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Other Name
WEDGE CAP, "ANDERSON SISTERS"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, THREAD, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20160044001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WEDGE CAP, "ANDERSON SISTERS"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1970
Materials
FELT, THREAD, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
11
Length
30
Width
1.7
Description
BLACK FELT WEDGE CAP WITH RED ACCENTS STITCHING. TWO RED AND GOLD PLASTIC BEADS ON THE FRONT EDGE. CURSIVE “ANDERSON SISTERS” EMBROIDERED IN RED ON ONE SIDE AND “ALICE” ON THE OTHER. VERY GOOD CONDITION: MAKEUP STAINS PRESENT OF THE INSIDE BRIM OF THE HAT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS WEDGE CAP WAS A COMPONENT OF THE UNIFORM THE SISTERS WORE WHEN THEY PERFORMED AT PLACES SUCH AS ARMY BASES AND DANCE HALLS. THIS CAP BELONGED TO ALICE, THE SECOND YOUNGEST OF THE SISTERS. IN 16 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE: RUTH STATES, “THE HAT WOULD BE AT LEAST FROM 1940 - ’41… ALL OF THE SISTERS HAD [A CAP AND] THEY WERE SPECIAL MADE FOR THEM. ‘ANDERSON SISTERS’ WAS EMBROIDERED ON ONE SIDE AND THEN THEIR NAMES ON THE OTHER. THEY WERE MADE TO GO WITH THESE MILITARY LOOKING DRESSES THAT THEY HAD. THEY TYPICALLY ALWAYS DRESSED ALIKE FOR THE PERFORMANCES. THE HATS WERE MADE TO GO ALONG WITH THEM WHEN THEY WERE DOING PERFORMANCES AT THE MILITARY BASES.” “[THE SISTERS] USUALLY CAME UP WITH [THE UNIFORM] COLLECTIVELY,” RUTH EXPLAINED, “AND THEY WORKED WITH A TAILOR IN TOWN WHO ACTUALLY DID SOME OF THEIR SUITS. THERE MIGHT BE A LABEL THAT I COULD FIND WITH REGARDS TO WHAT THAT COMPANY WAS….THERE WERE USUALLY ALWAYS TAILORS INVOLVED, AND WHEN THEY CAME UP WITH AN IDEA OR CONCEPT, THEY’D HAVE IT DONE AT THE SAME PLACE, BUT I DON’T HAVE THE DETAILS ON THAT.” MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING THIS CAP, WERE KEPT TOGETHER IN ONE OF ALICE’S TRUNKS. WHEN RUTH AND ELEANOR WERE HELPING THEIR MOTHER SORT HER THINGS, SHE EXPLAINED THE ITEMS IN THE TRUNK TO THEM. THE WEDGE CAP CAME TO THE MUSEUM ENCLOSED IN A SHADOW BOX COMPLETE WITH ARTICLE CLIPPINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS, WHICH WAS ASSEMBLED FOR A COMMUNITY DISPLAY. PERMISSION WAS GRANTED BY THE DONOR TO REMOVE THE CAP FROM THE BOX. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR PHOTOGRAPH OF THE BOX. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044001
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"BOY SCOUTS"
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180028001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"BOY SCOUTS"
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
FELT, COTTON, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
20
Width
21.5
Description
