVERELY CREASED AT BOTTOM EDGE OF UPPER BROWN BORDER. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. PAPER INSERT, 43.5 CM LONG X 28 CM WIDE. INSERT IS WHITE WITH BLACK TEXT AND IMAGES PRINTED; FRONT HAS HEADER WITH BLACK TEXT “RADIO SUPPLY, HAM NEWS, MCLEOD BUILDING EDMONTON, MARCH 1947, 134-12TH AVENUE W. CALGARY, HAM HEADQUARTERS FOR EQUIPMENT AND INFORMATION”. INSERT FRONT INCLUDES PHOTO AND PRINTED STORIES; INSIDE OF INSERT HAS IMAGES, SPECIFICATIONS, AND PRICES FOR RADIO PARTS AND EQUIPMENT; BACK PAGE HAS IMAGES, SPECIFICATIONS, AND PRICES FOR RADIOS, AND WRITTEN TEXT IN PENCIL UPPER RIGHT CORNER “12, 267 50/56 00/211 50”. PAPER IS FOLDED AND CREASED TWICE ACROSS; PAPER SHOWS SIGNS OF DISCOLORATION ALONG EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. PAPER INSERT, 21.5 CM LONG X 13.4 CM WIDE. PAPER IS BLACK LINED WITH BLUE HAND-DRAWN DIAGRAMS ON FRONT AND TEXT; TEXT IS WRITTEN IN BLUE INK IN CURSIVE, “IF NO TONE OBTAINED WITH KEY CLOSED, [RECEIVE] VALUE OF R8. REDUCE VALUE IF CONSTANT [TOL] IS RECEIVED REGARDLESS OF KEY UP OR DOWN POSITION”. PAPER HAS BLACK PRINTED BORDER AT BOTTOM WITH TEXT “CHRYCO “ALL-MAKE” PARTS…FINEST FOR ALL CARS”. PAPER HAS HOLE PUNCHED IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER. PAPER SHOWS MINOR SIGNS OF DISCOLORATION AROUND EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE INSTRUCTION MANUAL, REDEKOPP NOTED, “I USED TO GET THE AMATEUR RADIO HANDBOOK. THIS IS [AN] AMATEUR RADIO HANDBOOK. IT COMES OUT ANNUALLY, AND ALL THE LATEST TRANSMITTERS AND DEVELOPMENTS, ANTENNAS INCLUDED…[ARE]ALL IN HERE. THE DEVELOPMENTS. I THINK IT’S IN THIS MANUAL THAT THIS TRANSMITTER THE ENGINEER HAD DESIGNED, AND I WAS READING UP ON IT AND I THOUGHT, “MAN, THAT’S A TERRIFIC TRANSMITTER. I LIKE THAT.” IT COVERS ALL THE BANDS THAT I WOULD BE USING: 80, 40, 20, 15 AND 10, AND SO I THOUGHT, “I HAVE TO BUILD THAT THING.” THAT’S WHAT GOT ME GOING ON IT. IT TOOK ME ABOUT FOUR MONTHS TO BUILD IT BECAUSE YOU ONLY DO SO MUCH EVERY DAY, AND YOU [HAVE TO] TEND TO THE FAMILY.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010005
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ANTENNA TUNER
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, COPPER, CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20180010006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ANTENNA TUNER
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
STEEL, COPPER, CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
17
Length
25.5
Width
15.3
Description
HOMEMADE ANTENNA TUNER; GREY, UNFINISHED STEEL BASE WITH TWO COPPER COILS ON TOP SECURED WIT SCREWS AND FOUR WHITE CERAMIC MOUNTS. COILS ARE JOINED TOGETER WITH METAL BAR AT SCREWS IN THE CENTER, AND JOINED BY CLOTH-COVERED WIRE AT SCREWS ON ENDS; CENTER METAL BAR JOINING COILS HAS BLUE PLASTIC COVER WRAPPED AROUND IT. COILS JOINED AT END SCREWS WITH CLOTH-COVERED WIRE TO WHITE METAL MOUNT WITH SILVER METAL DISCS. MOUNT HAS TWO SETS OF NINETEEN DISCS; DISCS ARE SHAPED LIKE HALF-CIRCLES; DISCS ARE JOINED AT TOPS WITH METAL ROD RUNNING THROUGH. TUNER SHOWS SIGNS OF WEAR, AND IS STAINED WITH SOILING; TUNER BASE HAS HOLES PUNCHED IN SIDES AND TOP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE INSTRUCTION MANUAL, REDEKOPP NOTED, “THE ANTENNA IS ALMOST THE KEY TO A SUCCESSFUL STATION. THERE’S TWO THINGS: YOU CAN EITHER GET YOUR RADIO WAVES THROUGH THE ANTENNA, OR YOU CAN HEAT YOUR CONDUCTOR, YOUR TRANSMISSION LINE, IF IT DOESN’T MATCH, TOO.” “YOU HAVE TO HAVE YOUR ANTENNA TUNED. FREQUENCY AND WAVE LENGTH GO TOGETHER AND THEY ARE VERY IMPORTANT. YOU HAVE TO HAVE THIS TUNED TO THE CORRECT FREQUENCY SO IT WILL MATCH THE ANTENNA. IF IT DOESN’T MATCH, YOU’RE JUST [HEATING] YOUR CONDUCTOR AND YOU’RE NOT GETTING ANYWHERE FAR. THAT’S THE KEY. THERE’S WHAT THEY CALL A STANDING WAVE RATIO…IF IT’S TOO HIGH, IT’S JUST HEATING A WIRE AND YOU’RE NOT GETTING [A SIGNAL] OUT. THE NEARER TO ONE-TO-ONE THAT YOU CAN GET–THREE-TO-ONE IS GOOD…NOT IDEAL, BUT GOOD—FOUR-TO-ONE, FIVE-TO-ONE-–FORGET [IT]. YOU’RE JUST HEATING THE WIRE. ANTENNAS [ARE] AMAZING. AS A MATTER OF FACT, IT’S A SCIENCE. ANTENNAS [ARE] A SCIENCE.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010006
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BASKETBALL TEAM PATCH "LCI CLIPPERS"
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1956
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160045001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BASKETBALL TEAM PATCH "LCI CLIPPERS"
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1956
Materials
FELT, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Height
12.7
Length
12.6
Width
0.6
Description
GREEN AND YELLOW CIRCULAR TERRY CLOTH AND FELT PATCH THAT READS "LCI CLIPPERS" IN CURSIVE-STYLE FOLLOWED BY "55 56" ALL IN GREEN CHARACTERS. THE PATCH INCLUDES AN IMAGE OF A BASKETBALL NET MADE WITH YELLOW FELT AND BLACK STITCHING. THE IMAGE AND WORDS ARE SUPPORTED BY A GREEN FELT AND PALE YELLOW FELT BASE. A TERRY CLOTH-LIKE YELLOW FILLS THE CIRCLULAR CENTER OF PATCH. BACK SIDE OF STITCHING VISIBLE. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: FOUR LOOSE THREADS (ONE ON THE BACK OF THE "C" IN "LCi", ONE ON THE TOP CURVE OF PATCH, AND ONE ON THE BOTTOM CURVE OF THE "C" IN "CLIPPERS"; GENERAL DISCOLORATION AND SURFACE DIRT OVERALL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SPORTS
COMMEMORATIVE
History
IN EARLY 2016, LLOYD YAMAGISHI DONATED TWO LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE (L. C. I.) CLIPPERS BADGES TO THE GALT MUSEUM. IN CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE MUSEUM, YAMAGISHI STATED, “I CAME ACROSS THE BADGES A NUMBER OF YEARS AGO WHEN WE MOVED MY NOW DECEASED MOTHER FROM HER HOME TO MARTHA’S HOUSE. I DIDN’T TOSS AWAY THE BADGES THINKING THEY BELONGED TO MY OLDER SISTER, SINCE SHE WAS THE ONLY SIBLING THAT ATTENDED LCI… THE BADGES WERE NOT HERS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO THE BADGES BELONGED TO. THEY READ, “LCI CLIPPERS 55 56” AND “PROV. CHAMPS 1956”. IT IS KNOWN THAT THE CLIPPERS WAS THE GIRLS’ BASKETBALL TEAM FOR LCI. THE 1956 LCI YEARBOOK TITLED “SPOTLITE” READS, “ON APRIL 10TH, THE CLIPPER QUEENS, COACHED BY MARGE CLARK, ENDED A TREMENDOUS BASKETBALL SEASON BY WINNING THE PROVINCIAL “A” GIRLS BASKETBALL CROWN. THE QUEENS RECORDED A LONG STRING OF PLAYOFF VICTORIES. THEY KNOCKED OVER THEIR FIRST VICTIMS, NOBLEFORD, TO GAIN THE LETHBRIDGE NORTHERN BASKETBALL LEAGUE TROPHY AND THE RIGHT TO ENTER THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA PLAYOFFS. THEN THE QUEENS SWAMPED VULCAN, WARNER AND TABER IN RAPID ORDER, RACKING UP SOME OF THE MOST ONE-SIDED SCORES EVER SEEN IN THE SOUTH. THE CENTRAL ALBERTA CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM, LACOMBE, WAS THE NEXT VICTIM TO FALL BEFORE THE QUEENS’ STEADY ATTACK, AS THE NORTHERNERS BOWED OUT IN TWO STRAIGHT GAMES. THE CLIPPER QUEENS THEN RETURNED HOME TO DEFEAT THE CAMROSE COMETS 83-24 AND 75-30 IN A TWO-OUT-OF-THREE SERIES. THIS FEAT CROWNED THEM PROVINCIAL CHAMPS OF 1955-56.” THE YEARBOOK LISTS THE PLAYERS OF THAT YEAR’S TEAM AS FOLLOWS: CAROLE PONECH (CAPTAIN), BEV COWARD (FORWARD, BETTY BEIMLER (FORWARD), BERNICE COWARD (GUARD), MAY LEISHMAN (GUARD), MARIANNE SNOWDON (FORWARD), CAROL LARSON (GUARD), SHIRON ERICKSON (CENTRE), JOYCE GOLIA (GUARD), AND DONALDA POZZI (FORWARD). THE BOOKS STATES THE COACH, MISS MARGE CLARK, WAS IN HER SECOND YEAR AS “THE QUEENS’ MENTOR.” THE TEAM MANAGER THAT YEAR WAS MYRNA VOSBURGH. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE DONOR CORRESPONDENCE. THE LCI 1956 YEARBOOK CITED ABOVE IS HOUSED IN THE GALT ARCHIVES (20001046000).
Catalogue Number
P20160045001
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

75 records – page 1 of 4.