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Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
31
Diameter
13.4
Description
BLACK CANDLESTICK-STYLE TELEPHONE WITH RECEIVER AND SPEAKER. TELEPHONE SPEAKER IS ATTACHED TO BLACK ROUND BASE AND BLACK MIDDLE ROD WITH HOOK FOR HANGING THE RECEIVER; METAL STAND ON BROWN PADDED BASE WITH BLACK PLASTIC SPEAKER AT THE TOP. BASE HAS WHITE STAMPED TEXT AROUND BASE OF THE STAND “WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 26 15”. TELEPHONE HAS BLACK METAL PLATE BENEATH PLASTIC SPEAKER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT “9298W, WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 14 1919”. BASE HAS TWO BROWN CLOTH-COVERED CORDS EXTENDING FROM BACK OF BASE; FIRST CORD IS CUT OFF, SECOND CORD IS ATTACHED TO BLACK PLASTIC RECEIVER. RECEIVER IS CONE-SHAPED WITH WIDER MOUTHPIECE AT END. RECEIVER IS WRAPPED WITH BLACK TAPE AROUND MIDSECTION; RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND CORD, “PAT. IN U.S.A. APRIL 16, 1918, MAY 20, 1913, JUNE 3, 1913”. RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND BACK EDGE OF MOUTHPIECE “WESTERN ELECTRIC MADE IN U S A 143”. TELEPHONE HAS CHIPPED PAINT ON RECEIVER HOOK; SPEAKER OF TELEPHONE IS CHIPPED WITH LOSS IN PLASTIC; TELEPHONE BODY AND RECEIVER ARE STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
ON APRIL 3, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JOHN WENSVEEN REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE. WENSVEEN HAD RETIRED FROM ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED AND HAD KEPT THE TELEPHONE AS A SOUVENIR FROM HIS TIME EMPLOYED. ON HOW HE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE TELEPHONE, WENSVEEN ELABORATED, “WHEN I RETIRED [IN THE FALL OF 1989] FROM THE ELEVATOR, THESE PHONES WERE NOT USED ANY MORE SO THEY WERE MORE OR LESS DISCARDED. WHEN I RETIRED I [WOULD] JUST TAKE ONE HOME. SO I DID. I DIDN’T STEAL IT OR ANYTHING BECAUSE THEY WEREN’T USED ANYMORE.” “[I WORKED FOR] THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ELEVATOR LATER KNOWN AS ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED.” “THESE [PHONES] WERE IN THE ELEVATOR AND AS LONG AS THEY WERE WORKING, WE USED THEM. [THE COMPANY] DIDN’T WANT TO GO TO ANOTHER PHONE AND HAVE THE SAME THING SITTING IN THE OFFICE…THE PHONE WOULD RING AND THEN YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO OVER THERE AND ANSWER IT. THEY DECIDED WE’VE GOT TO GET SOMETHING THAT WE CAN CARRY WITH US AND THAT’S WHAT WE DID. WE COULD HAVE GONE THROUGH A REGULAR PHONE AS SUCH BUT, AGAIN, YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO THROUGH THAT OFFICE AND ANSWER THE PHONE.” “WE HAD A BOX, [THE] WIRE WAS CONNECTED ON TO THE BOX…IT WAS ON THE WALL AND IT HAD DIFFERENT FLOORS MARKED IN A LITTLE SPACE [WITH] A LITTLE BUTTON BEHIND IT. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT ANOTHER FLOOR, YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU PRESSED THAT BUTTON FOR THAT PARTICULAR FLOOR. THEN THE PHONE WOULD RING. THEN YOU WOULD GET IT OVER THERE AND YOU WOULD ANSWER THE CALL.” “I STARTED IN ’58 AND I THINK WE USED THEM FOR ABOUT 15 YEARS AFTER THAT [UNTIL ABOUT 1972]." “WE WENT OVER TO WALKIE TALKIES…[WHEN] I STARTED WORK THERE...WE WERE USING ALL THESE PHONES AND THEY HAD ONE OF THESE PHONES ON EACH FLOOR. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT SOMEBODY, THAT’S WHAT YOU HAD TO USE. THAT’S WHAT WE DID AND, LATER ON THEY WERE OFF-LISTED AND PUT IN THE BASEMENT, AND MORE OR LESS FORGOT ABOUT. SO I DECIDED TO TAKE ONE HOME.” “THESE PHONES WERE NOT THAT CLEAR. WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH CLEARER…[YOU] HELD THE MIC CLOSE TO YOU. IF YOU WERE TOO FAR AWAY FROM THE PHONE AND SOMEONE WAS TALKING YOU COULDN’T PICK IT UP VERY WELL. IT WAS SOMETHING AT THE TIME, IT WAS GOOD AT THE TIME BECAUSE THERE WAS NOTHING ELSE. BUT WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH BETTER.” “WE USED THIS PHONE ALL THE TIME WHEN WORKING THERE, SO IT WAS SOMETHING THAT WE WERE USED TO USING…THAT’S THE MAIN REASON [I BROUGHT IT HOME]. I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE NICE TO TAKE ONE AS A REMEMBRANCE OF THE ELEVATOR AND I’LL USE IT HOW IT USED TO BE.” “I PUT IT OUTSIDE, I HAVE A SHED, AND I PUT IT IN THE SHED AND IT MORE OR LESS STAYED THERE...I THOUGHT EVENTUALLY IT WOULD BE A KEEPSAKE AND WOULD BE A REMINDER OF MY PLACE WHERE I WORKED. [NOW] I’M DOWNSIZING. I’M GOING TO BE MOVING OUT OF THE HOUSE AND I KNEW I HAD THIS IN THE SHED OUTSIDE. I THOUGHT MAYBE THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO SEE IF I CAN DONATE IT AND I DIDN’T WANT TO THROW IT OUT.” ON HIS TIME WITH ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED, WENSVEEN RECALLED, “I WORKED ON THE SCALE FOR 8 YEARS. THE SCALES WERE UPSTAIRS AND THEY HAD 6 PITS DOWN BELOW WHERE THE GRAIN WOULD BE DUMPED. IN THE EARLY DAYS THEY USED BOXCARS, CPR, AND THEY WOULD HOLD 1500 BUSHELS. THEY WERE MADE FOR [TRANSPORT] AND THE GRAIN WOULD COME UP…ABOVE THE SCALE AND WE COULD CONTROL THAT AND WE WOULD WEIGH IT. I WORKED UP THERE FOR ABOUT 8 YEARS. THEN A POSITION CAME AVAILABLE DOWNSTAIRS FOR RECEIVING AND SHIPPING SO I PUT IN FOR IT AND I GOT THAT POSITION. I DID THE RECEIVING AND SHIPPING LATER ON, TAKING GRAIN IN AND SHIPPING GRAIN OUT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180007000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
Acquisition Date
2018-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
IRON, LEATHER, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20160020000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Materials
IRON, LEATHER, STEEL
No. Pieces
2
Length
15.5
Width
9.1
Diameter
12.2
Description
METAL COW BELL WITH LEATHER STRAP. BELL IS MADE UP OF 2 PIECES OF METAL FUSED TOGETHER AT SIDES WITH TWO NAILS IN EACH SEAM. TOP IS FOLDED TOGETHER WITH THE ENDS FUSED DOWN THE SIDE IN A TRIANGULAR FOLD. FRONT AND BACK OF BELL ARE RELATIVELY FLAT, COMING OUT SLIGHTLY AT EDGE. WELDING OF BELL IS CRUDE. INSIDE OF THE BELL IS THE CLAPPER WITH A BALL END THAT IS 10.5 CM IN CIRCUMFERENCE. BALL IS ATTACHED TO A ROD THAT IS HOOKED TO THE LOOP INSIDE THE TOP OF BELL. FLAT METAL LOOP AT TOP OF BELL ATTACHES THE BELL TO LEATHER STRAP THAT IS 109.4 CM IN LENGTH AND 2.4 CM IN WIDTH. 9 HOLES PUNCHED IN LEATHER FOR STRAP ADJUSTMENT WITH THE BUCKLE GOING THROUGH THE 10TH HOLE PUNCH. STANDARD METAL BUCKLE WITH LEATHER BELT LOOP FOR THE EXCESS LENGTH OF STRAP. FAIR CONDITION: METAL SEVERELY RUSTED IN COLOUR. AT ONE SEAM NEAR THE BASE, THE METAL HAS OXIDIZED TO A GREEN COLOUR. METAL SURFACE INSIDE OF BELL HAS LOST SHINE AND IS RUSTY. STRAP IS SEVERELY WORN AND HAS SCRATCHES AND LOSS OF FINISH OVERALL. END OF THE STRAP OPPOSITE OF BUCKLE IS TORN OFF.
Subjects
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
History
ON 14 JULY, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONOR, ELLENNOR PORTER, AND HER DAUGHTER, KAREN PORTER AT THE GALT MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THAT INTERVIEW. ELLENNOR’S HUSBAND WAS ROBERT MICHAEL “MICK” PORTER. HE FOUND THE BELL AS ELLENNOR REMEMBERS, “[I REMEMBER] HIM BRINGING IT IN THE HOUSE… I DON’T KNOW JUST HOW LONG AGO… [AND HIM SAYING], ‘LOOK WHAT I GOT.’ THEN IT WAS JUST EVERYONE WAS SAYING, ‘WOW,’ AND PLAYING AROUND WITH IT… [AFTER THAT] IT WAS PUT IN THE BASEMENT WITH THE REST OF THE THINGS.” KAREN AND ELLENNOR BELIEVE THE BELL WOULD HAVE BEEN FOUND BY MICK IN THE 1950S OR THE 1960S. ELLENNOR CONTINUED, “[HE FOUND IT ON] THE RANCH. HE WAS OUT VISITING HIS RELATIVES OUT THERE. HE HAD AUNTS AND UNCLES ON THE BURN RANCH. HE’S PROBABLY JUST RE-VISITING THEIR PLACE THAT HAD BEEN SOLD, SO MAYBE IT CAME FROM PINCHER CREEK. IN THAT AREA ANYWAY, LUNDBRECK OR PINCHER CREEK.” “DAD WOULD GO UP SOMETIMES BY HIMSELF,” KAREN ADDED, “I DON’T THINK ANY OF US WERE WITH HIM WHEN HE CAME HOME WITH THAT. I THINK WE WERE AT HOME WHEN HE BROUGHT IT TO THE HOUSE… IT IS ALSO POSSIBLE THAT HIS FATHER AND MOTHER HAD [THE BELL] AT THEIR HOUSE AND GAVE IT TO HIM. THEY WERE FARMERS AT THE WALDRON RANCH – NOW THE WALDRON RANCH – [BUT IT] WAS THE PORTER RANCH. THEY HAD A HOUSE IN PINCHER CREEK, SO THERE IS A POSSIBILITY THAT’S ALSO WHERE HE WOULD HAVE GOTTEN IT.” THINKING BACK TO HER LATE HUSBAND’S DAYS IN THE AREA, ELLENNOR EXPLAINED, “[MICK’S] DAD WAS AT THE PORTER/WALDRON RANCH. IT WAS JUST THE PORTER RANCH AND AFTER HE MOVED TO PINCHER, HE SOLD LIKE HIS INTEREST PART OF IT TO WALDRON, SO IT [BECAME] A PARTNERSHIP… THE WALDRON RANCH IS NEAR BLACK MOUNTAIN ON THAT ROAD, TOWARDS THE BAR-U RANCH.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE BELL, ELLENNOR SAID, “[THIS BELL] BRINGS BACK MEMORIES FROM WAY BACK WHEN WE USED TO LOOK FOR CATTLE BACK IN THE BUSH, AND I IMAGINE THAT’S WHAT MY HUSBAND MUST HAVE THOUGHT TOO… [IT WOULD BE] A REMEMBRANCE FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. THEY PROBABLY HAD TO BRING IN THE OLD MILK COW AND SHE WOULD BE WEARING THE BELL. THAT’S WHAT THEY DID. THEY PUT IT ON THE BIG MILK COW, SO THAT WHEN THEY WANTED THEM TO COME IN TO MILK THEY COULD FIND THEM. SOMETIMES THEY’D GO HIDE IN THE BUSH, SO THEY KEPT THE BELL ON THEM SO THEY COULD KEEP TRACK OF WHERE THEY WERE AT.” ELLENNOR FURTHER EXPLAINED, “I HAD NO CONNECTION WITH THAT BELL. WE HAD NO CATTLE. WE WERE GRAIN FARMERS.” KAREN ADDED, “MUM AND DAD WERE WHEAT FARMING ON [THE K-LAZY-A-RANCH]. THERE WERE CATTLE THERE, BUT MUM DOESN’T REMEMBER THERE BEING CATTLE WITH BELLS ON. THEY WERE IN THE FARM YARD… THERE WERE HARDLY ANY TREES. THAT WAS THE RANCH ORIGINALLY AND LATER BECAME A WHEAT FARM. IF THEY KEPT IT AS A RANCH WITH CATTLE AND HORSES, THAT MEANT THEY COULD NEVER EVER LEAVE AND IT WAS PRETTY ISOLATED, SO OVER THE YEARS DAD TALKED THE OWNER INTO LETTING HIM COVERT IT TO WHEAT.” “THERE WAS NO BUSH [THERE FOR THE COWS] TO HIDE IN. SO NO NEED FOR A BELL!” ELLENNOR REMEMBERED. THE DONOR AND HER DAUGHTER REMEMBERED HOW MICK VALUED OBJECTS AND MEMORIES. “HIS EYES WOULD LIGHT UP [AND HE WOULD SAY], ‘LOOK WHAT WE HAVE HERE,’ [WHEN HE SAW SOMETHING ATTACHED TO A MEMORY]. HE HAD ALL KINDS OF MEMORIES OF HIS GROWING UP. SOME WERE NOT TOO HAPPY, SOME WERE VERY HAPPY, BUT HE ALWAYS REALLY LOVED COWS. IT DIDN’T MATTER WHERE WE WENT TRAVELLING IN THE WORLD…[HE ALWAYS] STOPPED AND TOOK SOME PICTURES. ‘OH LOOK AT THE COWS!’ HE’D SAY,” ELLENNOR JUMPED IN, COMPLETING HER DAUGHTER’S SENTENCE. “DAD TOOK THOUSANDS OF PICTURES OF COWS. FOR HIM THERE WAS A REAL CORRELATION,” KAREN FINISHED. “[THE BELL IS A TREASURE] BECAUSE IT HAS BEEN IN OUR HOME FOR SUCH A LONG TIME. WHEN DAD BROUGHT IT HOME, IN HIS PERSPECTIVE, HE WOULD HAVE THE SAME KIND OF MEMORIES MY MUM DOES OF HEARING THE COWS…I CAN REMEMBER THEM WHEN I WAS LITTLE ON THE FARM OUT BY SKIFF HEARING COW BELLS OR BEING OUT AT MY GRANDMOTHER’S FARM BY OLDS HEARING COW BELLS… [THIS BRINGS] THE MEMORY OF DAD BEING EXCITED ABOUT [THE BELL] AND TRYING TO WAKE US UP IN THE MORNING RINGING IT, IF WE WERE SLEEPING IN TOO LONG. THAT’S MORE THE MEMORY FOR US… [BUT] I WAS NEVER ON THE RANCH WHEN MY DAD WOULD HAVE FOUND [THIS SPECIFIC] BELL, SO THOSE MEMORIES AREN’T MY MEMORIES, THEY’RE MORE HIS MEMORIES. HE ALWAYS TREASURED IT, HE ALWAYS WANTED IT KEPT AND WE’D LIKE TO HONOUR THAT,” KAREN ADDED. NOTES FROM AN 2008 INTERVIEW WITH MICKEY AND ELEANOR PORTER STATE THE DONOR’S FATHER-IN-LAW, GEORGE ENGLISH PORTER, WAS BORN 1878 IN ORILLIA, ONTARIO AND DIED ON MARCH 16, 1959. HE CAME WEST FROM ONTARIO IN 1896 AT THE AGE OF SEVENTEEN. GEORGE PORTER’S FAMILY SETTLED 30 MILES NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ON THE EASTERN SLOPES OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. THE FAMILY SETTLED ON THE BLACK MOUNTAIN RANCH. GEORGE WAS ONE OF FOURTEEN CHILDREN IN THE FAMILY. HER MOTHER-IN-LAW WAS BORN IN EASTERN CANADA BEFORE MOVING TO OREGON. SHE IMMIGRATED TO CANADA WHEN SHE WAS8 YEARS OLD AND WAS RAISED ON THE BURN RANCH NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ALBERTA. THE NOTES FURTHER STATE THE DONOR, ELLENNOR PORTER, WAS BORN IN 1922. THE OBITUARY FOR ROBERT MICHAEL “MICK” PORTER READS MICK WAS BORN ON MAY 23, 1921 IN COWLEY, ALBERTA. HE ATTENDED SCHOOL IN COWLEY AND GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL FROM ST. MICHAEL’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL IN PINCHER CREEK. HE JOINED THE RCAF DURING WWII AND UPON AN HONOURABLE DISCHARGE AFTER A HIP INJURY, HE WORKED AS A GRAIN BUYER. HE MARRIED ELLENNOR CHRISTOFFERSEN IN OLDS, ALBERTA. LATER, HE WORKED FOR THE MCINTYRE RANCH FOR 5 YEARS. IN 1953, HE BEGAN FARMING IN THE SKIFF AREA AND RETIRED IN 1984. MICK AND ELLENNOR HAD FIVE CHILDREN: LAWNA ROBART, MICHAEL, RONALD, KAREN PORTER, AND CHRISTOPHER, WHO PASSED AWAY AS AN INFANT. MICK PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 AT THE AGE OF 91 YEARS. HISTORY OF THE WALDRON CATTLE RANCH LTD. WAS PUBLISHED IN THE “CANADIAN CATTLEMEN” PUBLICATION IN MARCH OF 1946. IT STATES THE RANCH “COMPRISED ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND ACRES OF LAND SITUATED IN SOUTH-WESTERN ALBERTA. IT WAS SITUATED IN A VALLEY EXTENDING BETWEEN THE PORCUPINE HILLS AND OLD MAN RIVER FOR ABOUT 30 MILES NORTH AND SOUTH AND VARYING FROM THREE TO FIVE MILES IN WIDTH.” THE HISTORY STATES THE WALDRON CATTLE RANCH WAS FORMED IN 1883 BY SIR JOHN WALROND WALROND OF BARONET AND LORD CLINTON OF LONDON – BOTH MEN OF ENGLAND. ON JUNE 26TH, 1884, QUEEN VICTORIA GRANTED THE RANCH AN INDENTURE OF LEASE TO SIR WALROND, BARONET. (THE TEXT OF THAT LEASE AGREEMENT WAS PRODUCED AS PART OF THE CATTLEMEN PUBLICATION AND IS ATTACHED TO THE ARTIFACT’S PERMANENT RECORD.) ACCORDING TO THE ARTICLE, THE FIRST PURCHASE OF CATTLE WAS IN 1883 – 3,125 HEAD FOR $100,000. IN 1897, THE COMPANY WAS INCORPORATED UNDER THE CANADIAN JOINT STOCK COMPANIES ACT, MOVING ITS HEAD OFFICE FROM LONDON, ENGLAND. DUNCAN MCEACHRAN WAS APPOINTED PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER OF THE RANCH AND DAVID WARNOCK FROM GLASGOW BECAME THE LOCAL MANAGER. AT THE TIME OF THIS TRANSITION, IT IS BELIEVED THE RANCH HAD GROWN TO 12,311, THOUGH THIS WAS A MERE ESTIMATE. MCEACHRAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THE COMPANY FROM ITS BEGINNING IN 1883, WHEN HE STARTED AS THE GENERAL MANAGER. HIS LEADERSHIP GOT THE COMPANY THROUGH “PERIODS OF DEPRESSED CONDITION.” AFTER A HARSH WINTER IN 1906-1907, THE RANCH LOST APPROXIMATELY 5,000 HEAD OF CATTLE DUE TO SEVERE TEMPERATURE CHANGES. AFTER THIS, IN THE SUMMER OF 1908, THE RANCH “DISPOSED OF ALL ITS CATTLE TO PAT BURNS. FOLLOWING THE SALE, THE LAND OF THE WALDRON RANCH, EXCLUDING 1,000 ACRES WAS LEASED FIRST TO W. R. HULL, THEN TO PAT BURNS. C. W. BUCHANAN WAS APPOINTED THE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER OF THE RANCH THAT IN 1923. MCEACHRAN PASSED AWAY IN OCTOBER 1924. ANOTHER HISTORY ON THE RANCH WAS FOUND BY MUSEUM RESEARCHERS IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. PUBLISHED ON 1 MAY 1954, THE ARTICLE READS, “AT ONE TIME THE WALDRON LEASE CONSISTED OF BETWEEN 300,000 TO 400,000 ACRES OF LAND, EXTENDING FROM WHAT IS KNOWN AS STOWE TO THE NORTH FORK OF THE OLDMAN RIVER. IN THE NORTH FORK DISTRICT THE LAND WAS DIVIDED INTO FIVE BRANCHES… AT ITS PEAK IN THE SUMMER OF 1906 THE RANCH HAD 20,000 HEAD OF STOCK.” GEORGE PORTER IS LISTED IN THE HISTORY AS ONE OF THE CATTLE MEN EMPLOYED BY THE WALDRON RANCH FROM 1883 TO 1908. ABOUT HIM, THE ARTICLE STATES, “GEORGE PORTER [WAS] A GOOD STOCKMAN, [WHO] LATER BOUGHT 12 SECTIONS OF THE COMPANY’S FREEHOLD AT ITS NORTHERN END AND ADJOINING LAND ALREADY OWNED BY HIM.” “GEORGE PORTER AND SONS HAVE SOLD THEIR RANCH AND CATTLE TO JOHN FRANCIS MILLER… THE PORTER RANCH IS ABOUT THIRTY MILES NORTH OF LUNDBRECK AND ADJOINS THE 19,000 ACRE WALDRON RANCH WHICH MR. MILLER ALSO OWNS HAVING PURCHASED IT FROM P. BURNS RANCHES LAST FEBRUARY,” THE HISTORY STATES. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE 21 AUGUST 1953 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ANNOUNCED, “TWO OF THE LARGEST AND MOST FAMOUS RANCHES IN THE SOUTH-WESTERN ALBERTA FOOTHILLS ARE BEING OFFERED FOR SALE. THEY ARE THE WALDRON AND PORTER RANCHERS, NORTH OF LUNDBRECK. THESE PROPERTIES ARE OWNED NOW BY JOHN F. MILLER OF LAS VEGAS, NEVADA… [THEY] HAVE BEEN OPERATED BY MR. MILLER’S SON, WHO TOOK OVER THE JOB SEVERAL YEARS AGO WHEN THE MILLERS BOUGHT THE WALDRON FROM THE WALDRON RANCHING COMPANY AND THE PORTER RANCH PROPERTY FROM GEORGE PORTER…” THE HISTORY OF GEORGE AND NORA PORTER (NEE BURN)’S MARRIAGE WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON JUNE 26, 1954 FOR THEIR 50TH ANNIVERSARY. THE COUPLE WERE MARRIED AT THE BURN RANCH IN JUNE 21 1904. THE COUPLE’S FOURTEEN CHILDREN WERE: MARJORIE ANDERSON, NORMAN PORTER, PHYLLIS ROBBINS, KATHLEEN HAMILTON, WINNIFRED BONERTZ, SANDY PORTER, EILEEN IRONMONGER, JEAN ALCOCK, JOSEPHINE ROBINSON, LILLIAN CHRISTIANSON, ISOBEL SINNOT, MICHAEL PORTER, LAWRENCE PORTER, AND CONNIE PORTER. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20080020001 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE PORTER AND BURN FAMILIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160020000
Acquisition Date
2016-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
314.2
Length
4.9
Width
33.5
Description
ADJUSTABLE LADDER, SIDE RAILS COME TOGETHER TO MAKE THE LADDER MORE COMPACT (LADDER IS ONLY 8.0CM WIDE WHEN THE SIDE RAILS ARE TOGETHER). SILVER COLOURED METAL, WITH ORANGE PAINT, BLACK RUBBER, AND EIGHT RUNGS. ANTI-SLIP SAFETY SHOE ON THE BOTTOM OF BOTH SIDE RAILS. SAFETY SHOE IS BLACK RUBBER ON THE BOTTOM, WITH A PATTERN OF 10 CIRCLES PER SHOE BOTTOM. METAL TEETH ON THE FRONT OF THE SHOE. SHOES ARE ADJUSTABLE, BUT ARE VERY STIFF. BRACE COMES UP FROM THE BOTTOM AND LOCKS TO PREVENT LADDER RAILS FROM COLLAPSING BACK TOGETHER. BOTTOM OF LADDER HAS A 54.5CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT AND TOP HAS A 46.0CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT. TOP OF ONE RAIL HAS A BLACK RUBBER TOPPER. SMALL BLACK STICKER AT BOTTOM “P1” WITH SEVERAL STICKERS ON THE OPPOSITE RAIL: A ROUGHLY OVAL SHAPED, RED, BLACK, AND SILVER STICKER: “THIS IS A DUO-SAFETY LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP 519 W 9TH AVE. OSHKOSH, WIS.”; THEN A RECTANGULAR RED STICKER WITH WHITE WRITING: “THIS LADDER IS CERTIFIED TO COMPLY WITH N.F.P.A. SPEC 1931-1832; CURRENT EDITION, FOR FIRE DEPARTMENT GROUND LADDERS AND OSHA FIRE LADDER REQUIREMENTS. REFER TO DUO-SAFETY LADDER SAFETY BOOK FOR CARE – USE – MAINTENANCE ON THIS LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP. OSHKOSH, WI 54901”; THEN A WHITE STICKER WITH GOLD WRITING: “10”. THERE IS ALSO A SILVER COLOURED STICKER WITH HANDWRITING ON THIS SAME RAIL, LOCATED BETWEEN THE FIRST AND SECOND RUNGS: “TEST DATE: 25 NOV 2006. LADDER #: ATTIC #18. APPARATUS #: P1. APPARATUS #: P1.” BOTH RAILS HAVE THE FOLLOWING STICKERS, AT ROUGHLY THE MID-POINT OF THE LADDER: RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLUE BORDER, BLACK WRITING: “DANGER. FAILURE TO USE, UNDERSTAND, AND FOLLOW PROPER LADDER USAGE INSTRUCTIONS AS MADE AVAILABLE BY DUO-SAFETY LADDER, N.F.P.A., I.S.F.S.I., A.N.S.I., O.S.H.A., ETC. COULD CAUSE SERIOUS INJURY AND/OR DEATH.” RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK BORDER AND WRITING: “DANGER. WATCH FOR WIRES. THIS LADDER CONDUCTS ELECTRICITY.” RECTANGULAR, YELLOW, WITH BLACK WRITING: CAUTION. SET UP LADDER PROPERLY TO REDUCE SLIP AND OVERHEAD HAZARDS. FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS. 1. PLACE TOES AGAINST BOTTOM OF LADDER SIDE RAILS. 2. STAND ERECT. 3. EXTEND ARMS STRAIGHT OUT. 4. PALMS OF HANDS SHOULD TOUCH TOP OF RUNG AT SHOULDER LEVEL. OUT -->” STICKER ON THE INSIDE OF FOURTH RUNG FROM THE BOTTOM: WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK WRITING: “REMOVE LADDER FROM SERVICE AND TEST IF ANY HEAT SENSOR TURNS DARK -->” LADDER IS IN GOOD OVERALL CONDITION. ADJUSTABLE FEET ARE VERY STIFF. LOTS OF SCUFF MARKS ALL OVER LADDER AND SOME STICKERS HAVE BEEN PARTIALLY REMOVED/SCRATCHED.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS ATTIC LADDER WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDER WAS “USED TO ACCESS ATTIC SPACES THROUGH SMALL ACCESS HOLES IN CEILINGS. USED WHEN WE DID NOT WANT TO PULL A CEILING DOWN AFTER A FIRE TO ENSURE THAT THE FIRE IN THE ATTIC WAS OUT.” HE CONTINUED SAYING THAT THIS LADDER WAS DECOMMISSIONED BECAUSE IT IS “OLD AND WORN OUT. ALL LADDERS MUST MEET MINIMUM ACCEPTANCE STANDARDS.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT THIS IS “WHAT WE CALL A LITTLE ATTIC LADDER, TO GET BACK INTO A TIGHT PLACE WHERE YOU COULDN’T BRING A BIG LADDER IN … YOU COULD GET IT UP INTO THE ATTIC SO YOU COULD CHECK WHAT WAS IN THE ATTIC.” LAZENBY ELABORATED: “THIS IS A FOLDING ATTIC LADDER … THE RUNGS THAT SEPARATE THE TWO BEAM SECTIONS ARE ACTUALLY HINGED IN NATURE AND SO IT FOLDS UP AND FITS IN, TYPICALLY, A LITTLE COMPARTMENT ON THE BACK END OF THE TRUCK BECAUSE [THEY] HAVE SOME LONG, LATERAL STORAGE THERE. THESE SURPRISINGLY GET USED A FAIR AMOUNT, STILL.” HE CONTINUED SAYING “THEY’RE NARROW ENOUGH THAT THEY’RE ALMOST DIFFICULT TO CLIMB WITH YOUR BIG FIRE BOOTS ON.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDERS IN USE PRESENTLY ARE VERY SIMILAR TO THIS MODEL: “YOU CAN TELL BY LOOKING AT IT IT’S AN OLDER PIECE BUT THE CONSTRUCTION IS ESSENTIALLY THE SAME. THEY MIGHT BE USING SLIGHTLY LIGHTER MATERIALS NOW, BUT FROM WHAT I CAN SEE, THEY’RE BASICALLY THE SAME.” HE ADDED THAT HE WAS OFTEN THE ONE USING THE LADDER: “BECAUSE I WAS NEVER ONE OF THE BIGGER GUYS ON THE JOB, AND ESPECIALLY WHEN I STARTED I WAS PROBABLY TWENTY POUNDS LIGHTER THAN I AM NOW, IF THEY NEEDED SOMEONE TO GET INTO A SMALLER SPACE, I WAS THAT GUY, TYPICALLY, BECAUSE WHEN YOU WEIGHT 250 [POUNDS] AND YOU THROW THE SCBA ON AND ALL THE EQUIPMENT, IT’S DEFINITELY TOUGH FOR SOME OF THOSE GUYS TO GET THROUGH THAT ACCESS. SO, YES, I’VE BEEN IN MY FAIR SHARE OF ATTICS AND THAT’S THE ONLY MEANS TO GET UP THERE.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THE IMPORTANCE OF USING THE LADDER: “ANY TIME A FIRE VENTS OUT OF A WINDOW AND TOUCHES ANY PART OF THE SOFFIT, IT’S INCUMBENT THAT YOU HAVE TO ABSOLUTELY CHECK THAT BECAUSE IF YOU DON’T AND YOU’RE OPERATING UNDERNEATH AN ATTIC FIRE, THAT’S A VERY, VERY UNSAFE PLACE TO BE.” DZUREN ADDED: “THAT’S A COLLAPSIBLE LADDER. IT’S KIND OF LIKE A SCISSOR TYPE OF LADDER. IT WAS VERY COMPACT, YOU COULD STORE IT ON ONE OF YOUR VEHICLES WITHOUT IT TAKING UP TOO MUCH ROOM … YOU’D CARRY THAT INTO YOUR HOUSE IF AN OFFICER WANTED YOU TO GO UP INTO AN ATTIC … IT WAS EASY TO TRANSPORT AND ONCE YOU GOT IT INTO THE OPENING YOU COULD JUST GIVE IT A SWITCH AND IT WOULD OPEN UP AND YOU COULD JUST CLIMB RIGHT UP TO THE SPOT THERE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PIERCING NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS, RUBBER, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20150010006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PIERCING NOZZLE
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Materials
BRASS, RUBBER, STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Length
151.1
Width
10.2
Diameter
6.3
Description
PIERCING NOZZLE. BRASS, WITH CHROME PLATE, STEEL, AND BLACK RUBBER. CYLINDRICAL END OF NOZZLE HEAD IS THREADED, TO ALLOW A HOSE TO BE CONNECTED. TEXTURED EDGE NEAR THREADING. THROUGH THIS OPENING A BLACK RUBBER RING AND METAL MESH ARE VISIBLE. ADJUSTABLE HANDLE EMBOSSED ON ONE SIDE WITH “AKRON BRASS” AND “1 1/2 4 WAP” ON THE OTHER. (NOTE: WAP IS A BEST GUESS, LETTERS HAVE LOST THEIR DEFINITION.) BELOW HANDLE, STAMPED INTO THE METAL BODY OF THE NOZZLE IS “SHUT FOG OPEN”. HANDLE MARKS CHANGE IN SHAPE FROM CYLINDRICAL TO TRIANGULAR. TRIANGULAR PORTION HAS A BLACK STICKER “Q2” AND A STRIPE OF YELLOW PAINT, NEAR THE CONNECTION WITH THE PIPE. A SMALL RECTANGULAR PUSH BUTTON ALLOWS THE NOZZLE TO BE DISCONNECTED FROM THE PIPE. SMALL HOLE THROUGH THE NOZZLE HEAD VISIBLE AT THE CONNECTION OF THE PIPE AND HEAD, WHICH OPENS AND CLOSES WITH THE OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE HANDLE. NEAR THE CONNECTION OF THE PIPE AND HEAD STAMPED INTO THE METAL OF THE PIPE “LFD 62”, WITH THE STAMP BEING PARTIALLY FILLED IN WITH WHITE PAINT. TWO SECTIONS OF STEEL PIPING HAVE BEEN PERMANENTLY THREADED TOGETHER. END OF PIPE HAS THREE SETS OF TWELVE HOLES EACH AROUND THE PIPE, 13.5CM FROM THE END. TIP OF PIPE IS ANGLED, TO CREATE A SHARP END TO PENETRATE THROUGH WALLS. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. WELL-WORN. CHROME PLATING HAS WORN AWAY, ESPECIALLY ON THE EDGES OF THE HANDLE. LOTS OF SCRATCHES AND SCUFF MARKS ALL OVER. VARIOUS BLACK STAINS ON THE PIPE SECTION.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS PIERCING NOZZLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS NOZZLE WAS “USED TO PUT WATER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF A WALL, FLOOR, OR CEILING. ALSO USED TO PUT WATER INSIDE OF A HAYSTACK.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004) AND TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994). BROWN EXPLAINED SAYING: “IT HAS A METAL PROBE ON ONE END OF IT WITH LITTLE HOLES DRILLED INTO IT. MOSTLY WE USED IT FOR BALE FIRES, JAMMING IT INTO THE HAYSTACK OR BALE … ONCE IN A WHILE, WE’D USE IT FOR INSIDE A WALL, BUT VERY SELDOM.” LAZENBY ADDED: “THIS PIECE OF EQUIPMENT … HAS A NUMBER OF NAMES … IT’S BEEN CALLED ANYTHING FROM A CELLAR NOZZLE … TO AN ATTIC NOZZLE, TO A PIERCING NOZZLE … THE POINT ON THE END OF THIS WAS ACTUALLY QUITE SHARP, AND IF YOU WANTED TO, IF YOU HAD AN ATTIC FIRE, YOU COULD EASILY POKE THIS FROM BELOW UP THROUGH YOUR DRYWALL AND YOUR INSULATION … AND THERE WERE A BUNCH OF SMALL HOLES DRILLED INTO THE VERY END SO THAT WHEN YOU DID OPEN IT, THE WATER WOULD COME OUT IN A FOG PATTERN.” HE CONTINUED, SAYING: “THE ADVANTAGE OF THAT IS THAT YOU DIDN’T NECESSARILY HAVE TO PULL THE CEILING DOWN … YOU COULD DO SOME SUPPRESSION UP THERE BEFORE YOU DECIDED TO PULL THAT CEILING DOWN AND SORT OF MAKE CONDITIONS BETTER BEFORE YOU EXPOSED YOURSELF TO THEM. SO FOR THE ATTIC USE, IT WORKED REALLY, REALLY WELL FROM WHAT I HEARD. I’VE NEVER DEPLOYED ONE OF THESE IN THAT SITUATION.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED FURTHER: “THE OTHER USE … IF YOU GOT TO A STRUCTURE AND THE BASEMENT WAS ON FIRE, SAME IDEA, JUST DIFFERENT DIRECTION … IF YOU SHOVED THE NOZZLE DOWN AND OPENED IT UP, YOU’RE GETTING AUTOMATIC SUPPRESSION BEFORE YOU SENT A TEAM DOWN THERE INTO THAT ATMOSPHERE. I WAS EVEN TOLD THAT YOU COULD USE THESE ON AN ENGINE FIRE … SOME OF THESE WERE BUILT WITH A STRIKING SECTION ON THEM SO THAT IF YOU HAD A HAMMER YOU COULD HIT THE TOP OF IT – THIS WOULD ACTUALLY PIERCE THE HOOD OF THE VEHICLE, ENTER THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT, YOU COULD TURN THE NOZZLE ON, AND IT WOULD SUPPRESS THE FIRE WITHOUT EVER HAVING TO LIFE THE HOOD. … I DON’T THINK THAT WE EVER USED THIS TOOL MAYBE AS OFTEN AS WE SHOULD HAVE. I THINK THAT WE, AT TIMES, COULD HAVE MADE BETTER USE AND ACTUALLY MADE CONDITIONS A LITTLE BIT BETTER FOR OURSELVES BEFORE WE PUT OURSELVES INTO THAT SPACE OR ATMOSPHERE.” WHEN ASKED IF THIS TYPE OF NOZZLE IS STILL IN USE, LAZENBY REPLIED: “WE HAVE ONE OF THESE ON OUR ENGINE DOWNTOWN … OURS BREAKS DOWN INTO A COUPLE OF PIECES SO IT STORES EASIER … BUT FUNDAMENTALLY IT’S THE SAME TOOL, SLIGHT MODIFICATIONS FOR EASE OF USE, BUT YEAH, THEY’RE STILL AROUND.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010006
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE / PUMP LENGTH HOSE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, BRASS, RUBBER,
Catalogue Number
P20150010021
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE / PUMP LENGTH HOSE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1985
Materials
NYLON, BRASS, RUBBER,
No. Pieces
1
Length
416.0
Width
38.3
Diameter
17.5
Description
SHORT HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE, ALSO KNOW AS PONY LENGTH OR PUMP LENGTH FIRE HOSE. SHORT, WIDE, RED FIRE HOSE. COUPLINGS ON EACH END OF HOSE. ON THE LARGER END (17.5CM DIAMETER) THE CHROME PLATED COUPLING HAS 10.4CM LONG HANDLES AND A STRIPE OF GREEN PAINT NEAR THE CONNECTION WITH THE HOSE. THE HOSE HAS BEEN TRIPLE CLAMPED ONTO THE COUPLING. ON THE OTHER END OF THE HOSE, THE DIAMETER IS 14.0CM, AND THE COUPLING HAS HANDLES THAT ARE 4.7CM LONG. THIS END OF THE HOSE IS ALSO TRIPLE CLAMPED ONTO THE COUPLING. ON EACH END OF THE HOSE, TWO OF THE CLAMPS ARE SMALLER AND ARE STAMPED WITH A REPEATING "* DENVER * COLORADO * USA * BAND * IT *" THE LARGEST CLAMPS, EACH FURTHEST FROM ITS RESPECTIVE COUPLING, STAMPED: "DIXON V. & C. CO. USA 525" ON EITHER SIDE OF THE TWO LARGE BOLT SETS. VERY GOOD OVERALL CONDITION. CHROME PLATING HAS WORN AWAY ON EDGES. LOTS OF SCRATCHES AND GOUGES IN THE METAL HANDLES OF THE COUPLINGS.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS HOSE WAS USED “WHEN A FIRE ENGINE NEEDED TO CONNECT TO A FIRE HYDRANT AND WAS PARKED RIGHT BESIDE THE HYDRANT. THIS WAS BEFORE WE CARRIED LARGER BUT LIGHTER HOSES ON THE TRUCKS.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT “THIS WAS ONE OF YOUR MAIN PIECES OF EQUIPMENT WHEN YOU WENT TO A FIRE … WE’D HOOK THIS [THE HOSE] TO THE HYDRANT, AND THEN THIS INTO OUR PUMP, SO WE’D BE GETTING 8 INCHES OF WATER INTO OUR PUMP, AND THEN THE PUMP WOULD BOOST THAT LINE, AND WE COULD PUT UP 5 OR 6 LINES … THIS WAS ONLY USED AT LARGE FIRES … WHEN WE HAD TO USE THIS, THERE WAS BIG TROUBLE.” LAZENBY ADDED: “IF THIS WAS IN SERVICE WITH OUR DEPARTMENT, THIS WAS IN SERVICE BEFORE I GOT ON, SO I DON’T KNOW THAT I’VE EVEN EVER ACTUALLY SEEN ONE OF THESE, TO BE HONEST WITH YOU.” DZUREN ELABORATED: “THAT’S WHAT WE WOULD HOOK UP ONTO FROM OUR HYDRANT TO THE PUMP. THE HYDRANT MAN, HE WOULD CONNECT THAT TO THE HYDRANT GATE, TO THE HYDRANT, AND THIS WOULD GO TO THE INPUT SIDE OF THE PUMPER. AND THEN THEY WOULD TURN ON THE WATER WITH THAT NOZZLE AND THEY WOULD SUPPLY WATER TO THE FIRE TRUCK AND HE COULD PUMP IT TO A MULTITUDE OF LINES THAT COME OFF OF THERE.” WHEN ASKED WHY FIREFIGHTERS WOULD WANT TO RUN THE WATER THROUGH THE PUMPER TRUCK, RATHER THAN JUST OFF THE HYDRANT, DZUREN EXPLAINED: “WELL, IF THE HYDRANT PRESSURE IS NOT HIGH ENOUGH TO ACCOMMODATE FIREFIGHTING, LIKE SAY IF OUR HOSE, IF A NOZZLE LIKE THAT, YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE UP TO A HUNDRED POUNDS IN THERE, A HYDRANT NORMALLY DOESN’T HAVE THAT KIND OF HIGH PRESSURE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010021
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PIKE HOOK
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20150010008
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PIKE HOOK
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1990
Materials
METAL, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Length
323
Width
11.5
Diameter
4.2
Description
PIKE POLE. LONG, CYLINDRICAL WOODEN HANDLE, WITH A METAL HEAD. THE HEAD IS IN THE SHAPE OF A LOWER CASE 'R', WITH A STRAIGHT AND HOOKED POKER. TWO METAL RIVETS HOLD THE METAL HEAD ON THE WOODEN POLE. NO MARKINGS. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. METAL HAS RUSTED. WOOD IS WELL USED AND HAS SEVERAL GOUGES/SLIVERS MISSING. WOOD IS VERY DARK FROM USE. WOOD ESPECIALLY DARK AT JUNCTION WITH METAL HEAD.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS PIKE POLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT IT WAS “USED TO PULL CEILINGS FROM BELOW DURING OVERHAUL. ALSO USED TO FORCE CEILINGS DOWN DURING VENTILATION. THE SAME TYPE OF TOOL IS IN USE TODAY.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004) AND TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994). BROWN EXPLAINED “THAT WAS PRETTY IMPORTANT … WHEN YOU HAD A FIRE, AND THE FIRE WAS STILL GOING, BUT MOST OF IT WAS OUT, THE CEILINGS – IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW IF THE FIRE WAS OUT IN THE CEILING, YOU’D TAKE THE PIKE POLE, AND YOU CAN SEE HOW YOU WOULD POKE IT IN … THAT WAS A VERY DESTRUCTIVE TOOL, YOU COULD DO A LOT OF DAMAGE WITH THAT. BUT IF THERE WAS SOMETHING THAT YOU HAD TO GET INTO THE CEILING TO CHECK, AND WE’D OPEN A HOLE IN THE CEILING TO GET UP ON THE LADDER TO LOOK … POKING AROUND TO MAKE SURE THE FIRE WAS OUT.” LAZENBY ADDED: “THIS IS PROBABLY AS CLASSIC A TOOL, A HAND TOOL, AS MAYBE THE PICK HEADED AXE … AS FAR AS FIREFIGHTING GOES. THIS IS A GREAT SALVAGE AND OVERHAUL TOOL … IF YOU HAD A FIRE GO UP INSIDE THE WALLS AND YOU THOUGHT MAYBE THERE WAS FIRE IN THE ATTIC, YOU WOULD NEED TO PULL DOWN THE PLASTER BOARD OR THE LATH OR THE DRYWALL TO … DO A VISUAL INSPECTION OF THAT SPACE.” HE CONTINUED, EXPLAINING ITS USE: “THE POINTY END WAS PERFECT FOR BREAKING THROUGH THE DRYWALL AND ONCE YOU MADE THAT INCISION, FOR LACK OF A BETTER TERM, IF YOU TURNED IT NINETY DEGREES, NOW ALL OF A SUDDEN, THE HOOK IS POINTING TOWARDS A FRESH PORTION OF THE DRYWALL AND AS YOU PULLED, IT WOULD COME DOWN IN RELATIVELY LARGE CHUNKS. AND YOU CAN OPEN UP A FAIR AMOUNT OF CEILING IN A SHORT TIME WITH THIS.” LAZENBY DESCRIBED THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THIS PIKE POLE AND MORE MODERN VERSIONS: “THE CONNECTION POINT BETWEEN THE METAL HEAD AND WOODEN HANDLE WOULD WEAKEN AND SOMETIMES THE HEADS WOULD ROCK A LITTLE BIT; THEY WERE TOUGH TO KEEP TIGHT, THEY WOULD RUST A LITTLE BIT. THEY’RE BEING MADE OUT OF DIFFERENT MATERIALS NOW, MOST NOTABLY, THE HANDLES HAVE GONE TO FIBERGLASS. THEY DON’T CONDUCT ELECTRICITY WELL, WHICH IS GOOD. NEITHER DID THE WOOD, BUT AGAIN, NO SPLINTERS, NO SLIVERS, THAT KIND OF THING.” HE REITERATED THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS TOOL: “IT’S ANOTHER GO-TO TOOL FOR US: AXE, HALLIGAN, AND I WOULD SAY PIKE POLE ARE PROBABLY THE THREE MOST COMMONLY USED HAND TOOLS … AND ACTUALLY, IF YOU LOOK, MOST FIRE SERVICE BADGES THAT PEOPLE WEAR – YOU’VE GOT A PIKE POLE AND LADDER – THEY’RE SYNONYMOUS WITH THE FIRE SERVICE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010008
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
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