GREEN FELT CAP WITH BRIM ON FRONT. CAP HAS GOLD CORD TRIM AROUND EDGE AND ABOVE BRIM, WITH GOLD CORD TRIM STITCHED UP SIDES OF CAP FROM EDGE TO TOP, FORMING SIX SECTIONS. TOP OF CAP HAS GREEN BEAD IN THE CENTER. FRONT OF THE CAP HAS RED EMBROIDERY OF A WOLF FACE WITH BLACK DETAILING ON THE EYES, NOSE, AND CENTERS OF EARS, AND RED EMBROIDERED TEXT “BOY SCOUTS”. FRONT HAS TWO METAL SIX-POINT STARS FIXED ON BOTH SIDES OF EMBROIDERED TEXT. INSIDE OF CAP HAS GREEN COTTON LINING, WITH STITCHED GREEN CIRCLE IN THE CENTER AND WHITE COTTON STRIPE ACROSS STITCHED CIRCLE. INSIDE OF CAP HAS TWO METAL BARS TO FIX STARS TO THE FRONT. LINING FABRIC AROUND METAL BARS IS STAINED BROWN AND RED, AND METAL BARS ARE RUSTED. LINING INSIDE IS DISCOLORED AND FADED; CAP IS FOLDED AT BACK. CAP EXTERIOR IS SOILED AND STAINED BROWN ON BRIM AND SIDES. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON DECEMBER 13, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BILL LINGARD REGARDING HIS DONATION OF BOY SCOUTS AND WOLF CUBS REGALIA. LINGARD WAS A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE WOLF CUB AND BOY SCOUT TROUPES AS A YOUTH. ON THE BOY SCOUTS CAP, LINGARD ELABORATED, “THIS WAS INHERITED FROM WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY [IN 2007]. THAT’S PROBABLY WHERE IT WAS FIRST SO THAT’S ALL I CAN REMEMBER…[THE] LAST TIME I SAW IT…WAS PROBABLY A NUMBER OF YEARS [AGO].” LINGARD RECALLED HIS TIME IN THE BOY SCOUTS AND WOLF CUBS, “YOU HAD TO BE EIGHT YEARS OLD [TO ENROLL IN WOLF CUBS]. THERE MIGHT HAVE BEEN ONE OR TWO OTHER KIDS THAT I KNEW FROM SCHOOL THAT HAD GOTTEN INTERESTED IN IT. I CAN’T REALLY SAY THERE WAS ONE DEFINING MOMENT THAT I [WANTED TO JOIN]-–I OBVIOUSLY TRIED IT OUT AND LIKED IT BECAUSE I WAS IN IT FOR ABOUT 3 YEARS. [I WAS] ABOUT 10 OR 11 WHEN THEY BOOSTED [ME] UP TO BOY SCOUTS BECAUSE I WENT TO SCOUTS AFTER THAT. WHEN I STARTED OUT, I GOT TO BE A SIXER AND THEN I GOT TO BE WHAT WAS CALLED A SENIOR SIXER, THAT’S LIKE A SERGEANT [WHERE] YOU GET THREE STRIPES. I DID [THE] THINGS YOU DID IN CUBS.” “[I REMEMBER] GOING TO MEETINGS, I JUST WALKED. IT WOULD HAVE BEEN [AT] 14TH STREET AND ST. AUGUSTINE’S CHURCH, ON 11TH AND 4TH AVENUE. IT’S A MATTER OF 6 BLOCKS. YOU WALKED EVERYWHERE THEN. I THINK WE HAD A TRUCK [THEN]. THAT’S ABOUT THE FIRST THING I REMEMBER [ABOUT] JOINING, AND I ENJOYED IT. I KNEW VERA SHIRLEY UP UNTIL THE TIME SHE PASSED AWAY, A NICE LADY.” “[WE MET] TUESDAY OR THURSDAY EVENINGS. IT WAS ABOUT 6:30 OR 7, PROBABLY 6:30 TILL ABOUT 7:30. I REMEMBER IN THE SUMMER TIME WE GENERALLY MET OUTSIDE A LOT ON THE FRONT LAWN OF THE MANSE AT ST. AUGUSTINE’S CHURCH WHICH IS WHERE THE NEW CHURCH SITS. THAT WAS FRONT LAWN THEN AND WE USED TO MEET OUTSIDE A LOT. IN THE WINTER IT WAS DOWN IN THE BASEMENT IN THE CHURCH AND WE USED TO DO [A] CERTAIN AMOUNT OF ACTIVITIES OVER IN THE RCMP GROUNDS.” “WE PROBABLY PLAYED GAMES. IT SEEMS AT A CUBS' MEETING WE HAD AN OPENING AND THEN WE DID…TYING KNOTS. I THINK THERE WERE A CERTAIN NUMBER OF CUB-LIKE ACTIVITIES, TEACHING YOU HOW TO FOLLOW DIRECTIONS AND STUFF LIKE THAT. THERE WAS USUALLY TIME TO BURN OFF A BIT OF ENERGY AND A CLOSING THING. I CAN IMAGINE THAT CUB MEETINGS WERE ABOUT AN HOUR AT THAT AGE. IT SEEMED LIKE A LONG TIME THEN BUT THAT’S PROBABLY [ALL] IT WAS.” “[WE NEVER LEFT THE CITY] WITH CUBS. IN SCOUTS, I WENT TO CAMP ONCE BUT CUBS WAS IN TOWN…IN SCOUTS, THEY HAD A FATHER AND SON BANQUET ONCE A YEAR…IT WAS JUST RIGHT AFTER THE WAR AND THERE WEREN’T A WHOLE LOT OF THINGS THAT WE DID, THAT WERE EXTRACURRICULAR…THAT