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Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
37
Length
36.4
Width
20
Description
A. BUTTON ACCORDION, 37 CM TALL X 36.4 CM LONG X 20 CM WIDE. ACCORDION IS BROWN POLISHED WOOD WITH BLACK AND LIGHT BROWN TRIM; ACCORDION HAS BLACK PLASTIC BELLOWS AND SILVER PLATE OVER THREE ROWS OF WHITE BUTTONS AT SIDE; OPOPSITE END OF ACCORDION HAS FOUR ROWS OF WHITE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS SET IN SILVER PLATE ABOVE BLACK LEATHER STRAP. TOP OF ACCORDION HAS TWO SILVER BASS/TREBLE SWITCHES. BORDERS AROUND BELLOWS HAVE PEAL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID. ACCORDION IS MISSING BUTTON FROM FOURTH ROW OF BUTTONS, AND HAS TWO WOODEN SUBSTITUTE BUTTONS IN SECOND AND FOURTH ROWS. FRONT OF ACCORDION HAS WINDOW ABOVE BELLOWS WITH GLASS PLATE OVER WHITE PAPER AND BLACK TEXT “C. DALLAPE, TRENTO (ITALIA)”. ACCORDION HAS FOUR BRASS FEET ON SIDE WITH FOUR ROWS OF BUTTONS. WOOD IS WORN AT HANDLES AND EDGES; METAL PLATES AND ACCENTS HAVE CORROSION. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BLUE COTTON BAG, 72 CM LONG X 53 CM WIDE. BAG HAS HANDLE ATTACHED TO COVER FLAP; COVER FLAP HAS THREE BUTTON HOLES. BAG HAS TWO BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS ON FRONT ALONG TOP EDGE. BAG HAS PATCHES STITCHED WITH BLACK THREAD ON FRONT UPPER LEFT CORNER, ON BACK IN THE CENTER OF BAG, AND ON THE BACK BESIDE LEFT CORNER OF HANDLE. BAG IS TORN IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER AND FRAYED; BAG IS TORN ALONG LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES AND ON FRONT AT UPPER RIGHT EDGE; BACK HAS TORN HOLES AT BOTTOM. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LESLIE MORTON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A BUTTON ACCORDION. THE ACCORDION WAS OWNED AND PLAYED BY MORTON’S GRANDFATHER, GIUSEPPE (JOSEPH) "FABRO" BRIDAROLLI, AND WAS LATER OWNED BY HER UNCLE, SYLVIO "SYL" BRIDAROLLI, BEFORE BECOMING IN HER POSSESSION. MORTON DISCUSSED HER MEMORIES OF THE ACCORDION IN HER HOME, STATING, “IT’S A BUTTON ACCORDION…THERE’S BUTTON ACCORDIONS AND PIANO ACCORDIONS, AND I PLAY THE PIANO. IF I HAD A PIANO ACCORDION, I COULD AT LEAST PICK OUT THE NOTES BECAUSE I COULD READ THE MUSIC. THIS IS SOMETHING DIFFERENT. YOU HAVE TO BE A REAL MUSICIAN TO PLAY A BUTTON ACCORDION BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY BY EAR. THERE’S THE MELODY SIDE AND THE CHORD SIDE AND YOU JUST DO IT BY EAR. IF YOU LISTEN TO HIS TAPE [IN ARCHIVES]…HE WAS JUST TURNING 81 WHEN HE MADE THIS TAPE AND HE WAS TRYING TO REMEMBER SOME OF THE SONGS HE KNEW. ONE CAME OUT REALLY GOOD AND THEN HE GOT THE MELODY OF SOMETHING. HE WAS PICKING IT OUT AND HE WAS INTO THINGS HE WAS MORE FAMILIAR WITH. HE WAS VERY MUSICAL AND HAD A REAL EAR. IT’S SORT OF LIKE AN IRISH BUTTON ACCORDION BUT NOT QUITE. IT’S BIGGER.” “WHAT I REMEMBER [MY GRANDPARENTS] TELLING ME IS WHEN HE WAS HERE, HE HAD IT MADE FOR HIM IN ITALY AND IT WAS SENT OVER TO CANADA WHEN HE LIVED HERE. I ALSO UNDERSTOOD HE PLAYED IN ITALY BUT THIS ACCORDION WAS MADE FOR HIM THERE AND SENT OVER [IN THE 1920S].” “IT’S A TREASURE. I WOULD SAY OF ALL THE THINGS I FOUND IN MY PARENTS’ HOME AND ALL THE THINGS I’VE HAD TO FIND HOMES FOR, ALL THE THINGS THAT WOULD REMIND ME OF MY CHILDHOOD, THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING. EVER. IT EVOKES REALLY STRONG MEMORIES. THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT MUSIC IN A FAMILY. IF YOU CAN MEET TOGETHER AND YOU CAN SHARE MUSIC, WHICH OUR FAMILY DID, IT LEAVES AN IMPRESSION THAT YOU DON’T EVER FORGET.” “[THE ACCORDION] REALLY WAS FOR MY GRANDFATHER [GIUESEPPE “JOSEPH” BRIDAROLLI]. IT WAS FROM HIM. THAT’S WHERE THE [LOVE OF] MUSIC CAME FROM FOR ALL [MY FAMILY].” “WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL, WE WOULD GO OVER TO [MY GRANDPARENTS’] HOUSE AT 909 - 8TH STREET NORTH, [MY GRANDFATHER] ALWAYS PLAYED. HE’D JUST SIT IN HIS KITCHEN AND HE’D PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. HE WOULD SIT ON A BENCH BY THE BACK DOOR OUTSIDE AND HE WOULD PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. AT CHRISTMAS, MY GRANDPARENTS WOULD COME OVER [TO OUR HOME] AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. MY MOTHER WOULD PLAY THE VIOLIN, MY SISTER THE PIANO. SHE WAS BETTER THAN ME AND WE WOULD ALL SING CAROLS. FOR MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE THE SAME. HE ALWAYS WAS THERE PLAYING HIS ACCORDION. WHEN MY UNCLE AND AUNT CAME TO VISIT, IT WAS THE SAME THING. HE’D PLAY.” ON HER FAMILY’S HISTORY AND CONNECTION TO THE ACCORDION, MORTON ELABORTED, “[MY GRANDFATHER] STOPPED WORKING IN THE MINES IN THE FIFTIES. HE WAS STILL DOING IT IN THE FIFTIES. WHEN THEY CAME OVER FOR SUNDAY DINNER OR WE WENT OVER THERE [MY GRANDFATHER WOULD PLAY]. [WHEN] MY GRANDMOTHER WAS WELL ENOUGH, WE WOULD ALTERNATE [HOMES FOR DINNERS]. THEN WHEN IT GOT HARDER FOR HER [SUNDAY DINNER] WAS ALWAYS IN OUR HOME. I MADE A TAPE WHEN MY PARENTS WENT TO INDIA IN 1971, AND THAT’S WHEN MY UNCLE GOT MARRIED AS WELL. WE CORRESPONDED BY CASSETTE TAPE. THAT SOUNDS VERY ANTIQUATED NOWADAYS. THERE WAS NO EMAIL. PHONES WERE DIFFICULT WHEN YOU TRIED TO PHONE INDIA AND [WE] HAD TO YELL INTO THE PHONE. SO WE DECIDED TO MAKE CASSETTE TAPES…I WENT DOWN SEPTEMBER THE 5TH, 1971…AND I HAD HIM PLAY THE ACCORDION SO THAT I COULD SEND THIS TAPE TO MY PARENTS. [THIS TAPE HAS] HIS VOICE A LITTLE BIT IN THE BACKGROUND AND MINE A TINY BIT BUT IT’S HIS MUSIC THAT’S IMPORTANT. IT WAS SENT OVER TO INDIA FOR THEM AND WE’VE KEPT IT EVER SINCE. HE DIED IN ’72 AND WE PLAYED THAT ACCORDION TAPE A HUNDRED MILLION TIMES. MY UNCLE ALSO HAD ONE OF COURSE. HE WAS ALWAYS PLAYING. MY MOTHER TELLS A STORY, ALTHOUGH IT’S NOT A FAMILY ONE BUT SHE SAID THAT FRIENDS OF HIS, WHEN IT WAS THEIR BIRTHDAY, HE WOULD GO OVER SIT UNDER THEIR WINDOW AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. HE WOULD PLAY AT GATHERINGS OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY. HE PLAYED AT DANCES.” “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN SEPTEMBER 7TH 1890 AND MY GRANDMOTHER [MARIA BERTE] WAS JANUARY 9TH, 1893. THEY WERE FROM CAVENDINE, ITALY, WHICH IS IN THE PROVINCE OF TRENTO AND THAT’S WHERE THIS ACCORDION WAS MANUFACTURED…THEY WERE VERY POOR OVER THERE…I FOUND A PAPER IN THE MIDDLE OF THE FAMILY DOCUMENTS THAT, I DON’T SPEAK ITALIAN, BUT IT LOOKED LIKE A POVERTY DOCUMENT THAT HAS MY GRANDFATHER—HIS FATHER’S NAME ON IT. THEY WERE VERY POOR AND THEY WOULD HAVE COME HERE TO MAKE A BETTER LIFE FOR HIS FAMILY.” “I UNDERSTAND THAT MY GRANDFATHER CAME OVER BY HIMSELF PRIOR TO 1920. HE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE AND SIZED THINGS UP. HE WENT BACK TO ITALY AND GOT MARRIED TO MY GRANDMOTHER IN 1920. MY MOTHER WAS BORN OVER THERE. IT WAS 1924, IN OCTOBER WHEN HE BROUGHT HIS WIFE AND HIS YOUNG DAUGHTER, ANN, OVER. THEY CAME ON A BOAT AND LANDED IN THE MARITIMES, AND THEY MADE THEIR WAY TO LETHBRIDGE. THEY STARTED IN COALHURST FOR A SHORT WHILE…AND THEN THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. MY UNCLE WAS BORN HERE IN 1926.” “I CAN GUESS [MY GRANDPARENTS MOVED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA] BECAUSE [OF] MILLIE LUCIANI—THERE WERE BERTE FAMILIES HERE AND MY GRANDMOTHER WAS A BERTE. MILLIE LUCICANI’S FATHER[WAS A BERTE AND HE WAS A COUSIN OF MY [GRAND]MOTHER] … THERE WAS COMMUNICATION THERE THAT THIS WAS THE PLACE TO COME BECAUSE THEY WERE ALREADY HERE.” “WHEN MY GRANDFATHER DIED IN 1972, I HAD THIS ACCORDION AND THEN, AT A CERTAIN POINT I GAVE IT TO MY UNCLE, HIS SON, SYL. HE HAD IT IN FERNIE THEN IN MERRITT. HE DIED IN 2011 AND MY AUNT SENT IT TO ME. WE TALKED ABOUT LEAVING IT TO THE MUSEUM BUT I DIDN’T WANT TO LET GO OF IT YET. WHAT HAS SPURRED IT ON IS THAT THERE IS NOBODY ELSE TO PASS IT ON TO.” “I WAS GIVEN THIS BECAUSE, WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL I JUST LOVED IT. HE PLAYED AND I LOVED IT. MY UNCLE LOVED IT TOO, HE DIDN’T LIVE HERE AND BECAUSE IT WAS EASY AND MY PARENTS HAD TO LEAVE FOR INDIA, I GOT IT TEMPORARILY. IT DID BELONG MORE TO MY MOM AND MY UNCLE THAN TO ME, BUT I HAD IT FIRST FOR QUITE A WHILE.” “MY SISTER AND I WERE TALKING AND WE THOUGHT, WELL REALLY IT WAS MORE [OUR UNCLE’S] THAN OURS. THAT’S WHY [I GAVE IT TO HIM]. BY GOING TO ME IT WENT TO MY MOM AND SHE WAS THE ELDEST. BUT WHEN MY MOTHER WAS GETTING REALLY SICK AND HE WAS COMING TO VISIT HER AND SHE WASN’T GOING TO LIVE, THEN IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IT GO TO THE NEXT PERSON WHICH REALLY WOULD BE MY UNCLE. WE THOUGHT IT WAS THE RIGHT THING AND HE WAS ENCHANTED. IT WAS REALLY HIS AT THAT POINT.” “I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY IT SO I TRIED, BUT I HAD ARTHRITIS IN MY SHOULDERS SO I COULDN’T. I WOULD TAKE [IT] OUT EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE AND TRY TO PLAY “SILENT NIGHT”. I JUST TOOK IT WHEREVER I WENT AND TRIED TO LOOK AFTER IT.” “IT WOULD BE [ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN MY HOME] AND I’M SURE FOR MY UNCLE TOO. PICTURES ARE REALLY IMPORTANT TO OUR FAMILY AND TO ME. I KNOW TO MY UNCLE SYL AS WELL THIS WOULD BE [IMPORTANT] BECAUSE WE ALL REMEMBERED [MY GRANDFATHER] PLAYING ALL THE TIME. HE NEVER SAT DOWN WITHOUT IT ON HIS LAP. TO MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE EVEN STRONGER BECAUSE, OF COURSE, HE GREW UP WITH HIS FATHER PLAYING THE ACCORDION.” “MY GRANDPARENTS HAD TWO CHILDREN, MY MOTHER ANN, AND HER BROTHER SYL. SYL NEVER HAD ANY CHILDREN, THEY ADOPTED A GIRL ONCE BUT THAT WAS LONG AGO [AND] SHE’S OUT OF THE PICTURE. THERE’S MY AUNT, HIS WIFE, AND THERE’S ME. MY PARENTS HAVE PASSED AWAY AND MY SISTER, LAUREL, PASSED AWAY IN 2009 IN GENEVA. IF SOMETHING HAPPENS TO ME, THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO WAY THIS BRIDAROLLI FAMILY WILL CARRY ON. THE ANDERSON FAMILY [MY FATHER’S FAMILY] THERE WERE EIGHT OF THEM. THERE’S NOBODY ELSE. THERE’S ME AND I FEEL A LITTLE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE IT’S POSSIBLE THAT THE JOSEPH BRIDAROLLI FAMILY IS IN SOME WAY REMEMBERED. MY GRANDFATHER WAS A COAL MINER IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE ALSO WAS A PART OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY AND THEY WEREN’T RICH; THEY WEREN’T POWERFUL. THEY DIDN’T HOLD POSITIONS BUT I THINK THEIR STORY IS VERY IMPORTANT AS IMMIGRANTS FROM ITALY AND I’D LIKE TO TELL THEIR STORY. THAT’S THE REASON I BROUGHT IT. I THINK IT WOULD BE REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IN SOME WAY IT IS PERPETUATED BOTH FOR MY UNCLE AND MY MOTHER AS WELL AS HER PARENTS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180011000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WWII ARTILLERY CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20160038001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WWII ARTILLERY CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
BRASS
No. Pieces
2
Height
4.9
Length
7
Description
A: BRASS SECOND WORLD WAR ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY CAP BADGE. BADGE DEPICTS THE ARTILLERY’S CREST WITH A FIELD GUN IN THE CENTER. UNDERNEATH A CROWN AT THE TOP OF THE BADGE IS THE WORD “UBIQUE” EMBOSSED IN BANNER IN BRASS. BELOW THE FIELD GUN IS A BANNER THAT READS “QUO PAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT”. BACKSIDE HAS TWO PARALLEL RINGS HORIZONTALLY IN THE BOTTOM HALF FOR THE PIN. B: BRASS CAP BADGE PIN WITH TWO PRONGS MEETING AT ONE END WITH A LOOP AND THEN EXTENDING OUTWARD. OUTER ENDS ARE BENT AWAY FROM EACH OTHER TO FORM A WIDER V. PIN DIMENSIONS: 6.1 X 1.7 CM CONDITION: FINISH HAS DARKENED WITH MINOR WEAR TO SURFACE.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED TWO CAP BADGES AND A WORLD WAR II DEFENSE MEDAL TO THE GALT MUSEUM. VAN DEN BROEKE’S FATHER, GEORGE JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE, AND HIS UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE BOTH SERVED FOR CANADA DURING THE WAR. VAN DEN BROEKE’S UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION WHILE OVERSEAS. IT IS CLAIMED THE ARTIFACTS BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S FATHER AND UNCLE. THIS BADGE IS PRESUMED TO HAVE BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S FATHER. TO ACQUIRE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ARTIFACTS’ HISTORY, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE AT THE MUSEUM ON 6 NOVEMBER 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. VAN DEN BROEKE EXPLAINED, “MY FATHER WAS...A GUNNER [WITH THE 44 A.A. BATTERY]. HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT. MY UNCLE – I’M NOT TOO SURE IF ANY OF THESE [ITEMS] DEAL WITH HIM – IS ON THE CENOTAPH AT LETHBRIDGE. HE DIED IN VILLANOVA ITALY IN DECEMBER ’44, 1943... THE WAR IS JUST ABOUT OVER WHEN HE GOT KILLED.” “[THESE BADGES AND THE MEDAL REMIND ME OF] THE WAR EFFORT,” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “[ALONG WITH] MY UNCLE AND MY FATHER [WHO WERE A PART OF THAT EFFORT]. [WHILE] MY UNCLE DIED IN ’44, MY FATHER [DIDN’T GO] INTO THE ARMY UNTIL ABOUT ’43. HE WAS DRAFTED OUT TO PRINCE RUPERT FOR THE JAPANESE INVASION, IF IT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. IT’S [PART OF THE] HISTORY OF OUR FAMILY.” ALONG WITH THE DONATION OF THE BADGES AND THE MEDAL, VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED SOME OF HIS FAMILY’S ARCHIVAL MATERIAL CONNECTED TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR TO THE GALT ARCHIVES (PLEASE SEE ARCHIVAL ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102). ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE [THE DONOR] WAS BORN IN 1947 AND HIS DAD RETURNED HOME FOLLOWING THE WAR. HE STATED, “[I KNEW THAT THESE MATERIALS EXISTED] FROM WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWENTY, OR MAYBE EVEN YOUNGER. MY GRANDMOTHER WAS MOTHER OF THE YEAR OR WHATEVER THEY CALL, SILVER MOTHER OR SOMETHING, HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1967.” “[MOST OF THE VETERANS] DIDN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE REPLIED WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF HIS FATHER SPEAKING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE OF THE WAR, “PROBABLY THE FIRST REAL TIME I GOT INTO THIS WAS WHEN HE WENT AND TOOK GRAMMA TO THE GRAVE TO LAY THE WREATH. HE ESCORTED HER AS HER SON, AND SHE LAID THE WREATH ON BEHALF OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I WAS THERE FOR THAT CEREMONY, AND [I RECALL BEING] QUITE TAKEN BACK BY THE WAY THOSE GUYS COULD SALUTE. IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN MY FATHER DO IT, AND IT ALMOST RAISED THE HAIR ON YOUR NECK BECAUSE IT WAS SO PRECISE. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TAKING AN INTEREST IN THIS STUFF.” “[EVEN AFTER I TOOK AN INTEREST IN THAT HISTORY, MY DAD DID NOT REALLY SPEAK MUCH ABOUT IT.] THERE WASN’T A LOT HAPPENED ON THE WEST COAST [WHERE HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT]. THEY WERE SITTING UP THERE WAITING F0R THE JAPANESE TO INVADE AND THEY HAD ALL THE GUNS OUT ON THE WEST COAST, BUT IT NEVER CAME TO BE,” VAN DEN BROEKE STATED.” WHEN ASKED WHY HIS FATHER DID NOT GO OVERSEAS, VAN DEN BROEKE SPECULATED, “PROBABLY BECAUSE HE WASN’T CONSCRIPTED UNTIL ’43. AT THAT POINT THEY THOUGHT THE JAPANESE WERE [A LARGE THREAT]. THEY PROBABLY ATTACKED PEARL HARBOR BY THEN, I WOULD IMAGINE. THAT’S WHEN THEY SET UP THE TROOPS ON THE WEST COAST. MY UNCLE WENT IN THE WAR PROBABLY IN ’39 WHEN IT STARTED, SO HE WAS PROBABLY CONSCRIPTED AND SENT OVERSEAS, AND THAT’S HOW HE ENDED UP IN ITALY.” “[ON THE OTHER HAND] I THINK MY FATHER WAS ACTUALLY CONSCRIPTED [TO JOIN THE WAR], BECAUSE HE WAS QUITE A BIT OLDER AND WHEN HE GOT INTO THE ARMY HE WOULD HAVE BEEN [AROUND HIS MID TO LATE THIRTIES].” “I WOULD SAY MY MOTHER [WAS THE PERSON MOST AWARE OF THESE ARTIFACTS OTHER THAN MY FATHER],” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “PROBABLY THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN IT [WAS AFTER] MY DAD PASSED AWAY IN ’67. [WHEN] I WAS ONLY NINETEEN, HE WAS IN A FIRE AT PARK LAKE. HE WAS THE WARDEN AT THE PARK LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK AND A GARAGE BLEW UP AND HE DIED JANUARY 1ST, 1968. SO AT THAT POINT MY MOTHER AND I MOVED FROM PARK LAKE TO PICTURE BUTTE. [I RECEIVED THE ITEMS] WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY IN ABOUT 1992.” SPEAKING ABOUT HIS FATHER’S EARLIER LIFE, VAN DEN BROEKE SAID, “HE WAS BORN IN HELLENDOORN, HOLLAND IN 1905 ON JANUARY 30TH. HE EMIGRATED TO MONARCH WITH HIS FATHER IN 1911. HIS FATHER WAS A BLACKSMITH IN MONARCH. PROBABLY ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE OR THIRTY [DUTCH IMMIGRANTS WERE HERE WHEN MY DAD’S FAMILY ARRIVED] AND THEY ALL SETTLED IN MONARCH. THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE THAT LITTLE CHURCH OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE AT MONARCH. THAT WAS PART OF THEIR CHURCH, ALL MY AUNTS AND UNCLES, AND THEY’RE BURIED IN THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD CEMETERY.” AS HIS UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, VAN DEN BROEKE HAS SPECIFIC MEMORIES OF HIS FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE OF THE REMEMBRANCE DAYS AFTER THE WAR. HE SAID, “YEARS AGO I SENT THEIR PICTURES BOTH INTO THE HERALD WHEN THEY FIRST STARTED THAT REMEMBRANCE DAY [PUBLICATION]. I SENT BOTH THEIR PICTURES AND THEY’VE BEEN IN THE HERALD. [AND THAT’S WHY I WAS REMINDED TO DONATE THESE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM] RIGHT NOW, AS WE JUST HAVE A WEEK TO GO [UNTIL REMEMBRANCE DAY].” A NOTICE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD STATES, “SON OF GEO. VAN DEN BROEKE OF MONARCH, GUNNER A. J. VAN DEN BROEKE, WHO IS SERVING WITH A BATTERY STATIONED AT THE WEST COAST. HE HAS A WIFE AND AN INFANT DAUGHTER, CHRISTINE LOUISE, RESIDED AT MONARCH, ALTA., ALSO A BROTHER OVERSEAS…” THE OBITUARY OF THE DONOR’S FATHER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READS, “PASSED AWAY IN SUDDENLY IN THE CITY ON MONDAY, JAN. 1, [1968], GEORGE JOHN “GERRIT”, AGED 62 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. CHRISTINA VAN DEN BROEKE OF COALHURST. BESIDES HIS LOVING WIFE, SURVIVORS INCLUDE TWO SONS, GEORGE JOHN OF COALHURST, AND HENRY MARTIN OF RED DEER; ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. WALTER CHRISTINE LOUISE DUNN OF TURIN; ONE SISTER, RIKA NILSON… HIS STEPMOTHER MRS. JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. THE LATE MR. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1905 AND WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH.” ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, OBTAINED FROM THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED ON NOVEMBER 6, 1942 UNDER THE NATIONAL RESOURCES MOBILIZATION ACT OF 1940. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS LISTED AS BEING A TRUCK DRIVER AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS STATIONED AS A GUNNER FIRST AT ESQUIMALT, BRITISH COLUMBIA, THEN AT VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA IN 1943 WITH THE 27, 28, AND 29TH REGIMENTS OF THE 44 AA BATTERY. GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE WAS DISCHARGED ON MARCH 7, 1946 ON DEMOBILIZATION. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE'S SERVICE RECORD, AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH (UOFL ARCHIVES RECORD, COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION LETTER, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES).
Catalogue Number
P20160038001
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WWII CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRONZE, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160038002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WWII CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
BRONZE, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
5.5
Length
4.8
Description
A: BRONZE SECOND WORLD WAR CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE. WREATH OF THISTLE IN BRONZE WITH ST. ANDREW’S CROSS (AN "X") MAKES UP OVERALL SHAPE OF BADGE. ON THE CENTRE OF THE CROSS, THERE IS A BEAVER ON A LOG ENCIRCLED BY A WREATH OF MAPLE LEAVES. BEAVER AND LOG ARE IN A DARKER METAL THAN REST OF BRONZE DESIGN. ON THE WREATH, BELOW THE BEAVER, IS A SCROLL OF THISTLES AND BELOW THAT IS A WHITE METAL SCROLL INSCRIBED WITH “CALGARY HIGHLANDERS”. THE CROWN IN AT THE TOP CENTER OF THE BADGE. BACK SIDE HAS A LOOP ON EITHER SIDE OF THE BADGE, PARALLEL FROM EACH OTHER, FOR THE PIN. B: BRASS-COLOURED PIN WITH TWO PRONGS MEETING ON ONE END IN A LOOP AND COMING OUT FROM THAT, AWAY FROM EACH OTHER, LIKE A “V”. PIN DIMENSIONS: 5.2 X 1.1 CM. CONDITION: SLIGHT TARNISHING OF METAL OVERALL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED TWO CAP BADGES AND A WORLD WAR II DEFENSE MEDAL TO THE GALT MUSEUM. VAN DEN BROEKE’S FATHER, GEORGE JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE, AND HIS UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE BOTH SERVED FOR CANADA DURING THE WAR. VAN DEN BROEKE’S UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION WHILE OVERSEAS. IT IS CLAIMED THE ARTIFACTS BELONGED TO THE DONOR’S FATHER AND UNCLE. THIS BADGE IS PRESUMED TO HAVE BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S UNCLE. TO ACQUIRE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ARTIFACTS’ HISTORY, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE AT THE MUSEUM ON 6 NOVEMBER 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. VAN DEN BROEKE EXPLAINED, “MY FATHER WAS...A GUNNER [WITH THE 44 A.A. BATTERY]. HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT. MY UNCLE – I’M NOT TOO SURE IF ANY OF THESE [ITEMS] DEAL WITH HIM – IS ON THE CENOTAPH AT LETHBRIDGE. HE DIED IN VILLANOVA ITALY IN DECEMBER ’44, 1943... THE WAR IS JUST ABOUT OVER WHEN HE GOT KILLED.” “[THESE BADGES AND THE MEDAL REMIND ME OF] THE WAR EFFORT,” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “[ALONG WITH] MY UNCLE AND MY FATHER [WHO WERE A PART OF THAT EFFORT]. [WHILE] MY UNCLE DIED IN ’44, MY FATHER [DIDN’T GO] INTO THE ARMY UNTIL ABOUT ’43. HE WAS DRAFTED OUT TO PRINCE RUPERT FOR THE JAPANESE INVASION, IF IT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. IT’S [PART OF THE] HISTORY OF OUR FAMILY.” ALONG WITH THE DONATION OF THE BADGES AND THE MEDAL, VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED SOME OF HIS FAMILY’S ARCHIVAL MATERIAL CONNECTED TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR TO THE GALT ARCHIVES (PLEASE SEE ARCHIVAL ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102). OF THAT SEGMENT OF THE DONATION, VAN DEN BROEKE DESCRIBED, “THERE’S A LETTER THERE FROM THE LIEUTENANT WHO WITNESSED MY UNCLE GETTING SHOT IN VILLANOVA, ITALY AND [SAW] WHAT HAPPENED… IT EXPLAINS THAT HE WAS A SERGEANT AND HIS PLATOON WAS TO TAKE A STRATEGIC AREA. THEY WERE PINNED DOWN UNDER HEAVY MACHINE GUN FIRE, AND HE WAS MORTALLY WOUNDED. HE DIED INSTANTLY OF HIS WOUNDS. THE LIEUTENANT SAID HE WAS A VERY GOOD SERGEANT AND THAT HE WAS THERE HELPING TO FIGHT THE NAZI MONSTER, SO THE LETTER IS QUITE INTERESTING AND IT’S IN VERY GOOD SHAPE.” ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN 1947 AND HIS DAD RETURNED HOME FOLLOWING THE WAR. HE STATED, “[I KNEW THAT THESE MATERIALS EXISTED] FROM WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWENTY, OR MAYBE EVEN YOUNGER. MY GRANDMOTHER WAS MOTHER OF THE YEAR OR WHATEVER THEY CALL, SILVER MOTHER OR SOMETHING, HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1967.” “[MOST OF THE VETERANS] DIDN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE REPLIED WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF HIS FATHER SPEAKING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE OF THE WAR, “PROBABLY THE FIRST REAL TIME I GOT INTO THIS WAS WHEN HE WENT AND TOOK GRAMMA TO THE GRAVE TO LAY THE WREATH. HE ESCORTED HER AS HER SON, AND SHE LAID THE WREATH ON BEHALF OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I WAS THERE FOR THAT CEREMONY, AND [I RECALL BEING] QUITE TAKEN BACK BY THE WAY THOSE GUYS COULD SALUTE. IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN MY FATHER DO IT, AND IT ALMOST RAISED THE HAIR ON YOUR NECK BECAUSE IT WAS SO PRECISE. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TAKING AN INTEREST IN THIS STUFF.” "MY UNCLE WENT IN THE WAR PROBABLY IN ’39 WHEN IT STARTED, SO HE WAS PROBABLY CONSCRIPTED AND SENT OVERSEAS, AND THAT’S HOW HE ENDED UP IN ITALY.” “[MY UNCLE] HE WASN’T [MARRIED WHEN HE WENT OVERSEAS]. HE WAS 23 [WHEN HE DIED]. SO HE WAS YOUNG, PROBABLY JOINED WHEN HE WAS NINETEEN. THERE WAS A LOT OF PEOPLE AT THAT TIME SAYING, ‘COME ON, JOIN AND LET’S GO FIGHT,’ SO THAT’S WHAT THEY DID,” SAID VAN DEN BROEKE, “HE HAD A SISTER THAT USED TO LIVE IN CUTBANK, MONTANA NAMED RIKA NELSON. SHE HAD TWO OR THREE OR FOUR KIDS, AND THERE IS A PICTURE OF [MY UNCLE] WITH TWO OF HER SONS (ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102).” “I WOULD SAY MY MOTHER [WAS THE PERSON MOST AWARE OF THESE ARTIFACTS OTHER THAN MY FATHER],” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “PROBABLY THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN IT [WAS AFTER] MY DAD PASSED AWAY IN ’67. [WHEN] I WAS ONLY NINETEEN, HE WAS IN A FIRE AT PARK LAKE. HE WAS THE WARDEN AT THE PARK LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK AND A GARAGE BLEW UP AND HE DIED JANUARY 1ST, 1968. SO AT THAT POINT MY MOTHER AND I MOVED FROM PARK LAKE TO PICTURE BUTTE. [I RECEIVED THE ITEMS] WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY IN ABOUT 1992.” SPEAKING ABOUT HIS FATHER’S EARLIER LIFE, VAN DEN BROEKE SAID, “HE WAS BORN IN HELLENDOORN, HOLLAND IN 1905 ON JANUARY 30TH. HE EMIGRATED TO MONARCH WITH HIS FATHER IN 1911. HIS FATHER WAS A BLACKSMITH IN MONARCH. PROBABLY ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE OR THIRTY [DUTCH IMMIGRANTS WERE HERE WHEN MY DAD’S FAMILY ARRIVED] AND THEY ALL SETTLED IN MONARCH. THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE THAT LITTLE CHURCH OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE AT MONARCH. THAT WAS PART OF THEIR CHURCH, ALL MY AUNTS AND UNCLES, AND THEY’RE BURIED IN THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD CEMETERY.” “[THE DUTCH CONNECTION IS] VERY INTERESTING BECAUSE ROELOF HEINEN USED TO BE REEVE FOR THE COUNTY OF LETHBRIDGE WHEN THEY HAD THAT DUTCH, THEY HAD SOME KIND OF A DUTCH APPRECIATION DAY IN PICTURE BUTTE ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. ROELOF TOOK THAT LETTER THAT I GOT FROM THE LIEUTENANT AND HE WAS GOING TO READ IT AT THAT APPRECIATION DAY, BUT THE PROGRAM GOT TOO LONG AND HE NEVER GOT TO IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE RECALLED AS HE SPOKE OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HIS FAMILY’S DUTCH BACKGROUND IN CONNECTION TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR, “[MY UNCLE BEING A DUTCH IMMIGRANT FIGHTING WITH THE CANADIAN MILITARY] WAS QUITE UNIQUE. HE WAS FIGHTING FOR CANADA, [AND HE WAS] BORN IN CANADA, BUT WITH A DUTCH NAME AND HE WAS KILLED IN ITALY. HE’S THE ONLY ONE THAT DIED FROM THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD AREA THAT WENT TO FIGHT, ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY BOOKS FROM THE AREA. AS HIS UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, VAN DEN BROEKE HAS SPECIFIC MEMORIES OF HIS FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE OF THE REMEMBRANCE DAYS AFTER THE WAR. HE SAID, “YEARS AGO I SENT THEIR PICTURES BOTH INTO THE HERALD WHEN THEY FIRST STARTED THAT REMEMBRANCE DAY [PUBLICATION]. I SENT BOTH THEIR PICTURES AND THEY’VE BEEN IN THE HERALD. [AND THAT’S WHY I WAS REMINDED TO DONATE THESE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM] RIGHT NOW, AS WE JUST HAVE A WEEK TO GO [UNTIL REMEMBRANCE DAY].” AN ONLINE RECORD FOR THE DONOR’S UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ARCHIVES DATABASE TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH,” READS, “MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN ON JULY 12, 1921 IN MONARCH, ALBERTA TO PARENTS GERHARD AND JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. HE WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH WITH SIBLINGS, GERRIT AND RIKA… AT THE TIME OF ENLISTMENT, HE WAS SINGLE AND WORKING FOR HIS FATHER AS AN APPRENTICE BLACKSMITH. ON DECEMBER 22, 1942, MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED FOR SERVICE WITH THE CANADIAN ARMY AT CALGARY. HE SPENT THE NEXT NINE MONTHS TRAINING AT CALGARY, CAMROSE, AND WINDSOR, NOVA SCOTIA. ON SEPTEMBER 1, 1943, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. JUST TWO MONTHS LATER, HE WAS SENT TO ITALY WHERE HE WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH BY THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS. SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS INCLUDED IN COMBAT OPERATIONS WITH THIS UNIT AS THE ALLIED FORCES MADE THEIR MARCH ACROSS ITALY. ON DECEMBER 13, 1944, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE BREAKING OF THE GOTHIC LINE. HE WAS LAID TO REST AT VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY. FOR HIS WARTIME SERVICE, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS AWARDED THE 1939-45 STAR, ITALY STAR, WAR MEDAL AND CANADIAN VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL WITH CLASP. HIS MOTHER RECEIVED A MEMORIAL CROSS IN HONOUR OF HER SON.” A LETTER PROVIDED BY THE DONOR FROM THE COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION STATES, “M 105808 SERGEANT MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE OF THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS, CANADIAN INFANTRY CORPS DIED ON 13 DECEMBER 1944 AT AGE 23. HE IS BURIED IN THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY, ITALY IN PLOT 7, ROW B, GRAVE 5.” ACCODING TO THE WEBSITE OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CANADA ON THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY IN ITALY, THE CANADIAN 5TH ARMOURED DIVISION, WHICH INCLUDED THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS AND NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, ESTABLISHED A BRIDGEHEAD OVER THE LAMONE RIVER ON DECEMBER 10-11, 1944. THE 5TH CANADIAN ARMOURED DIVISION PARTICIPATED IN LIBERATING THE ITALIAN PROVINCE OF RAVENNA, INCLUDING THE VILLAGE OF VILLANOVA, IN DECEMBER 1944. AS STATED ON THE VETERANS AFFAIRS WEBSITE ON THE VILLANOVA CEMETERY, “THE ADVANCE ACROSS THE LAMONE NEAR VILLANOVA WENT WELL. THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS WERE QUICKLY OVER THE DYKE AND IN THE VILLAGE, WITH 43 PRISONERS CAPTURED…THE NAVIGLIO CANAL WAS THE NEXT CANADIAN OBJECTIVE, AND THE ASSAULT BEGAN THE NIGHT OF DECEMBER 12…ENEMY FIRE PREVENTED THE RESERVE SQUADRONS FROM EVEN APPROACHING THE CANAL. TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE, AIR SUPPORT WAS UNAVAILABLE DUE TO POOR VISIBILITY AND THE TANKS WERE UNABLE TO REACH THIS SECTION. IN THAT ONE NIGHT'S ACTION, 21 OF THE REGIMENT WERE KILLED AND 46 CAPTURED…THE SITUATION WOULD IMPROVE IN A MATTER OF DAYS, WHEN AIR AND TANK SUPPORT BECAME AVAILABLE.” A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED ABOUT THE DEATH OF MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE. IT STATES, “HE IS THE FIRST SERVICEMAN FROM MONARCH TO MAKE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE.” ARTICLES WERE ALSO PUBLISHED IN THE NEWSPAPER ABOUT PREVIOUS INJURIES MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE SUSTAINED IN COMBAT. THE OBITUARY OF THE DONOR’S FATHER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READS, “PASSED AWAY IN SUDDENLY IN THE CITY ON MONDAY, JAN. 1, [1968], GEORGE JOHN “GERRIT”, AGED 62 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. CHRISTINA VAN DEN BROEKE OF COALHURST. BESIDES HIS LOVING WIFE, SURVIVORS INCLUDE TWO SONS, GEORGE JOHN OF COALHURST, AND HENRY MARTIN OF RED DEER; ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. WALTER CHRISTINE LOUISE DUNN OF TURIN; ONE SISTER, RIKA NILSON… HIS STEPMOTHER MRS. JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. THE LATE MR. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1905 AND WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE'S SERVICE FILE, AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH (UOFL ARCHIVES RECORD, COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION LETTER, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES).
Catalogue Number
P20160038002
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DEFENSE / 1939-1945 WAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NICKLE, RIBBON
Catalogue Number
P20160038003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DEFENSE / 1939-1945 WAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
NICKLE, RIBBON
No. Pieces
1
Length
12.7
Width
3.2
Diameter
3
Description
A. CIRCULAR, SILVER MEDAL. THE BRITISH ISSUE MEDALS WERE MADE OF CUPRO-NICKEL. A PLAIN, STRAIGHT NON-SWIVELING SUSPENDER WITH A SINGLE-TOED CLAW. THE OBVERSE OF THE MEDAL SHOWS THE CROWNED COINAGE EFFIGY OF KING GEORGE VI, FACING LEFT, AND THE LEGEND GEORGIVS VI D : BR : OMN : REX ET INDIAE IMP : THE REVERSE SHOWS A LION STANDING ON THE BODY OF A DOUBLE-HEADED DRAGON. THE DRAGON’S HEADS ARE THOSE OF AN EAGLE AND A DRAGON TO SIGNIFY THE PRINCIPAL OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL ENEMIES. AT THE TOP, RIGHT OF CENTRE ARE THE DATES 1939/1945 IN TWO LINES. B. ATTACHED RIBBON IS 3.2 CM WIDE WITH GREEN, BLACK, ORANGE BANDS OF COLOUR. CONDITION: RIBBON SLIGHTLY DIRTY AND ENDS HAVE FRAYED; DIRT AND SEVERE TARNISH OF THE METAL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED TWO CAP BADGES AND A WORLD WAR II DEFENSE MEDAL TO THE GALT MUSEUM. VAN DEN BROEKE’S FATHER, GEORGE JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE, AND HIS UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE BOTH SERVED FOR CANADA DURING THE WAR. VAN DEN BROEKE’S UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION WHILE OVERSEAS. IT IS UNCLEAR IF THE COMPOSITE MEDAL AND RIBBON BELONGED TO THE DONOR’S FATHER OR UNCLE. THE MISMATCHED RIBBON AND MEDAL ARE CATALOGUED AS RECEIVED FROM THE DONOR. TO ACQUIRE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ARTIFACTS’ HISTORY, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE AT THE MUSEUM ON 6 NOVEMBER 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. VAN DEN BROEKE EXPLAINED, “MY FATHER WAS...A GUNNER [WITH THE 44 A.A. BATTERY]. HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT. MY UNCLE – I’M NOT TOO SURE IF ANY OF THESE [ITEMS] DEAL WITH HIM – IS ON THE CENOTAPH AT LETHBRIDGE. HE DIED IN VILLANOVA ITALY IN DECEMBER ’44, 1943... THE WAR IS JUST ABOUT OVER WHEN HE GOT KILLED.” “[THESE BADGES AND THE MEDAL REMIND ME OF] THE WAR EFFORT,” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “[ALONG WITH] MY UNCLE AND MY FATHER [WHO WERE A PART OF THAT EFFORT]. [WHILE] MY UNCLE DIED IN ’44, MY FATHER [DIDN’T GO] INTO THE ARMY UNTIL ABOUT ’43. HE WAS DRAFTED OUT TO PRINCE RUPERT FOR THE JAPANESE INVASION, IF IT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. IT’S [PART OF THE] HISTORY OF OUR FAMILY.” ALONG WITH THE DONATION OF THE BADGES AND THE MEDAL, VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED SOME OF HIS FAMILY’S ARCHIVAL MATERIAL CONNECTED TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR TO THE GALT ARCHIVES (PLEASE SEE ARCHIVAL ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102). OF THAT SEGMENT OF THE DONATION, VAN DEN BROEKE DESCRIBED, “THERE’S A LETTER THERE FROM THE LIEUTENANT WHO WITNESSED MY UNCLE GETTING SHOT IN VILLANOVA, ITALY AND [SAW] WHAT HAPPENED… IT EXPLAINS THAT HE WAS A SERGEANT AND HIS PLATOON WAS TO TAKE A STRATEGIC AREA. THEY WERE PINNED DOWN UNDER HEAVY MACHINE GUN FIRE, AND HE WAS MORTALLY WOUNDED. HE DIED INSTANTLY OF HIS WOUNDS. THE LIEUTENANT SAID HE WAS A VERY GOOD SERGEANT AND THAT HE WAS THERE HELPING TO FIGHT THE NAZI MONSTER, SO THE LETTER IS QUITE INTERESTING AND IT’S IN VERY GOOD SHAPE.” ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN 1947 AND HIS DAD RETURNED HOME FOLLOWING THE WAR. HE STATED, “[I KNEW THAT THESE MATERIALS EXISTED] FROM WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWENTY, OR MAYBE EVEN YOUNGER. MY GRANDMOTHER WAS MOTHER OF THE YEAR OR WHATEVER THEY CALL, SILVER MOTHER OR SOMETHING, HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1967.” “[MOST OF THE VETERANS] DIDN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE REPLIED WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF HIS FATHER SPEAKING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE OF THE WAR, “PROBABLY THE FIRST REAL TIME I GOT INTO THIS WAS WHEN HE WENT AND TOOK GRAMMA TO THE GRAVE TO LAY THE WREATH. HE ESCORTED HER AS HER SON, AND SHE LAID THE WREATH ON BEHALF OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I WAS THERE FOR THAT CEREMONY, AND [I RECALL BEING] QUITE TAKEN BACK BY THE WAY THOSE GUYS COULD SALUTE. IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN MY FATHER DO IT, AND IT ALMOST RAISED THE HAIR ON YOUR NECK BECAUSE IT WAS SO PRECISE. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TAKING AN INTEREST IN THIS STUFF.” “[EVEN AFTER I TOOK AN INTEREST IN THAT HISTORY, MY DAD DID NOT REALLY SPEAK MUCH ABOUT IT.] THERE WASN’T A LOT HAPPENED ON THE WEST COAST [WHERE HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT]. THEY WERE SITTING UP THERE WAITING F0R THE JAPANESE TO INVADE AND THEY HAD ALL THE GUNS OUT ON THE WEST COAST, BUT IT NEVER CAME TO BE,” VAN DEN BROEKE STATED.” WHEN ASKED WHY HIS FATHER DID NOT GO OVERSEAS, VAN DEN BROEKE SPECULATED, “PROBABLY BECAUSE HE WASN’T CONSCRIPTED UNTIL ’43. AT THAT POINT THEY THOUGHT THE JAPANESE WERE [A LARGE THREAT]. THEY PROBABLY ATTACKED PEARL HARBOR BY THEN, I WOULD IMAGINE. THAT’S WHEN THEY SET UP THE TROOPS ON THE WEST COAST. MY UNCLE WENT IN THE WAR PROBABLY IN ’39 WHEN IT STARTED, SO HE WAS PROBABLY CONSCRIPTED AND SENT OVERSEAS, AND THAT’S HOW HE ENDED UP IN ITALY.” “[MY UNCLE] HE WASN’T [MARRIED WHEN HE WENT OVERSEAS]. HE WAS 23 [WHEN HE DIED]. SO HE WAS YOUNG, PROBABLY JOINED WHEN HE WAS NINETEEN. THERE WAS A LOT OF PEOPLE AT THAT TIME SAYING, ‘COME ON, JOIN AND LET’S GO FIGHT,’ SO THAT’S WHAT THEY DID,” SAID VAN DEN BROEKE, “HE HAD A SISTER THAT USED TO LIVE IN CUTBANK, MONTANA NAMED RIKA NELSON. SHE HAD TWO OR THREE OR FOUR KIDS, AND THERE IS A PICTURE OF [MY UNCLE] WITH TWO OF HER SONS (ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102).” “[ON THE OTHER HAND] I THINK MY FATHER WAS ACTUALLY CONSCRIPTED [TO JOIN THE WAR], BECAUSE HE WAS QUITE A BIT OLDER AND WHEN HE GOT INTO THE ARMY HE WOULD HAVE BEEN [AROUND HIS MID TO LATE THIRTIES].” “I WOULD SAY MY MOTHER [WAS THE PERSON MOST AWARE OF THESE ARTIFACTS OTHER THAN MY FATHER],” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “PROBABLY THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN IT [WAS AFTER] MY DAD PASSED AWAY IN ’67. [WHEN] I WAS ONLY NINETEEN, HE WAS IN A FIRE AT PARK LAKE. HE WAS THE WARDEN AT THE PARK LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK AND A GARAGE BLEW UP AND HE DIED JANUARY 1ST, 1968. SO AT THAT POINT MY MOTHER AND I MOVED FROM PARK LAKE TO PICTURE BUTTE. [I RECEIVED THE ITEMS] WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY IN ABOUT 1992.” SPEAKING ABOUT HIS FATHER’S EARLIER LIFE, VAN DEN BROEKE SAID, “HE WAS BORN IN HELLENDOORN, HOLLAND IN 1905 ON JANUARY 30TH. HE EMIGRATED TO MONARCH WITH HIS FATHER IN 1911. HIS FATHER WAS A BLACKSMITH IN MONARCH. PROBABLY ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE OR THIRTY [DUTCH IMMIGRANTS WERE HERE WHEN MY DAD’S FAMILY ARRIVED] AND THEY ALL SETTLED IN MONARCH. THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE THAT LITTLE CHURCH OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE AT MONARCH. THAT WAS PART OF THEIR CHURCH, ALL MY AUNTS AND UNCLES, AND THEY’RE BURIED IN THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD CEMETERY.” “[THE DUTCH CONNECTION IS] VERY INTERESTING BECAUSE ROELOF HEINEN USED TO BE REEVE FOR THE COUNTY OF LETHBRIDGE WHEN THEY HAD THAT DUTCH, THEY HAD SOME KIND OF A DUTCH APPRECIATION DAY IN PICTURE BUTTE ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. ROELOF TOOK THAT LETTER THAT I GOT FROM THE LIEUTENANT AND HE WAS GOING TO READ IT AT THAT APPRECIATION DAY, BUT THE PROGRAM GOT TOO LONG AND HE NEVER GOT TO IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE RECALLED AS HE SPOKE OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HIS FAMILY’S DUTCH BACKGROUND IN CONNECTION TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR, “[MY UNCLE BEING A DUTCH IMMIGRANT FIGHTING WITH THE CANADIAN MILITARY] WAS QUITE UNIQUE. HE WAS FIGHTING FOR CANADA, [AND HE WAS] BORN IN CANADA, BUT WITH A DUTCH NAME AND HE WAS KILLED IN ITALY. HE’S THE ONLY ONE THAT DIED FROM THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD AREA THAT WENT TO FIGHT, ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY BOOKS FROM THE AREA. AS HIS UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, VAN DEN BROEKE HAS SPECIFIC MEMORIES OF HIS FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE OF THE REMEMBRANCE DAYS AFTER THE WAR. HE SAID, “YEARS AGO I SENT THEIR PICTURES BOTH INTO THE HERALD WHEN THEY FIRST STARTED THAT REMEMBRANCE DAY [PUBLICATION]. I SENT BOTH THEIR PICTURES AND THEY’VE BEEN IN THE HERALD. [AND THAT’S WHY I WAS REMINDED TO DONATE THESE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM] RIGHT NOW, AS WE JUST HAVE A WEEK TO GO [UNTIL REMEMBRANCE DAY].” AN ONLINE RECORD FOR THE DONOR’S UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ARCHIVES DATABASE TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH,” READS, “MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN ON JULY 12, 1921 IN MONARCH, ALBERTA TO PARENTS GERHARD AND JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. HE WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH WITH SIBLINGS, GERRIT AND RIKA… AT THE TIME OF ENLISTMENT, HE WAS SINGLE AND WORKING FOR HIS FATHER AS AN APPRENTICE BLACKSMITH. ON DECEMBER 22, 1942, MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED FOR SERVICE WITH THE CANADIAN ARMY AT CALGARY. HE SPENT THE NEXT NINE MONTHS TRAINING AT CALGARY, CAMROSE, AND WINDSOR, NOVA SCOTIA. ON SEPTEMBER 1, 1943, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. JUST TWO MONTHS LATER, HE WAS SENT TO ITALY WHERE HE WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH BY THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS. SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS INCLUDED IN COMBAT OPERATIONS WITH THIS UNIT AS THE ALLIED FORCES MADE THEIR MARCH ACROSS ITALY. ON DECEMBER 13, 1944, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE BREAKING OF THE GOTHIC LINE. HE WAS LAID TO REST AT VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY. FOR HIS WARTIME SERVICE, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS AWARDED THE 1939-45 STAR, ITALY STAR, WAR MEDAL AND CANADIAN VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL WITH CLASP. HIS MOTHER RECEIVED A MEMORIAL CROSS IN HONOUR OF HER SON.” A LETTER PROVIDED BY THE DONOR FROM THE COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION STATES, “M 105808 SERGEANT MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE OF THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS, CANADIAN INFANTRY CORPS DIED ON 13 DECEMBER 1944 AT AGE 23. HE IS BURIED IN THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY, ITALY IN PLOT 7, ROW B, GRAVE 5.” ACCODING TO THE WEBSITE OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CANADA ON THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY IN ITALY, THE CANADIAN 5TH ARMOURED DIVISION, WHICH INCLUDED THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS AND NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, ESTABLISHED A BRIDGEHEAD OVER THE LAMONE RIVER ON DECEMBER 10-11, 1944. THE 5TH CANADIAN ARMOURED DIVISION PARTICIPATED IN LIBERATING THE ITALIAN PROVINCE OF RAVENNA, INCLUDING THE VILLAGE OF VILLANOVA, IN DECEMBER 1944. AS STATED ON THE VETERANS AFFAIRS WEBSITE ON THE VILLANOVA CEMETERY, “THE ADVANCE ACROSS THE LAMONE NEAR VILLANOVA WENT WELL. THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS WERE QUICKLY OVER THE DYKE AND IN THE VILLAGE, WITH 43 PRISONERS CAPTURED…THE NAVIGLIO CANAL WAS THE NEXT CANADIAN OBJECTIVE, AND THE ASSAULT BEGAN THE NIGHT OF DECEMBER 12…ENEMY FIRE PREVENTED THE RESERVE SQUADRONS FROM EVEN APPROACHING THE CANAL. TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE, AIR SUPPORT WAS UNAVAILABLE DUE TO POOR VISIBILITY AND THE TANKS WERE UNABLE TO REACH THIS SECTION. IN THAT ONE NIGHT'S ACTION, 21 OF THE REGIMENT WERE KILLED AND 46 CAPTURED…THE SITUATION WOULD IMPROVE IN A MATTER OF DAYS, WHEN AIR AND TANK SUPPORT BECAME AVAILABLE.” A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED ABOUT THE DEATH OF THE YOUNGER VAN DEN BROEKE. IT STATES, “HE IS THE FIRST SERVICEMAN FROM MONARCH TO MAKE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE.” ARTICLES WERE ALSO PUBLISHED IN THE NEWSPAPER ABOUT PREVIOUS INJURIES MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE SUSTAINED IN COMBAT. A NOTICE PUBLISHED IN THE HERALD STATES, “SON OF GEO. VAN DEN BROEKE OF MONARCH, GUNNER A. J. VAN DEN BROEKE, WHO IS SERVING WITH A BATTERY STATIONED AT THE WEST COAST. HE HAS A WIFE AND AN INFANT DAUGHTER, CHRISTINE LOUISE, RESIDED AT MONARCH, ALTA., ALSO A BROTHER OVERSEAS…” THE OBITUARY OF THE DONOR’S FATHER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READS, “PASSED AWAY IN SUDDENLY IN THE CITY ON MONDAY, JAN. 1, [1968], GEORGE JOHN “GERRIT”, AGED 62 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. CHRISTINA VAN DEN BROEKE OF COALHURST. BESIDES HIS LOVING WIFE, SURVIVORS INCLUDE TWO SONS, GEORGE JOHN OF COALHURST, AND HENRY MARTIN OF RED DEER; ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. WALTER CHRISTINE LOUISE DUNN OF TURIN; ONE SISTER, RIKA NILSON… HIS STEPMOTHER MRS. JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. THE LATE MR. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1905 AND WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH.” ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, OBTAINED FROM THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED ON NOVEMBER 6, 1942 UNDER THE NATIONAL RESOURCES MOBILIZATION ACT OF 1940. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS LISTED AS BEING A TRUCK DRIVER AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS STATIONED AS A GUNNER FIRST AT ESQUIMALT, BRITISH COLUMBIA, THEN AT VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA IN 1943 WITH THE 27, 28, AND 29TH REGIMENTS OF THE 44 AA BATTERY. GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE WAS DISCHARGED ON MARCH 7, 1946 ON DEMOBILIZATION. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE'S SERVICE FILE, AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH (UOFL ARCHIVES RECORD, COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION LETTER, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES).
Catalogue Number
P20160038003
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Length
58.5
Width
22
Description
A. BANJOLELE, 53 CM LONG X 19 CM WIDE X 5.5 CM TALL. BODY IS POLISHED BROWN WOOD WITH WHITE LEATHER DRUM/HEAD; BODY HAS SILVER METAL TAIL PIECE AND TONE RING AROUND DRUM/HEAD. NECK AND HEAD-STOCK ARE COVERED IN PEARL/TORTOISE SHELL; FRET ON NECK IS STRUNG WITH ONE SILVER WIRE AND ONE CLOTH STRING; FRETBOARD IS LINED WITH SILVER METAL FRETS. HEAD-STOCK HAS FOUR SILVER METAL TUNING PEGS AND BLACK AND GOLD TEXT LABEL “VALENCIA”. BACK HAS FOUR DISCOLORED WHITE, WOODEN TUNING PEGS AND SILVER METAL SPRING AT JUNCTION OF NECK AND HEAD-STOCK. BACK OF DRUM BODY HAS CUT-OUT SWIRLS IN WOOD. WOOD BODY IS SCRATCHED AND WORN AT EDGES; BACK OF NECK HAS PEELING FINISH ON WOOD; LEATHER OF DRUM/HEAD IS WORN AND STAINED BLACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CASE, 58.5 CM LONG X 9 CM TALL X 22 CM WIDE. CASE IS BROWN CLOTH COVERING A PAPER BOARD IN SHAPE OF BANJOLELE, WITH WIDER BASE. CASE OPENS AT BASE AND HAS BROWN LEATHER HINGE AND SILVER METAL CLASP. BROWN LEATHER HANDLE ON SIDE OF CASE IS BROKEN AND DETACHED AT END. INSIDE OF CASE IS LINED WITH DARK GREEN FABRIC. TOP OF CASE HAS “L W” HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. CASE IS WORN AROUND EDGES AND CLOTH IS FRAYING; BOTTOM OF CASE HAS WATER DAMAGE AND WHITE STAINING; TOP OF CASE HAS WHITE STAINING AND SCRATCHES. LEATHER HINGE AND HANDLE ARE CRACKED AND FADED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BEVE SPENGLER AND RUTH HILL REGARDING RUTH’S DONATION OF A BANJOLELE AND GUITAR. THE INSTRUMENTS WERE KEPT AND PLAYED BY THEIR FATHER, SYDNEY JAMES WOMACK, IN THE 1930S AND 1940S. ON THE BANJOLELE, RUTH RECALLED, “I CAN’T REMEMBER [MUCH] ABOUT [IT] AT ALL, BECAUSE HE BOUGHT [THE GUITAR] BUT SOMEHOW HE MUST HAVE SEEN THIS, AND THEN HE THOUGHT FOR LORNE [OUR BROTHER] HE WOULD BUY THAT [BANJOLELE] TO MATCH THE GUITAR.” “MY DAD USED TO PLAY ME TO SLEEP FROM THE TIME…WE WENT OUT TO THE FARM IN ’30. I WAS BORN IN ’27, SO ALL THE ‘30S HE PLAYED ME TO SLEEP EVERY NIGHT…I NEVER SAW MY DAD PLAY [THE BANJOLELE] YET HE BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE KNEW THERE WAS A MATCHING PAIR. HE COULDN’T AFFORD BOTH OF THEM AT THE SAME TIME. HE BOUGHT HIS GUITAR AND THEN, LATER ON WHEN HE HAD SOME MORE MONEY, HE WENT AND GOT THAT FOR LORNE, BUT I CAN’T REMEMBER HIM PLAYING IT.” “[HE BOUGHT THE BANJOLELE] HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. HE BROUGHT [HIS] VIOLIN FROM THE STATES, BUT THOSE TWO PIECES WERE BOUGHT IN LETHBRIDGE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE AT, BUT I KNOW IT WAS IN THE EARLY ‘20S BECAUSE THEY CAME TO THE FARM WITH US IN ’30. THEY CAME HERE IN ’18…HE WORKED AT THE CPR AS AN OILER AND THEN HE ENDED UP AT THE GALT GARDENS WORKING WITH THE PLANTS. WHEN THAT FIZZLED OUT, HE WANTED A FARM SO WE WENT FARMING.” HILL ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S MUSICAL BACKGROUND, NOTING, “[MY PARENTS] MOVED FROM ENGLAND TO IOWA. THEY WERE THERE FOR SEVEN YEARS AND DADDY LEARNED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE TOILET, IN THE OUTHOUSE. THAT’S WHAT HE TOLD US.” “HE LOVED MUSIC AND ACTUALLY HIS BEST WAS HAWAIIAN GUITAR…THAT’S WHY HE GOT [THE GUITAR], BECAUSE HE LOVED HAWAIIAN MUSIC. HE LOVED TO PLAY HAWAIIAN SONGS ON [THE GUITAR] BECAUSE THEY WERE SLOWER. THE VIOLIN HE COULD REALLY GO TO TOWN AND PLAY TWO STEPS.” “[WE] USED TO GO [TO DANCES] EVERY MONTH. I CAN SEE HIM WITH THE OLD MODEL T—HE WOULD HAVE TO PUT A FIRE UNDER IT TO GET IT STARTED AT HOME, THEN WE WOULD GO FOR THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND HE WOULD START PLAYING UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING. THEN HE HAS TO PUT THE FIRE UNDER TO GET THE CAR GOING AGAIN. THEY WERE BAD YEARS BUT THEY WERE WONDERFUL YEARS…FROM [1933] UNTIL I WENT OUT IN GRADE NINE HE USED TO COME, WE USED TO HAVE DANCES, ALL THROUGH THE THIRTIES WE HAD DANCES AT LEAST TWICE A MONTH.” BEVE ADDED, “HE PLAYED WITH OTHER MEN, HE DIDN’T PLAY BY HIMSELF.” RUTH ELABORATED, “THEY HAD A LADY ON THE PIANO, THEY HAD DADDY ON THE VIOLIN, AND THEN THEY HAD ANOTHER CHAP ON THE DRUMS…[OUR FATHER] TOOK THE LEAD. THE VIOLIN WOULD ALWAYS START BEFORE, BECAUSE HE HAD THE MEMORY OF THE PIECES HE WANTED TO PLAY AND NOBODY ELSE KNEW NOTHING UNTIL HE GOT STARTED. THEN THEY’D JOIN IN.” “HE WAS STILL PLAYING THE VIOLIN, HE USED TO LIKE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN. EVEN IN THE ‘40S [HE LIKED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN], I CAN REMEMBER THAT. HE DIDN’T SO MUCH PLAY [THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS] BUT HE PLAYED THE VIOLIN. “ “HE WAS GOOD. THAT DANCE FLOOR IN THE SCHOOL THERE WOULD BE LOADED AS SOON AS HE STARTED PLAYING. AS SOON AS HE STARTED TO PLAY THEY WERE ALL UP, AND AT NIGHT NOBODY LEFT UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING…HE USED TO TAKE THE GUITAR AND PLAY THE WALTZES ON THAT, BUT THE VIOLIN HE WOULD PLAY THE OTHERS.” “THAT CLASSICAL [MUSIC], HE HAD NO USE FOR [IT]. HE USED TO SAY, “THERE’S NO BEAT THERE.” THEY WERE HIS WORDS. THERE WAS NO BEAT AND HE SAID, “IF THEY CAN’T PLAY THIS, I’M NOT LISTENING.” HE COULDN’T READ MUSIC, BUT IF HE COULD SEE THE [NOTES] AS [THEY] WENT UP OR DOWN…THAT’S WHAT HE’D LOOK AT, AND THEN HE’D LEARN TO PLAY THAT SONG. THAT WAS ON THE GUITAR, THAT WAS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PART.” “[HE HAD THE INSTRUMENTS] ON OUR FARM AT KIPP, ALBERTA AND ON THE FARMHOUSE, I’M IN THE BED. HE [WOULD BE] PLAYING THAT AND THEN I’D GO TO SLEEP TO HIM PLAYING THAT DAY IN, WEEK AFTER WEEK. YEAR AFTER YEAR. HE ALWAYS PLAYED ME TO SLEEP.” “HE [PLAYED] IN THE FRONT ROOM. [THE INSTRUMENTS] STAYED IN THE CORNER, HE BUILT A SHELF FOR THE RADIO AND THEN [THE GUITAR] STOOD UNDERNEATH THAT SHELF. THAT’S WHERE [THEY] STAYED…[THE INSTRUMENTS WERE] WITH MY DAD UNTIL ’93, THEN HE CAME TO LIVE WITH ME AND OF COURSE HE BROUGHT HIS THINGS WITH HIM. I NEVER THOUGHT THEY WERE IN MY CLOSET AND I HADN’T DONE A BIG CLEANING, SO THEY’VE JUST BEEN THERE. NOW I THOUGHT IT’S TIME TO LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT THEM...[OUR FATHER] DIED IN ’98.” “I DIDN’T WANT THE INSTRUMENTS TO BE GARBAGED. I WANTED THEM TO MEAN SOMETHING, AND I KNEW…THE MUSEUM WOULD ACCEPT THEM…IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL [FOR MY DAD TO PLAY FOR ME] BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC TOO. THAT WAS REALLY SOMETHING TO HAVE HIM PLAYING TO ME ALL THE TIME [AT BEDTIME].” “LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT [THE INSTRUMENTS] NOW. I’VE GOT ALL THE MEMORIES…I CAN SEE HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN HEAR HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN SEE IT AT THE DANCEHALL, I’VE GOT IT RIGHT THERE. SO SOMEBODY ELSE CAN LOOK AT [THEM] NOW.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, SHELL
Catalogue Number
P20180001002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, METAL, SHELL
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Length
94
Width
32.5
Description
A. GUITAR, 94 CM LONG X 32.5 CM WIDE X 9 CM TALL. WOODEN BODY WITH PEARL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID AS PICK GUARD AND ALONG FRET BOARD; GUITAR IS STRUNG WITH SIX WIRE STRINGS. GUITAR HAS SIX TUNING KNOBS AT HEAD WITH WHITE PLASTIC HANDLES ON METAL SCREWS. GUITAR BODY HAS DECORATIVE BROWN, RED AND GREEN TRIM AROUND EDGE; GUITAR HAS BLACK KNOB AT BASE. “VALENCIA” LABEL AT TOP OF HEAD; GUITAR SHOWS WEAR AND STAINING ON PICK GUARD AND FRET BOARD; GUITAR HAS SOILING INSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. GUITAR CASE, 100 CM LONG X 37 CM WIDE X 13 CM TALL. BLACK FAUX-LEATHER EXTERIOR WITH LEATHER BUCKLE AT BASE AND LEATHER HANDLE FIXED TO TOP WITH SILVER RINGS; CASE OPENS AT BASE. BASE OF CASE HAS BLACK METAL SNAP AROUND LEATHER BUCKLE STRAP. INSIDE OF CASE LINED WITH BROWN FAUX-FUR. CASE IS HEAVILY WORN ON EDGES AND PEELING; CASE IS SCRATCHED ON SIDES; LEATHER BUCKLE STRAP AT BASE IS CRACKED AND FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BEVE SPENGLER AND RUTH HILL REGARDING RUTH’S DONATION OF A BANJOLELE AND GUITAR. THE INSTRUMENTS WERE KEPT AND PLAYED BY THEIR FAMER, SYDNEY JAMES WOMACK, IN THE 1930S AND 1940S. ON THE GUITAR, RUTH HILL RECALLED, “HE BOUGHT IT AND STARTED STRUMMING ON IT…IT WAS ALWAYS ON HIS LAP…MY DAD USED TO PLAY ME TO SLEEP FROM THE TIME…WE WENT OUT TO THE FARM IN ’30. I WAS BORN IN ’27, SO ALL THE ‘30S HE PLAYED ME TO SLEEP EVERY NIGHT…I NEVER SAW MY DAD PLAY [THE BANJOLELE] YET HE BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE KNEW THERE WAS A MATCHING PAIR. HE COULDN’T AFFORD BOTH OF THEM AT THE SAME TIME. HE BOUGHT HIS GUITAR AND THEN, LATER ON WHEN HE HAD SOME MORE MONEY, HE WENT AND GOT [THE BANJOLELE] FOR LORNE.” “HE LOVED MUSIC AND ACTUALLY HIS BEST WAS HAWAIIAN GUITAR…THAT’S WHY HE GOT [THE GUITAR], BECAUSE HE LOVED HAWAIIAN MUSIC. HE LOVED TO PLAY HAWAIIAN SONGS ON [THE GUITAR] BECAUSE THEY WERE SLOWER. THE VIOLIN HE COULD REALLY GO TO TOWN AND PLAY TWO STEPS.” “[HE BOUGHT THE GUITAR] HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. HE BROUGHT [HIS] VIOLIN FROM THE STATES, BUT THOSE TWO PIECES WERE BOUGHT IN LETHBRIDGE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE AT, BUT I KNOW IT WAS IN THE EARLY ‘20S BECAUSE THEY CAME TO THE FARM WITH US IN ’30. THEY CAME HERE IN ’18…HE WORKED AT THE CPR AS AN OILER AND THEN HE ENDED UP AT THE GALT GARDENS WORKING WITH THE PLANTS. WHEN THAT FIZZLED OUT, HE WANTED A FARM SO WE WENT FARMING.” HILL ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S MUSICAL BACKGROUND, NOTING, “[MY PARENTS] MOVED FROM ENGLAND TO IOWA. THEY WERE THERE FOR SEVEN YEARS AND DADDY LEARNED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE TOILET, IN THE OUTHOUSE. THAT’S WHAT HE TOLD US.” “[WE] USED TO GO [TO DANCES] EVERY MONTH. I CAN SEE HIM WITH THE OLD MODEL T—HE WOULD HAVE TO PUT A FIRE UNDER IT TO GET IT STARTED AT HOME, THEN WE WOULD GO FOR THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND HE WOULD START PLAYING UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING. THEN HE HAS TO PUT THE FIRE UNDER TO GET THE CAR GOING AGAIN. THEY WERE BAD YEARS BUT THEY WERE WONDERFUL YEARS…FROM [1933] UNTIL I WENT OUT IN GRADE NINE HE USED TO COME, WE USED TO HAVE DANCES, ALL THROUGH THE THIRTIES WE HAD DANCES AT LEAST TWICE A MONTH.” BEVE ADDED, “HE PLAYED WITH OTHER MEN, HE DIDN’T PLAY BY HIMSELF.” RUTH ELABORATED, “THEY HAD A LADY ON THE PIANO, THEY HAD DADDY ON THE VIOLIN, AND THEN THEY HAD ANOTHER CHAP ON THE DRUMS…[OUR FATHER] TOOK THE LEAD. THE VIOLIN WOULD ALWAYS START BEFORE, BECAUSE HE HAD THE MEMORY OF THE PIECES HE WANTED TO PLAY AND NOBODY ELSE KNEW NOTHING UNTIL HE GOT STARTED. THEN THEY’D JOIN IN.” “HE WAS STILL PLAYING THE VIOLIN, HE USED TO LIKE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN. EVEN IN THE ‘40S [HE LIKED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN], I CAN REMEMBER THAT. HE DIDN’T SO MUCH PLAY [THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS] BUT HE PLAYED THE VIOLIN. “ “HE WAS GOOD. THAT DANCE FLOOR IN THE SCHOOL THERE WOULD BE LOADED AS SOON AS HE STARTED PLAYING. AS SOON AS HE STARTED TO PLAY THEY WERE ALL UP, AND AT NIGHT NOBODY LEFT UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING…HE USED TO TAKE THE GUITAR AND PLAY THE WALTZES ON THAT, BUT THE VIOLIN HE WOULD PLAY THE OTHERS.” “THAT CLASSICAL [MUSIC], HE HAD NO USE FOR [IT]. HE USED TO SAY, “THERE’S NO BEAT THERE.” THEY WERE HIS WORDS. THERE WAS NO BEAT AND HE SAID, “IF THEY CAN’T PLAY THIS, I’M NOT LISTENING.” HE COULDN’T READ MUSIC, BUT IF HE COULD SEE THE [NOTES] AS [THEY] WENT UP OR DOWN…THAT’S WHAT HE’D LOOK AT, AND THEN HE’D LEARN TO PLAY THAT SONG. THAT WAS ON THE GUITAR, THAT WAS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PART.” “[HE HAD THE INSTRUMENTS] ON OUR FARM AT KIPP, ALBERTA AND ON THE FARMHOUSE, I’M IN THE BED. HE [WOULD BE] PLAYING THAT AND THEN I’D GO TO SLEEP TO HIM PLAYING THAT DAY IN, WEEK AFTER WEEK. YEAR AFTER YEAR. HE ALWAYS PLAYED ME TO SLEEP.” “HE [PLAYED] IN THE FRONT ROOM. [THE INSTRUMENTS] STAYED IN THE CORNER, HE BUILT A SHELF FOR THE RADIO AND THEN [THE GUITAR] STOOD UNDERNEATH THAT SHELF. THAT’S WHERE [THEY] STAYED…[THE INSTRUMENTS WERE] WITH MY DAD UNTIL ’93, THEN HE CAME TO LIVE WITH ME AND OF COURSE HE BROUGHT HIS THINGS WITH HIM. I NEVER THOUGHT THEY WERE IN MY CLOSET AND I HADN’T DONE A BIG CLEANING, SO THEY’VE JUST BEEN THERE. NOW I THOUGHT IT’S TIME TO LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT THEM...[OUR FATHER] DIED IN ’98.” “I DIDN’T WANT THE INSTRUMENTS TO BE GARBAGED. I WANTED THEM TO MEAN SOMETHING, AND I KNEW…THE MUSEUM WOULD ACCEPT THEM…IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL [FOR MY DAD TO PLAY FOR ME] BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC TOO. THAT WAS REALLY SOMETHING TO HAVE HIM PLAYING TO ME ALL THE TIME [AT BEDTIME].” “LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT [THE INSTRUMENTS] NOW. I’VE GOT ALL THE MEMORIES…I CAN SEE HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN HEAR HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN SEE IT AT THE DANCEHALL, I’VE GOT IT RIGHT THERE. SO SOMEBODY ELSE CAN LOOK AT [THEM] NOW.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180001002
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
IRON, LEATHER, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20160020000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Materials
IRON, LEATHER, STEEL
No. Pieces
2
Length
15.5
Width
9.1
Diameter
12.2
Description
METAL COW BELL WITH LEATHER STRAP. BELL IS MADE UP OF 2 PIECES OF METAL FUSED TOGETHER AT SIDES WITH TWO NAILS IN EACH SEAM. TOP IS FOLDED TOGETHER WITH THE ENDS FUSED DOWN THE SIDE IN A TRIANGULAR FOLD. FRONT AND BACK OF BELL ARE RELATIVELY FLAT, COMING OUT SLIGHTLY AT EDGE. WELDING OF BELL IS CRUDE. INSIDE OF THE BELL IS THE CLAPPER WITH A BALL END THAT IS 10.5 CM IN CIRCUMFERENCE. BALL IS ATTACHED TO A ROD THAT IS HOOKED TO THE LOOP INSIDE THE TOP OF BELL. FLAT METAL LOOP AT TOP OF BELL ATTACHES THE BELL TO LEATHER STRAP THAT IS 109.4 CM IN LENGTH AND 2.4 CM IN WIDTH. 9 HOLES PUNCHED IN LEATHER FOR STRAP ADJUSTMENT WITH THE BUCKLE GOING THROUGH THE 10TH HOLE PUNCH. STANDARD METAL BUCKLE WITH LEATHER BELT LOOP FOR THE EXCESS LENGTH OF STRAP. FAIR CONDITION: METAL SEVERELY RUSTED IN COLOUR. AT ONE SEAM NEAR THE BASE, THE METAL HAS OXIDIZED TO A GREEN COLOUR. METAL SURFACE INSIDE OF BELL HAS LOST SHINE AND IS RUSTY. STRAP IS SEVERELY WORN AND HAS SCRATCHES AND LOSS OF FINISH OVERALL. END OF THE STRAP OPPOSITE OF BUCKLE IS TORN OFF.
Subjects
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
History
ON 14 JULY, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONOR, ELLENNOR PORTER, AND HER DAUGHTER, KAREN PORTER AT THE GALT MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THAT INTERVIEW. ELLENNOR’S HUSBAND WAS ROBERT MICHAEL “MICK” PORTER. HE FOUND THE BELL AS ELLENNOR REMEMBERS, “[I REMEMBER] HIM BRINGING IT IN THE HOUSE… I DON’T KNOW JUST HOW LONG AGO… [AND HIM SAYING], ‘LOOK WHAT I GOT.’ THEN IT WAS JUST EVERYONE WAS SAYING, ‘WOW,’ AND PLAYING AROUND WITH IT… [AFTER THAT] IT WAS PUT IN THE BASEMENT WITH THE REST OF THE THINGS.” KAREN AND ELLENNOR BELIEVE THE BELL WOULD HAVE BEEN FOUND BY MICK IN THE 1950S OR THE 1960S. ELLENNOR CONTINUED, “[HE FOUND IT ON] THE RANCH. HE WAS OUT VISITING HIS RELATIVES OUT THERE. HE HAD AUNTS AND UNCLES ON THE BURN RANCH. HE’S PROBABLY JUST RE-VISITING THEIR PLACE THAT HAD BEEN SOLD, SO MAYBE IT CAME FROM PINCHER CREEK. IN THAT AREA ANYWAY, LUNDBRECK OR PINCHER CREEK.” “DAD WOULD GO UP SOMETIMES BY HIMSELF,” KAREN ADDED, “I DON’T THINK ANY OF US WERE WITH HIM WHEN HE CAME HOME WITH THAT. I THINK WE WERE AT HOME WHEN HE BROUGHT IT TO THE HOUSE… IT IS ALSO POSSIBLE THAT HIS FATHER AND MOTHER HAD [THE BELL] AT THEIR HOUSE AND GAVE IT TO HIM. THEY WERE FARMERS AT THE WALDRON RANCH – NOW THE WALDRON RANCH – [BUT IT] WAS THE PORTER RANCH. THEY HAD A HOUSE IN PINCHER CREEK, SO THERE IS A POSSIBILITY THAT’S ALSO WHERE HE WOULD HAVE GOTTEN IT.” THINKING BACK TO HER LATE HUSBAND’S DAYS IN THE AREA, ELLENNOR EXPLAINED, “[MICK’S] DAD WAS AT THE PORTER/WALDRON RANCH. IT WAS JUST THE PORTER RANCH AND AFTER HE MOVED TO PINCHER, HE SOLD LIKE HIS INTEREST PART OF IT TO WALDRON, SO IT [BECAME] A PARTNERSHIP… THE WALDRON RANCH IS NEAR BLACK MOUNTAIN ON THAT ROAD, TOWARDS THE BAR-U RANCH.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE BELL, ELLENNOR SAID, “[THIS BELL] BRINGS BACK MEMORIES FROM WAY BACK WHEN WE USED TO LOOK FOR CATTLE BACK IN THE BUSH, AND I IMAGINE THAT’S WHAT MY HUSBAND MUST HAVE THOUGHT TOO… [IT WOULD BE] A REMEMBRANCE FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. THEY PROBABLY HAD TO BRING IN THE OLD MILK COW AND SHE WOULD BE WEARING THE BELL. THAT’S WHAT THEY DID. THEY PUT IT ON THE BIG MILK COW, SO THAT WHEN THEY WANTED THEM TO COME IN TO MILK THEY COULD FIND THEM. SOMETIMES THEY’D GO HIDE IN THE BUSH, SO THEY KEPT THE BELL ON THEM SO THEY COULD KEEP TRACK OF WHERE THEY WERE AT.” ELLENNOR FURTHER EXPLAINED, “I HAD NO CONNECTION WITH THAT BELL. WE HAD NO CATTLE. WE WERE GRAIN FARMERS.” KAREN ADDED, “MUM AND DAD WERE WHEAT FARMING ON [THE K-LAZY-A-RANCH]. THERE WERE CATTLE THERE, BUT MUM DOESN’T REMEMBER THERE BEING CATTLE WITH BELLS ON. THEY WERE IN THE FARM YARD… THERE WERE HARDLY ANY TREES. THAT WAS THE RANCH ORIGINALLY AND LATER BECAME A WHEAT FARM. IF THEY KEPT IT AS A RANCH WITH CATTLE AND HORSES, THAT MEANT THEY COULD NEVER EVER LEAVE AND IT WAS PRETTY ISOLATED, SO OVER THE YEARS DAD TALKED THE OWNER INTO LETTING HIM COVERT IT TO WHEAT.” “THERE WAS NO BUSH [THERE FOR THE COWS] TO HIDE IN. SO NO NEED FOR A BELL!” ELLENNOR REMEMBERED. THE DONOR AND HER DAUGHTER REMEMBERED HOW MICK VALUED OBJECTS AND MEMORIES. “HIS EYES WOULD LIGHT UP [AND HE WOULD SAY], ‘LOOK WHAT WE HAVE HERE,’ [WHEN HE SAW SOMETHING ATTACHED TO A MEMORY]. HE HAD ALL KINDS OF MEMORIES OF HIS GROWING UP. SOME WERE NOT TOO HAPPY, SOME WERE VERY HAPPY, BUT HE ALWAYS REALLY LOVED COWS. IT DIDN’T MATTER WHERE WE WENT TRAVELLING IN THE WORLD…[HE ALWAYS] STOPPED AND TOOK SOME PICTURES. ‘OH LOOK AT THE COWS!’ HE’D SAY,” ELLENNOR JUMPED IN, COMPLETING HER DAUGHTER’S SENTENCE. “DAD TOOK THOUSANDS OF PICTURES OF COWS. FOR HIM THERE WAS A REAL CORRELATION,” KAREN FINISHED. “[THE BELL IS A TREASURE] BECAUSE IT HAS BEEN IN OUR HOME FOR SUCH A LONG TIME. WHEN DAD BROUGHT IT HOME, IN HIS PERSPECTIVE, HE WOULD HAVE THE SAME KIND OF MEMORIES MY MUM DOES OF HEARING THE COWS…I CAN REMEMBER THEM WHEN I WAS LITTLE ON THE FARM OUT BY SKIFF HEARING COW BELLS OR BEING OUT AT MY GRANDMOTHER’S FARM BY OLDS HEARING COW BELLS… [THIS BRINGS] THE MEMORY OF DAD BEING EXCITED ABOUT [THE BELL] AND TRYING TO WAKE US UP IN THE MORNING RINGING IT, IF WE WERE SLEEPING IN TOO LONG. THAT’S MORE THE MEMORY FOR US… [BUT] I WAS NEVER ON THE RANCH WHEN MY DAD WOULD HAVE FOUND [THIS SPECIFIC] BELL, SO THOSE MEMORIES AREN’T MY MEMORIES, THEY’RE MORE HIS MEMORIES. HE ALWAYS TREASURED IT, HE ALWAYS WANTED IT KEPT AND WE’D LIKE TO HONOUR THAT,” KAREN ADDED. NOTES FROM AN 2008 INTERVIEW WITH MICKEY AND ELEANOR PORTER STATE THE DONOR’S FATHER-IN-LAW, GEORGE ENGLISH PORTER, WAS BORN 1878 IN ORILLIA, ONTARIO AND DIED ON MARCH 16, 1959. HE CAME WEST FROM ONTARIO IN 1896 AT THE AGE OF SEVENTEEN. GEORGE PORTER’S FAMILY SETTLED 30 MILES NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ON THE EASTERN SLOPES OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. THE FAMILY SETTLED ON THE BLACK MOUNTAIN RANCH. GEORGE WAS ONE OF FOURTEEN CHILDREN IN THE FAMILY. HER MOTHER-IN-LAW WAS BORN IN EASTERN CANADA BEFORE MOVING TO OREGON. SHE IMMIGRATED TO CANADA WHEN SHE WAS8 YEARS OLD AND WAS RAISED ON THE BURN RANCH NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ALBERTA. THE NOTES FURTHER STATE THE DONOR, ELLENNOR PORTER, WAS BORN IN 1922. THE OBITUARY FOR ROBERT MICHAEL “MICK” PORTER READS MICK WAS BORN ON MAY 23, 1921 IN COWLEY, ALBERTA. HE ATTENDED SCHOOL IN COWLEY AND GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL FROM ST. MICHAEL’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL IN PINCHER CREEK. HE JOINED THE RCAF DURING WWII AND UPON AN HONOURABLE DISCHARGE AFTER A HIP INJURY, HE WORKED AS A GRAIN BUYER. HE MARRIED ELLENNOR CHRISTOFFERSEN IN OLDS, ALBERTA. LATER, HE WORKED FOR THE MCINTYRE RANCH FOR 5 YEARS. IN 1953, HE BEGAN FARMING IN THE SKIFF AREA AND RETIRED IN 1984. MICK AND ELLENNOR HAD FIVE CHILDREN: LAWNA ROBART, MICHAEL, RONALD, KAREN PORTER, AND CHRISTOPHER, WHO PASSED AWAY AS AN INFANT. MICK PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 AT THE AGE OF 91 YEARS. HISTORY OF THE WALDRON CATTLE RANCH LTD. WAS PUBLISHED IN THE “CANADIAN CATTLEMEN” PUBLICATION IN MARCH OF 1946. IT STATES THE RANCH “COMPRISED ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND ACRES OF LAND SITUATED IN SOUTH-WESTERN ALBERTA. IT WAS SITUATED IN A VALLEY EXTENDING BETWEEN THE PORCUPINE HILLS AND OLD MAN RIVER FOR ABOUT 30 MILES NORTH AND SOUTH AND VARYING FROM THREE TO FIVE MILES IN WIDTH.” THE HISTORY STATES THE WALDRON CATTLE RANCH WAS FORMED IN 1883 BY SIR JOHN WALROND WALROND OF BARONET AND LORD CLINTON OF LONDON – BOTH MEN OF ENGLAND. ON JUNE 26TH, 1884, QUEEN VICTORIA GRANTED THE RANCH AN INDENTURE OF LEASE TO SIR WALROND, BARONET. (THE TEXT OF THAT LEASE AGREEMENT WAS PRODUCED AS PART OF THE CATTLEMEN PUBLICATION AND IS ATTACHED TO THE ARTIFACT’S PERMANENT RECORD.) ACCORDING TO THE ARTICLE, THE FIRST PURCHASE OF CATTLE WAS IN 1883 – 3,125 HEAD FOR $100,000. IN 1897, THE COMPANY WAS INCORPORATED UNDER THE CANADIAN JOINT STOCK COMPANIES ACT, MOVING ITS HEAD OFFICE FROM LONDON, ENGLAND. DUNCAN MCEACHRAN WAS APPOINTED PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER OF THE RANCH AND DAVID WARNOCK FROM GLASGOW BECAME THE LOCAL MANAGER. AT THE TIME OF THIS TRANSITION, IT IS BELIEVED THE RANCH HAD GROWN TO 12,311, THOUGH THIS WAS A MERE ESTIMATE. MCEACHRAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THE COMPANY FROM ITS BEGINNING IN 1883, WHEN HE STARTED AS THE GENERAL MANAGER. HIS LEADERSHIP GOT THE COMPANY THROUGH “PERIODS OF DEPRESSED CONDITION.” AFTER A HARSH WINTER IN 1906-1907, THE RANCH LOST APPROXIMATELY 5,000 HEAD OF CATTLE DUE TO SEVERE TEMPERATURE CHANGES. AFTER THIS, IN THE SUMMER OF 1908, THE RANCH “DISPOSED OF ALL ITS CATTLE TO PAT BURNS. FOLLOWING THE SALE, THE LAND OF THE WALDRON RANCH, EXCLUDING 1,000 ACRES WAS LEASED FIRST TO W. R. HULL, THEN TO PAT BURNS. C. W. BUCHANAN WAS APPOINTED THE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER OF THE RANCH THAT IN 1923. MCEACHRAN PASSED AWAY IN OCTOBER 1924. ANOTHER HISTORY ON THE RANCH WAS FOUND BY MUSEUM RESEARCHERS IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. PUBLISHED ON 1 MAY 1954, THE ARTICLE READS, “AT ONE TIME THE WALDRON LEASE CONSISTED OF BETWEEN 300,000 TO 400,000 ACRES OF LAND, EXTENDING FROM WHAT IS KNOWN AS STOWE TO THE NORTH FORK OF THE OLDMAN RIVER. IN THE NORTH FORK DISTRICT THE LAND WAS DIVIDED INTO FIVE BRANCHES… AT ITS PEAK IN THE SUMMER OF 1906 THE RANCH HAD 20,000 HEAD OF STOCK.” GEORGE PORTER IS LISTED IN THE HISTORY AS ONE OF THE CATTLE MEN EMPLOYED BY THE WALDRON RANCH FROM 1883 TO 1908. ABOUT HIM, THE ARTICLE STATES, “GEORGE PORTER [WAS] A GOOD STOCKMAN, [WHO] LATER BOUGHT 12 SECTIONS OF THE COMPANY’S FREEHOLD AT ITS NORTHERN END AND ADJOINING LAND ALREADY OWNED BY HIM.” “GEORGE PORTER AND SONS HAVE SOLD THEIR RANCH AND CATTLE TO JOHN FRANCIS MILLER… THE PORTER RANCH IS ABOUT THIRTY MILES NORTH OF LUNDBRECK AND ADJOINS THE 19,000 ACRE WALDRON RANCH WHICH MR. MILLER ALSO OWNS HAVING PURCHASED IT FROM P. BURNS RANCHES LAST FEBRUARY,” THE HISTORY STATES. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE 21 AUGUST 1953 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ANNOUNCED, “TWO OF THE LARGEST AND MOST FAMOUS RANCHES IN THE SOUTH-WESTERN ALBERTA FOOTHILLS ARE BEING OFFERED FOR SALE. THEY ARE THE WALDRON AND PORTER RANCHERS, NORTH OF LUNDBRECK. THESE PROPERTIES ARE OWNED NOW BY JOHN F. MILLER OF LAS VEGAS, NEVADA… [THEY] HAVE BEEN OPERATED BY MR. MILLER’S SON, WHO TOOK OVER THE JOB SEVERAL YEARS AGO WHEN THE MILLERS BOUGHT THE WALDRON FROM THE WALDRON RANCHING COMPANY AND THE PORTER RANCH PROPERTY FROM GEORGE PORTER…” THE HISTORY OF GEORGE AND NORA PORTER (NEE BURN)’S MARRIAGE WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON JUNE 26, 1954 FOR THEIR 50TH ANNIVERSARY. THE COUPLE WERE MARRIED AT THE BURN RANCH IN JUNE 21 1904. THE COUPLE’S FOURTEEN CHILDREN WERE: MARJORIE ANDERSON, NORMAN PORTER, PHYLLIS ROBBINS, KATHLEEN HAMILTON, WINNIFRED BONERTZ, SANDY PORTER, EILEEN IRONMONGER, JEAN ALCOCK, JOSEPHINE ROBINSON, LILLIAN CHRISTIANSON, ISOBEL SINNOT, MICHAEL PORTER, LAWRENCE PORTER, AND CONNIE PORTER. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20080020001 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE PORTER AND BURN FAMILIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160020000
Acquisition Date
2016-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"113TH BATTALION...LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, WICKER, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190007005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"113TH BATTALION...LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS"
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, WICKER, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
8.5
Length
52.6
Width
41.5
Description
BROWN WOOD TRAY WITH WICKER SIDES AND HANDLES; INSIDE OF TRAY HAS LARGE STENCILLED AND PAINTED CREST COMPRISED OF AN OVAL WITH BLACK OUTLINE, A BLACK, YELLOW, AND RED CROWN AT THE TOP, A GREEN MAPLE LEAF IN THE CENTER OF THE OVAL WITH “113” IN YELLOW, A BLACK BANNER ACROSS THE BASE OF THE OVAL WITH “CANADA” IN YELLOW, GREEN THISTLES AROUND THE BANNER, AND YELLOW TEXT ON BROWN BACKGROUND AROUND THE EDGES OF THE OVAL, “OVERSEAS BATTALION, LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS”. WICKER SIDES ARE DISCOLOURED AND WORN; BASE IS SCRATCHED AND HAS BROKEN AND FRAYED WICKER ENDS AROUND EDGES; INSIDE OF TRAY HAS CRACKLING OF FINISH, IS SCRATCHED, AND PAINT IS FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
MILITARY
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON MARCH 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CAROL AND BRETT CLIFTON REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE AND MILITARY MEMORABILIA. THE OBJECTS WERE COLLECTED BY CAROL’S LATE HUSBAND, CHRIS CLIFTON, AND DONATED IN HIS MEMORY. ON THE TRAY, BRETT CLIFTON NOTED, “THE ONES [I FIND IMPORTANT], AFTER MY BREAK- IN, THERE WERE SOME OTHER THINGS THAT WERE TOTALLY IRREPLACEABLE TO ME, NOT NECESSARILY THE HIGHEST MONETARY VALUE, BUT SOMETHING WHERE I’D BE LIKE, “OH, DARN WHERE AM I EVER GOING TO FIND ANOTHER LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS TRAY AGAIN?...SOME OF THE THINGS TOO THAT I CHOSE, THE PENNANTS AND THE TRAY IN PARTICULAR AND THE SPORRAN, ARE JUST THINGS LIKE, THEY’RE REALLY COOL FOR ME TO HAVE AND THEY’RE AWESOME TO SIT IN MY BASEMENT AND I CAN GO LOOK AT THEM ANY TIME I WANT, BUT NO ONE ELSE GETS TO SEE THEM. THERE’S A BROADER STORY TO BE TOLD IN A MORE, COMMUNITY APPRECIATION, I THINK, THAN JUST SITTING IN MY BASEMENT, IN MY MAN CAVE, LOOKING AT IT.” ON CHRIS CLIFTON’S ACQUISITIONS OF THE OBJECTS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “[CHRIS SEARCHED ON] AUCTION WEB…HE WAS A VERY EARLY USER. THESE THINGS COST MONEY. CHRIS AND I WERE ALWAYS LIKE, ‘OH WELL, ONE DAY WE’LL DONATE THEM AND IT’LL BE OUR GIFT TO CHARITY...’” “MUCH OF THE REST [OF THE COLLECTION] WAS FOUND BY CHRIS ON EBAY…IT COULD BE THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT [AND CHRIS WOULD SAY], ‘HEY, BRETT, GUESS WHAT’S ON EBAY?’” “HE DIDN’T THINK TWICE. IF [AN ITEM] WAS THERE AND HE COULD AFFORD IT, HE GOT IT...IT WAS LIKE HE FELT LIKE HE WAS SAVING IT. I SUPPOSE, AS A MUSEUM, YOU CAN’T NECESSARILY JUST BUY WITH THAT ABANDON BECAUSE YOU HAVE PEOPLE YOU HAVE TO ANSWER TO. WELL, HE DIDN’T HAVE TO ANSWER TO ANYONE...IF HE FELT IT BELONGED IN LETHBRIDGE HE BOUGHT IT...[HE WAS] BRINGING IT HOME.” ON THEIR MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTIONS, CAROL CLIFTON NOTED, “THE FIRST REASON THAT WE DECIDED TO DONATE AT THIS TIME…IS THAT WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A NICE WAY TO HONOUR [CHRIS] TO MAKE SURE THAT THE COLLECTION ALWAYS STAYED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND THAT IT’S AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS. [THE DONATION] WOULD BE SOMETHING IN HIS MEMORY THAT WOULD KEEP HIS MEMORY ALIVE.” ON HER HUSBAND’S INTEREST IN SOUTERN ALBERTA HISTORY, CAROL CLIFTON ELABORATED, “CHRIS PASSED AWAY…[HE] REALLY MADE US INTERESTED IN HISTORY. FOR HIM IT WAS ALL ABOUT LOCAL HISTORY, SO ANYTHING THAT HE COLLECTED HAD A LETHBRIDGE OR SOUTHERN ALBERTA CONNECTION OR HE DIDN’T COLLECT IT. HE LIKED TO RESEARCH THEM.” “[CHRIS] WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE BEEN RAISED MORMON FROM A MORMON FAMILY THAT HAD DEEP PIONEER ROOTS INTO UTAH, AND WERE ORIGINALS TO UTAH AND ORIGINALS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ALONG WITH THAT MORMONS…REALLY ENCOURAGE HISTORY IN TERMS OF COLLECTING THEIR ARTIFACTS OR RELIGIOUS ARTIFACTS, AND GENEALOGY. [CHRIS DID] ALL OF HIS OWN GENEALOGY AND HE WOULD DO GENEALOGY FOR ANYONE HE KNEW. WE JUST LITERALLY HAVE REAMS OF PERSONAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY IN THAT FORM. IT GREW FROM THERE. [CHRIS] WAS A COLLECTOR AT HEART, HE BEGAN COIN COLLECTING AND DID A LOT OF WORK FOUNDING A NUMISMATICS SOCIETY IN TOWN AND BELONGED TO SEVERAL, AND DISPLAYED ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.” “IN TERMS OF THE MILITARY ITEMS, I WOULD SAY [HIS INTEREST BEGAN] WITH HIS DAD BEING FROM THE CALGARY TANK REGIMENT IN DIEPPE AND A PRISONER OF WAR. HIS DAD’S MOTHER HAD SAVED A BUNCH OF ITEMS AND BEFORE CHRIS’ DAD PASSED AWAY, HE GAVE EVERYTHING TO CHRIS…THAT KIND OF FOSTERED [HIS INTEREST IN MILITARY COLLECTIONS] AND THEN IT JUST GREW INTO INTERESTING LOCAL THINGS.” “CHRIS LOVED SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND NO MATTER WHAT, HE NEVER WOULD HAVE LEFT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE LOVED TO TRAVEL BUT HE NEVER WOULD HAVE MOVED. HE LIVED IN MAGRATH AND LETHBRIDGE HIS WHOLE LIFE AND HAD NO INTEREST IN ANY OTHER PLACE BUT HERE.” ON CHRIS’ RESEARCH EFFORTS, CAROL CLIFTON RECALLED, “CHRIS WAS METICULOUS. ANYTHING CHRIS DID, HE DID IT TEN TIMES MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE WOULD. HE WOULD NOT GIVE UP…WHEN [HIS SON] BRETT DID THE CENOTAPH WORK, CHRIS WOULD HELP HIM IDENTIFY [THE NAMES] AND IT WOULD BE A DEAD END AFTER ANOTHER DEAD END, AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNEW WAS CHRIS HAD FOUND A RELATIVE IN ENGLAND WHO WAS A GREAT GRANDDAUGHTER’S NEIGHBOR. HE WOULD LITERALLY SPEND YEARS RESEARCHING ONE THING. IT WAS JUST HIS PERSONALITY AND HIS LEVEL OF INTEREST AND HE DIDN’T STOP THERE, HE WOULD DO IT FOR ANYONE…HE WAS A VERY GIVING PERSON AND HE WAS SO FANTASTICALLY GOOD AT THAT TYPE OF RESEARCH.” “[CHRIS] AND BRETT TOGETHER WOULD DO [THE RESEARCH] AND I WOULD DO IT OUT OF INTEREST…I DON’T KNOW OF ANYONE WHO DID IT TO THE LEVEL HE DID. HE WOULD BE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT FOLLOWING A LEAD IN EUROPE ON SOMEONE HE DIDN’T KNOW FOR SOMEONE HE BARELY KNEW…[CHRIS WAS] TOTALLY SELF-TAUGHT…OF COURSE WITH THE INTERNET IT BECAME MUCH EASIER FOR EVERYONE TO [SEARCH]. THE GENEALOGY HE DID BEFORE WAS PRE-INTERNET SO THAT INVOLVED A LOT OF ARCHIVAL THINGS…HE BEGAN RESEARCH WORK VERY EARLY IN THE INTERNET AND WE GOT OUR FIRST COMPUTER IN 1995, AND HE PRETTY MUCH DID RESEARCH FROM THEN ON. HE WAS INTERESTING IN THAT NO MATTER WHAT RESEARCH HE DID HE DIDN’T WANT CREDIT FOR IT. HE DIDN’T WANT TO BELONG TO THINGS…IN ADDITION, HE DIDN’T LIKE TO DO THE WRITING, ALTHOUGH HE COULD WRITE, BUT HE WAS THE BEST PROOF READER BECAUSE HE WAS SO METICULOUS, AND HE WOULD PROOF READ FOR ANYONE. [IF] SOMEBODY WROTE AN ARTICLE HE WOULD BE A PROOF READER OR A FACT CHECKER. IT WAS JUST HIS NATURE…[HE WAS] STUBBORN, AND COMPETITIVE, AND INTERESTED, AND METICULOUS, AND IF HE DID IT IT’S CORRECT. IF THERE’S A MISTAKE IN IT HE SURE DIDN’T KNOW IT. HE WOULD HAVE NEVER PUT ANYTHING DOWN HE WASN’T PRETTY DARN SURE OF.” IN 2014 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVERY OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS IS EXCERPTED FROM CHRISTOPHER R. KILFORD'S BOOK 'LETHBRIDGE AT WAR: THE MILITARY HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE FROM 1990 TO 1996' (BATTERY BOOKS & PUBLISHING, 1996) AND COMPILED BY EDMUNDSON. "THE 113TH CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE, THE LETHBRIDGE HIGHLANDERS, WERE ORGANIZED DECEMBER 22, 1915 [AS] PART OF A CANADIAN RECRUITING DRIVE WHERE MEN FROM THE SAME REGION COULD ENLIST AND SERVE TOGETHER. THIS TYPE OF COMMUNITY SPIRIT RECRUITING WAS VERY POPULAR AS IT DREW IN FRIENDS, NEIGHBOURS, CO-WORKERS, ETC. WITH THE PROMISE OF SERVING TOGETHER THROUGHOUT THE WAR. THE 113TH CONSISTED OF 883 MEN AND OFFICERS AND HAD ITS BARRACKS AT THE EXHIBITION GROUNDS IN LETHBRIDGE... BASIC TRAINING IN THE CEF INVOLVED RIFLE TRAINING, BOMBING OR HAND GRENADE PRACTICE, ROUTE MARCHES, RIFLE DRILL AND MANY INSPECTIONS... IN LATE MAY 1916 THE BATTALION MOVED TO SARCEE CAMP OUTSIDE CALGARY FOR FURTHER TRAINING THAT LASTED UNTIL SEPTEMBER... ON SEPTEMBER 26TH 1916 THE 113TH EMBARKED ALONG WITH THE 111TH AND 145TH BATTALIONS ON THE SS TUSCANIA... UPON ARRIVING IN ENGLAND THE BATTALION WAS TAKEN TO A HOLDING CAMP AT SANDLING NEAR SHORNCLIFFE... THE COMMANDING OFFICER LEARNED THAT THE 113TH WOULD BE BROKEN UP FOR REPLACEMENTS AND WOULD NOT SEE ACTION AS A UNIT AFTER ALL... THE 113TH WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE 17TH RESERVE BATTALION CEF, THE NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, AFFILIATED WITH THE SCOTTISH SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS... ON OCTOBER 12, 1916 MOST OF THE OLD 113TH PROCEEDED TO FRANCE... ALMOST IMMEDIATELY 300 MEN OF THE OLD 113TH WERE ASSIGNED AS REPLACEMENTS TO ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS BATTALIONS IN THE CEF, THE 16TH BATTALION CANADIAN SCOTTISH." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190007005
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SAXOPHONE W/CASE AND ACCESSORIES
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS, VELVET, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20190003000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SAXOPHONE W/CASE AND ACCESSORIES
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
BRASS, VELVET, WOOD
No. Pieces
9
Height
15.3
Length
61.2
Width
26
Description
A. CASE, BLACK SYNTHETIC LEATHER EXTERIOR, 61.2 CM LONG X 26 CM WIDE X 15.3 CM TALL. LINED WITH BLUE COTTON VELVET; CASE HAS BLACK LEATHER HANDLE ON FRONT WRAPPED IN BLACK PLASTIC TAPE; FRONT HAS TWO SILVER METAL CLASPS AND SILVER METAL LOCK IN CENTER. FRONT HAS BROWN PAPER LABEL WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “S.R. SMEREK”. FRONT AND TOP HAVE WORN BROWN PAPER LABELS; WORN LABEL ON TOP HAS REMAINING TEXT “CANADIAN PACIFIC EXPRESS COMPANY”. CORNERS OF CASE HAVE SILVER METAL GUARDS. CASE EXTERIOR HAS METAL GUARD ALONG EDGE OF LID COVERED SYNTHETIC LEATHER. INSIDE HAS INDENT FOR SAXOPHONE BODY; INSIDE HAS SQUARE COMPARTMENT WITH BLACK LEATHER STRAP AND SILVER BUTTON SNAP FOR STORING MOUTHPIECE, NECK, REEDS, AND CLEANING CLOTH. CASE EXTERIOR IS WORN, SCRATCHED, AND STAINED ON ALL SIDES; EDGES OF CASE ARE HEAVILY WORN WITH WOOD UNDER OUTER LINING VISIBLE IN PATCHES. METAL CORNERS AND CLASPS ARE TARNISHED; LABELS ARE DISCOLOURED AND BRITTLE. INSIDE OF CASE HAS WORN LINING. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. SAXOPHONE BODY, BRASS, 57 CM LONG X 22.5 CM WIDE. SAXOPHONE KEYS INLAID WITH PEARL; BOW HAS RED FELT RESTS ON VALVES. BELL HAS INSCRIPTION ON FRONT, “INDIANA, INDIANA BAND INST. CO., ELKHART, IND., U.S.A.” WITH LOGO OF THE PROFILE OF A NATIVE AMERICAN MAN IN HEADDRESS. BACK OF BODY HAS WHITE PAPER LABEL TAPED ON WITH BLACK PRINTED TEXT “STEVE SMEREK, ROYAL ALBERTANS ORCHESTRA 1940’S, LETHBRIDGE, AB”. INCLUDED INSIDE IS YELLOW COTTON-FELT RING FOR FITTING TO BODY AT NECK IN TRANSPORT. BACK OF BODY HAS BRASS LOOP FOR ATTACHING NECK STRAP. BODY IS TARNISHED AND CORRODED ON BACK, KEYS, AND BELL; BELL HAS WHITE RESIDUE AROUND BASE OF VALVES AND BASES OF VALVE GUARDS; INSIDE NECK AND BELL OPENINGS ARE TARNISHED AND CORRODED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. SAXOPHONE NECK, 16,3 CM LONG X 2.2 CM DIAMETER. BRASS NECK PIECE WITH CORK AT END TO ATTACH TO MOUTHPIECE. BASE HAS ROUND OCTAVE PIN RING WITH OCTAVE KEY THAT RUNS ALONG TOP; OCTAVE KEY HAS RED COTTON PAD ON BASE AND CORK ALONG UNDERSIDE THAT TOUCHES NECK. INSIDE OF NECK IS TARNISHED AND CORRODED; OUTSIDE OF NECK IS TARNISHED; CORK AT MOUTHPIECE END HAS TARNISHING WORN THROUGH; TARNISHING VISIBLE AROUND BODY END. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. CLEANING CLOTH, 48 CM LONG X 21 CM WIDE. YELLOW COTTON CLOTH WITH BROWN STITCHED EDGING AT ENDS; CLOTH IS FRAYED AT UPPER EDGE. CLOTH IS STAINED WITH BROWN, BLACK AND GREEN ON FRONT AND BACK; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. E. MOUTHPIECE IN BOX. MOUTHPIECE 10 CM LONG X 2.5 CM DIAMETER; BOX 12.5 CM LONG X 4.3 CM WIDE X 4.2 CM TALL. MOUTHPIECE BLACK PLASTIC WITH SILVER METAL CAP, WOODEN REED, SILVER METAL CLASP AND TWO SILVER METAL PINS. BACK OF MOUTHPIECE HAS WHITE SQUARE PATCH; BACK OF CLASP HAS ENGRAVED “A”. BOX BASE IS BLUE CARDBOARD WITH BLUE INSERT AND ATTACHED BLACK ELASTIC BAND. BOX LID IS LIGHT BLUE CARDBOARD WITH DARK BLUE TEXT ON TOP “BRILLHART” WITH IMAGES OF MOUTHPIECE AND REED; SIDE OF LID HAS DARK BLUE TEXT “TOMALIN, CLARINET, SERIAL NO. FACING, 24607, 3” WITH IMAGE OF STAR BESIDE “3”; SIDE OF LID HAS HANDWRITTEN PENCIL INSCRIPTION “SCCC, 15.50”. MOUTHPIECE HAS TARNISHING ON CAP AND METAL CLASP AND PINS; BOX BASE IS WORN ON INSIDE AND OUTER SIDES; BOX LID IS WORN AT EDGES AND ON SIDES. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. F. TWO REEDS IN PAPER SLEEVE, 11.4 CM LONG X 3.2 CM WIDE. ORANGE CARDBOARD SLEEVE WITH GREY CARDBOARD INSERT; CANE REED INSERTED ON EITHER SIDE OF CENTER CARDBOARD. ORANGE CARDBOARD STAPLED CLOSED AT EDGES. CANE REEDS DISCOLORED PINK; REEDS STAMPED IN BLACK AT BASES “RICO” WITH BARS AND TREBLE CLEF BACKGROUND IMAGE, “REGISTERED U.S. PAT. OFFICE” AND “REG. U.S. PAT.”, “V1” AND “V2” STAMPED AT BASE. REEDS HAVE RESIDUE AT TOPS; LABELS FADED ON REEDS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. G. CANE REED IN CARDBOARD SLEEVE, 9.1 CM LONG X 3.8 CM WIDE. CARDBOARD SLEEVE FOLDED OVER; FRONT HAS BLACK PRINTED IMAGE OF REED AND TEXT “MICRO “PLASTICOAT” REED, A GUARANTEED “MICRO” PRODUCT” AND FADED STAMP AT BOTTOM EDGE “ALTO SAX. NO. 2”. BACK OF SLEEVE HAS BLACK PRINTED TEXT “PLEASE NOTE: AFTER USING YOUR MACRO “PLASTICOAT” REED FOR A WHILE THE PLASTI-COATING MAY PEEL OFF. WHEN THIS HAPPENS YOUR REED IS READY TO GIVE YOU EVEN MORE SATISFACTION AS TO TONE AND PLAYING SERVICE. IT IS ONLY THE EXCESS COATING THAT PEELS OFF.” INSIDE OF SLEEVE HAS BLACK PRINTED TEXT “CAUTION: TO AVOID DAMAGE TO TIP, DO NOT PUSH REED TOO FAR IN. IMPORTANT: FOR BEST RESULTS, WET REED THOROLY, SAME AS CANE REED, BEFORE PLAYING.” REED IS WOODEN WITH WORN BLACK COATING ON BACK AND FRONT; REED FRONT HAS BLACK AND GOLD LABEL AT BASE, “MICRO PLASTICOAT CANE REED, REG. U.S. PAT. OFF., MADE IN U.S.A., 2”. SLEEVE IS WORN AT EDGES AND CREASED; BACK OF SLEEVE HAS RED STAINING AT LOWER EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. H. CANE REED IN CARDBOARD SLEEVE, 9.1 CM LONG X 3.7 CM WIDE. CARDBOARD SLEEVE FOLDED OVER; FRONT HAS BLACK PRINTED IMAGE OF REED AND TEXT “MICRO “PLASTICOAT” REED, A GUARANTEED “MICRO” PRODUCT” AND FADED STAMP AT BOTTOM EDGE “ALTO SAX. NO. 3”. BACK OF SLEEVE HAS BLACK PRINTED TEXT “PLEASE NOTE: AFTER USING YOUR MACRO “PLASTICOAT” REED FOR A WHILE THE PLASTI-COATING MAY PEEL OFF. WHEN THIS HAPPENS YOUR REED IS READY TO GIVE YOU EVEN MORE SATISFACTION AS TO TONE AND PLAYING SERVICE. IT IS ONLY THE EXCESS COATING THAT PEELS OFF.” INSIDE OF SLEEVE HAS BLACK PRINTED TEXT “CAUTION: TO AVOID DAMAGE TO TIP, DO NOT PUSH REED TOO FAR IN. IMPORTANT: FOR BEST RESULTS, WET REED THOROLY, SAME AS CANE REED, BEFORE PLAYING.” REED IS WOODEN WITH GROOVED BACK OF BASE; REED HAS FADED BLACK STAMP ON BASE OF FRONT “VIBRATOR, CHIRON, FRANCE, M.F.G. U.S.A.” SLEEVE IS WORN AT EDGES AND CREASED ON FRONT AND BACK; SLEEVE HAS RIP ON FRONT RIGHT EDGE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. I. NECK STRAP, 40.8 CM LONG X 10.3 CM WIDE. BROWN LEATHER AT NECK WITH COTTON CORDS ATTACHED. CORDS ATTACH AT BASE WITH BLACK PLASTIC FITTING; CORDS ARE TWINED AT BASE TO ATTACH TO SILVER METAL HOOK. COTTON CORDS STAINED GREEN; LEATHER IS WORN AND STAINED GREEN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
MILITARY
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BARBARA LEGGE AND ROBERT SMEREK REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF A SAXOPHONE, CASE, AND ACCESSORIES. LEGGE AND SMEREK RECALLED THAT THE SAXOPHONE BELONGED TO THEIR FATHER, STEVE SMEREK, WHO PLAYED IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE SAXOPHONE, LEGGE ELABORATED, “IT WAS STILL MY DAD’S…HE DIED IN 1970. MY DAD [WAS] STEVE SMEREK, THE ORCHESTRA LEADER OF THE ROYAL ALBERTAN’S ORCHESTRA.” “[DAD] PLAYED IN…THE ROYAL ALBERTAN’S ORCHESTRA…FROM IN THE EARLY ‘40S, TILL 1951. [ROB AND I WERE] VERY SMALL [ROB WAS BORN IN ’43, AND I WAS BORN IN 1948], AND THEY PLAYED TILL ’51, AS FAR AS I COULD CAPTURE [FROM] THE NEWSPAPER ARTICLES. I ONLY REMEMBER GOING TO A PRACTICE WITH HIM. I THINK IT WAS AT THE TRIANON…WHEN I WAS YOUNG…WHEN HE WAS WORKING, WE WOULD PLAY ON THE PIANO…” “I PLAYED WITH MY DAD, WHILE ON THE PIANO, AND THEN HE ACCOMPANIED ME WITH THE SAXOPHONE [THAT WAS IN JUNIOR HIGH, I GUESS]…WE STARTED BAND IN GRADE TEN, SO THAT WAS PROBABLY IN 1964, THAT I ACTUALLY HAD [THE SAXOPHONE] IN MY HANDS.” “MY BIGGEST MEMORY IS HIM COMING IN AND PLAYING THE SAXOPHONE, JOINING ME ON WHATEVER I WAS PRACTICING ON THE PIANO. [MY] BEGINNER PIANO LESSONS WERE IN CLASSICAL MUSIC. I WAS PROBABLY PLAYING POPULAR MUSIC BY THAT TIME. I HAD SWITCHED TO A MRS. SINCLAIR, TO LEARN POPULAR MUSIC. THAT’S WHEN I REMEMBER HIM COMING IN. I’D PLAY SOME OF HIS OLD SONGS, BECAUSE HE HAD BOOKS OF OLD SONGS THAT I USED TO PLAY ON PIANO, SO HE WOULD KNOW ALL THE MUSIC.” ROBERT SMEREK ADDED, “I WAS THERE ONCE, AT THE TRIANON BALLROOM…IT WAS A PRACTICE. THEY MIGHT HAVE BEEN RECORDING TOO…IN THE ‘50S, THE BIG BANDS WERE ON THE WAY OUT, SO THAT’S WHEN THE BAND TERMINATED, AND I WAS ONLY 8 YEARS OLD.” “I DON’T THINK THEY TRAVELED. THEY PLAYED THE TRIANON BALLROOM, HENDERSON LAKE PAVILION, THE RAINBOW BALLROOM IS ANOTHER ONE.” LEGGE CONTINUED, “BEFORE THAT, HE WAS IN OTHER BANDS, WITH SOME OF [THE SMALLER BANDS]. [HE WAS] IN A MELODY QUEEN’S BAND, WHEN HE WAS YOUNGER. THEN [HE WAS] IN THE 18TH BRIGADE BAND, DURING THE WAR. SOME PEOPLE FROM OTHER BANDS IN LETHBRIDGE, THEY WERE ALL KIND OF MUSICAL FRIENDS, (LOU GONZY AND THE RANCH BOYS, A FEW PEOPLE), AND I HAVE NO IDEA HOW [THE BAND MEMBERS] ALL GOT TOGETHER FOR THIS ORCHESTRA. THEY ALL PLAYED, AS FAR AS I COULD TELL, DIFFERENT INSTRUMENTS, BECAUSE THERE’S DIFFERENT PICTURES THAT WE HAVE. IN ONE, MY DAD’S PLAYING THE SAXOPHONE, BUT THERE’S ANOTHER ONE WHERE HE’S PLAYING THE CLARINET. IN SOME OF THE MUSIC, I THINK HE’S PLAYING THE TRUMPET. I DON’T KNOW IF IT’S HIM, FOR SURE. THEY WOULD SWITCH INSTRUMENTS, EXCEPT FOR MY UNCLE MIKE, WHO WAS THE DRUMMER IN THE BAND.” “SOME OF THE ANNOUNCEMENTS…WERE AT THE MARQUIS HOTEL, WHICH ISN’T HERE ANYMORE, AND THE LEGION MEMORIAL HALL. THERE’S A FEW WHERE, I THINK, THEY PROBABLY WENT OUT OF TOWN, BUT PROBABLY NO FARTHER THAN COALDALE. I THINK MOST, OR ALL THESE ANNOUNCEMENTS, ARE MOSTLY AT THE HENDERSON LAKE PAVILION, UNTIL THE END, THERE IS A TRIANON ONE…[DAD] HAD A FAMILY, SO HE DIDN’T REALLY TRAVEL…THE STORY TOLD BY MY AUNT, HIS SISTER-IN-LAW, WAS THAT, WHEN TOMMY DORSEY WAS HERE IN [JULY] 1951, THAT HE WANTED MY DAD TO JOIN HIS BAND WHEN HE WAS ON TOUR HERE. BUT MY DAD DIDN’T WANT TO GO, BECAUSE HE DIDN’T WANT TO LEAVE HIS FAMILY. WE WERE ALL SMALL THEN. AS FAR AS I KNOW, HE DIDN’T REALLY GO OUT OF TOWN. IT WAS ALL LAKE PAVILION, AND WORKING AT HIS REGULAR JOB.” “THE DANCES WERE…EVERY SATURDAY, AND TUESDAYS…I REMEMBER WEDNESDAYS IN LETHBRIDGE, THE STORES WERE CLOSED, AT LEAST FOR HALF A DAY, BECAUSE MY MOM USED TO WORK AT EATON’S, AND WEDNESDAY WAS THEIR DAY OFF, AT LEAST AFTER 12:00 NOON. SO, THERE WAS A LOT OF DANCING ON TUESDAYS, AND SATURDAYS.” “[MY DAD STARTED PLAYING MUSIC WHEN] MY GRANDMA (HIS MOM) WAS TOLD BY A DOCTOR THAT HIS LUNGS WERE A BIT WEAK, AND THAT THE BEST THING TO DO WAS TO START BLOWING AN INSTRUMENT…HIS LUNGS WERE KIND OF WEAK SO THE BEST THING TO DO WAS BLOW AN INSTRUMENT. THEY TELL YOU THAT TODAY, TOO. YOU CAN STRENGTHEN YOUR LUNGS BY BLOWING AN INSTRUMENT…THERE WAS MUSIC IN OUR FAMILY, PRIOR TO THAT, SO I’M NOT SURE WHY [DAD CHOSE] THE SAXOPHONE…[OUR DAD’S] GRANDFATHER HAD BEEN IN BANDS. THERE’S A FUNNY STORY ABOUT THE SMEREK’S – THERE WERE TWO SISTERS MARRIED TWO BROTHERS…AND THEY’RE ALL SINGERS, AND MUSICAL BACKGROUNDS FROM THE OLD COUNTRY. [THAT WAS] THE STORY WE WERE TOLD WHY HE STARTED PLAYING THE SAXOPHONE. MY GRANDMA DIDN’T WANT HIM TO GO INTO THE MINE…BECAUSE AN OLDER BROTHER WAS KILLED IN THE MINE–-THE #9 OR #6 MINE ON THE NORTH SIDE.” “[ROBERT] PLAYED THE TENOR, SO I RECEIVED THE ALTO SAX [FROM DAD], BECAUSE [DAD] TOLD ME IT WAS EASIER TO PLAY THAN HIS CLARINET, TO LEARN ON A SAXOPHONE INSTEAD. THAT WAS JUST IN HIGH SCHOOL, WHEN [MOM AND DAD WERE] STILL IN LETHBRIDGE.” ON THE MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE SAXOPHONE, LEGGE ELABORATED, “AFTER OUR DAD DIED, OUR MOTHER KEPT ALL THE INSTRUMENTS TILL WE WANTED THEM…I HAVE BEEN HOLDING [ONTO] THE SAXOPHONE [SINCE 1970], BECAUSE MY CHILDREN PLAYED IT IN BAND, IN HIGH SCHOOL [IN FORT MCMURRAY, ALBERTA], AND I PLAYED IT IN BAND, IN CATHOLIC CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL…ROB PLAYED THIS SAXOPHONE IN HIGH SCHOOL BAND AT ST. FRANCIS HIGH SCHOOL, LETHBRIDGE…WE’RE GETTING OLDER NOW, AND MOST OF THE PEOPLE THAT WE HAVE THE HISTORY FROM ARE NO LONGER WITH US. I DECIDED THAT IT WAS TIME TO PUT IT SOMEWHERE WHERE EVERYBODY CAN LOOK AT IT AND ENJOY IT…THE INSTRUMENT ITSELF. [I] WANT IT SOMEWHERE PROTECTED.” “IT’S VERY DIFFICULT FOR ME [TO GIVE IT UP], AND IT TOOK A WHILE FOR ME TO WANT TO DO THIS, AND KNOW THAT IT’S GOING TO BE HERE. I JUST HAVE TO ADJUST TO IT, BUT IT’S STILL, TODAY, A VERY DIFFICULT DAY FOR ME TO ACTUALLY GIVE YOU THIS [SAXOPHONE].” “IT’S ‘HIM’. IT JUST IS, BUT I STILL THINK [DONATING THE SAXOPHONE IS] A GOOD THING FOR US TO DO…[DAD] PLAYED A BIG ROLE IN LETHBRIDGE, IN THE BAND ERA, IN THE ‘40S. I JUST WANT HIM TO BE REMEMBERED, AND I WANT HIS STUFF TO BE ENJOYED BY OTHER PEOPLE, ESPECIALLY MY KIDS, BECAUSE THEY HAVEN’T REALLY HEARD THESE RECORDS DIRECTLY, LIKE I HAVE. [MY KIDS] THOUGHT IT WAS A GOOD IDEA. I RAN IT BY EVERYBODY, TO SEE HOW THEY FELT ABOUT IT. THEY’RE OK WITH IT, BUT IT’S STILL HARD TO DO.” ROBERT SMEREK ADDED, “I’D LIKE TO HAVE OTHER PEOPLE SEE IT, AND REMEMBER [DAD]. [BARBARA] WOULD HAVE MORE CONNECTION TO IT THAN I’D HAVE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190003000-GA
Catalogue Number
P20190003000
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 1.