REQUIRED TRANSPORTATION AND MOVING AROUND A LOT. WE HAD BADGES.” “I’M SURE THERE WERE TROUPES ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE CITY. PROBABLY AT THE CATHOLIC CHURCH AND PROBABLY AT THE MORMON CHURCH. WHEN I WENT TO SCOUTS, THE SCOUT TROUPE WAS AT SOUTHMINSTER CHURCH BUT I DON’T THINK THEY HAD CUBS AT SOUTHMINSTER. IT WAS AT ST. AUGUSTINE’S. I DON’T THINK THERE WERE THAT MANY CUB TROUPES BECAUSE THERE WERE ONLY ABOUT 15,000 PEOPLE IN LETHBRIDGE RIGHT AFTER THE WAR SO IT WASN’T THAT BIG OF A PLACE…WE WERE NUMBER 4 SO MAYBE THERE WERE 4 OR 5.” “SCOUTS WAS [THE] ADOLESCENT—PRETTY SOON [I WAS] LESS INTERESTED IN SCOUTS AND MORE INTERESTED IN GIRLS. I ENJOYED CUBS VERY MUCH AND VERA SHIRLEY WAS CERTAINLY A VERY POSITIVE PERSON. I WOULD SAY THAT THE OVERALL EFFECT, WHICH I DIDN’T REALLY REALIZE AT THE TIME, SINCE THEN THROUGHOUT MY LIFE, I HAVE BELONGED TO A LOT OF THINGS AND HAVE ENJOYED THEM. I THINK THAT [IT] PROBABLY HELPED TO [INFLUENCE] THAT FROM KIND OF A SHY KID TO BEING ABLE TO DO OTHER THINGS. I FEEL THAT THE CUB EXPERIENCE THERE WITH THAT GROUP OF PEOPLE…WAS POSITIVE.” “ONCE I GOT INTO JUNIOR HIGH AND THEN EVEN TOWARD HIGH SCHOOL THEN IT WAS CURLING AND THINGS LIKE THAT I WAS GETTING INTERESTED IN…I’M NOT SURE THAT I EVEN GOT ANY BADGES IN SCOUTS.” LINGARD EXPRESSED HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE CAP AND JACKET, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING. I DON’T THINK WE EVEN KNEW THIS EXISTED TWO YEARS AGO, IT WAS PUT AWAY SOMEWHERE. IT WAS [TIME TO DECIDE] WHAT TO DO WITH THIS. WE DIDN’T REQUIRE IT ANYMORE SO I THOUGHT I WOULD CHECK WITH [THE MUSEUM] BEFORE IT WENT ELSEWHERE.” “I’D SAY IT’S VALUED BUT IT WAS A MATTER [OF] ONE DAY THIS IS GOING TO GO. IF IT HAS SOME VALUE [I’D LIKE TO SEE] THAT IT GOES SOMEWHERE WHERE IT CAN BE APPRECIATED, WHERE IT BRINGS BACK SOME MEMORIES.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180028001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180028001
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1957
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, VINYL, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170005002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1957
Materials
FABRIC, VINYL, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.5
Length
25.5
Diameter
19.5
Description
BLACK CONDUCTOR’S HAT WITH GOLD ACCENTS; BLACK VINYL BRIM WITH GREEN COLOURED FABRIC ON BOTTOM; TWO PARALLEL GOLD-COLOURED BANDS STITCHED ONTO HAT; “CPR CONDUCTOR” IS STITCHED ONTO FRONT OF HAT IN A BRONZE-COLOURED THREAD; TWO BLACK EYELETS LOCATED ON BOTH SIDES OF THE HAT. INSIDE IS LINED WITH GREY FABRIC. INSIDE TAG READS "4 - SCULLY 7 1/8 MONTREAL" PRINTED IN BLACK INK. THE "4" HAS BEEN CROSSED OUT AND "5" HAS BEEN WRITTEN BY HAND BOTH IN BLUE INK. TAN LEATHER RIM AROUND THE INSIDE CIRCUMFERENCE OF HAT. GOOD CONDITION: WHITE BAND INSIDE OF HAT BRIM IS STAINED GREY; PIECES OF YELLOWED PAPER ARE STUCK INTO BOTH SIDES OF THE HAT; CIRCULAR-SHAPED INDENT IS PRESENT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TOP OF THE HAT. SEVERE WEAR/STAIN IN CENTER OF THE INSIDE OF HAT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
THIS CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (CPR) CONDUCTOR CAP BELONGED TO JAMES (JIM) FRANCES LOGAN, WHO WORKED FOR THE CPR IN LETHBRIDGE FOR FORTY-FOUR YEARS FOLLOWING WORLD WAR I. IN A PHONE CALL THAT TOOK PLACE ON JULY 16, 2018 BETWEEN LOGAN'S GRANDSON, CALVIN LOGAN AND GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CALVIN LOGAN STATED HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED FOR CPR FROM 1913 TO 1957. ON MARCH 9, 2017 MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CALVIN LOGAN, WHO HAD POSSESSION OF THE CAP AT THE TIME OF DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “MY FATHER (DENZIL LOGAN) GAVE ME THIS HAT PROBABLY FIFTEEN YEARS AGO. IT CAME FROM HIS FATHER, JAMES FRANCES LOGAN… MY DAD FELT IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT I HAVE SOMETHING, A KEEPSAKE, OF MY GRANDFATHER’S AND WITH THAT, I’VE ALWAYS ADMIRED [THE CAP]. I REMEMBER IT IN MY FATHER’S POSSESSION, IN HIS HOUSE. [THE CAP WAS] ON A SHELF IN HIS STUDY." "MY GRANDFATHER LIVED HERE SINCE THE EARLY 1900’S AND MY DAD WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1926, SO THIS HAT KIND OF HAS A REAL SIGNIFICANCE FOR ME IN LETHBRIDGE," LOGAN EXPLAINED, "MY GRANDFATHER WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE WORKED FOR THE CPR FOR WELL OVER FORTY YEARS AND WAS VERY PROUD OF HIS POSITION AND ROLE IN THE CPR." “I WOULD BE OVER AT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HOME; GRANDMA WOULD THERE AND [GRANDPA] WOULD BE ON THE ROAD,” LOGAN SAID AS HE RECALLED HIS EARLIEST MEMORIES OF HIS GRANDFATHER AND THE CPR, “HE ALSO WOULD ALWAYS BE WEARING OVERALLS AND I AM STILL A PERSON THAT LOVES TO WEAR OVERALLS TOO. THE FIRST PAIR OF OVERALLS [I HAD] WHEN I GOT TO BE OLDER WERE FROM MY GRANDFATHER. THEY WERE BLUE AND WHITE STRIPED OVERALLS. HE HAD LOTS OF PAIRS OF THEM FROM HIS DAYS AT THE CPR. I HAVE INHERITED THAT KIND OF TRADITION FROM MY GRANDFATHER, I GUESS.” “MY OTHER MEMORY [WOULD BE] WHEN I GOT TO BE PROBABLY SEVEN OR EIGHT WHEN [CPR] OFFERED OUR FAMILY TO RIDE THE LAST ACTUAL PASSENGER TRAIN THAT RAN FROM LETHBRIDGE TO CALGARY. THE IMMEDIATE FAMILY MEMBERS OF MY GRANDFATHER WERE INVITED TO JOIN HIM ON THE TRAIN. WE GOT TO RIDE FROM LETHBRIDGE, OVER THE HIGH LEVEL BRIDGE, TO CALGARY AND BACK AGAIN… THAT IS THE ONLY TRIP AS A KID THAT I DO REMEMBER." "ANOTHER ONE OF MY MEMORIES," LOGAN CONTINUED, "IS OF THE TRAIN THAT THEY HAD AT GALT GARDENS. I WOULD IMAGINE MYSELF AS A CONDUCTOR AND BACK THEN YOU COULD GO RIGHT INSIDE THE TRAIN. ONE MINUTE I WAS THE ENGINEER AND THE NEXT MINUTE I WAS THE CONDUCTOR. I WAS TRYING TO IMAGINE MYSELF AS A TRAIN PERSON AND WORKING WITH THE ENGINES SO LARGE AND JUST HOW COOL IT WOULD BE AS A KID GROWING UP THINKING OF MYSELF WORKING ON THESE BIG HUGE STEAM ENGINE TRAINS." "[WHEN I WAS YOUNG], I WANTED TO SEE WHERE [MY GRANDFATHER] WAS WORKING AND WHAT HE DID, BUT OFTEN TIMES IT WAS VERY DIFFICULT TO DO THAT BECAUSE OF THE TYPE OF JOB HE HAD. MY LAST MEMORIES OF THE RUN THAT HE HAD WERE FROM WHEN HE WORKED AS A CONDUCTOR IN THE REGULAR RUN FROM LETHBRIDGE TO YAK AND THEN IT WAS A RETURN TRIP FROM YAK TO LETHBRIDGE. THAT WAS THE LAST ROUTE HE WAS RUNNING BEFORE HE RETIRED,” LOGAN RECALLED. “I’D ALWAYS FELT A CONNECTION [TO TRAINS],” LOGAN CONTINUED, “NOT ONLY THROUGH MY GRANDFATHER, BUT ALSO THROUGH MY FATHER. A GREAT DEAL OF LIVESTOCK WAS HAULED IN THOSE DAYS THROUGH TRAIN AND FOR MANY OF THE PUBLIC YARDS ACROSS CANADA, TRAINS WERE THEIR WAY OF SHIPPING CATTLE TO DIFFERENT AREAS FOR PROCESSING. EVERY DAY OF [MY DAD’S] WORK WAS LOADING BOXCARS WITH CATTLE. I WAS AROUND THE YARDS PROBABLY MORE THAN MOST KIDS, BECAUSE MY DAD ON A SATURDAY OR SUNDAY WOULD HAVE TO STOP IN AT THE YARDS. I WOULD ALWAYS BE THE FIRST ONE IN THE CAR TO COME WITH HIM, I SAW MANY A CATTLE LOADED UP INTO THE BOXCARS. MY CLEARER MEMORIES [OF THE RAILWAY YARDS] WERE MORE SO OF MY FATHER’S CONNECTION WITH THE RAILWAY. [I ALSO REMEMBER] THERE WERE TIMES WHEN THERE WERE TRAIN ACCIDENTS [MY FATHER WOULD BE] CALLED OUT.” LOGAN WENT ON TO DESCRIBE HIS GRANDFATHER’S HISTORY, “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN IN POTSDAM, NEW YORK. [AROUND THAT TIME] THERE WAS A LOT OF OPPORTUNITY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I THINK THE REASON MY GRANDFATHER ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE WAS BECAUSE HIS FATHER HAD ACQUIRED LAND HERE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA… [MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER] OWNED QUITE A NUMBER OF ACRES IN THAT AREA OF LETHBRIDGE. SO AS FAR AS THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF HOW THEY ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T REALLY KNOW THAT PART OF IT, BUT I DO KNOW THAT MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER DID OWN A FARM AND IT WAS A PART OF THE FAIRWAY PLAZA AREA TODAY.” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE APRIL 6TH, 1944 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD LISTED JAMES LOGAN JR. AS ONE OF THE EIGHT REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE CRANBROOK SECTION OF C.P.R. EMPLOYEES (FROM THE TERRITORY COVERING CROW’S NEST TO CRESTON) TO ATTEND A PROVINCIAL C. P. R. MEETING ABOUT VICTORY BOND SALE METHODS IN VANCOUVER. JAMES FRANCIS LOGAN’S OBITUARY WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1983. IT READS: “LOGAN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MAY 8TH, 1983 AT THE AGE OF 90 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. DOROTHY LOGAN… MR. LOGAN WAS BORN MAY 9TH, 1892 AT OGDENSBURG, NEW YORK AND CAME TO CANADA AND LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, WHERE HE FIRST WORKED IN THE MINES. HE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE 20TH BATTERY FROM 1914 TO 1918 AND WAS THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF 25TH CANADIAN FIELD ARTILLERY. HE WORKED FOR THE C. P. R. FOR 44 YEARS AND AT THE TIME OF HIS RETIREMENT WAS A CONDUCTOR.” FOR INFORMATION ABOUT J. F. LOGAN’S EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR I, PLEASE SEE ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 19861018001. PLEASE REFERENCE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD CLIPPINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20170005002
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail