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Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190025001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1957
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
30.1
Width
9.5
Description
WOOD DIRECTIONAL SIGN WITH SIX TRIANGULAR POINTS CARVED AT HORIZONTAL ENDS; SIGN HAS STENCILED CREAM-COLOURED TEXT PAINTED ON FRONT, “300 – 307” WITH LINE PAINTED UNDER TEXT; LINE HAS LOWER HALF OF AN ARROW HEAD PAINTED AT END UNDER “300”. SIGN HAS TWO HOLES CARVED BESIDE “300” AND “307” FOR HANGING THE SIGN. BACK OF SIGN IS UNPAINTED. CARVED POINTS AT ENDS ARE CHIPPING AND PEELING; FRONT SHOWS WEAR AROUND CARVED HOLES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
BUSINESS
History
ON JUNE 19, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RAY DJUFF REGARDING THE DONATION OF A PAIR OF SIGNS FROM THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL IN WATERTON LAKES NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA. ON THE SIGN, DJUFF ELABORATED, “[I CHOSE TO GIVE CHRIS MORRISON THE SIGN] INDICATING THE HALLWAY WITH ROOMS 300 TO 307 [BECAUSE] IT JUST LOOKED LIKE A GOOD SIGN. SOME OF THEM WERE A LITTLE MORE WORN THAN OTHERS AND I WANTED [TO] TRY AND PICK ONES THAT WERE IN REASONABLE CONDITION OR BETTER CONDITION…THE DIRECTION SIGNS ARE PRETTY WELL THE SAME.” “THE [SIGNS] ALL ORIGINAL TO THE OPERATION OF THE HOTEL. THE SIGNS DATE FROM 1957…THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL WAS BUILT BY THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY, AND IN 1957, THE RAILWAY WAS LOOKING TO GET RID OF ITS HOTEL COLLECTION IN BOTH GLACIER AND WATERTON AND, IN THAT DRIVE, IT LEASED THE HOTELS. THIS WOULD INCLUDE GLACIER PARK LODGE, MANY GLACIER HOTEL, LAKE MCDONALD LODGE, THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL AS WELL AS A NUMBER OF MOTOR INNS IN GLACIER PARK; THAT’S GLACIER NATIONAL PARK IN MONTANA. IT LEASED THE WHOLE KIT AND CABOODLE TO DONALD KNUTSON, A BUILDER AND HOTELIER OUT OF MINNESOTA. THE IDEA WAS THAT MR. KNUTSON WOULD UPDATE AND UPGRADE THE HOTELS WHICH WERE PRETTY WELL ORIGINAL FROM WHEN EACH OF THEM HAD BEEN BUILT, DATING FROM 1913 TO 1927.” “THESE SIGNS WERE INSTALLED AT THAT TIME TO MODERNIZE THE LOOK, AND THE HOTELS ALL TOOK ON A VERY DISTINCT 1950S, MID-CENTURY, MODERN LOOK…THE ROOM SIGNS I FOUND PARTICULARLY INTERESTING BECAUSE, AT EACH ONE OF THE HOTELS, THERE WAS A SIMILAR SHIELD SIGN THAT WAS USED. BUT ON EACH ONE, THERE WAS A DIFFERENT SYMBOL REPRESENTING THE HOTEL AND THIS WAS PART OF THE MARKETING CAMPAIGN THAT DONALD KNUTSON CAME UP WITH.” “THE OTHER [SIGN] THAT YOU HAVE…ONE INDICATING ROOMS ON THE THIRD FLOOR, 300 TO 307, [IS] PRETTY STANDARD OF WHAT THEY DID AT THE TIME. RUSTIC-LOOKING, A LITTLE BIT, BUT STILL, VERY MID-CENTURY. IT’S INTERESTING, THE ONE INDICATING ROOMS DOWN THE HALLWAY, BECAUSE IT’S OBVIOUSLY A STENCIL WHERE THE OTHERS ARE WELL LETTERED; HAND-LETTERED, ALL HAND-DRAWN.” DJUFF RECALLED THE ACQUISITION OF THE SIGNS, STATING, “I WAS AT THE HOTEL IN LATE MAY, 2019. I WAS DOING A PRESENTATION FOR THE HOTEL STAFF ON THE HISTORY OF THE HOTEL, AND THE MANAGER OF THE HOTEL, CHRIS CAULFIELD…INDICATED THAT THE SIGNAGE WAS BEING CHANGED THROUGHOUT THE HOTEL BECAUSE THE COMPANY THAT OWNS THE HOTEL [GLACIER PARK COLLECTION BY PURSUIT] WAS STANDARDIZING THE SIGNAGE THROUGHOUT THE COMPANY. THEREFORE, THESE WERE TAKEN DOWN AND AT THE TIME, HE INDICATED THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HOTEL IN THE REPAIRMAN’S OFFICE AND IF I WISHED TO HELP MYSELF TO THEM, GO AHEAD.” “I [TOOK THE SIGNS] FOR A COUPLE OF REASONS. ONE WAS TO PRESERVE THE SIGNS. I WAS FEARFUL, AS I’VE SEEN HAPPEN IN OTHER CIRCUMSTANCES, SIGNS WOULD SIMPLY BE DISPOSED OF AND NO RECORD OF THEM WOULD BE KEPT OTHER THAN MAYBE IN A PHOTOGRAPH. I HAD PERSONAL REASONS AS WELL. SINCE I’D WORKED AT THE HOTEL FOR FOUR SUMMERS…THIS WAS THE SIGNAGE THAT WAS IN PLACE AT THAT TIME AND IT CAPTURED A LITTLE BIT OF PERSONAL MEMORY FOR ME.” “I KNOW THAT WHEN KNUTSON DID THE RENOVATIONS OF THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL IN THE ‘50S…MANY THINGS GOT THROWN OUT AND SOME ITEMS OF PARTICULAR IMPORTANCE. IN THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL DINING ROOM…[THERE] WERE DRAWINGS BY JOHN FERY, AN ARTIST WHO HAD BEEN HIRED BY THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY AT THE TURN OF THE LAST CENTURY, IN 1910, 1911, 1912, TO PAINT SCENES OF GLACIER NATIONAL PARK. WHEN THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL WAS OPENED, FERY WAS BROUGHT IN TO AGAIN PAINT SCENES AND THESE WERE MOUNTED ON THE WALL IN THE DINING ROOM. MOST OF THOSE SCENES WERE SIMPLY CUT OFF THE WALL WITH AN EXACT-O-KNIFE AND, TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE, WERE THROWN OUT OR TAKEN BY A FEW OF THE STAFF OR OTHER PEOPLE. I’VE SEEN ONE OF THOSE IMAGES AND I KNOW WHERE IT WAS.” “I KNEW THOSE GOT THROWN OUT. I KNEW IN LATER RENOVATIONS, OTHER ITEMS WERE SIMPLY DISPOSED OF, SO THAT’S MY MOTIVATION IN LATCHING ONTO THESE. THEY’RE SMALL ITEMS BUT INDICATIVE OF AN ERA, AND HAVING BEEN AT THE HOTEL FOR MORE THAN HALF ITS LIFE.” “I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT [THE ORIGINAL 1927-28 SIGNS WOULD] LOOK LIKE. THERE ARE VERY FEW PICTURES OF PARTS OF THE INTERIOR OF THE HOTEL FROM THOSE EARLY YEARS...IF I HAD MY DRUTHERS, I WOULD PREFER THAT THESE WOULD HAVE STAYED THERE, MAYBE SOME COULD HAVE BEEN UPDATED…I KNOW THAT MANY GLACIER HOTEL, WHICH IS NOW UNDER THE CONTROL AND OWNERSHIP OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE IN THE UNITED STATES, THAT THERE HAS BEEN A PUSH TO PRESERVE THIS SORT OF SIGNAGE THROUGHOUT THE HOTEL IN RECOGNITION THAT IT IS PART OF AN ERA IN THE OWNERSHIP OF THE HOTEL.” “I UNDERSTAND THE CURRENT ADMINISTRATION OR OWNERS, AND EVEN GREAT NORTHERN AT THE TIME, LOOKING TO HAVE THE HOTELS RENOVATED TO MAKE THEM SELLABLE…IT’S ALSO UNDERSTANDABLE, HAVING WORKED THERE IN THE 1970S AT…THE PRINCE OF WALES, SOME OF THE THINGS WE FACED FROM CUSTOMERS WHO WERE WALKING IN, LOOKING AT THE HOTEL ROOMS AND BALKING BECAUSE THEY HAD COME TO EXPECT A CERTAIN LEVEL OF FURNISHING AT A HOTEL AND JUST SERVICES OFFERED, AND WHEN YOU WALK INTO A ROOM AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL NOW, WE APPRECIATE IT FOR ITS HISTORIC VALUE. BACK IN THE ‘50S AND ‘70S, PEOPLE WERE WALKING IN SAYING, ‘THIS JUST LOOKS LIKE AN OLD, CRAPPY ROOM. WHY AM I PAYING GOOD MONEY, EVEN IF IT IS A RESORT, FOR SOMETHING THAT IS SUBSTANDARD IN WHAT I CAN GET AT A MORE MODERN HOTEL?’ SOME OF THE UPGRADES WERE CERTAINLY NECESSARY. I’M GLAD THEY WERE DONE TO KEEP THE HOTEL FUNCTIONAL, ONGOING, AND I WON’T NECESSARILY SAY A PROFITABLE VENTURE BUT CERTAINLY ENOUGH THAT NO ONE WANTED TO TEAR IT DOWN OR REPLACE IT.” ON HIS TIME WORKING WITH THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL, DJUFF SHARED, “I WORKED AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL FOR FOUR SUMMERS, 1973, ’74, ’75, AND ’78, AND MY APPRECIATION OF THE HOTEL REALLY STARTED THAT FIRST SUMMER. MY INITIAL POSITION WAS AS A BUSBOY, AND I DIDN’T QUITE KNOW WHAT THE POSITION WAS. I SIMPLY ACCEPTED IT WAS IN A NATIONAL PARK, IT WAS IN THE ROCKIES…I’D SPENT A SUMMER IN BANFF IN 1970 AND I JUST WANT TO BE BACK IN THE MOUNTAINS SO I TOOK THE POSITION. DIDN’T MATTER WHAT IT WAS, I GOT A POSITION AT THE HOTEL.” “THEY REQUIRED US TO WORK A TRIPLE-SPLIT SHIFT IN THE DINING ROOM. YOU WOULD OPEN UP AT EIGHT IN THE MORNING AND SERVE BREAKFAST UNTIL ABOUT TEN. IT WOULD SHUT DOWN, YOU’D GO BACK TO YOUR DORM, COME BACK, HAVE LUNCH, OPEN UP AT NOON, DINING ROOM IS CLOSED AT 1:30, YOU MIGHT HAVE DUTIES IN THE AFTERNOON—ADDITIONAL ONES—OTHERWISE YOU RETURN TO YOUR DORM, COME BACK UP, EAT DINNER AND THEN OPEN THE DINING ROOM AT SIX AND IT WAS OPEN UNTIL ABOUT 8:30…IT WAS TIRING, IT WAS EXHAUSTING, IT WAS HARD WORK. BEING A BUSBOY, YOU’RE A GRUNT.” “I WAS FORTUNATE IN THAT ONE OF THE BARTENDERS WAS NEW AT THE HOTEL, THE OTHER WAS THE MORE SENIOR ONE AND HE’D BEEN THERE ALMOST TEN YEARS. THE NEW BARTENDER WASN’T WORKING OUT WELL, AND THE SENIOR BARTENDER SAW POTENTIAL IN ME, ALTHOUGH I’D NEVER SERVED ALCOHOL IN MY LIFE. AFTER MY TRIPLE-SPLIT SHIFTS, I STARTED TRAINING OVER THERE AND I WOULD CONTINUE WORKING UNTIL MIDNIGHT…I SWITCHED POSITIONS WITH THE BARTENDER. HE BECAME A BUSBOY, EVENTUALLY A WAITER. I BECAME A BARTENDER AND IT TURNED MY LIFE AROUND BECAUSE THEN I WAS WORKING A SINGLE SHIFT; BETTER CONDITIONS. I WAS EARNING TIPS—WHICH ENHANCED MY SAVINGS TO RETURN TO UNIVERSITY, PAY FOR MY EDUCATION—AND THE INTERACTION WITH CUSTOMERS IS WHAT MADE THE JOB PHENOMENAL, FURTHER ENHANCED BY THE FACT THE WINDSOR LOUNGE AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL LOOKS SOUTH DOWN UPPER WATERTON LAKE AND IS ONE OF THE MOST INCREDIBLE VIEWS IN THE CANADIAN ROCKIES.” “THERE’S AN EXPRESSION A FRIEND OF MINE HAS, AND HE’S TALKING ABOUT GLACIER NATIONAL PARK ACROSS THE BORDER FROM WATERTON, BUT IT APPLIES TO WATERTON AS WELL. THE EXPRESSION IS, ‘WHEN THE GLACIER BUG BITES YOU, THERE IS NO CURE,’ AND THE WATERTON BUG BIT ME. THERE IS NO CURE. I’VE BEEN GOING BACK FOR FOUR DECADES MORE AND I CAN’T GET ENOUGH. I WANT[ED] TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HOTEL, KEPT DOING RESEARCH, IT EVENTUALLY LED TO THE PUBLICATION OF A NUMBER OF BOOKS RELATED TO WATERTON AND GLACIER, AND I CONTINUED GOING BACK AND I CONTINUE DOING RESEARCH AND THE FASCINATION HASN’T ENDED.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS TO DONATE THE SIGNS, DJUFF NOTED, “THERE WERE TWO THOUGHTS IN MIND. THE FIRST WAS THAT I WAS ABLE TO ACQUIRE A NUMBER OF THESE SIGNS FROM THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL, AND I HAD MORE THAN I NEEDED. IN FACT, I TOOK THESE ADDITIONAL ONES WITH THE IDEA OF SHARING THEM WITH MY WRITING PARTNER AND CO-CREATOR, CHRIS MORRISON, OF LETHBRIDGE, AND ALSO, WATERTON. SO, I PICKED SOME OUT AND GAVE HER SOME THAT I THOUGHT SHE MIGHT ENJOY AND SHE DECIDED SHE DIDN’T NEED MORE PHYSICAL THINGS IN HER LIFE. [SHE] APPRECIATED THE OFFER, AND TOLD ME SHE WAS GOING TO DONATE THEM TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHICH I AM INCREDIBLY HAPPY ABOUT; THAT THEY’RE PRESERVED IN A MORE PERMANENT WAY THAN JUST IN OUR POSSESSION.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND INFORMATION ON THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL SIGNAGE REBRANDING, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190025001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190025001
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190025002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1957
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.7
Width
15.2
Description
HARDWOOD/FIBERBOARD SIGN, FRONT PAINTED WHITE WITH A BLACK CROWN ABOVE RED ITALICIZED TEXT, “214”. SIGN FASHIONED IN THE SHAPE OF A SHIELD; SIGN HAS TWO HOLES DRILLED IN UPPER CORNERS AND HOLE DRILLED IN LOWER POINT OF SHIELD. BACK OF SIGN IS BROW WITH TEXTURED-LEATHER APPEARANCE; BACK IS STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
BUSINESS
History
ON JUNE 19, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RAY DJUFF REGARDING THE DONATION OF A PAIR OF SIGNS FROM THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL IN WATERTON LAKES NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA. ON THE SIGN, DJUFF ELABORATED, “[THE ROOM DOOR SIGNS WERE THE] SAME SIZE, SAME SHAPE…THE SAME CROWN ON EACH ONE…THERE’S NO WORDING, WHATSOEVER. THEY JUST HAD A CROWN ON THEM…214 WAS JUST A NUMBER THAT STRUCK ME; NO PARTICULAR MEANING FOR THE HOTEL.” “EACH ROOM SIGN HAD A CROWN ON IT INDICATING ROYALTY AND THE NAME, ‘PRINCE OF WALES’, REFERRING TO THE PRINCE OF WALES OF BOTH ENGLAND AND CANADA. AT GLACIER PARK LODGE, EACH HOTEL ROOM HAD A SILHOUETTE OF A NATIVE AMERICAN HEAD—WITH LIKE A WAR BONNET ON. AT MANY GLACIER HOTEL, THE SYMBOL WAS A SWISS CROSS AND THE THEME THROUGHOUT THE HOTEL WAS SWISS. AT GLACIER PARK LODGE, THE THEME WAS NATIVE AMERICAN/WESTERN WRANGLER OR COWBOY AND, IN PART, A REFLECTION OF THE POPULARITY OF…THE COWBOY GENRE BOTH ON T.V. AND IN THE MOVIES DURING THAT ERA. THAT WAS PART OF THE MARKETING THAT THEY DID. IF YOU ACTUALLY LOOK AT LETTERHEAD OF THE HOTEL COMPANY DURING THAT TIME, WHEN KNUTSON HAD THE HOTELS AS A LEASE, FROM ’57 TO ’59, YOU WILL SEE THOSE SYMBOLS USED ON THE LETTERHEAD, KIND OF INDICATING THE FOUR, PRIMARY HOTELS.” “THE ROOM SIGNS [HAVE A] SMALL, INTERESTING DIFFERENCE WHICH IS, ALL THE ROOM SIGNS…FOR THE FIFTH FLOOR TO THE SECOND FLOOR…THE NUMERALS ARE ALL IN ITALICS. THE NUMERALS FOR THE SIXTH FLOOR ROOMS ARE ALL UPRIGHT, NOT LEANING, AND THOSE WERE DONE AFTER THE ORIGINAL SIGNS WERE PUT IN, WHEN THOSE ROOMS BECAME AVAILABLE FOR RENTAL. THEY HAD TO RECREATE THE SIGNS THEY INSTALLED LOWER DOWN IN THE HOTEL.” “THE [SIGNS ARE] ALL ORIGINAL TO THE OPERATION OF THE HOTEL. THE SIGNS DATE FROM 1957…THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL WAS BUILT BY THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY, AND IN 1957, THE RAILWAY WAS LOOKING TO GET RID OF ITS HOTEL COLLECTION IN BOTH GLACIER AND WATERTON AND, IN THAT DRIVE, IT LEASED THE HOTELS. THIS WOULD INCLUDE GLACIER PARK LODGE, MANY GLACIER HOTEL, LAKE MCDONALD LODGE, THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL AS WELL AS A NUMBER OF MOTOR INNS IN GLACIER PARK; THAT’S GLACIER NATIONAL PARK IN MONTANA. IT LEASED THE WHOLE KIT AND CABOODLE TO DONALD KNUTSON, A BUILDER AND HOTELIER OUT OF MINNESOTA. THE IDEA WAS THAT MR. KNUTSON WOULD UPDATE AND UPGRADE THE HOTELS WHICH WERE PRETTY WELL ORIGINAL FROM WHEN EACH OF THEM HAD BEEN BUILT, DATING FROM 1913 TO 1927.” “THESE SIGNS WERE INSTALLED AT THAT TIME TO MODERNIZE THE LOOK, AND THE HOTELS ALL TOOK ON A VERY DISTINCT 1950S, MID-CENTURY, MODERN LOOK…THE ROOM SIGNS I FOUND PARTICULARLY INTERESTING BECAUSE, AT EACH ONE OF THE HOTELS, THERE WAS A SIMILAR SHIELD SIGN THAT WAS USED. BUT ON EACH ONE, THERE WAS A DIFFERENT SYMBOL REPRESENTING THE HOTEL AND THIS WAS PART OF THE MARKETING CAMPAIGN THAT DONALD KNUTSON CAME UP WITH.” DJUFF RECALLED THE ACQUISITION OF THE SIGNS, STATING, “I WAS AT THE HOTEL IN LATE MAY, 2019. I WAS DOING A PRESENTATION FOR THE HOTEL STAFF ON THE HISTORY OF THE HOTEL, AND THE MANAGER OF THE HOTEL, CHRIS CAULFIELD…INDICATED THAT THE SIGNAGE WAS BEING CHANGED THROUGHOUT THE HOTEL BECAUSE THE COMPANY THAT OWNS THE HOTEL [GLACIER PARK COLLECTION BY PURSUIT] WAS STANDARDIZING THE SIGNAGE THROUGHOUT THE COMPANY. THEREFORE, THESE WERE TAKEN DOWN AND AT THE TIME, HE INDICATED THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT OF THE HOTEL IN THE REPAIRMAN’S OFFICE AND IF I WISHED TO HELP MYSELF TO THEM, GO AHEAD.” “I [TOOK THE SIGNS] FOR A COUPLE OF REASONS. ONE WAS TO PRESERVE THE SIGNS. I WAS FEARFUL, AS I’VE SEEN HAPPEN IN OTHER CIRCUMSTANCES, SIGNS WOULD SIMPLY BE DISPOSED OF AND NO RECORD OF THEM WOULD BE KEPT OTHER THAN MAYBE IN A PHOTOGRAPH. I HAD PERSONAL REASONS AS WELL. SINCE I’D WORKED AT THE HOTEL FOR FOUR SUMMERS…THIS WAS THE SIGNAGE THAT WAS IN PLACE AT THAT TIME AND IT CAPTURED A LITTLE BIT OF PERSONAL MEMORY FOR ME.” “I KNOW THAT WHEN KNUTSON DID THE RENOVATIONS OF THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL IN THE ‘50S…MANY THINGS GOT THROWN OUT AND SOME ITEMS OF PARTICULAR IMPORTANCE. IN THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL DINING ROOM…[THERE] WERE DRAWINGS BY JOHN FERY, AN ARTIST WHO HAD BEEN HIRED BY THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY AT THE TURN OF THE LAST CENTURY, IN 1910, 1911, 1912, TO PAINT SCENES OF GLACIER NATIONAL PARK. WHEN THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL WAS OPENED, FERY WAS BROUGHT IN TO AGAIN PAINT SCENES AND THESE WERE MOUNTED ON THE WALL IN THE DINING ROOM. MOST OF THOSE SCENES WERE SIMPLY CUT OFF THE WALL WITH AN EXACT-O-KNIFE AND, TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE, WERE THROWN OUT OR TAKEN BY A FEW OF THE STAFF OR OTHER PEOPLE. I’VE SEEN ONE OF THOSE IMAGES AND I KNOW WHERE IT WAS.” “I KNEW THOSE GOT THROWN OUT. I KNEW IN LATER RENOVATIONS, OTHER ITEMS WERE SIMPLY DISPOSED OF, SO THAT’S MY MOTIVATION IN LATCHING ONTO THESE. THEY’RE SMALL ITEMS BUT INDICATIVE OF AN ERA, AND HAVING BEEN AT THE HOTEL FOR MORE THAN HALF ITS LIFE.” “I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT [THE ORIGINAL 1927-28 SIGNS WOULD] LOOK LIKE. THERE ARE VERY FEW PICTURES OF PARTS OF THE INTERIOR OF THE HOTEL FROM THOSE EARLY YEARS…I KNOW THAT MANY GLACIER HOTEL, WHICH IS NOW UNDER THE CONTROL AND OWNERSHIP OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE IN THE UNITED STATES, THAT THERE HAS BEEN A PUSH TO PRESERVE THIS SORT OF SIGNAGE THROUGHOUT THE HOTEL IN RECOGNITION THAT IT IS PART OF AN ERA IN THE OWNERSHIP OF THE HOTEL.” “I UNDERSTAND THE CURRENT ADMINISTRATION OR OWNERS, AND EVEN GREAT NORTHERN AT THE TIME, LOOKING TO HAVE THE HOTELS RENOVATED TO MAKE THEM SELLABLE…IT’S ALSO UNDERSTANDABLE, HAVING WORKED THERE IN THE 1970S AT…THE PRINCE OF WALES, SOME OF THE THINGS WE FACED FROM CUSTOMERS WHO WERE WALKING IN, LOOKING AT THE HOTEL ROOMS AND BALKING BECAUSE THEY HAD COME TO EXPECT A CERTAIN LEVEL OF FURNISHING AT A HOTEL AND JUST SERVICES OFFERED, AND WHEN YOU WALK INTO A ROOM AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL NOW, WE APPRECIATE IT FOR ITS HISTORIC VALUE. BACK IN THE ‘50S AND ‘70S, PEOPLE WERE WALKING IN SAYING, ‘THIS JUST LOOKS LIKE AN OLD, CRAPPY ROOM. WHY AM I PAYING GOOD MONEY, EVEN IF IT IS A RESORT, FOR SOMETHING THAT IS SUBSTANDARD IN WHAT I CAN GET AT A MORE MODERN HOTEL?’ SOME OF THE UPGRADES WERE CERTAINLY NECESSARY. I’M GLAD THEY WERE DONE TO KEEP THE HOTEL FUNCTIONAL, ONGOING, AND I WON’T NECESSARILY SAY A PROFITABLE VENTURE BUT CERTAINLY ENOUGH THAT NO ONE WANTED TO TEAR IT DOWN OR REPLACE IT.” ON HIS TIME WORKING WITH THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL, DJUFF SHARED, “I WORKED AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL FOR FOUR SUMMERS, 1973, ’74, ’75, AND ’78, AND MY APPRECIATION OF THE HOTEL REALLY STARTED THAT FIRST SUMMER. MY INITIAL POSITION WAS AS A BUSBOY, AND I DIDN’T QUITE KNOW WHAT THE POSITION WAS. I SIMPLY ACCEPTED IT WAS IN A NATIONAL PARK, IT WAS IN THE ROCKIES…I’D SPENT A SUMMER IN BANFF IN 1970 AND I JUST WANT TO BE BACK IN THE MOUNTAINS SO I TOOK THE POSITION. DIDN’T MATTER WHAT IT WAS, I GOT A POSITION AT THE HOTEL.” “THEY REQUIRED US TO WORK A TRIPLE-SPLIT SHIFT IN THE DINING ROOM. YOU WOULD OPEN UP AT EIGHT IN THE MORNING AND SERVE BREAKFAST UNTIL ABOUT TEN. IT WOULD SHUT DOWN, YOU’D GO BACK TO YOUR DORM, COME BACK, HAVE LUNCH, OPEN UP AT NOON, DINING ROOM IS CLOSED AT 1:30, YOU MIGHT HAVE DUTIES IN THE AFTERNOON—ADDITIONAL ONES—OTHERWISE YOU RETURN TO YOUR DORM, COME BACK UP, EAT DINNER AND THEN OPEN THE DINING ROOM AT SIX AND IT WAS OPEN UNTIL ABOUT 8:30…IT WAS TIRING, IT WAS EXHAUSTING, IT WAS HARD WORK. BEING A BUSBOY, YOU’RE A GRUNT.” “I WAS FORTUNATE IN THAT ONE OF THE BARTENDERS WAS NEW AT THE HOTEL, THE OTHER WAS THE MORE SENIOR ONE AND HE’D BEEN THERE ALMOST TEN YEARS. THE NEW BARTENDER WASN’T WORKING OUT WELL, AND THE SENIOR BARTENDER SAW POTENTIAL IN ME, ALTHOUGH I’D NEVER SERVED ALCOHOL IN MY LIFE. AFTER MY TRIPLE-SPLIT SHIFTS, I STARTED TRAINING OVER THERE AND I WOULD CONTINUE WORKING UNTIL MIDNIGHT…I SWITCHED POSITIONS WITH THE BARTENDER. HE BECAME A BUSBOY, EVENTUALLY A WAITER. I BECAME A BARTENDER AND IT TURNED MY LIFE AROUND BECAUSE THEN I WAS WORKING A SINGLE SHIFT; BETTER CONDITIONS. I WAS EARNING TIPS—WHICH ENHANCED MY SAVINGS TO RETURN TO UNIVERSITY, PAY FOR MY EDUCATION—AND THE INTERACTION WITH CUSTOMERS IS WHAT MADE THE JOB PHENOMENAL, FURTHER ENHANCED BY THE FACT THE WINDSOR LOUNGE AT THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL LOOKS SOUTH DOWN UPPER WATERTON LAKE AND IS ONE OF THE MOST INCREDIBLE VIEWS IN THE CANADIAN ROCKIES.” “THERE’S AN EXPRESSION A FRIEND OF MINE HAS, AND HE’S TALKING ABOUT GLACIER NATIONAL PARK ACROSS THE BORDER FROM WATERTON, BUT IT APPLIES TO WATERTON AS WELL. THE EXPRESSION IS, ‘WHEN THE GLACIER BUG BITES YOU, THERE IS NO CURE,’ AND THE WATERTON BUG BIT ME. THERE IS NO CURE. I’VE BEEN GOING BACK FOR FOUR DECADES MORE AND I CAN’T GET ENOUGH. I WANT[ED] TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HOTEL, KEPT DOING RESEARCH, IT EVENTUALLY LED TO THE PUBLICATION OF A NUMBER OF BOOKS RELATED TO WATERTON AND GLACIER, AND I CONTINUED GOING BACK AND I CONTINUE DOING RESEARCH AND THE FASCINATION HASN’T ENDED.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS TO DONATE THE SIGNS, DJUFF NOTED, “THERE WERE TWO THOUGHTS IN MIND. THE FIRST WAS THAT I WAS ABLE TO ACQUIRE A NUMBER OF THESE SIGNS FROM THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL, AND I HAD MORE THAN I NEEDED. IN FACT, I TOOK THESE ADDITIONAL ONES WITH THE IDEA OF SHARING THEM WITH MY WRITING PARTNER AND CO-CREATOR, CHRIS MORRISON, OF LETHBRIDGE, AND ALSO, WATERTON. SO, I PICKED SOME OUT AND GAVE HER SOME THAT I THOUGHT SHE MIGHT ENJOY AND SHE DECIDED SHE DIDN’T NEED MORE PHYSICAL THINGS IN HER LIFE. [SHE] APPRECIATED THE OFFER, AND TOLD ME SHE WAS GOING TO DONATE THEM TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHICH I AM INCREDIBLY HAPPY ABOUT; THAT THEY’RE PRESERVED IN A MORE PERMANENT WAY THAN JUST IN OUR POSSESSION.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND INFORMATION ON THE PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL SIGNAGE REBRANDING, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190025001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190025002
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
12
Height
55.5
Length
28.5
Width
10
Description
A: RIGHT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN METAL NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. N…ON CO. SYRACCUSE N.Y. U.S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN ON THE TOE AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. A CUT IN THE LEATHER SITS ABOVE THE TOE. THE STITCHING AT THE BACK OF THE BOOT HAS TORN OPEN AND AT THE TOP OF THE BOOT, NEXT TO THE LEATHER PULL, THE BOOT IS SPLIT NEXT TO THE SEAM. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.5CM, W: 10 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. B: THE TOE-SHAPED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT-SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R”. THE VARNISH IS CHIPPED AND DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. C: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “R” AND “6 R…”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, JUST AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. D: THE BACK PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “R”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. E: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, MINIMALLY SCRATCHED BUT DENTED AND DIMPLED. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.2 CM, L: 2.2 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. F: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 55 CM, L: 1.6 CM, W: 8.5 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. G: THE LEFT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN SILVER NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. NETTLET… CO. S…SE N.Y. ...S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN OVER THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE SIDE OF THE HEEL, AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.8 CM, W: 9.7 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. H: THE TOE SHAPED PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. I: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “L” AND “6 LEFT”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, MOSTLY AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. DIMENSIONS: H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. J: THE BACK PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. K: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, SCRATCHED AND WORN IN PLACES. A KNOT IN THE WOOD HAS FALLEN OUT AND LEFT A HOLE IN THE TOP OF THE INSERT. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.3 CM, L: 2.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. L: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R” WITH TWO LINES DRAWN OVER IT. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE INSERT IS A NAIL, THE TOP GRINDED DOWN. DIMENSIONS: H: 55.5 CM, L: 1.9 CM, W: 8.6 CM. CONDITION: GOOD.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
MILITARY
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
THIS PAIR OF RIDING BOOTS BELONGED TO MURRAY NELSON, THE BROTHER DONOR KATHRYN HINMAN. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THESE BOOTS AND THEIR OWNER, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HINMAN AT THE MUSEUM ON MARCH 20, 2017. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “THE PREVIOUS OWNER OF THESE BOOTS WAS MY BROTHER, MURRAY [NELSON],” HINMAN BEGAN, “HE PASSED AWAY AT THE END OF NOVEMBER 2015… HE WAS A LOCAL MUSICIAN. HE CAME INTO THE POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS FROM MY GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, WHO WAS LIEUTENANT COLONEL GEORGE S. BROWN. MY GRANDDAD WAS A GREAT FRIEND OF BRIGADIER GENERAL STEWART. GRANDDAD CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS AT SOME POINT FROM DR. STEWART AND WHEN MY BROTHER WAS ABOUT EIGHTEEN, MY GRANDFATHER PASSED THEM ON TO HIM.” “[MURRAY DID] TELL ME THAT HE WAS IN THE GARAGE OUT AT THE FARM, WHICH IS ACTUALLY BROWN ROAD JUST OFF THE COUTTS’ HIGHWAY AND THAT WAS WHERE MY GRANDFATHER’S ACREAGE WAS. ON THAT ACREAGE, THERE WAS A GARAGE [AMONG] MANY BUILDINGS. MURRAY HAD SAID GRANDDAD HAD TAKEN HIM INTO THE GARAGE AND WHEN MURRAY EXPRESSED AN INTEREST IN [THE BOOTS THERE] GRANDDAD SAID, ‘YUP, YOU CAN HAVE THEM. THEY WERE GENERAL STEWART’S FROM THE BOER WAR. TAKE GOOD CARE OF THEM.’” “[MY BROTHER] USED TO WEAR THEM PLAYING IN BANDS WHEN HE WAS EIGHTEEN AND UP,” HINMAN CONTINUED, “[THEY WERE] PART OF HIS DRESS CODE… THEY’RE LOVELY BOOTS. THE STORY WAS THAT THEY WERE FROM THE BOER WAR, WHICH PUTS THEM OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS OLD… [MY BROTHER] PROBABLY ACQUIRED [THESE BOOTS WHEN] MY GRANDFATHER PASSED AWAY IN 1968. MURRAY WOULD HAVE BEEN EIGHTEEN [THAT YEAR]. HE WAS IN HIS ELEMENT PLAYING WITH THE BANDS, EXPERIMENTING WITH ALL DIFFERENT KINDS OF MUSIC [AT THAT TIME]. I REMEMBER HIM LOOKING VERY COOL WEARING THEM. ALTHOUGH THESE ARE A VERY SMALL SIZE, RIGHT? SO I’M SURE THEY WERE A LITTLE PINCHEY.” “[MY BROTHER HAD] LONG HAIR – WELL EVERYBODY HAD LONG HAIR IN THE 60’S AND 70’S. [HE WAS] VERY COOL AND AT THAT POINT TOO MY DAD (BILL NELSON) HAD ACQUIRED A SMALL MGA, BURGUNDY-COLOURED, AND [MY BROTHER] USED TO BOMB AROUND AND GO TO BAND PRACTICE IN THAT. OH YEAH, HE WAS NOTORIOUS,” HINMAN LAUGHED, REMEMBERING. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER BROTHER, HINMAN REPLIED, “MY BROTHER WAS BORN IN 1950. HE WAS JUST A LITTLE OVER SIXTY-FIVE WHEN HE PASSED AWAY. HE WAS AN ACTIVE MUSIC TEACHER AND LOCAL GUITAR TEACHER IN TOWN. YOU COULD SEE HIM BUSKING ON THE STREETS IN FRONT OF THE PENNY COFFEE HOUSE AND IN FRONT OF ESQUIRE’S COFFEE HOUSE. EVERYBODY KNEW HIM. HE USED TO BUSK AT THE FARMER’S MARKET ON FIFTH STREET ON FIRST FRIDAYS. HE PLAYED IN BANDS FOREVER.” “[HE WAS IN A] ROCK’N ROLL BAND. HE WAS IN SO MANY BANDS OVER THE YEARS AND I DON’T KNOW THE NAMES OF THE EARLY BANDS. ONE OF [THE BANDS HE PLAYED WITH] WAS KRANDEL’S KLOUD MACHINE, ONE OF THEM WAS THE SHAMAN, AND THEN HE MOVED TO VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AND PLAYED IN VANCOUVER – UP AND DOWN THE WEST COAST. WHEN HE CAME BACK FROM THE COAST, HE JUST PLAYED EVERYWHERE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH VARIOUS PEOPLE… ANYWAY HE WAS VERY WELL KNOWN IN THE BAND SCENE AND HE HAD A RECORDING STUDIO. THAT WAS A PASSION. HE CALLED HIS RECORDING STUDIO, AARDVARK RECORDINGS. HE HAD HIS FIRST RECORDING STUDIO IN THE BASEMENT OF KRUEGER’S MUSIC, WHERE HE TAUGHT MUSIC FOR BILL KRUEGER. THEN HE MOVED ALL HIS STUFF OVER AND HE WAS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE TRIANON FOR YEARS TEACHING RECORDING AND THEN HE GOT INVOLVED IN TECHNOLOGY, SO HE STARTED FIXING COMPUTERS AND DID COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. HE KIND OF USED TECHNOLOGY IN THE RECORDING STUDIO. HE HAD THIS HUGE SOUND BOARD WITH ALL THE SWITCHES AND WHATEVER AND HE HAD TONS OF LIKE STACKS OF MACHINES [FOR RECORDING],” HINMAN REMEMBERED. “[MY BROTHER] HAD A REPUTATION,” HINMAN WENT ON, “[PEOPLE WOULD SAY TO ME], ‘OH YOUR MURRAY’S SISTER.’ IT WAS GREAT AND ACTUALLY MY HUSBAND WAS BORN IN CARDSTON AND HE HAD A BAND THAT HE USED TO PLAY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH. WE HAVE AN ACTUAL RECORDING FROM THE BASEMENT RECORDING STUDIO AT KRUEGER’S, WHEN [MY BROTHER] RECORDED WITH MY HUSBAND’S BAND. IT WAS GREAT.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE MUSICAL INFLUENCE WITHIN HER FAMILY, HINMAN EXPLAINED, “MY MOM (MARGARET NELSON) WAS A LOCAL MUSIC TEACHER. SHE WAS A PIANO TEACHER. MY DAD’S MOTHER WAS KATE MARQUIS NELSON, WHO WAS A LOCAL PIANO TEACHER SO [WE HAD INFLUENCE] FROM BOTH ENDS. WE ALL GREW UP IN OUR HOUSEHOLD WITH MUSIC. I HAVE A DEGREE IN MUSIC AND I’M A MUSIC TEACHER AND MY YOUNGER BROTHER, MARK, PLAYS CLASSICAL GUITAR. WE HAD MUSIC EVERYWHERE. I HAVE SOME PICTURES AT HOME OF THE THREE KIDS WITH A DRUM SET AND I’M ON THE KEYBOARD AND MURRAY IS PLAYING GUITAR AND, EVEN A PICTURE OF MY MOM SITTING AT THE DRUMS TAKING PART IN THE MERRIMENT IN OUR BASEMENT.” “MY DAD PLAYED IN THE SYMPHONY. IN FACT, MY MOM AND DAD REVIVED THE SYMPHONY IN THE EARLY ‘60S. SO IT WAS JUST NATURAL FOR MURRAY TO [BE MUSICAL]. HE PLAYED EVERYTHING. HE PLAYED BANJO WITH MUSICAL THEATRE ONE YEAR, AND TAUGHT BANJO. HE THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ‘ONLY’ BANJO TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. HE [ALSO] THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ONLY REAL GOOD GUITARIST TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE TOO,” HINMAN LAUGHED. “SO ANYWAY,” SHE CONTINUED, “IT WAS A STRUGGLE FINANCIALLY. MUSIC IS NOT AN EASY, AN EASY PROFESSION TO BE IN, A PERFORMING MUSICIAN. HE QUIT HIGH SCHOOL WHEN HE WAS PROBABLY SIXTEEN, BUT IN HIS MID TO LATE TWENTIES, HE FINISHED HIS DIPLOMA AND HE STARTED NURSING AT THE COLLEGE. HE DID PRETTY WELL [THERE], BUT HE DIDN’T DEAL WELL WITH AUTHORITY, SO HE DIDN’T FINISH IT. BUT [THROUGH THAT HE] GOT A LOT OF GOOD PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE. [AFTERWARDS] PROCEEDED TO PURSUE HIS PASSION, WHICH WAS MUSIC. IN THE LAST FEW YEARS OF HIS LIFE HE FIXED THOSE COMPUTER SIGNS THAT SIT ON THE SIDE OF THE ROAD. HE WOULD FIX THE MOTHER BOARD… HE JUST DID WHAT HE WANTED. HE LIVED IS LIFE HIS WAY.” TO THE QUESTION OF WHY HER GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, RECEIVED THE BOOTS FROM GENERAL JOHN SMITH STEWART, HINMAN ANSWERED, “THE ONLY REASON I CAN THINK OF IS THAT BECAUSE THEY WERE GREAT FRIENDS… [IF GENERAL STEWART PASSED AWAY IN THE 1970S], THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN AFTER MY GRANDFATHER [DIED]. I KNOW THAT THEY WERE INVOLVED IN THE MILITARY STUFF LOCALLY. ELLA STEWART AND MY GRANDMOTHER WERE GREAT FRIENDS. SOMEHOW [THESE BOOTS WERE] JUST PASSED ALONG TO GRANDDAD.” “WHEN MURRAY WAS DIAGNOSED WITH THE CANCER IN JUNE OF 2015, I KNEW THAT THERE WAS SOME ITEMS THAT HE HAD THAT I NEEDED TO RETRIEVE BECAUSE THEY WERE FAMILY HISTORY,” HINMAN REMEMBERED, “[AMONG THOSE TREASURED THINGS WERE] GENERAL STEWART’S BOOTS, SO I RETRIEVED THEM IN JULY… [MURRAY SAID], ‘TAKE THEM. DO WHAT YOU NEED TO DO WITH THEM.’” “[ONE REASON MY BROTHER HELD ON TO THE BOOTS WAS] HE WAS VERY CLOSE TO MY GRANDPARENTS, BECAUSE HE USED TO SPEND A LOT OF TIME OUT AT THE FARM,” HINMAN EXPLAINED, “I THINK THAT HE JUST COULDN’T BRING HIMSELF TO PART WITH THEM, BECAUSE THEY WERE PART OF HIS FAMILY HISTORY. IT WAS A SPECIAL KIND OF THING BECAUSE GRANDDAD HAD ACTUALLY PASSED THEM TO HIM.” MURRAY NELSON’S OBITUARY WAS PUBLISHED ON THE MARTIN BROTHERS FUNERAL CHAPELS WEBSITE. IT STATES, “WILLIAM MURRAY NELSON, AGE 65, PASSED AWAY PEACEFULLY AT THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL HOSPITAL ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2015, AFTER A VALIANT BATTLE WITH CANCER. MUSICIAN, PERFORMER, TEACHER, MENTOR, SOUND GUY, RECORDING GUY, VIDEO GUY, COMPUTER GUY, SIGN GUY; HE WAS A MAN WHO LIVED LIFE HIS WAY, ON HIS TERMS, DOING WHAT HE LOVED.” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON DECEMBER 9, 2015, SHORTLY AFTER THE MUSICIAN’S DEATH STATES THAT AT A LOCAL MUSIC SHOW, PROMINENT LEHTBRIDGE SONGWRITER, LEEROY STAGGER, BEGAN THE SHOW WITH A TRIBUTE TO NELSON. TO FURTHER UNDERSCORE NELSON’S REPUTATION IN THE CITY, A DECEMBER 23, 2015 ARTICLE TITLED, “2015 WAS A MEMORABLE YEAR FOR CITY MUSIC SCENE,” WRITTEN FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD BY RICHARD AMERY STATED, “LETHBRIDGE SAID GOODBYE TO MURRAY NELSON, WHO PASSED AWAY FROM CANCER THIS YEAR. NELSON WAS ONE OF THE SCENE’S MORE PROMINENT PERFORMERS ON STAGE PERFORMING SOLO AND WITH A VARIETY OF BANDS AS WELL AS BUSKING ON THE STREETS ALL OVER LETHBRIDGE…HIS MEMORY WILL LIVE ON IN THE STUDENTS HE TAUGHT AND THE SOULS HE TOUCHED ON STAGE OR JUST CHATTING AT VARIOUS WATER HOLES.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND THE COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REFERENCED.
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TRACHEOTOME SET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1988
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CLOTH, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140049007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TRACHEOTOME SET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1988
Materials
CLOTH, METAL
No. Pieces
6
Height
16.2
Length
57.5
Width
0.5
Description
1: GREEN FABRIC CASE, EDGED WITH BEIGE FABRIC. DIVIDED INTO THREE POUCHES SEWED IN WITH BEIGE THREAD. TWO BEIGE FABRIC STRAPS ATTACHED TO ROLL AND TIE THE FABRIC CASE. A WHITE LABEL IS SEWN ON, READING IN GREEN TEXT “ SIERRA – SHELDEN”, “TRACHEOTOME CATALOG NO. 175-00”, AND “SIERRA ENGINEERING CO. SIERRA MADRE. CALIF.” 2: THE OBTURATOR THAT MATCHES THE LARGE TRACEOSTOMY TUBE. CURVED METAL WIRE WITH A METAL BOBBLE AT ONE END AND A METAL HANDLE AT THE OTHER END WITH A “7” ETCHED ON THE END. L: 11 CM, D: 1.5 CM 3: THE OBTURATOR THAT MATCHES THE SMALLER TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE. CURVED METAL WIRE WITH A METAL BOBBLE AT ONE END THAT EXPANDS INTO A SHARP CURVE BLADE WITH A BLUNTED TIP. A SMALL CIRCULAR BEAD OF METAL SITS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE WIRE AND AT THE OTHER END OF THE WIRE IS A CYLINDRICAL HANDLE WITH KNURLING TEXTURE. THE END OF THE HANDLE READS “ SIERRA ENG. CO CAT. NO. 287-00” AND “PATENT PEND”. METAL BOBBLE IS MISSING SOME OF ITS PATINA. L: 11 CM, D: 1.6 CM 4: A HOLLOW NEEDLE HEAD WITH A SMALL HANDLE WITH KNURLING TEXTURE. ETCHED INTO THE END OF THE HANDLE THE TEXT READS “287 SIERRA”. H: 6.1 CM, D: 1.7 CM 5: THE LARGE TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE MADE UP OF THREE PIECES; THE OUTER CANNULA, THE INNER CANNULA AND THE FLANGE. THE CANNULA’S SIT TOGETHER, THE INNER LOCKED IN WITH A ROTATING LATCH, BOTH CURVED AND HOLLOW TUBES. THE FLANGE SITS AT THE END OF THE CANNULAS, A METAL PLATE WITH TWO RECTANGULAR HOLES AND CURVING LIP. H: 2.5 CM, L: 10 CM, W: 4 CM 6: THE SMALL TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE MADE UP OF TWO PIECES; THE CANNULA, AND THE FLANGE. THE CANNULA IS A CURVED HOLLOW TUBE ATTACHED AT ONE END TO THE FLANGE, A METAL PLATE WITH TWO RECTANGULAR HOLES AND A CURVING LIP. H: 2.5 CM, L: 6.5 CM, W: 3.8 CM
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS IS A TRACHEOTOMY SET THAT WAS USED IN DURING SURGERY, IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, AND IN THE EMERGENCY ROOM. BOTH DOCTORS AND NURSES WOULD HAVE USED THIS ARTIFACT DURING THE PROCEDURE OF TRACHEOTOMY, WHICH CREATES A DIRECT AIRWAY IN THROUGH AN INCISION IN THE TRACHEA (WINDPIPE). WHEN ANSWERING THE QUESTION OF THE ARTIFACT’S IMPORTANCE, THE INDIVIDUAL WRITING THE HISTORY STATED, “TRACHEOTOMIES HAVE BEEN LIFE-SAVERS EVEN TO THIS DAY.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049007
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SKIN THERMOMETER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1988
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, FABRIC, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20140049009
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SKIN THERMOMETER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1988
Materials
WOOD, FABRIC, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
4
Height
3.1
Diameter
8.3
Description
1: WOOD CASING LID WRAPPED IN BROWN, CHERRY FAUX LEATHER FABRIC. THE TOP HAS A STRIPE OF CREAM CLOTH TAPE, LIFTING AT ONE CORNER AND WRITTEN ON IT IN BLUE PEN IS, “CSR SKIN THERMOMETER”. THE INSIDE OF THE LID IS PADDED AT THE TOP WITH GREY FABRIC. THE FAUX LEATHER IS FRAYING AWAY AT THE EDGES AND LIFTING AT THE SEAM AT THE SIDE OF THE LID, REVEALING THE WOOD UNDERNEATH. 2: A CIRCULAR SLIP OF CREAM PAPER TITLED “CORRECTING TABLE”. THE REST IS TYPED IN BLACK INK. HANDWRITTEN BLUE INK ADDITIONS FILL IN THE INSTRUMENT NUMBER AS “3878” AS WELL AS FILLING ADDITIONS TO THE CORRECTION CHART. THE SLIGHTEST WRINKLING LEAVES TWO SMALL CREASES ON THE SURFACE. DIAMETER: 6.3 CM 3: THE SKIN THERMOMETER. IT IS CIRCULAR IN A BLACK PLASTIC CASING WITH A SINGLE HALF CIRCLE PLASTIC WINDOW TO THE DIAL ON THE TOP SIDE. THE DIAL READS “FOREGGER”, “FAHRENHEIT HEIDENWOLF AUSTRIA”, AND “PATENT 3878”. THE BOTTOM SIDE HAS A 1.1 CM HIGH, 2.3 CM DIAMETER CYLINDRICAL ARM ON WHICH A ROUND SENSOR SITS. THE SENSOR IS MISSING ALMOST ALL ITS PATINA, ONLY A LITTLE BIT SURVIVING AT THE EDGES. H: 3.8 CM, D: 7 CM 4: THE BOTTOM OF THE CASE. AN OPEN WOOD CYLINDER WRAPPED ON THE OUTSIDE WITH FAUX LEATHER FABRIC WITH GREY FELT ON THE INSIDE. THE INSIDE LIP (ON WHICH THE THERMOMETER SITS) DOES NOT WRAP AROUND COMPLETELY, LEAVING SPACE FOR THE SENSOR ARM. THE BOTTOM EDGE IS UNCOVERED. THE FAUX LEATHER IS FRAYING AT THE EDGES AND PULLING AWAY FROM THE SEAM ON THE SIDE. H: 3.1 CM, D: 8.3 CM
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS SKIN THERMOMETER WAS USED IN THE OPERATING ROOM FROM 1955 TO 1988. ACCORDING TO ITS HISTORY, “OPERATING ROOM STAFF [USED THE THERMOMETER] TO ASSESS THE TEMPERATURE OF THE PATIENTS.” THIS ARTIFACT SHOWS “HOW THINGS HAVE ADVANCED. THEY USE SKIN TAPES NOW THAT ARE THERMOMETERS.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049009
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"ALBERTA MEAT MARKET"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, WOOD, IRON
Catalogue Number
P20180025000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"ALBERTA MEAT MARKET"
Date
1955
Materials
STEEL, WOOD, IRON
No. Pieces
3
Height
115
Length
427
Width
24
Description
A. COMMERCIAL ADVERTISING SIGN, NEON. BODY STEEL PAINTED WITH TWO-TONE BLUE ON FRONT; FRONT HAS RED WOODEN LETTERS MOUNTED TO METAL FRAME AT BACK, SPELLING “ALBERTA" WITH WHITE NEON LETTERS OVERLAID. FRONT HAS WHITE LETTERS PAINTED ON BLUE BODY WITH OVERLAID WHITE NEON LETTERS READING “MEAT MARKET”. NEON LETTERS COMPRISED OF CONNECTED CLEAR, GLASS TUBES WITH BACKS PAINTED WHITE, AND UNPAINTED FRONTS; LETTERS ARE CONNECTED AND PAINTED BLACK BETWEEN INDIVIDUAL LETTERS; NEON LETTERS CONNECT INTO SIGN . LETTERS FASTENED TO FRONT OF SIGN BODY WITH BRACKETED GLASS EXTENSIONS, AND WITH SILVER WIRES TIED TO LETTERS. SIGN BODY IS RECTANGULAR WITH CUT-OUT SPACE IN CENTER WITH “ALBERTA" WOOD LETTERS IN FRONT OF CUT-OUT SPACE. SIGN BODY SLOPES DOWN FROM UPPER RIGHT CORNER; LOWER EDGE OF BODY SLOPES UP FROM RIGHT CORNER. SIGN FRONT HAS NEON TUBING ALONG UPPER EDGE ON BLUE FRAME, WITH SHORTER NEON TUBE RUNNING ACROSS FRAMING NEON TUBING ON THE LEFT SIDE. FRONT OF SIGN HAS LOGO BETWEEN “MEAT” AND “MARKET” NEON TEXT; LOGO COMPRISED OF RED BANNER EXTENDING FROM SIDES OF WHITE SHIELD IN CENTER; SHIELD HAS BLUE BORDER WITH BLUE “N” IN CENTER; RED BANNERS HAVE WHITE BORDERS AND WHITE TEXT ACROSS LOGO “NATIONAL NEON”.RED WOODEN LETTER “L” WARPED AND SPLITTING AT FRONT. TOP OF SIGN BODY STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT AND BLACK SOILING. BACK OF SIGN HAS FIXED BRACKETS ALONG EDGES WITH HOLES PUNCHED AT TOP AND BOLTED AT BOTTOMS TO SIGN BACK. BACK HAS BLACK POWER CORD EXTENDING WITH YELLOW POWER PLUG AT END; BACK HAS PAINT PEELING, IS STAINED AND RUSTED. BACK OF RED WOODEN LETTER “R” IS CRACKED; BACKS OF RED WOODEN LETTERS STAINED WITH YELLOW AND BLUE PAINT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. NEON TUBING REMNANT, LETTERS “TA”, 41 CM LONG X 54 CM WIDE. GLASS TUBING FILLED WITH WHITE, PAINTED BLACK ON BACKS AND AT ENDS. ENDS BENT AND FITTED WITH METAL CAPS WITH WIRES EXTENDING TO FIT INTO FRONT OF SIGN. LETTERS “TA” FASHION IN CURSIVE FONT AND CONNECTED; TUBE LOOPS OVER AT JUNCTION IN “A” AND GOING UP THE “T”. LOWER END OF “A” HAS BLUE PAINT STAINING; PAINT CHIPPED AROUND ENDS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. NEON TUBING REMNANT, LETTERS “AT”, 28 CM LONG X 50 CM WIDE. CLEAR GLASS TUBING, EMPTY, GLASS IS YELLOWED. TUBING PAINTED BLACK ON BACK, AT LOWER BASE, AND AT ENDS. ENDS BENT AND FITTED WITH METAL CAPS WITH WIRES EXTENDING TO FIT INTO FRONT OF SIGN. TUBES LOOP OVER AT JUNCTION IN “A” AND AT THE TOP LINE IN “T”. PAINT CHIPPED ON BACK AND FRONT; END CAPS RUSTED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
IN 2018, THE GALT MUSEUM RECEIVED A COMMERCIAL NEON SIGN FROM THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE CRIGHTON FAMILY. IN THE 1920S, GEORGE CRIGHTON OPENED CRIGHTON MEAT MARKET ON 3RD AVENUE BETWEEN 7TH AND 8TH STREET IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE, AND OPENED THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET AS A SECOND SHOP AT 510—6TH AVENUE SOUTH. THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET REMAINED OPERATED BY THE CRIGHTON FAMILY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 2012. THE ORIGINAL NEON SIGN FROM THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET WAS REMOVED AND DONATED ON NOVEMBER 22, 2018. IN APRIL 2019, THE SIGN UNDERWENT RESTORATIONS TO REPAIR THE NEON LETTERING AT L.A. NEON, LETHBRIDGE, PRIOR TO ITS INSTALLATION IN THE GALT MUSEUM PERMANENT DISPLAYS ON JULY 9, 2019. ON DECEMBER 19, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ELAINE BROWN, WHOSE FATHER-IN-LAW, DAVE BROWN, OWNED NATIONAL NEAN DISPLAYS LTD., AND WHOSE HUSBAND, ALLAN BROWN, WORKED FOR NATIONAL NEON. ON THE “ALBERTA MEAT MARKET” SIGN, BROWN RECALLED, “THAT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST SIGNS THAT THEY MADE…THE WOOD ON IT, IS WHY I KNEW THAT IT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST ONES.” “[ALLAN] USED TO GO AROUND EVERY EVENING, ONCE A WEEK, AND CHECK AND MAKE SURE [THE SIGNS] WERE ALL KEPT UP. IF ANY OF THE NEON WAS BROKEN, THEN THEY WOULD IMMEDIATELY GO AND REPAIR IT SO THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘AS IS’. HE WORKED [AT NATIONAL NEON] ALL DAY.” “[ALLAN] WAS PROUD OF THEM ALL. HE KNEW EXACTLY WHERE EVERY SIGN WAS. ANY ONE THAT HE WOULD PUT UP, HE COULD GO IN AND REPAIR QUICKLY, BECAUSE HE KNEW EXACTLY WHERE EVERYTHING WAS.” “ALLAN USED TO PAINT AND HANG SIGNS, [HIS BROTHER] JIM USED TO BLOW THE NEON AND [HIS BROTHER] BUSTER WOULD ALSO HANG SIGNS.” BROWN FURTHER ELABORATED ON THE HISTORY OF NATIONAL NEON DISPLAYS, STATING, “BEFORE [WE MARRIED IN 1957] ALLAN’S DAD, DAVE, BOUGHT THE BUSINESS WITH HIS THREE SONS…[IT WAS] NATIONAL NEON DISPLAYS LTD.” “IT WAS [AN EXISTING] BUSINESS OWNED BY ANOTHER BROWN…[DAVE] WAS INTERESTED IN IT, SO HE WENT IN AND DID ALL THE LEGWORK TO SEE IF HE COULD MAKE A GO OF IT. OBVIOUSLY, HE DECIDED HE COULD BECAUSE HE [AND THE SONS] BOUGHT IT.” “[ALLAN’S FAMILY] HADN’T BEEN [MAKING SIGNS] BEFORE BUT I PRESUME THEY KNEW THAT THEY COULD MAKE IT GO AND THEY COULD MAKE SIGNS. GRANDPA BROWN SAID THAT HE THOUGHT THEY COULD MAKE IT GO AND THEY DID.” “[ALLAN] DIDN’T THINK THE PLASTIC [SIGNS], WITH JUST THE FACE, WERE AS EYE-CATCHING AS THE NEON SIGNS NOR WERE THEY AS NICE TO LOOK AT WHEN THEY WERE ON. HE REALLY TOOK AN INTEREST IN IT; HE REALLY TRIED TO KEEP IT UP QUITE WELL. THEN HE RETIRED AND WE SOLD TO A MAN FROM CALGARY. I DON’T KNOW WHAT HAPPENED AFTER THAT BUT I THINK NEON PRODUCTS OWNS IT NOW, SO THEY SHUT [THE ORIGINAL] BUILDING DOWN. ALLAN HAD SOLD THE BUILDING AFTER HE RETIRED AND THEN THEY SHUT [THE] BUILDING DOWN AFTER THAT.” “WE HOPED THAT NATIONAL NEON WOULD BE IN PEOPLE’S MINDS AS BEING HERE AND BUILDING THOSE SIGNS…NATIONAL NEON WAS HERE AS A COMPANY AND EXPANDED FROM HERE. [ALLAN] USED TO GO INTO B.C. AND SASKATCHEWAN, TO EDMONTON…TO SELL THEM. IT WASN’T JUST A LOCAL BUSINESS. IT WAS ALL OVER, B.C., SASKATCHEWAN, ALBERTA—AND I THOUGHT IT WAS REALLY INTERESTING THAT THEY’D PICK ONE OF THE FIRST SIGNS THAT [ALLAN] BUILT TO TAKE DOWN AND PRESERVE. I’M SURE [ALLAN] WOULD HAVE BEEN HAPPY WITH THAT.” ON NOVEMBER 28, 2019, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MIRIAM SMITH AND BOB CRIGHTON REGARDING THEIR MEMORIES OF THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, OWNED AND OPERATED BY THEIR GRANDFATHER GEORGE CRIGHTON, FATHER JAMES CRIGHTON, AND THEMSELVES. ON THE HISTORY OF THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, MIRIAM SMITH RECALLED, “THE CRIGHTON FAMILY MOVED FROM SCOTLAND IN 1920…[GRANDPA CRIGHTON] OPENED THE STORE; HE RAN THE 6TH AVENUE STORE. HE RAISED HIS SONS OUT OF THERE. DAD WAS A BUTCHER IN SCOTLAND; THEY ALL BECOME BUTCHERS. BOBBY LEFT; TOMMY LEFT; DAVEY, HE WAS A BUTCHER; GEORGE WENT TO CAMPBELL RIVER.” “[DAD TOOK OVER THE SHOP ON 6TH AVENUE] ’38, OR ’39.” BOB CRIGHTON ELABORATED, “[DAD] TRIED TO ENLIST, BUT HE HAD THE STORE ON 3RD AVENUE, AND HE WENT BROKE THERE. THAT WAS CALLED CRIGHTON’S MEAT MARKET AT THAT TIME...HE HAD TO PAY ALL OF HIS BILLS OFF, SO MY GRANDPA ASKED HIM TO TAKE OVER THE 6TH AVENUE STORE. SO HE TOOK OVER THE 6TH AVENUE STORE, AND CHANGED IT TO THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET.” “[WHEN DAD GOT THE NEW NEON SIGN] I REMEMBER HIM PUTTING IT UP. DAD RENOVATED THE STORE AND WE GOT NEW MEAT COUNTERS, AND WHEN HE GOT THE NEW SIGN UP, I WATCHED THEM PUT IT UP. NATIONAL NEON PUT IT UP…I WAS 12-14 YEARS OLD.” MIRIAM SMITH RECALLED, “I WORKED THERE WHEN I WENT TO SCHOOL. I HAD TO ANSWER THE TELEPHONE ON SATURDAYS, OR HOLIDAYS…IT WAS A BUSY STORE. I REMEMBER ALONG 6TH AVENUE AND 5TH STREET, YOU COULDN’T FIND A PLACE TO PARK BECAUSE IT WAS SO BUSY. I REMEMBER, AT LUNCHTIME, I USED TO SAY, 'I’M GOING TO GO FOR MY LUNCH NOW,' AND THERE USED TO BE SILVER’S ACROSS THE STREET. MY DAD WOULD ALWAYS SAY, ‘NO, YOU CAN’T GO. I’VE GOT TO FIX THE COUNTER AND GET MY PARSLEY OUT.' HE ALWAYS HAD HIS COUNTER VERY BEAUTIFULLY DONE.” “THE PHONE WOULD RING OFF THE HOOK, ESPECIALLY [WITH] EVERYBODY WANTING TO ORDER THEIR MEAT. IT WAS PLEASANT VISITING WITH THE DIFFERENT PEOPLE. SOME OF THEM I KNEW; SOME OF THEM I DIDN’T. BUT I FOUND MOST PEOPLE VERY NICE TO CHAT WITH. I REMEMBER MY DAD, AND DORIS HUNT (H.B.HUNT), THE DOCTOR’S WIFE. SHE USED TO COME IN, AND SHE WAS QUITE A BOISTEROUS LADY, AND SHE SPOKE HER MIND. I REMEMBER ONE TIME SHE SAID TO MY DAD, 'JIMMY, THAT ROAST BEEF YOU GAVE ME LAST WEEK WAS TOUGHER THAN HELL.' WELL, MY DAD SAID TO HER, 'YOU KNOW, DORIS, I REMEMBER YOUR HUSBAND TOOK MY APPENDIX OUT, AND THEY COME BACK AGAIN.'" MIRIAM SMITH NOTED, "I REMEMBER THE TIME THAT DAD GAVE THE TURKEY TO THE KID…THE KID HAD NO MONEY, AND HE COME FOR HAMBURGER.” BOB CRIGHTON ELABORATED, “HAMBURGER, AT CHRISTMAS TIME. IT WAS 40 BELOW OUTSIDE, AND HE [CAME] DOWN…HE SAID, ‘I WANT A POUND OF HAMBURGER, MR. CRIGHTON.' [DAD] SAYS, ‘WHAT ARE YOU HAVING FOR CHRISTMAS SUPPER?' 'HAMBURGER.' 'JUST A MINUTE.' SO, [DAD] GETS A TURKEY, AND A HAM, AND SAUSAGE. GOT A BAG FOR HIM, AND HE SAYS, 'THERE – MERRY CHRISTMAS.'" “DAD WAS A PRETTY GENEROUS MAN! WHEN ANDY KERGEN DIED, JUDY [CAME] IN. SHE WAS CRYING. SHE HAD A $200.00 BILL; SHE COULDN’T PAY IT. SHE HAD $5.00 TO PUT ON THE BILL. DAD SAYS, “GIVE ME THE BILL, JUDY.” HE LOOKED AT THE BILL; HE TOOK HIS WALLET OUT AND PAID THE BILL, AND THEN GAVE HER THE RECEIPT.” MIRIAM SMITH CONTINUED, “I ALWAYS REMEMBER WHEN WE WERE KIDS GROWING UP, WE ALWAYS HAD LOTS OF MEAT. WHATEVER WAS LEFT OVER AT THE STORE [WOULD] COME HOME…WE COULD BRING ANYBODY WE WANTED, MOTHER DIDN’T MIND. THE MEAT PLATTER WOULD BE PLACED IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TABLE, AND THE WATER PITCHER. NOBODY WANTED TO SIT BESIDE THE WATER PITCHER, BECAUSE ALL YOU DID WAS POUR WATER.” MIRIAM SMITH NOTED, “[WE, THE CHILDREN, BOUGHT DAD OUT] IN 1965.” ON DECEMBER 11, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED KEN CRIGHTON, GRANDSON OF JAMES [JIM] CRIGHTON. KEN CRIGHTON WORKED WITH THE FAMILY IN ALBERTA MEAT MARKET. ON HIS MEMORIES OF WORKING IN THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, KEN CRIGHTON NOTED, “I WAS THERE EVERY DAY FOR 30 SOME YEARS…MY DAD AND HIS TWO BROTHERS WERE OPERATING IT WHEN I WAS A KID. [I] GOT TOLD TO GET DOWN THERE, AND HELP CLEAN UP; DO SOME CHORES; HELP WITH DELIVERIES; THEN I WORKED INTO LEARNING HOW TO CUT MEAT.” “[MY GRANDFATHER OWNED IT] JAMES ANDERSON CRIGHTON, BUT EVERYONE CALLED HIM ‘JIM’.” “[MY] FIRST MEMORIES OF GOING THERE TO WORK WAS HAVING TO RIDE ON YOUR BIKE, OR WALK FROM SCHOOL RIGHT AFTER SCHOOL, TO HELP CLEAN UP EITHER AT 4 O’CLOCK OR 4:30. IT ALWAYS SEEMED TO ME THAT I WAS DOING THE BULK OF THE WORK, AND THEY WERE DOING MOST OF THE BEER-DRINKING.” “EVERY NIGHT YOU HAD TO EMPTY ALL THE MEAT OUT OF THE COUNTER, COVER IT OVER, TAKE IT, PUT IT IN THE BIG COOLER; TAKE ALL THE PLATTERS OUT OF THE COUNTER, WASH THEM, DRY THEM…EVERYTHING FROM SWEEPING THE FLOOR, TO RAKING THE FLOOR. WE USED TO HAVE SAWDUST ON THE FLOOR TO SOAK UP ALL THE BLOOD AND FAT THAT WOULD FALL DOWN. YOU’D RUN A RAKE THROUGH IT TO PICK UP ALL THE BIG CHUNKS OF GARBAGE, AND THEN TWICE A WEEK YOU’D SWEEP UP ALL THE SAWDUST, AND REPLACE IT WITH FRESH SAWDUST. THAT ENDED WHEN THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT CHANGED…WHEN I WAS ABOUT 12-13, SO THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN 1972.” “[THE SHOP WAS OPEN] SIX DAYS A WEEK. WE WERE ONLY CLOSED, THEN, ON SUNDAYS.” “EVERY DAY, WEEKDAYS AFTER SCHOOL, AND SATURDAYS, I WOULD HELP THE GUY THAT WOULD DO DELIVERIES. WE’D RUN OUT A COUPLE, OR THREE, LOADS OF DELIVERIES TO HOUSES. IT WAS DIFFERENT BACK THEN. WE HAD SOME CUSTOMERS WHO WOULD ORDER THEIR STUFF IN THE MORNING FOR WHAT THEY WANTED FOR LUNCH. THEN THEY PHONE IN THE AFTERNOON, AND ORDER FOR WHAT THEY WANTED FOR SUPPER, WHICH, LATER ON, BECAME THE, “NO, YOU GET ONE DELIVERY A DAY.”” KEN CRIGHTON RECALLED THE LAYOUT OF THE SHOP, STATING, “THE FRONT HALF OF THE BUILDING, WHERE THE CUSTOMERS WERE, WAS PROBABLY ONLY ABOUT THE FIRST THIRD, MAYBE HALF OF THE BUILDING. A GLASS COUNTER/COOLER [WAS] ALONG THE MIDDLE, AND BEHIND IT WAS WHERE WE HAD OUR CUTTING BLOCKS AND SAW. [THERE WAS A] LITTLE COUNTER FOR A PHONE, [A] LITTLE COUNTER TO DO BOOKS ON, [AND] A 6’ WIDE AREA FOR THE CUSTOMERS TO STAND. EVERYTHING WAS SERVED. THERE WAS NO ‘THEM PICKING IT OUT’ AT THE COUNTER. IT WAS ALL DONE AND WRAPPED IN BROWN PAPER BY US.” “ON THE LEFT SIDE, [THERE WAS] A GOOD 15’ TO 20’ WALK-IN COOLER. THEN, ALONG THE WEST WALL, WE HAD A SMALL FREEZER WITH SHELVES. [IT] HAD NINE LITTLE DOORS THAT [OPENED] UP, AND SLIDE TRAYS IN. WHEN YOU’RE DOING FREEZER BEEF ORDERS, YOU’D USE THAT TO FREEZE THEM UP. [THERE WAS] A LITTLE WALK-IN FREEZER TO HOLD THE BOXES, PROBABLY ONLY 3’ BY 6’. [THERE WAS] A COUNTER [AT] THE BACK END, WITH A STOVE, THAT WE WOULD USE TO COOK UP CORNED BEEF, [AND] A FEW OTHER COLD MEATS.” “WE HAD A DOUBLE DOOR ON THE SIDE THAT WENT TO THE ALLEY, THAT WE WOULD BRING THE STUFF IN OFF THE TRUCK. USUALLY IT WAS TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS, WE WOULD GET THE BIG ORDERS OF HANGING BEEF IN. WE HAD TWO HUGE 2’ BY 6’ PIECES OF WOOD THAT WERE ON BIG HOOKS THAT WERE PROPPED UP IN THE ATTIC. THEN YOU WOULD HANG YOUR BIG MEAT HOOKS ON THEM. YOU COULD GET 8 HIND QUARTERS, AND 6-8 FRONT QUARTERS HANGING UP IN THERE. ONE DAY WAS THE DAY YOU WOULD BREAK THEM DOWN INTO PIECES, AND THEN PUT THEM INTO THE COOLER, OR SAVE THE QUARTERS IF YOU HAD A WHOLE QUARTER FOR A FREEZER ORDER.” “[I LEARNED THE TRADE] MOSTLY BY WATCHING…BY THE TIME I WAS 15-16, [I WAS] IN THERE DOING EVERY SINGLE THING THEY’RE DOING: RUNNING THE BAND SAW, THE GRINDER, MIXING UP BURGERS, MAKING PATTIES, THE WHOLE DEAL. [I] DIDN’T REALLY GET TO SERVE CUSTOMERS TILL [I WAS] OLDER. A LOT OF THE CUSTOMERS, EVEN THEN, DIDN’T WANT ME SERVING THEM, [THEY] WANTED THE OLD MAN, OR ONE OF THE OLDER GUYS. I’M SURE LOTS OF FAMILY BUSINESSES RUN INTO THAT, WHERE THE OLD-TIME CUSTOMERS ONLY WANT THE OLDER PEOPLE LOOKING AFTER THEM.” “[THE SHOP DID WELL] I THINK BECAUSE, PROBABLY A LOT OF REPUTATION, AND PERSONALIZED SERVICE. BUT, AFTER A WHILE, IT GOT TO BE THAT YOU WERE RUNNING INTO A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WOULD WANT YOUR QUALITY/YOUR SERVICE BUT AT THE SAME SALE PRICE THAT THE BIG STORES WOULD HAVE. THAT WAS THE FRUSTRATION OF IT…I WOULD SAY PROBABLY 90% OF THE CLIENTELE WERE REPEATS, AND YOU HAD YOUR STEADY CORE CUSTOMERS…THEY WOULD GET WHAT THEY LIKED.” “[IN THE 1980S] THERE WAS MYSELF, DAD, [AND] HE HAD TWO OTHER YOUNGER PEOPLE WORKING, ONE NAMED LEN, WHO WAS CUTTING MEAT, AND ANOTHER [WOMAN] NAMED IDA, WHO CUT. BUSINESS STARTED TO TAPER OFF THEN. HE LAID OFF IDA, AND THEN ME, AND LEN, AND DAD WOULD PRETTY WELL OPERATE THE WHOLE SHOW. THAT WAS ABOUT 1990.” “[DAD] WAS VERY, I THINK, ASTUTE AT THE BUSINESS…[HE] HAD TO BE, BECAUSE THAT WAS THEIR LIVING. THEY HAD NOTHING ELSE TO FALL BACK ON. [HE HAD TO] MAKE IT WORK. HE WAS REALLY GOOD WITH THE CUSTOMERS. HE ENJOYED SERVING THE CUSTOMERS MORE THAN THE GRUNT WORK IN THE BACK. HE COULD DO IT, BUT HE PREFERRED BEING UP FRONT, WORKING WITH THE PEOPLE. ME AND MY UNCLE RON COULD STAY IN THE BACK ALL DAY. I COULD STAND THERE AT THAT BLOCK, AND WE COULD CUT MEAT 8 HOURS STRAIGHT. [IT] WOULDN’T BOTHER US. I COULD HANDLE SERVING THE CUSTOMERS, BUT I PREFERRED JUST WORKING.” “[BUSINESS] REALLY STARTED DECLINING…I REALLY NOTICED IT AROUND 2008, 2009. FOR THE LAST WHILE, [I] JUST HAD MYSELF AND ONE OTHER YOUNG FELLOW, GARRY, WORKING THERE. IT WAS TO THE POINT WHERE YOU COULDN’T MAKE ENOUGH SALES TO AFFORD ANOTHER PERSON, BUT IT WAS TOO BUSY FOR ONE. GARRY WAS STARTING TO HAVE A FAMILY, AND NEEDED MORE MONEY. HE LEFT TO GO WORK SOMEWHERE ELSE. SO, I HUNG ONTO IT, AND JUST DID IT ALL BY MYSELF FOR THE LAST FOUR YEARS. BEING THE ONLY GUY THERE, EVERY HOUR OF EVERY DAY, FOR TEN HOURS A DAY, STARTED TO GET TO ME. IT GOT TO THE POINT WHERE, IN 2011, EARLY 2012, I JUST THOUGHT, “THERE’S NO POINT IN WORKING LIKE THIS, AND NOT MAKING ANYTHING. I MIGHT AS WELL DO NOTHING, AND MAKE THE SAME AMOUNT.”” KEN CRIGHTON SOLD ALBERTA MEAT MARKET IN 2012. MIRIAM SMITH SPOKE TO HER THOUGHTS ON THE SIGN BEING DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM, NOTING, “I’M VERY HAPPY. I THINK IT’S A GOOD PLACE FOR IT, AND I THINK KENNETH, AND EVERYBODY FEELS THAT WAY.” KEN CRIGHTON CONFIRMED, “I’M ECSTATIC! I WOULD RATHER IT BE HERE. OUR WHOLE FAMILY’S LOST OUR IDENTITY/ERASED [IT] BY HAVING IT JUST THROWN AWAY. ON THE OTHER HAND, I DIDN’T WANT IT STILL ON THE BUILDING, [WITH] THE BUILDING BEING USED FOR A DIFFERENT PURPOSE, AND HAVING THE NAME ASSOCIATED. [IT] FELT LIKE THE NAME BELONGED TO THE CRIGHTON’S MORE THAN THE COMMUNITY, OR WHOEVER OWNED THE BUILDING.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, FAMILY OBITUARIES, AND ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180025000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180025000
Acquisition Date
2018-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20170024000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1950
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
22
Length
50
Width
40
Description
A. TYPERWRITER, 22 CM TALL X 50 CM LONG X 40 CM WIDE. DARK GREY WITH SILVER TRIM AND BLACK DECK; TYPEWRITR HAS BLACK AND RED RIBBON FIXED UNDER DARK GREY COVER; TYPEWRITER HAS FULL SET OF KEYS MARKED WITH BLACK AND CREAM LABELS. TYPEWRITER HAS TWO SILVER SWITCHES ON FRONT LEFT SIDE ABOVE “TAB CLEAR” BUTTON, AND TWO SILVER SWITCHES ON FRONT RIGHT SIDE WITH RED, BLUE AND WHITE MARKS BETWEEN, ABOVE “TAB SET” BUTTON. FRONT HAS GOLD PLATE TARNISHED BLACK WITH SILVER TEXT “ROYAL”, AND WHITE WORN PAINTED TEXT “MADE IN CANADA” BELOW. TYPEWRITER HAS WIDE DECK. RIGHT SIDE OF TYPEWRITER HAS BLACK TURN-KNOB WITH WORN WHITE PAINTED TEXT “TOUCH CONTROL” AND METAL ADJUSTMENT PLATE BELOW. BACK HAS WORN WHITE PAINTED LABEL “ROYAL”; UPPER LEFT CORNER OF BACK HAS WORN WHITE PAINTED LABEL “PATENTED, 1910, 1915, 1916, 1924”; BOTTOM OF BACK HAS WORN WHITE PAINTED LABEL “PROTECTED BY AMERICAN AND FOREIGN PATENTS, NOT FOR EXPORT, TOUCH CONTROL”. SERIAL NUMBER ENGRAVED INSIDE BACK LEFT SIDE OF CARRIAGE DECK, “KMM14-2685751”. CARRIAGE DECK IS WORN AND SOILED; PAINTED LABELS ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. TYPEWRITER COVER, 51.5 CM LONG X 50.5 CM WIDE. GREY-GREEN CANVAS COVER WITH COTTON LINING. COVER HAS WHITE MACHINE-STITCHED EDGES THAT ARE WORN AND FRAYING. COVER HAS HOLES AND TEARS IN SIDES AND FRONT; COVER IS CREASED AND FLAKING ON FRONT AND SIDES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
WRITTEN COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
COAL MINING
INDUSTRY
History
ON JULY 26, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GLORIA MARTENS REGARDING HER DONATION OF A “ROYAL” TYPEWRITER. MARTENS ACQUIRED THE TYPEWRITER FROM DON LIVINGSTON WITH BRIDGE VALLEY GOLF IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. ON HER MEMORIES OF THE TYPEWRITER, MARTENS RECALLED, “I DIDN’T [KNOW IT WAS THERE] PRIOR TO TAKING IT. IT WAS UP ON A HIGH SHELF IN THE BACK CORNER AND I WAS UP TRYING TO FIND WHAT WAS UP THERE AND THAT’S WHEN I COME ACROSS IT. I NEVER [SAW MR. LIVINGSTON USE IT].” “I WAS WORKING DOWN AT BRIDGE VALLEY GOLF FOR MR. DON LIVINGSTON. I WAS CLEANING UP THE OFFICE ONE DAY AND IT WAS UP ON A TOP SHELF IN THE BACK CORNER. I ASKED HIM ABOUT IT AND HE INFORMED ME THAT IT HAD BEEN HIS DAD’S AND THAT HE HAD USED IT IN THE MINE, IN HIS OFFICE. MR. LIVINGSTON SAID, “IF YOU WANT IT YOU CAN TAKE IT HOME.” I BROUGHT IT HOME THINKING IT WAS QUITE AN INTERESTING PIECE AND IT’S MOVED WITH ME A COUPLE OF TIMES, BUT IT’S GOT TO THE POINT WHERE I DON’T USE IT SO, THEREFORE, MAYBE IT CAN BE PUT TO SOME USE SOMEWHERE.” “IT HAS TO BE 30 OR SO YEARS AGO [SINCE I WAS GIVEN THE TYPEWRITER].” “IT WAS JUST AN OLD TYPEWRITER AND IT WAS SOMETHING SIMILAR TO WHAT MY GRANDFATHER PROBABLY USED, AND SO IT WAS INTERESTING TO ME. SO I BROUGHT IT HOME.” “I HAD A SMALL LITTLE TYPEWRITER, BUT I NEVER DID MUCH TYPING.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY FOR R. DONALD LIVINGSTONE [MARCH 13, 2001], IT IS RECOUNTED THAT R. LIVINGSTONE WORKED FOR THE #8 MINE UNDERGROUND BEFORE ADVANCING TO ENGINEER, MANAGER, AND GENERAL MANAGER FOR LETHBRIDGE COLLIERIES FOR 34 YEARS. R. LIVINGSTONE WAS A LIFETIME MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE COUNTRY CLUB AND OWNED BRIDGE VALLEY PAR-3 GOLF COURSE AND DRIVING RANGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170024000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170024000
Acquisition Date
2017-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE HERALD AGENT"
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
TIN, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180004000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE HERALD AGENT"
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
TIN, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
30.6
Width
25.8
Description
METAL SIGN WITH DOUBLE-SIDED PRINTING ON LIGHT BROWN BACKGROUND. SIGN SHOWS BLACK SQUARE BACKGROUND WITH RED TRIM AND LIGHT BROWN TEXT WITH RED TRIM READING “AGENT FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD HERE, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD SERVES THE SOUTH”; SIGN HAS SMALL BLACK TEXT PRINTED AT BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER “TMOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO. LTD. MONTREAL”. BACK OF SIGN IS PRINTED THE SAME. SIGN HAS JAGGED METAL EDGE BENT DOWN ON LEFT SIDE; SIGN IS RUSTED FRONT AND BACK AND FADED; SIGN IS SCRATCHED IN FRONT UPPER RIGHT CORNER AND CORRODED LOWER LEFT CORNER. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
PROFESSIONS
History
ON MARCH 19TH, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONTACTED DAN PLOURDE, THE "AGENT FOR...HERALD" SIGN'S SELLER. THE SIGN WAS PURCHASED BY THE GALT MUSEUM AT URBAN PRAIRIE ANTIQUE MALL ON MARCH 21, 2018. PLOURDE, A PICKER, LEASES MALL SPACE AT URBAN PRAIRIE AS A LOCATION TO SELL HIS PICKS. PLOURDE TOLD MACLEAN THAT THE HERALD SIGN CAME FROM A RURAL PROPERTY NEAR CHIN LAKE. THE RURAL LOCATION FEATURED "QUONSETS" FULL OF OTHER ITEMS, INCLUDING GAS MEMORABILIA AND FURNITURE. THE ORIGINAL OWNER OF THE SIGN, WHO LIVED AT THE PROPERTY WAS NO LONGER LIVING. THE OWNER, CONTINUED PLOURDE, CONDUCTED HIS OWN PICKING "IN BACK ALLEYS IN LETHBRIDGE 60 YEARS AGO". PLOURDE ATTEMPTED TO SELL THE SIGN IN FORT MACLEAD BEFORE RECOGNIZING THAT ITS MARKET WAS GREATER IN LETHBRIDGE. FOR COPIES OF INFORMATION REGARDING THE SIGN, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180004000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180004000
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
31
Diameter
13.4
Description
BLACK CANDLESTICK-STYLE TELEPHONE WITH RECEIVER AND SPEAKER. TELEPHONE SPEAKER IS ATTACHED TO BLACK ROUND BASE AND BLACK MIDDLE ROD WITH HOOK FOR HANGING THE RECEIVER; METAL STAND ON BROWN PADDED BASE WITH BLACK PLASTIC SPEAKER AT THE TOP. BASE HAS WHITE STAMPED TEXT AROUND BASE OF THE STAND “WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 26 15”. TELEPHONE HAS BLACK METAL PLATE BENEATH PLASTIC SPEAKER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT “9298W, WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 14 1919”. BASE HAS TWO BROWN CLOTH-COVERED CORDS EXTENDING FROM BACK OF BASE; FIRST CORD IS CUT OFF, SECOND CORD IS ATTACHED TO BLACK PLASTIC RECEIVER. RECEIVER IS CONE-SHAPED WITH WIDER MOUTHPIECE AT END. RECEIVER IS WRAPPED WITH BLACK TAPE AROUND MIDSECTION; RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND CORD, “PAT. IN U.S.A. APRIL 16, 1918, MAY 20, 1913, JUNE 3, 1913”. RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND BACK EDGE OF MOUTHPIECE “WESTERN ELECTRIC MADE IN U S A 143”. TELEPHONE HAS CHIPPED PAINT ON RECEIVER HOOK; SPEAKER OF TELEPHONE IS CHIPPED WITH LOSS IN PLASTIC; TELEPHONE BODY AND RECEIVER ARE STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
ON APRIL 3, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JOHN WENSVEEN REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE. WENSVEEN HAD RETIRED FROM ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED AND HAD KEPT THE TELEPHONE AS A SOUVENIR FROM HIS TIME EMPLOYED. ON HOW HE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE TELEPHONE, WENSVEEN ELABORATED, “WHEN I RETIRED [IN THE FALL OF 1989] FROM THE ELEVATOR, THESE PHONES WERE NOT USED ANY MORE SO THEY WERE MORE OR LESS DISCARDED. WHEN I RETIRED I [WOULD] JUST TAKE ONE HOME. SO I DID. I DIDN’T STEAL IT OR ANYTHING BECAUSE THEY WEREN’T USED ANYMORE.” “[I WORKED FOR] THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ELEVATOR LATER KNOWN AS ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED.” “THESE [PHONES] WERE IN THE ELEVATOR AND AS LONG AS THEY WERE WORKING, WE USED THEM. [THE COMPANY] DIDN’T WANT TO GO TO ANOTHER PHONE AND HAVE THE SAME THING SITTING IN THE OFFICE…THE PHONE WOULD RING AND THEN YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO OVER THERE AND ANSWER IT. THEY DECIDED WE’VE GOT TO GET SOMETHING THAT WE CAN CARRY WITH US AND THAT’S WHAT WE DID. WE COULD HAVE GONE THROUGH A REGULAR PHONE AS SUCH BUT, AGAIN, YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO THROUGH THAT OFFICE AND ANSWER THE PHONE.” “WE HAD A BOX, [THE] WIRE WAS CONNECTED ON TO THE BOX…IT WAS ON THE WALL AND IT HAD DIFFERENT FLOORS MARKED IN A LITTLE SPACE [WITH] A LITTLE BUTTON BEHIND IT. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT ANOTHER FLOOR, YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU PRESSED THAT BUTTON FOR THAT PARTICULAR FLOOR. THEN THE PHONE WOULD RING. THEN YOU WOULD GET IT OVER THERE AND YOU WOULD ANSWER THE CALL.” “I STARTED IN ’58 AND I THINK WE USED THEM FOR ABOUT 15 YEARS AFTER THAT [UNTIL ABOUT 1972]." “WE WENT OVER TO WALKIE TALKIES…[WHEN] I STARTED WORK THERE...WE WERE USING ALL THESE PHONES AND THEY HAD ONE OF THESE PHONES ON EACH FLOOR. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT SOMEBODY, THAT’S WHAT YOU HAD TO USE. THAT’S WHAT WE DID AND, LATER ON THEY WERE OFF-LISTED AND PUT IN THE BASEMENT, AND MORE OR LESS FORGOT ABOUT. SO I DECIDED TO TAKE ONE HOME.” “THESE PHONES WERE NOT THAT CLEAR. WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH CLEARER…[YOU] HELD THE MIC CLOSE TO YOU. IF YOU WERE TOO FAR AWAY FROM THE PHONE AND SOMEONE WAS TALKING YOU COULDN’T PICK IT UP VERY WELL. IT WAS SOMETHING AT THE TIME, IT WAS GOOD AT THE TIME BECAUSE THERE WAS NOTHING ELSE. BUT WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH BETTER.” “WE USED THIS PHONE ALL THE TIME WHEN WORKING THERE, SO IT WAS SOMETHING THAT WE WERE USED TO USING…THAT’S THE MAIN REASON [I BROUGHT IT HOME]. I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE NICE TO TAKE ONE AS A REMEMBRANCE OF THE ELEVATOR AND I’LL USE IT HOW IT USED TO BE.” “I PUT IT OUTSIDE, I HAVE A SHED, AND I PUT IT IN THE SHED AND IT MORE OR LESS STAYED THERE...I THOUGHT EVENTUALLY IT WOULD BE A KEEPSAKE AND WOULD BE A REMINDER OF MY PLACE WHERE I WORKED. [NOW] I’M DOWNSIZING. I’M GOING TO BE MOVING OUT OF THE HOUSE AND I KNEW I HAD THIS IN THE SHED OUTSIDE. I THOUGHT MAYBE THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO SEE IF I CAN DONATE IT AND I DIDN’T WANT TO THROW IT OUT.” ON HIS TIME WITH ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED, WENSVEEN RECALLED, “I WORKED ON THE SCALE FOR 8 YEARS. THE SCALES WERE UPSTAIRS AND THEY HAD 6 PITS DOWN BELOW WHERE THE GRAIN WOULD BE DUMPED. IN THE EARLY DAYS THEY USED BOXCARS, CPR, AND THEY WOULD HOLD 1500 BUSHELS. THEY WERE MADE FOR [TRANSPORT] AND THE GRAIN WOULD COME UP…ABOVE THE SCALE AND WE COULD CONTROL THAT AND WE WOULD WEIGH IT. I WORKED UP THERE FOR ABOUT 8 YEARS. THEN A POSITION CAME AVAILABLE DOWNSTAIRS FOR RECEIVING AND SHIPPING SO I PUT IN FOR IT AND I GOT THAT POSITION. I DID THE RECEIVING AND SHIPPING LATER ON, TAKING GRAIN IN AND SHIPPING GRAIN OUT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180007000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
Acquisition Date
2018-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, STEEL, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20180005000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
2000
Materials
PLASTIC, STEEL, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
30.5
Length
57
Width
11.3
Description
CAMCORDER COMPRISED OF LENS, BETACAM DECK, AND COLOR CAMERA. BETACAM DECK AT BACK OF CAMERA IS TWO-TONE GREY WITH TWO PLUG-INS FOR “AUDIO IN, CH-1, CH-2” AND ONE PLUG-IN FOR “DC-IN, 12V”. BETACAM DECK HAS TWO BLACK SLIDE BUTTONS ON TOP LABELLED IN WHITE “EJECT” AND “REW”. BETACAM DECK HAS GREY METAL HANDLE AT TOP THAT FASTENS TO BETA CASSETTE DECK. BETACAM DECK HAS YELLOWED PLASTIC WINDOW ON SIDE TO VIEW INSIDE MECHANISMS; BELOW WINDOW IS GREEN, RED AND BLUE DECAL READING “45 NEWS, 45”. REVERSE SIDE HAS SILVER “POWER ON/OF” SWITCH ABOVE METER MEASURING BATTERY CHARGE, “SONY VU”; BETACAM DECK HAS TWO ROUND BLACK BUTTONS LABELLED “RESET” AND “LIGHT” ABOVE BLACK SWITCH LABELLED “TAPE TIMER, TIME CODE”; SIDE HAS DIGITAL DISPLAY SCREEN READING “HOUR, MIN, SEC”. SIDE HAS ROW OF SIX RED LIGHTS NEAR BOTTOM LABELLED WITH WORN WHITE PAINT WITH FIRST TWO ILLEGIBLE, “HUMID, SLACK, TAPE END, BATTERY”. SIDE HAS PANEL THAT OPENS AT BOTTOM EDGE WITH SIX DARK GREY BUTTONS LABELLED IN PAIRS “HOUR, MINUTE, SECOND” AND TWO BLACK SWITCHES LABELLED “U-BIT, TIME” AND “REC RUN, FREE RUN”. SIDE HAS SILVER PLATE FIXED READING “SONY”. BACK OF BETACAM DECK HAS SILVER LABEL WITH RED, GREEN AND BLUE LOGO “45 CFCN TELEVISION”; BACK HAS BLACK LABEL WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY BETACAM, MODEL BVV-1, VIDEOCASSETTE BETACAM DECK, DCIN, 12V, 10W, NO. 11085, SONY CORPORATION, MADE IN JAPAN, 3-676-119-01”. TOP OF BETACAM DECK HAS BLACK LABEL WITH SILVER TEXT “SAVE MODE ONLY”. COLOR CAMERA IN MID-SECTION IS LIGHT GREY WITH SMALL PIECE OF SILVER TAPE FIXED TO TOP. SIDE OF CAMERA HAS YELLOW LABEL WITH BLACK “1”; SIDE HAS DARK GREY CONTROL PANEL AT BOTTON EDGE WITH EMBOSSED TEXT AND SILVER SWITCHES AND BUTTONS, “AUTO WHITE BAL, CAMERA, PRE HEAT/ON, VTR, SAVE/STOP, GAIN, 12/6/0, OUTPUT, BASS/CAM, WHITE BAL, PRE SET/AUTO”. SIDE HAS DARK GREY BUTTON ABOVE CONTROL PANEL LABELLED “VTR START”. SIDE HAS SILVER FITTING BESIDE PANEL LABELLED “PEDESTAL”. SIDE HAS SILVER LABEL WITH WORN BLACK TEXT “SONY MODEL NO. BVP-1, COLOR VIDEO CAMERA, DC, 12V, 11W, NO. 10505”. SIDE HAS SILVER LABEL WITH BLACK TEXT “FILTER, 1 3200’K, 2 5200’K + 1/4ND, 3 5200’K, 4 6800’K”. REVERSE SIDE HAS BLACK PLATE FIXED WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY” ABOVE BLACK LABEL WITH RED, GREEN, BLUE AND WHITE LOGO “TRINICON”. SIDE HAS SILVER FITTING AT LOWER EDGE WITH EMBOSSED LABEL “MONITOR OUT”; LOWER EDGE HAS SILVER KEY HOLE WITH EMBOSSED LABEL “BATTERY”. CAMERA HAS ATTACHED BLACK ABOVE-VIEWFINDER WITH RUBBER GUARD OVER GLASS LENS. VIEWFINDER IS FIXED TO FRONT OF CAMERA; VIEWFINDER HAS WHITE TAPE ATTACHED TO TOP WITH BLUE HANDWRITTEN TEXT “PASS JULZ DAMAGE TO TUBE OR MULT.PLER”. BACK OF VIEWFINDER HAS SILVER SWITCH “TALLY, ON/OF” AND TWO BLACK METAL TURN-KNOBS “BRIGHT, CONTR”. FRONT OF VIEWFINDER HAS BLACK PLATE ATTACHED WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY”. BLACK LENS AT FRONT FIXED IN LENS STAND WITH LEATHER STRAP ON SIDE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS “VTR, RET, IRIS M”; SIDE OF LENS STAND HAS BLACK SWITCHES “W/T” AND “IRIS, A/M”. LENS HAS WHITE LABEL AROUND MID-SECTION “CANON MACRO TV ZOOMJ13X9C, 9-117MM, 1.1.6, NO.80581, CANON, JAPAN”. LENS ROTATES TO ADJUST FOCUS AND DEPTH. BETACAM HAS WEAR ON LABELS AND DISCOLORATION ON PLASTIC WINDOW; COLOR CAMERA HAS WEAR ON LABELS AND ADHESIVE RESIDUE ON SIDE; HANDLE ON TOP HAS WORN AND CHIPPED PAINT; VIEWFINDER IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
BUSINESS
History
ON MARCH 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DARREN KRONLUND REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A SONY BVV-1 BETACAM AND CAMCORDER. THE CAMCORDER WAS USED IN THE 1980S BY THE CTV LETHBRIDGE FILM CREW. ON THE FUNCTION OF THE CAMERA IN THE CTV STUDIO, KRONLUND ELABORATED, “THE TECHNOLOGY WITH CAMERAS PROGRESSED QUICKER THAN THE DECKS DID. THESE CAMERAS AND DECKS ARE USED FOR ELECTRONIC FIELD PRODUCTION [AND ARE] CALLED THE EFP CAMERAS. THE DECKS KIND [ARE] THAT TECHNOLOGY WHICH THE MAJORITY OF STATIONS USED FOR THE LONGEST TIME [IN] SONY BETA CAM FORMAT. THAT’S WHAT THE DECK IS, BUT THE CAMERAS THEMSELVES HAD AT ONE TIME THREE TUBES FOR COLOUR CAMERAS. THEN TECHNOLOGY CAME WHERE THEY COULD DO IT WITH JUST SENSORS…SO YOU DIDN’T HAVE TUBES. IT WAS MORE SENSITIVE TO LIGHT AND THAT WAS AN IMPROVEMENT. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE TO BRING A BUNCH OF LIGHTS ALONG WITH YOUR SHOOTS. AS THOSE CAMERAS CAME OUT, THEY JUST DID SUCH A BETTER JOB, THAT THESE CAMERAS WERE NO LONGER USED. ALTHOUGH THEY WORKED, THEY WOULD JUST GET STORED AND NEWER TECHNOLOGY, BETTER PICTURES AND LIGHTER [WOULD BE USED].” “[THIS CAMERA] IS A COMPOSITE. AS TECHNOLOGY EVOLVED, THEY COULD SUPPLY [THE] UPPER HALF, THE CAMERA HALF, [AND] YOU COULD CONTINUE TO USE THE OLDER DECK.” TO ME [THE DECK AND CAMERA] ARE DIFFERENT [AGES]. I THINK THE DECK IS NEWER THAN THE CAMERA. OTHERWISE THEY’D BE THE SAME COLOUR. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE OLD, ORIGINAL DECK BUT YOU COULD SWAP OUT DECKS BECAUSE THEY DID MAKE IMPROVEMENTS WITH DECKS AS WELL. THERE WAS A TIME THEY USED METAL TAPES WHICH WAS FOR AUDIO. IT HELPED, YOU COULD GET BETTER AUDIO QUALITY. THEY CALLED THEM METAL, IT’S JUST METAL PARTICLES IN THE TAPE.” “I WOULD SAY THIS CAMERA PROBABLY GOT USED, I’M GOING TO GUESS ’84…IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN SERVICE WHEN I GOT HERE…I PROBABLY SERVICED THE] CAMERA AND/OR DECK…[BY 1990 IT WAS] PROBABLY REPLACED WITH THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY. NOT THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY BUT NEWEST TO US, CALGARY WOULD HAVE HAD THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY.” “BETA WAS THE STAPLE FORMAT FOR VIDEO FOR MANY YEARS. PROBABLY LEADING RIGHT UP TO INTO THE DIGITAL WORLD IT WAS THE KING. PANASONIC HAD A FORMAT [TOO]…HITACHI HAD THEIR OWN TOO, BUT THEY EVEN MADE THEIR CAMERAS COMPATIBLE WITH BETA DECKS THAT’S HOW BIG INFLUENCE [WAS]. SOME SMALLER, INDEPENDENT STATIONS MAYBE WENT WITH SOME OF THAT STUFF, BUT I’D SAY 90% OF THE INDUSTRY WAS BETA.” “IT WAS [FOR] REPORTERS. IT WAS FOR NEWS AND VIDEO PRODUCTION.” KRONLUND ELABORATED ON THE CAMERA’S HISTORY IN PRODUCTION, NOTING, “IT’S BEEN IN THE BASEMENT FOR PROBABLY [TEN YEARS]…I FOUND IT IN AN OLD SHIPPING CONTAINER. THERE’S BEEN NUMEROUS UPGRADES TO CAMERAS SINCE THEN, SO NOTHING WAS DONE WITH IT. THE LAST TIME IT WAS USED I’M GOING TO GUESS [WAS] ROUGHLY TEN YEARS AGO, MAYBE MORE.” “I DOUBT YOU WOULD FIND ANYONE USING IT, BUT I WOULDN’T BE SURPRISED IF SOMEBODY HAD IT IN THEIR BASEMENT [FOR] THE SAME REASON OURS WAS. JUST OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND AND YOU’RE JUST GOING ABOUT YOUR DAY–TO-DAY BUSINESS, UNTIL YOU START CLEANING OUT THINGS AND YOU GO, “OH YEAH, THE OLD BBB1.”” “[WE ACQUIRED EQUIPMENT] USUALLY USED. CALGARY WOULD GET THE NEW STUFF AND THEN THE WORKING STUFF THAT THEY WERE REPLACING WOULD COME DOWN TO US, FOR THE MOST PART. THE CAMERAS WE HAVE NOW WERE BOUGHT BRAND NEW, STATE-OF THE-ART, SO THAT WAS NICE. IT IS NICE FOR THAT, BUT THIS WAS PROBABLY PRE-DATED EVEN ME AND I HAVE BEEN HERE TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS. IT WAS PROBABLY THE CAMERA THEY WERE USING, IF NOT AT THE TIME, BUT LIKELY BEFORE I STARTED.” “THIS [CAMERA] FUNCTIONS TODAY. I’M SURE YOU COULD MAKE PICTURES WITH IT, BUT THE USE OF IT WOULD PROBABLY BE, I’M GOING TO GUESS, MAYBE FIVE OR SIX YEARS. THEN [THE] BUDGETS WOULD [GROW], THEY GOT THIS NEW TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN SHOOT UNDER LESS LIGHT. IT’S A LIGHTER CAMERA AND [THEY] HAVE THESE BENEFITS, SO THEY WOULD BUDGET IN TO UPDATE THE CAMERAS AND DECKS. THROUGH THAT CYCLE, THAT IS WHEN WE WOULD PROBABLY GET A COUPLE OF NEW CAMERAS, THE OLDER STUFF WE’D PUT IN THE BASEMENT.” “I’M [NOW] CLEANING OUT OLD EQUIPMENT, BECAUSE IT BUILDS UP AND WE RUN OUT OF ROOM. IT’S SOMETHING HARD TO GET RID OF BECAUSE THEY’RE ALWAYS WORKING AND USUALLY WORKING AND FUNCTIONING FINE, BUT TECHNOLOGY PROGRESSES AND THEY BECOME BIGGER AND BETTER--OR THERE BECOMES BIGGER AND BETTER WAYS OF DOING THE SAME JOB. IT JUST GETS OUTDATED AND HITS THE SHELF. [I] HATE TO SEE IT JUST GET RECYCLED.” “I’M NOT REALLY THAT TYPE OF [NOSTALGIC] PERSON. THE CAMERAS TODAY ARE ALL DIGITAL, THEY GO RIGHT TO A SD CARD IN DIGITAL FORMAT. THERE’S NO MECHANICAL PARTS AND THAT’S PART OF THE REASON I WAS EMPLOYED BECAUSE SO MUCH OF WHAT I DID WAS BECAUSE PARTS WEAR OUT AND NEED TO BE FIXED AND REPLACED, WHERE THE NEW CAMERAS…IT’S NOT MUCH YOU CAN DO IF IT’S IN DIGITAL FORMAT AND [HAS] NO MECHANICAL MOVING PARTS. I DON’T MISS WORKING ON THEM, THAT COULD BE FRUSTRATING BECAUSE A LOT OF TINY LITTLE GEARS AND TIMING…YOU CAN SPEND HOURS AND NOT GET ANYWHERE, AND THEN FINALLY SHIP IT OUT TO THE MANUFACTURER BECAUSE YOU JUST COULDN’T GET ANYWHERE. YOU SPENT A WEEK WORKING ON IT AND NOW YOU’VE GOT TO, IN THE END, PAY SOMEONE TO DO IT. THOSE ARE FRUSTRATIONS, BUT IT IS SATISFYING WHEN YOU DO FIX A PROBLEM AND ARE ABLE TO FIX IT. BUT THOSE DAYS ARE BEHIND US AND I CAN’T SAY I MISS THEM. IT’S JUST DIFFERENT WAYS OF MAINTAINING CAMERAS NOW.” “IT’S HARD TO THROW OUT BECAUSE THE VALUE OF IT IS LIKE BUYING A CAR…AT THAT TIME. THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE DOING IS PUTTING A CAR ON YOUR SHOULDER, MAYBE NOT QUITE A CAR, BUT I’M GOING TO GUESS THIS CAMERA WAS PROBABLY FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS BACK THEN. THAT’S A LOT OF MONEY.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180005000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180005000
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SANDAL
Date Range From
2010
Date Range To
2017
Material Type
Artifact
Catalogue Number
P20170007006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SANDAL
Date Range From
2010
Date Range To
2017
No. Pieces
2
Length
26.3
Width
9.3
Description
PAIR OF WHITE SANDALS, LADIES’ SIZE 8.5. SANDALS HAVE ANKLE STRAP WITH SILVER BUCKLE AND TOE STRAP WITH A CENTER STRAP CONNECTING TOE STRAP TO ANKLE; INSIDE OF SANDALS IS SILVER; BOTTOM OF SANDALS IS BROWN. LABELS INSIDE SANDALS READ “GEORGE” ON BOTTOM, “8 ½, 29 PADDY, MADE IN CAMBODIA, FABRIQUE EN CAMBODGE, 030829470 36131215 S14” INSIDE ANKLES. INSIDE LININGS HAVE RED/BROWN GRIME BUILDUP AROUND EDGES; ANKLES OF SANDALS ARE WORN AND DISCOLOURED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON FEBRUARY 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED WILMA WOOD, DAUGHTER OF DOROTHY TAYLOR, ABOUT HER DONATION OF TAYLOR’S ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE REGALIA. THE REGALIA REPRESENTED TAYLOR’S 50-YEAR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE FROM BRANDON, MANITOBA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. ON THE SANDALS, WOOD ELABORATED, “THESE ARE RELATIVELY NEW SHOES [ABOUT FIVE OR SIX YEARS OLD] THAT WE GOT WHEN SHE WENT TO PARK MEADOWS BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T HAVE HEELS ANY MORE, OR ANY HEIGHT. SHE AND I WENT OUT AND WE FOUND THESE SHOES THAT SHE COULD WEAR TO THE MEETINGS.” WOOD DISCUSSED HER MOTHER’S TIME IN THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE, STATING, “SHE CONSIDERS [THESE OBJECTS IN ACTIVE USE]. SHE IS VERY MUCH A PERSON WHO VALUES THAT SOCIETY. IT HELPED HER A NUMBER OF TIMES. AS YOU GROW OLDER, ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU DISCOVER THAT YOUR BRAIN ISN’T AS ACTIVE AS IT SHOULD BE AND THE MEMORY IS GOING. SHE WOULD PUT HERSELF INTO POSITIONS WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION INCLUDING BEING PRESIDENT, THREE OR FOUR TIMES. SHE HAD TO BE AN ORGANIZER, SHE HAD TO GET HER BRAIN AND KEEP HER BRAIN FUNCTIONING, WHICH I THOUGHT WAS VERY ADMIRABLE FOR A WOMAN HER AGE BECAUSE…SHE WAS IN HER EIGHTIES. SHE RECEIVED HER 50 YEAR PIN, I THINK IT WAS TWO YEARS AGO OR THREE.” “SHE JOINED [THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE] IN BRANDON, MANITOBA WHERE [MY PARENTS] WERE LIVING AT THE TIME, AND MY DAD RETIRED THERE. THEY MOVED HERE TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE MY BROTHER LIVED HERE, AND MY UNCLE ART GOOD…HE LIVED HERE AND THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSER TO FAMILY. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND MY DAD DIED SHORTLY AFTER THAT.” “[SHE JOINED] BECAUSE OF HER FRIENDS. SHE HAD A FRIENDSHIP GROUP AND THEY BELONGED. THEY RECRUITED HER.” “WHEN SHE WAS VERY ACTIVE, SHE WAS A MAJOR RECRUITER. SHE WENT OUT AND FOUND YOUNG WOMEN BUT THEY FELL BY THE WAYSIDE BECAUSE OF LIFE. SHE WAS CERTAINLY VERY ACTIVE IN THEIR PROJECTS, ONE OF WHICH WAS FINDING FINANCES TO EDUCATE YOUNG PEOPLE. WHATEVER THEY WERE [DOING], SHE WAS INTO IT FULL TILT BECAUSE THAT’S THE KIND OF PERSON SHE IS…WHATEVER SHE DOES IS FULL BLAST, FULL BORE. SHE NEVER TOLD ME ANY DETAILS ABOUT THE SOCIETY BECAUSE IT’S ONE OF THOSE SECRET SISTERHOODS. SHE WAS ALWAYS VERY PROUD TO BE A MEMBER OF IT.” “THIS [CHAPTER] DID A LOT OF EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT…SHE TRAVELED WITH THEM BECAUSE IT WAS A CANADIAN ORGANIZATION, SO THEY HAD THEIR ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS ALL OVER CANADA. SHE CAME OUT TO VANCOUVER TO A MEETING AND I WENT OVER TO VANCOUVER TO MEET HER AND SAY “HOWDY”. SHE WENT OUT TO THE PREMIER’S, AT THAT TIME WAS VANDER ZALM, AND HE HAD THE BIG GARDENS OUT NEAR STEVESTON. SHE WENT OUT THERE AND SHE MET HIM.” “A YEAR AGO ABOUT THIS TIME, THAT’S WHEN [THE ORDER WAS] FOLDING. THE ALBERTA CLUBS WERE ALL IMPLODING, AND I THINK THERE’S ONLY ONE LEFT IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. IT WAS THE ISSUE THAT THEY WERE ALL OLD PEOPLE AND YOUNG PEOPLE DID NOT WANT TO JOIN THESE KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS ANY LONGER…[THIS HAPPENED BECAUSE] I THINK WE HAVE MORE LEGAL SUPPORT. THE GOVERNMENT HAS SET UP HEALTH CARE, COMMUNITIES HAVE SET UP ASSISTANCE FOR WOMEN WHO ARE ABUSED, THERE’S DRUG ASSISTANCE. THERE IS MUCH MORE ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. IN THE EARLY DAYS ON THE PRAIRIES, IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOUR NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOR, WHO MIGHT BE TWENTY MILES AWAY, YOU WERE IN DEEP DOO-DOO IF YOU HAD A BIG PROBLEM. THAT’S WHAT THESE SOCIETIES CAME OUT OF WAS THAT NEED. THE NEED PRETTY WELL HAS BEEN TAKEN CARE OF, I THINK. THERE ARE STILL CLUBS BUT THEY’RE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CLUBS NOW.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTIVATION FOR DONATING HER MOTHER’S REGALIA TO THE MUSEUM, WOOD NOTED, “MY MOTHER HAS TURNED 99 YEARS OLD IN JANUARY. SHE HAS DEMENTIA AND SO WE’VE HAD TO MOVE HER FROM HER SENIOR’S LODGE ROOM INTO A MORE SECURE ROOM. CONSEQUENTLY THE LAST OF THE THINGS THAT SHE TREASURED OR VALUED MUST BE DISPERSED. MY BROTHER AND I DECIDED THAT, SINCE THE ELKS AND THE ROYAL PURPLE MEANT SO MUCH TO HER, THAT [THESE WERE] THE [OBJECTS] WE WOULD LIKE TO DONATE TO THE MUSEUM. IT DEPICTS A PERIOD OF TIME WHEN THE WOMEN USED THESE ASSOCIATIONS AS A SUPPORT GROUP FOR THEMSELVES. IT WAS ANOTHER ONE OF THESE SECRET SOCIETIES, WHEN IN FACT THEY WERE SISTERHOODS. THEY WERE MEANT MAINLY FOR THEM TO HAVE PEOPLE TO SUPPORT EACH OTHER. SINCE THIS ORGANIZATION HAS BASICALLY COLLAPSED, I THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT THE MUSEUM SHOULD HAVE BECAUSE IT DOES SHOW THAT PERIOD OF TIME IN THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF CANADA.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170007006
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WATER VALVE WRENCH
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
IRON
Catalogue Number
P20170013000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WATER VALVE WRENCH
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
IRON
No. Pieces
1
Length
125
Width
43
Description
WATER VALVE WRENCH; IRON RODS WELDED TOGETHER; RODS FORM A CROSS AT TOP WHERE ROD WITH TWO SOCKET ENDS IS FITTED TO LONGER ROD. TOP OF ROD HAS AN IRON WEDGE OR CHISEL ATTACHED. BASE OF ROD HAS ROUNDED END WITH CUT-OUT THROUGH CENTER. WRENCH IS RUSTED AND RUBBED ALONG BOTTOM AND TOP LEFT AND RIGHT SECTIONS. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
METALWORKING T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
ON FEBRUARY 28, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BETTY AND BRIAN ILLINGWORTH ABOUT THEIR DONATION OF A WATER VALVE WRENCH. THE WRENCH WAS USED BY THE ILLINGWORTH’S AT THEIR LETHBRIDGE DRY-CLEANING BUSINESS TO SHUT OFF WATER WHILE WORKING ON THEIR BOILER. ON THE PURPOSE OF THE WRENCH, BRIAN NOTED, “WHEN I WAS WORKING ON THE BOILER…I HAD TO SHUT THE WATER OFF, TO MAKE SURE THAT I WOULDN’T LET ANY STEAM GO, TO PUSH THE WATER BACK.” “WITH [THE WRENCH] YOU COULD SHUT THE WATER OFF [FROM] WHERE IT CAME IN – THE CITY BROUGHT IT IN. YOU COULD TAKE THAT CAP OFF, AND GO DOWN AND SHUT THE WATER OFF. WE WOULD USE THAT WHERE THE MAIN LINE WAS COMING INTO THE STORE TO SHUT THE WATER OFF. [THE MAIN LINE] WAS IN THE SIDEWALK. WE WERE CONTROLLING THE WATER PRESSURE.” WHEN ASKED WHY THEY HAD A BOILER IN THE BUSINESS, BRIAN ELABORATED, “WE HAD TO HAVE STEAM TO PRESS THE CLOTHES.” “[THE BOILER] PROBABLY CAME FROM WINNIPEG. YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE A BOILER, AND THEN YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE A TICKET TO RUN THE BOILER. [BETTY] ENDED UP GETTING A TICKET, BECAUSE I WAS AWAY A LOT, PICKING UP AND DELIVERING CLEANING, I WASN’T THERE. SOMEBODY HAD TO BE THERE, WITH A TICKET, SO SHE GOT ONE. THERE’S A PICTURE OF HER IN THE HERALD, WORKING ON THAT BLOODY BOILER.” BRIAN RECALLED MOVING TO LEHBRIDGE AND OPERATING THE DRY-CLEANING BUSINESS, STATING, “[IT WAS] THE ONE DOWNTOWN, ON EIGHTH STREET…[CALLED] SPIC AND SPAN.” “[WE MOVED FROM PINCHER CREEK TO LETHBRIDGE] AFTER THE WAR WAS OVER. I WAS IN THE SERVICE FOR 5 YEARS.” “WE HAD [RUN A DRY-CLEANING BUSINESS] IN PINCHER CREEK. WHEN WE CAME HERE, WE BOUGHT DIFFERENT EQUIPMENT, AND WE INCREASED OUR BUSINESS. THEN WE USED TO HAVE PICK UP HERE – I WOULD PICK-UP AND DELIVER YOU KNOW. THANK GOD THEY DON’T DO THAT, ANYMORE! IT WOULD BE TOUGH THE WAY THE TRAFFIC IS NOW. IT WOULD BE TOUGH TO TRY TO DELIVER. YOU’D BE STUCK IN TRAFFIC.” “WE HAD A FIRE [IN PINCHER CREEK]. WE USED VARSOL…WE BUILT A SMALL SHACK AWAY FROM OUR BUILDING, AND THAT’S WHERE WE DID THE CLEANING, BUT IT CAUGHT FIRE ONE DAY…IT ALL BURNED UP, SO WE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, AND [FOUND] OUT, FROM ANOTHER CLEANERS HERE, WHERE WE COULD GET NEW EQUIPMENT. WE WENT DOWN TO GREAT FALLS TO GET IT.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY WE CHOSE LETHBRIDGE]. WE WERE TALKING TO SOMEBODY [BETTY] KNEW, AND HE SUGGESTED THAT PLACE.” BETTY NOTED, “THERE WAS A BUILDING AVAILABLE. THAT WAS ANOTHER THING, ‘CAUSE IT WAS SORT OF OUT-OF-THE-WAY.” “WHEN WE LEFT PINCHER, I WAS DRESS-MAKING…IT SORT OF MATCHED UP [WITH THE DRY-CLEANING BUSINESS] BECAUSE THERE WAS TAILORING POSSIBILITIES IN THIS BUILDING.” “OURS WAS DRY-CLEANING. MOST OF THE OTHERS WERE…SELF-LAUNDRY. THE OTHER BIG DRY-CLEANERS WAS BART-NEILSEN.” BRIAN RECALLED, “IN THOSE DAYS, SOME WOMEN THEY SENT THEIR SHIRTS AND STUFF, AND COLLARS OUT. THEY DIDN’T WANT TO DO IT AT HOME. THEY SENT IT OUT TO US. IT’S A DIFFERENT BALLGAME.” “[WE WORKED] A LOT OF LATE HOURS, TOO. WE THOUGHT NOTHING OF WORKING, WHEN WE STARTED IN THE MORNING, TILL MAYBE NINE OR TEN AT NIGHT. THEN THE BUILDING WE WERE IN, THERE WAS A RADIATOR SHOP IN ONE HALF THE BUILDING, AND WE WERE IN THE OTHER HALF. THE GUY THAT OWNED THE BUILDING CAME DOWN HERE…HE SAID HE WAS SELLING THE BUILDING, BUT HE WOULDN’T SELL IT TO ANYBODY ELSE, IF WE WANTED [IT]. WE BOUGHT THE BUILDING, AND THEN WE HAD TO KICK THE GUY OUT, THAT HAD THE RADIATOR SHOP – TOM DELANEY– IT’S TOM’S RADIATOR NOW. HE WAS A VERY GOOD GUY - HUNGARIAN BOY. HE WAS OFF THE FARM. HE BUGGERED HIMSELF UP…STRONG KID FROM THE FARM. HE’D PICK UP THE…RADIATOR [AND] BUGGERED HIS BACK UP. THEN FINALLY HE GOT RID OF THAT, AND DID IT ALL AUTOMATIC.” “[WE RAN THE BUSINESS] AT LEAST SIXTY [YEARS]” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE P20170013000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170013000
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"MARQUIS HOTEL"
Date Range From
1928
Date Range To
2015
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20150037000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"MARQUIS HOTEL"
Date Range From
1928
Date Range To
2015
Materials
CERAMIC, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.08
Width
12.4
Description
BLACK, CERAMIC ASHTRAY. THE INSIDE OPENING OF THE ASHTRAY IS 6.4 CM. THE LETTERING ON THE TOP SAYS “THE MARQUIS HOTEL, LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA.” THERE IS AN ABSTRACTED FLORAL DESIGN ON EITHER SIDE OF THIS LETTERING. THE FLOWERS ARE PAINTED RED AND THEIR STEMS PAINTED GREEN. THIS WORDING AND DESIGN REPEATS ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. THE LETTERING ON THE BOTTOM SAYS, “MADE IN JAPAN 29.” VERY GOOD CONDITION. USED WITH SOME WEAR APPARENT. BLACK PAINT IS WEARING OFF ON SOME PARTS OF THE SURFACE. SIGNIFICANT WEAR TO THE RED AND GREEN PAINT OF THE DECALS.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
BUSINESS
History
ON DECEMBER 16, 2015, DONOR CHRIS MORRISON INFORMED COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN THAT SHE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE ASHTRAY WHEN SHE AND HER HUSBAND BECAME STEWARDS OF A WATERTON CABIN IN 1976. THE CABIN, LOCATED AT 103 CAMERON FALLS, WAS OWNED BY HER MOTHER-IN-LAW DOROTHY MORRISON (D. 1995). IT WAS AMONG ASSORTED FURNISHINGS LEFT BEHIND WHEN DOROTHY MOVED OUT AND CHRIS MOVED IN. THE DONOR’S RECOLLECTION OF THE ASHTRAY’S USE IMMEDIATELY PRIOR TO IT BECOMING HER PROPERTY WAS AS A CONTAINER. MORRISON SAID, “IT WAS IN A [CABIN] WASHSTAND AND USED TO HOLD LITTLE OBJECTS LIKE ROLLED UP KEROSENE LANTERN TAPE WICKS”. ACCORDING TO MORRISON, IT WAS ALSO KNOWN AS “GRANDPA’S ASHTRAY”. GRANDPA REFERS TO JAMES J. MORRISON OF LETHBRIDGE. “HE ONLY SMOKED CIGARS” SAID THE DONOR, WHEREAS HER MOTHER-IN-LAW DOROTHY DID NOT SMOKE AT ALL. THE ASHTRAY’S USE AS A CONTAINER FOR LANTERN WICKS AND SMALL ITEMS CONTINUED RIGHT UP TO THE DAY THAT IT WAS OFFERED TO THE GALT IN 2015. ACCORDING TO HER OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, DOROTHY MORRISON, PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON NOVEMBER 26, 1995 AT THE AGE OF 83 YEARS. JAMES JACOB MORRISON, DOROTHY’S FATHER-IN-LAW, PASSED ON FEBRUARY 18TH, 1975 AT AGE 93. THE ASHTRAY IS MARKED WITH “MARQUIS HOTEL,” WHICH COULD REFER TO THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL THAT OPENED IN JUNE 1928. REALIZING A NEED FOR A FIRST-CLASS HOTEL IN LETHBRIDGE, ESPECIALLY ONE WITH A BANQUET HALL, THE BUSINESSMEN OF THE BOARD OF TRADE COMMITTED THEMSELVES TO THE HOTEL IN 1927. AFTER ITS OPENING, THE BOARD OF TRADE WOULD HOLD THEIR REGULAR, NOON-HOUR MEETINGS AT THE HOTEL FOR MANY YEARS TO COME. THE HOTEL CLOSED ITS DOORS IN 1985 AND THE BUILDING WAS DEMOLISHED IN 1988. THIS INFORMATION COMES FROM LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND A WRITE-UP ABOUT THE HOTEL IN THE PUBLICATION TITLED "WHERE WAS IT? A GUIDE TO EARLY LETHBRIDGE BUILDINGS," BY IRMA DOGTEROM. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND A COPY OF THE INFORMATION FROM THE PUBLICATION CITED ABOVE.
Catalogue Number
P20150037000
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1951
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, COTTON LACES
Catalogue Number
P20160021000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1951
Materials
LEATHER, COTTON LACES
No. Pieces
2
Height
19
Length
26.5
Description
BLACK, LEATHER PAIR OF COWBOY BOOTS. ANKLE-LENGTH WITH A HEIGHT OF 19 CM FROM BOTTOM OF HEEL TO TOP OF BOOT. THE BOOTS ARE 26.5 CM LONG FROM THE TIP OF THE TOE TO THE BACK OF THE HEEL. THE HEEL HEIGHT IS 3 CM MEASURED FROM THE INSIDE CENTER OF THE HEEL. THE BOOTS ARE LACED UP WITH BLACK, FLAT LACES. THERE ARE 10 EYELETS ON EITHER SIDE OF THE SHOE FOR THE LACES. THERE IS DECORATIVE STITCHING IN BLACK THREAD ON THE BOOT WITH A DESIGN ON TOE. IN THE INSIDE RIM OF THE SHOES (AT THE ANKLES) THERE IS A BAND THAT SAYS “JUSTIN’S SINCE 1879 FT. WORTH, TEXAS.” THIS LOGO IS REPEATED AROUND THE RIM 3 TIMES ON BOTH SHOES. THE INSIDE SOLES AND BOTTOM SOLES OF THE SHOES ARE UNMARKED. GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE LEATHER OF THE SHOE, SPECIFICALLY ON THE TOES AND HEELS OF BOTH SHOES. THE BOTTOM AND INSIDE SOLES ARE WORN FROM USE. THERE IS A CRACK ON THE HEEL OF THE INSIDE SOLE INSERT OF THE LEFT SHOE. THE LEFT SHOE IS SLIGHTLY MISSHAPED (BENT TOWARDS THE INSIDE OF THE SHOE).
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON 4 AUGUST 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH LAWRENCE BAILIE WITH REGARDS TO THIS PAIR OF COWBOY BOOTS HE DONATED. THE BOOTS HAD PREVIOUSLY BELONGED TO HIS FATHER, RICHARD BAILIE. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THE INTERVIEW: “THE BOOTS BELONGED TO MY DAD [RICHARD BAILIE], AND MY DAD BOUGHT THEM IN EITHER 1950 OR ’51, IN SHERIDAN, WYOMING. WE WERE DOWN THERE ON A FAMILY HOLIDAY AND WENT TO THE BLACK HILLS, TO WILD BILL HICKOK’S SHOW... I WAS PROBABLY ABOUT… I THINK 13-14… IT WAS A SHORT ONE. MY DAD HAD ACTUALLY BOUGHT A NEW PLYMOUTH CAR, AND SO WE WENT ON A HOLIDAY… WE DIDN’T [GO ON HOLIDAYS] VERY MUCH, BECAUSE WE ALWAYS HAD WORK ON THE FARM, AND IT WAS HARD TO GET AWAY...” IT WAS BECAUSE OF THE RARE OCCASION OF THIS HOLIDAY THAT BAILIE WAS ABLE TO RECALL THE PURCHASE OF THE BOOTS: “I PROBABLY WOULD HAVE REMEMBERED THAT ANYWAYS BECAUSE WE DIDN’T HAVE – THAT WAS ONE OF THE ONLY HOLIDAYS [THAT WE WENT FAR AWAY] – OTHER TIMES WE WOULD MAYBE GO TO WATERTON FOR TWO DAYS, AND THAT WAS THE EXTENT [OF OUR TRAVELS]. THAT’S PROBABLY WHY I REMEMBER IT, BECAUSE IT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST BIG HOLIDAYS THAT WE WENT TOGETHER. AND IT WAS PROBABLY THE LAST ONE TOO – PROBABLY ONE OF THE ONLY ONES. I GOT OLDER AND WE DIDN’T DO THINGS. WE WERE TOO BUSY. WE WORKED. I GUESS MY DAD ALWAYS WANTED TO GO DOWN TO SEE THE BLACK HILLS, AND WE WENT TO YELLOWSTONE PARK, WE CAME BACK THROUGH SHERIDAN, AND WE STOPPED AND WERE SHOPPING. I ALWAYS WANTED COWBOY BOOTS, BECAUSE, UP UNTIL THAT POINT, I DIDN’T HAVE ANY. I THOUGHT I WAS A COWBOY - WELL, I WAS A HALF-WAY. EVERYBODY WANTED TO BE A COWBOY, BUT ANYWAYS I BOUGHT COWBOY BOOTS, AND MY DAD BOUGHT COWBOY BOOTS. THESE WERE HIS GOOD BOOTS – HIS DRESS BOOTS… MY DAD WORE THESE, THEY WERE HIS DANCING BOOTS, AND GOING OUT SPECIAL, YOU KNOW, TO CHURCH OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT. [THESE WERE] HIS SUNDAY BOOTS, SUNDAY SHOES, YEAH…” AS BAILIE RECALLS, HIS FATHER GREW UP ON A RANCH. HE EXPLAINS HIS GRANDFATHER ROBERT BAILIE’S HISTORY HOMESTEADING IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA: “MY GRANDFATHER, WHEN HE HOMESTEADED IN ’09, HE CAME TO WARNER. HE ACTUALLY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE FIRST. HE WENT OUT WITH SOME PEOPLE SELLING LAND, AND HE BOUGHT THIS LAND OUT THERE. HE HAD A HOMESTEAD OUT THERE, BUT HE BOUGHT SOME LAND AND IT WOULD BE, OH MY GOODNESS, APPROXIMATELY 10-12 MILES STRAIGHT EAST OF WARNER. HE HAD IT RIGHT UP AGAINST THE LAKE… MY DAD WAS CONCEIVED ON THE RANCH AND BEING IT WAS 1912, MY GRANDMA (LAURA BAILIE) [WHILE PREGNANT] WENT BACK TO MADISON, WISCONSIN, AND MY DAD WAS BORN THERE. BECAUSE THEY HAD A FAMILY DOCTOR THERE. THEY’D ONLY BEEN HERE FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS, AND THERE WAS NO DOCTORS IN THIS AREA, SO MY GRANDMA WENT BACK BEFORE MY DAD WAS BORN THERE, AND THEN AFTER HE WAS A COUPLE OF WEEKS OLD, OR SO, SHE BROUGHT HIM BACK TO ALBERTA… HIS DAD [ROBERT BAILIE], AT ONE TIME, HAD A HUGE HERD OF CATTLE AND HORSES OUT IN THE KING’S LAKE AREA [ALSO CALLED CROW INDIAN LAKE ON THE MAP], WHERE THEY HOMESTEADED. [IN] THE WINTER OF, I’LL SAY ’29, MY GRANDFATHER WAS PROBABLY A MILLIONAIRE. HE HAD, I CAN’T GIVE YOU NUMBERS, A HEAD OF CATTLE AND HORSES, BUT THEY COULDN’T FEED THEM. MY DAD TELLS STORIES ABOUT RIDING OUT CLOSE TO ’30, AND THERE’S JUST CATTLE AND HORSES ALL OVER, LAYING THERE, WITH THEIR FEET UP IN THE AIR, AND FROZE OVER. THEY STARVED TO DEATH OVER THE WINTER. MY GRANDFATHER LOST PRETTY NEAR EVERYTHING BECAUSE THERE WAS JUST NO FEED. THEY TURNED THEM LOOSE TO LET THEM FIND THEIR OWN FEED AND THEY JUST DIDN’T MAKE IT. BUT MY DAD WAS RAISED ON A RANCH. HE WAS A COWBOY. I CONSIDERED HIM PROBABLY MORE COWBOY THAN MOST COWBOYS ARE TODAY…” PRIOR TO HAVING HIS OWN FAMILY, RICHARD BAILIE “… WAS INTO RODEOS. HE LIKED TO RIDE, HE USED TO RIDE BRONCS… IN ALBERTA. IN THOSE DAYS, THEY HAD NO MONEY TO GO ANYPLACE ELSE, JUST ALBERTA. LOCAL RODEOS... THE LUND BOYS, AND THE ROSSES, AND SOME OF THE OTHER ONES WOULD GET TOGETHER ON A SUNDAY, AND THEY WOULD HAVE THEIR OWN RODEOS… [MY DAD] WAS AN OLD-TIME COWBOY… HE WAS IN ONE OF THE FIRST RODEOS THEY HAD IN RAYMOND. HE USED TO RIDE BRONCS, BEFORE I CAME INTO THE PICTURE, AND AFTER I WAS IN THE PICTURE. MY MOM SHUT HIM DOWN. NO MORE COWBOYING…” WHILE THERE WAS STILL FAMILY PRESENCE ON THE HOMESTEAD WHERE RICHARD BAILIE WAS RAISED, HE MOVED IN 1935 TO THE PLACE WHERE LAWRENCE BAILIE WOULD GROW UP. PRIOR TO PURCHASING HIS LAND, RICHARD MARRIED HIS WIFE, LELAH BAILIE (NEE FLICKENGER), IN 1935 AND IN 1936 LAWRENCE WAS BORN: “… MY DAD BOUGHT SOME LAND IN 1935 BETWEEN SKIFF AND GRASSY LAKE. THAT’S WHEN [MY DAD] STARTED FARMING... HE WAS MIXED FARMING. THEY WERE RANCHING AND WE HAD A LOT OF DRY LAND, AND MY DAD WAS VERY GOOD AT MECHANICS, AND SO HE BECAME A DRY LAND FARMER, AND I GUESS HE WAS SMART ENOUGH TO KNOW THAT THERE WASN’T THAT MUCH MONEY IN [RANCHING]. HE SORT OF SWITCHED FROM BEING A COWBOY TO A DRYLANDER, I GUESS… I CAN REMEMBER THAT WE MOVED FROM OUR LITTLE SHACK WHEN I WAS PROBABLY 4 YEARS OLD – 1939-1940 – TO SKIFF. MY DAD HAD BOUGHT SOME LAND AT SKIFF, BUT I REMEMBER BEING IN OUR TAR-PAPER SHACK - THAT IT GOT VERY COLD, AND AT TIMES, DURING THE NIGHT, WHEN I WAS YOUNG.” BAILIE EXPLAINS THESE BOOTS WERE HIS DAD’S GOOD SUNDAY BOOTS, WHICH HE WOULD WEAR WHEN HE WENT TO DANCES IN THE TOWN. BAILIE EXPLAINS, “HE WOULDN’T WEAR THEM RIDING BRONCS, BECAUSE THEY WERE LACED. HE COULDN’T GET THEM OFF. IF HE EVER GOT STUCK UP IN THE STIRRUP, HE COULDN’T GET HIS FOOT OUT – THEY WERE JUST ‘SHOW.’ … THEY WENT TO CHURCH, OR MOST OF THE TIME, HE’D WEAR THEM TO A DANCE. HE ACTUALLY WORE THESE LATER IN LIFE EVEN. YOU’D GO TO A DANCE, AND WEAR THESE WITH THE WESTERN HEEL. I CAN REMEMBER WHEN I WAS A KID, THAT THE SOCIAL ACTIVITIES OF THAT PART OF THE COUNTRY WOULD BE DANCES, [IN PLACES] LIKE IN HUDSON SCHOOL. THERE’D BE DANCES AT SKIFF, I DON’T KNOW, A FEW A YEAR - ALWAYS AT CHRISTMAS TIME AFTER THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT. THEN THEY WOULD GET TOGETHER AND CELEBRATE MAYBE THE FOURTH OF JULY OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT. THAT WAS THE MAIN SOCIAL THING, PEOPLE GET TOGETHER TO GO TO A DANCE… MY MOM [WAS THE MORE SOCIAL ONE IN THE RELATIONSHIP]. AT THAT TIME, THE MEN USED TO GET AWAY FROM THE FARM A LITTLE BIT MORE OFTEN. LIKE MY DAD USED TO BRING IN CATTLE, OR SOME PIGS, OR SOMETHING INTO LETHBRIDGE TO THE AUCTION MART AND MY MOM WOULDN’T COME. SHE’D BE HOME, LOOKING AFTER THE FARM. WHEN YOU LIVE OUT AT SKIFF, YOU ARE 55 MILES FROM NOWHERE. THERE WASN’T MUCH SOCIAL LIFE IN A COUNTRY STORE, WHICH WE USED TO WALK [TO]. WE’D WALK IN JUST AROUND A MILE TO WALK INTO SKIFF, AND GET GROCERIES THE ODD TIME, AND THEN IF THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE IN THE STORE AT THE SAME, MY MOM WOULD GET TO SEE THEM. OTHERWISE, IF IT WASN’T FOR THE SOCIAL, THERE WASN’T A VERY GOOD SOCIAL LIFE." "I DON’T KNOW WHEN WOULD BE THE LAST TIME HE EVER WORE THEM," BAILIE SAID GOING BACK TO HIS FATHER'S BOOTS, "THEY WERE A NOVELTY TO HIM. I DON’T KNOW IF HE WENT DOWN THERE LOOKING FOR THEM, OR IF WE WENT BY THE SHOP AND HE [SAW] THEM. I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT HE PAID FOR THEM. I THINK I PAID ABOUT $12.00 FOR MINE, SOMETHING LIKE THAT.” AS FOR THE COLOUR CHOICE OF THE BOOTS, BAILIE STATES: “WELL, IN THOSE DAYS, BLACK WAS THE COLOR. I GUESS THERE WAS THE ODD GUY HAD SOME REAL FANCY BOOTS, BUT, NO, THERE WASN’T THE COLORS OF - . BLACK WAS IT.” WHEN ASKED WHAT HE THINKS OF WHEN HE SEES HIS FATHER’S COWBOY BOOTS, BAILIE ANSWERED: “IT TAKES ME BACK TO MY CHILDHOOD – GOOD – AND MY DAD. HE WOULD ALWAYS, EVEN WHEN HE WAS OLDER, WEAR A BIG HAT... SOMETIMES HE WAS GOOFING OFF. WE USED TO CUT A LITTLE BIT OF OUR CROP WITH A BINDER, [AND] IF YOU EVER RAN OVER A ROCK IT REALLY BUCKED YOU RIGHT OFF IT. SO HE PLAYED AROUND THE ODD TIME, [AND] HE’D SIT THERE, AND HE’D THROW HIS HEEL LIKE HE WAS RIDING A BUCKING BRONC. PUT HIS HAND UP AND HIT A ROCK AND HE’D PUT ON A SHOW FOR ME. THE BINDER WAS LIKE RIDING A BUCKING BRONC. I LOOK AT THOSE BOOTS, THEY ARE LIKE A MEMORY OF MY DAD THAT I AM VERY PROUD OF… OH, HE WAS A HARDWORKING MAN, AND STRONG. I’M A WIMP COMPARED TO MY DAD... I WAS PROUD OF HIM. HE DID WELL. HE TREATED US WELL, AND LOOKED AFTER HIS FAMILY VERY WELL.” BAILIE AQUIRED THE BOOTS AFTER HIS FATHER MOVED IN THE 1990S: “I CLEANED OUT MY MOM AND DAD’S PLACE, BECAUSE THEY WENT INTO A SENIOR CITIZENS SOMETHING, SO I CLEANED OUT HIS PLACE, AND I SEEN THE BOOTS AND I HAVE NEVER SEEN ANYBODY ELSE WITH THAT TYPE OF BOOT... MY DAD WAS THE ONLY ONE THAT I KNEW THAT HAD A PAIR OF BOOTS LIKE THAT." BAILIE SAYS THAT SINCE THE BOOTS HAVE BEEN IN HIS POSSESSION “THEY HAVE BEEN IN THE GARAGE. I’VE JUST BEEN KEEPING THEM. I DON’T KNOW IF I HAVE EVER WORE THEM OR NOT. I DON’T THINK I HAVE. MY DAD’S FOOT WAS A LITTLE BIGGER THAN MINE, SO NO. I HAVE MY OWN BOOTS, SO I WOULDN’T HAVE WORE THEM.” AS STATED IN HIS OBITURARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, RICHARD BAILIE PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 28, 2002 AT THE AGE OF 90 YEARS. HE WAS PREDECEASED BY HIS WIFE, LELAH BAILIE, WHO PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON OCTOBER 8, 2001 AT THE AGE OF 86 YEARS. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITURARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160021000
Acquisition Date
2016-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
2
Height
13.7
Length
5.4
Width
1.8
Description
A: THERMOMETER. THE THERMOMETER'S CASING IS METAL. THERE IS A COVER ON THE THERMOMTER THAT HAS 17 HOLES PUNCHED OUT OF THE FRONT (7 ROWS ALTERNATING BETWEEN 3 AND 2 HOLES PER ROW). THERE IS A SHORT BACK TO THE COVER. THE COVER IS ATTACHED TO THE THERMOMETER WITH 2 SMALL NAILS ON EITHER SIDE. THE THERMOMETER GLIDES OUT OF THE COVER AND HINGES BACK TO STAND (SUPPORTED BY BACK OF CASE AND THE 2 NAILS). THE BACKGROUND OF THE THERMOMETER IS WHITE AND IS ATTACHED TO THE METAL CASE. “US PAT 2329685” IS ON THE BOTTOM OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE LEFT SIDE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS FROM 1 TO 6 ARE ETCHED. THE NUMBERS ARE DIVIDED INTO INCREMENTS OF FOUR. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER THERE ARE “00” ACROSS FROM EACH NUMBER ON THE LEFT. THE THERMOMETER’S GLASS IS TINTED YELLOW WITH A TRANSLUCENT CENTER. THIS TUBE IS 12.4CM IN LENGTH. TWO SMALL METAL RINGS HOLD THE GLASS THERMOMETER TO THE MEASUREMENT BACKING. THERE IS A SMALL METAL HOOK AT THE TOP OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER IN ITS CLOSED POSITION, "D. CARSE" IS HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. GOOD CONDITION. RUSTING/STAINING OVERALL SURFACE. LOSS OF WHITE BACKING BEHIND THE THERMOMETER (SEVERE ON THE UPPER LEFT CORNER AND SLIGHT ON THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER). B: CARDBOARD CASE WITH OVERALL DIMENSIONS OF 13.9 CM X 6 CM X 2 CM. CARDBOARD BOX WITH GREEN LABEL ON FRONT. THE LABEL SAYS “RUXCO” “NO-600-MO-10” “OVEN TEST THERMOMETER RANGE 100 TO 600°F IN 10° DIVISIONS.” GOOD CONDITION. MISSING LEFT END OF BOX. SCRATCH ON THE SURFACE OF THE LEFT SIDE OF THE LABEL. STAINING IN VARIOUS PLACES.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
THERMAL T&E
Historical Association
TRADES
DOMESTIC
History
IN SEPTEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED IRENE MOCH ABOUT THE HISTORY OF A THERMOMETER SHE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES. THE THERMOMETER BELONGED TO HER FATHER, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE, AND WAS USED BY HIM AS AN EMPLOYEE OF CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “HIS JOB WAS TO GO HOUSE-TO-HOUSE ON SPECIFIED CALLS TO REPAIR AND CHECK GAS APPLIANCES AT VARIOUS HOMES. HE LOVED HIS JOB. IT WAS GREAT PASSION AND HE WOULD SHARE A LOT OF HIS EXPERIENCES AT HOME WITH US. IT BECAME A BIG PART OF OUR FAMILY LIFE. HIS FIRST PASSION WAS HIS FAMILY AND HIS SECOND PASSION WAS HIS WORK. TWENTY- EIGHT YEARS, HE WAS WITH THE GAS COMPANY. HE WOULD BRING VARIOUS LITTLE ITEMS HOME, BUT MOSTLY IT WAS JUST HIS MEMORIES AND OUR MEMORIES OF THE STORIES THAT HE TOLD… MY MOM AND DAD WILLED THEIR HOUSE TO MY HUSBAND, WHO HAD BEEN CARING FOR IT OVER THE YEARS. [THEY] LEFT ALL THEIR TREASURES AS THEY WERE [TO] US BOTH TO DO WHAT WE FELT WAS BEST WITH EVERYTHING. THEY HAVE BEEN GONE SINCE 2000, 2003. SO FINALLY, THIS MOVE HAS FORCED ME TO GO THROUGH SOME OF THE THINGS THAT I HAVE, AND THIS HAS COME UP, AND IT MEANT A LOT. WE ALWAYS HAD GAS STOVE AND GAS RADIANT HEAT AND HE WOULD ALWAYS TEST MY MOTHER’S OVEN WITH THE THERMOMETER TO MAKE SURE THAT IT WAS FUNCTIONING PROPERLY. IT WAS VERY VISIBLE TO ALL OF US. IT WAS VERY IMPORTANT.” MOCH RECALLS THE THERMOMETER IN HER DAD’S WORK TOOLBOX: “… WHEREVER HE WENT, HE WOULD HAVE HIS TOOL BOX, AND THAT WAS THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF THE TOOL BOX. HE CARRIED IT IN HIS VEHICLE. HE DROVE TO THE HOUSES AND THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF HIS TOOL BOX WAS THAT.” IT WAS THE JOB AT CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY THAT BROUGHT CARSE AND HIS FAMILY TO LETHBRIDGE: “HE HAD ANDREW’S HARDWARE IN FORT MACLEOD FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS – QUITE A FEW – AND THEN HE WENT TO THE GAS PLANT IN BURDETT/ BOW ISLAND. AND FAMILY WAS COMING. [HE] NEEDED A STEADY JOB, [SO HE] CAME TO THE CITY [ TO] FIND A STEADY JOB. HE WAS A CERTIFIED PLUMBER AND GAS-FITTER SO HE APPLIED AT THE CANADIAN WESTERN AND NATURAL GAS… THAT WAS HIS WORLD. HE JUST BLOSSOMED. HE WAS A VERY PRIVATE PERSON, BUT HE LOVED TO BE WITH PEOPLE. THERE WAS A LOT OF COMRADERY AND HORSE-PLAY. HE WORKED BY HIMSELF. HE DIDN’T HAVE A PARTNER. AND [HE] WENT PLACE-TO-PLACE – AND IT GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW – 28 YEARS. AND IT WAS NOT UNCOMMON FOR OUR RESIDENCE PHONE AT HOME TO RING FROM VARIOUS PEOPLE, SAYING, ‘DON’T SEND SO-AND-SO; SEND DAVE BACK. DAVE KNOWS WHAT HE’S DONE HERE, AND THAT’S THE PERSON I WANT BACK.’ THAT WAS NOT UNCOMMON AT ALL TO HAPPEN AT OUR HOUSE. HE MADE A GOOD REPUTATION FOR HIMSELF, AND HE LOVED WHAT HE DID, AND IT SHOWED… HE BECAME A KIND OF AN IMAGE AND I THINK HE REVELED IN THAT. HE WAS KING OF HIS WORLD, REALLY. IT WAS VERY NICE.” “… THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEBODY ON CALL," CONTINUED MOCH, "BUT, IF IT WAS A MAJOR BLIZZARD, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THEN EVERYBODY WAS PRESSED INTO SERVICE. IF IT WAS TURKEY DAY, AND EVERYBODY WANTS TO COOK A TURKEY, AND THE PILOT LIGHT OR THE OVEN DIDN’T WORK, SOMEBODY HAD TO GO. AND THAT WAS THE BIG THING WITH THE GAS COMPANY. GAS COMPANY SERVICEMEN WERE FREE OF CHARGE AND THE ONLY CHARGE WOULD HAVE BEEN FOR A THERMOCOUPLE OR A PART THAT NEEDED TO BE REPLACED. PEOPLE WERE NOT SHY ABOUT CALLING THE GAS COMPANY TO REMEDY THEIR SITUATION. YES, THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEONE ON CALL, AND HE HAD TO TAKE HIS TURN DOING THAT. BUT, IF THERE WAS A MASS BLIZZARD OR STORM OF SOME SORT, THEN THEY WERE ALL CALLED OUT.” MOCH EXPLAINED THE THERMOMETER WAS OF GREAT IMPORTANCE TO CARSE’S WORK: “MOST OF HIS CALLS WERE [BAKING RELATED]. PEOPLE ALWAYS BAKED IN THOSE DAYS – ALWAYS BAKED AND [IF], ‘THE OVEN WASN’T COOKING RIGHT,’ OR ‘IT WASN’T HOT ENOUGH,’ OR ‘HOW COME THIS FLOPPED?’ ‘WE’D BETTER CALIBRATE THE OVEN PROPERLY.’ AND SO [THEY'D CALL IN], ‘CAN DAVE COME OUT AND CHECK IT OUT AND CHECK THAT OUT FOR US?’ SO YES, THAT [THERMOMETRE] WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT HE BROUGHT OUT… MOM BAKED ALL THE TIME AS WELL, TWICE A WEEK PROBABLY. ON A REGULAR BASIS, HE WOULD JUST DOUBLE CHECK [WITH THE THERMOMETER] TO MAKE SURE THINGS WERE WORKING THE WAY THEY SHOULD. NOT NECESSARILY THAT THERE WAS A PROBLEM, BUT JUST SO THAT THEY STAY THE WAY THEY SHOULD BE. HE EDUCATED US ALL ABOUT THE BLUE FLAME AND HOW THE BLUE FLAME HAD TO HAVE THE LITTLE TIP ON THE END OF THE BLUE FLAME AND THAT MEANS IT’S BURNING CLEAN. IT WAS VERY EDUCATIONAL, TOO.” “[HE] ALWAYS CAME HOME FOR LUNCH. MOM ALWAYS HAD LUNCH READY. WE HAD LUNCH IN THE LIVING ROOM WITH A SANDWICH AND HE HAD A LITTLE SNOOZE. FIVE MINUTES, AND HE WAS OUT THE DOOR. HE WAS NEVER LATE. HE WAS ALWAYS HOME, AND HE WAS NEVER LATE COMING HOME FROM WORK. HE JUST LOVED IT… HE RETIRED IN SEPTEMBER 30, ’73. SO, PROBABLY ’43, ’44 THAT HE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE TO [WORK AT THE] GAS COMPANY.” ACCORDING TO HIS OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON 15 NOVEMBER 2000. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND THERMOMETER PATENT.
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CARTON, MILK
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160019000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CARTON, MILK
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1970
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
24
Length
7.4
Width
7.2
Description
CARDBOARD MILK CARTON. SIDE ONE HAS “HOMOGENIZED MILK” ON TOP FOLD IN GREEN BLOCK LETTERING. FADED, BLACK INK STAMP ON THIS FOLD SAYS “?A 2 -45.” ON THE MAIN SECTION OF THIS SIDE THERE IS THE PURITY LOGO (“PURITY” IN PURPLE CURSIVE FONT), A PURPLE AND GREEN FLOWER, AND THE WORDS “CREAM IN EVERY DROP” IN PURPLE CURSIVE. ON THE BASE OF THIS PANEL IT SAYS “… HEAD OFFICE LETHBRIDGE.” THE OPPOSING SIDE (SIDE 3) IS SIMILAR, BUT WITH THE INDICATION OF “NET CONTENTS ONE QUART” AT THE BASE OF THE PANEL. SIDE 2’S TOP FOLD SAYS, “THE CONTAINER COVERED BY CANADIAN PATENTS 1941 – 395.645 1957 – 542-432… MANUFACTURED UNDER LICENSE FROM EX-CELL-O CORPORATION.” THE MAIN SECTION HAS THE PURITY LOGO AND THE SLOGANS “IT’S PURE. THAT’S SURE” AND “YOURS TO LOVE. OURS TO PROTECT.” ADDITIONALLY THIS SIDE INDICATED THAT THE MILK IS “PASTURIZED” AND IS “NOT LESS THAN 3.25% B.F.” PARALLEL TO THAT IS SIDE 4 WITH A TOP FOLD THAT HAS “SPOUT” MARKED ON IT. ON THE TOP FOLD, IT SAYS “PUREPAK” “YOUR PERSONAL MILK CONTAINER.” THE MAIN SECTION OF THIS HAS A GREEN ILLUSTRATION OF A CHURCH WITH “ATTEND THE CHURCH OF YOUR CHOICE…” ON THE BOTTOM OF THE CARTON, THERE ARE NUMBERS AND/OR LETTERS THAT WERE STAMPED INTO THE BOTTOM. A “W” IS VISIBLE. GOOD CONDITION. COLOUR OF CARDBOARD HAS YELLOWED OVERALL. THERE ARE VARIOUS STAINS ON THE SURFACE. BLACK STAINING AROUND THE CHURCH ILLUSTRATION. THE TOP FLAP OF THE CARTON IS DETERIORATING (BENT/TORN) WITH NOTICEABLE LOSS OF MATERIAL ON ONE SIDE’S CORNER.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
THE DONOR, HANK VROOM, FOUND THE MILK CARTON IN LETHBRIDGE APPROXIMATELY A DECADE BEFORE THE DATE OF DONATION (JULY 2016), AS A RESULT OF HIS CITY EMPLOYMENT AS A GARBAGE TRUCK DRIVER. THE LOCATION OF THE FIND IS UNKNOWN. IN THE TIME SINCE HIS POSSESSION, THE CARTON HAS BEEN IN A PLASTIC BAG IN A CUPBOARD. ACCORDING TO ADDITIONAL RESEARCH INTO THE EXISTENCE OF THIS TYPE OF MILK CARTON AND BRAND, IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THIS CARTON ORIGINATED PRIOR TO THE MID-1970S BECAUSE MILK MEASUREMENTS WERE CHANGED FROM QUARTS TO LITERS AROUND THAT TIME AND THIS CARTON’S MEASUREMENT IS INDICATED IN QUARTS. IN THE LATE 1950’S, PURITY DAIRY ADVERTISED BEING 100% PURE-PAK, MEANING THAT ALL MILK PRODUCTS CAME IN CARDBOARD CARTONS. BLOW MOLD PLASTIC CONTAINERS REPLACED CARDBOARD SHORTLY AFTER. WITH THE INDICATION OF THE 1957 PATENT NUMBER ON THE CARTON, THIS PLACES THE DATE OF THE MILK CARTON BETWEEN 1957 AND THE 1970S. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT PURITY DAIRY IS FROM THE RECORD FOR ARTIFACT P20070013001: SIMONIE (SAM) FABBI STARTED FABBI DAIRY IN 1923 IN LETHBRIDGE. HE WAS AN ITALIAN IMMIGRANT WHO BEGAN THE BUSINESS WITH THREE COWS AND SOME LARD BUCKETS. THE DAIRY WAS LOCATED AT 12 STREET B NORTH. AT THAT TIME, MILK WAS TRANSPORTED USING LARD PAILS OR CANS, WHICH, WITH THE HELP OF SAM’S SONS, WOULD BE LADLED INTO CUSTOMER’S CONTAINERS. FABBI DAIRY EXPANDED TO THE SOUTHSIDE DAIRY HILL IN THE EARLY 1930S. SHORTLY AFTERWARDS, FABBI DAIRY BOUGHT CITY DAIRY. SONS STAN AND ROMEO BOUGHT THE BUSINESS FROM THEIR FATHER IN 1936. AT THIS POINT, MILK WAS PACKAGED AND SOLD IN GLASS BOTTLES IN PINT, QUART OR GALLON SIZES. THE DAIRY HAD ITS OWN COWS, WHICH WERE MILKED DAILY AND WOULD PASTURE IN THE COULEES. BY 1936, HOWEVER, MILK AND CREAM WERE BROUGHT IN FROM OFFSITE. BETWEEN 1939 AND 1944, THE FABBI DAIRY BOUGHT PAVAN DAIRY AND THE BELLEVUE DAIRY. AT THAT POINT IN TIME, MANY SMALL DAIRIES WERE SUBJECT TO PASTEURIZATION LAWS, AND CHOSE TO CLOSE DOWN RATHER THAN CONVERT. FABBI DAIRY PURCHASED MAJESTIC THEATRE IN THE LATE 1930S OR EARLY 1940S FOR $10,000 FROM MAYOR SHACKERFORD, CONVERTING IT INTO A MILK BOTTLING PLANT. FABBI DAIRY CHANGED ITS NAME TO PURITY DAIRY, AND EXPANDED THROUGHOUT THE LATE 1940S AND 1950S, OPENING UP BUSINESSES IN MEDICINE HAT (1948), CALGARY (1950), EDMONTON (1950), CRANBROOK (1958), RED DEER AND TABER. ALL THESE LOCATIONS HAD DAIRIES EXCEPT FOR TABER, WHICH HAD A DEPOT. ACCORDING TO KEN FABBI, STAN FABBI’S SON, STAN AND ROMEO ESTABLISHED A DAIRY IN CALGARY WITHOUT A LICENSE. THE ONLY WAY TO OBTAIN A LICENSE FOR A DAIRY AT THAT TIME WAS TO BUY OUT AN EXISTING DAIRY. EXPANSION WAS SEEN AS NECESSARY TO THE FABBI BROTHERS, IF THEY WERE TO REMAIN IN BUSINESS. THE PURITY DAIRY IN CALGARY WAS DEEMED ILLEGAL, AND IN THE EARLY 1960S, STAN AND ROMEO FABBI WERE HANDCUFFED AND ARRESTED. PUBLIC SYMPATHY FOR THE FABBI BROTHERS ENABLED THEM TO PURCHASE A LICENSE AFTER THE INCIDENT. PURITY DAIRY HAD MANY INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS THAT OTHER DAIRIES IN TOWN DID NOT HAVE, LIKELY CONTRIBUTING TO THE DAIRY’S POPULARITY WITH THE PUBLIC. PURITY DAIRY WAS THE FIRST DAIRY IN WESTERN CANADA TO RELY SOLELY ON THE USE OF MILK TANKERS, WHICH VISITED VARIOUS LOCALS TO PICK UP MILK AND BRING IT TO THE DAIRY. PRIOR TO 1957, FARMERS WERE REQUIRED TO DELIVER MILK IN CANS TO THE DAIRY THEMSELVES. PURITY DAIRY HAD A SUBSTANTIAL FLEET OF RETAIL DELIVERY VEHICLES. IN ITS EARLY DAYS, HORSES WERE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE DELIVERY SYSTEM. AT ONE POINT, 17 HORSES WERE BEING USED FOR DELIVERY PURPOSES. IN 1959, PURITY DAIRY REPLACED ITS LAST THREE HORSES WITH DELIVERY TRUCKS. IN THE 1950S, PURITY DIARY BEGAN TO STREAMLINE PRODUCTION. BUTTER WAS PRODUCED IN MEDICINE HAT, WHILE THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH PRODUCED ICE CREAM, NOVELTIES, BUTTER MILK, AND SOUR CREAM, IN ADDITION TO MILK AND COTTAGE CHEESE. THE EDMONTON PLANT SHARED MILK PRODUCTION WITH LETHBRIDGE, AND BECAME THE SOLE PRODUCER OF BLOW MOLD PLASTIC FOR PURITY DAIRY. BUSINESS BEGAN TO FALL IN THE 1960S, AND IN 1971 STAN AND ROMEO FABBI SOLD PURITY DAIRY TO CO-OP DAIRY, WHICH WAS SUBSEQUENTLY KNOWN AS PURITY CO-OP LTD. BEFORE THE SALE, PURITY DAIRY EMPLOYED ABOUT 200 FULL-TIME STAFF AND SUPPLIED MILK PRODUCTS TO THOUSANDS OF ALBERTANS DAILY. THE LETHBRIDGE PLANT EMPLOYED ABOUT 70 PEOPLE, AND MANUFACTURED ICE CREAM CONFECTIONS, COTTAGE CHEESE, BUTTER, YOGURT, BUTTERMILK, SOUR CREAM, AND FRUIT DRINKS. STAN’S WIFE, NETTI, SAID OF THE SALE, “WE LOST EVERYTHING…WE EXPANDED TOO FAST. I TOLD STAN ‘WHO CARES? I’VE GOT YOU AND WE STILL HAVE THREE MEALS A DAY.’” IN 1972, PURITY CO-OP LTD WAS BOUGHT OUT BY PALM DAIRY, WHICH WAS CLOSED DOWN FOLLOWING A DRAMATIC EXPLOSION IN 1978. IT REOPENED AT A DIFFERENT LOCATION ONE YEAR LATER. IN THE INTERIM, PRODUCTS WERE SHIPPED IN FROM THE CALGARY PLANT. STAN AND ROMEO FABBI DIED IN 1992 AND 1991, RESPECTIVELY. THIS INFORMATION WAS GATHERED IN 2008-09 FROM ANTOINETTE AND KEN FABBI, STAN’S WIFE AND SON, RESPECTIVELY, AND FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARCHIVES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR P20070013001. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR P20160019000 FOR ADDITIONAL LETHBRIDGE HERALD CLIPPINGS, PRINT RESEARCH, AND PATENT DOCUMENTS.
Catalogue Number
P20160019000
Acquisition Date
2016-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ACME BOOT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20150016005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ACME BOOT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Materials
LEATHER
No. Pieces
2
Height
28.5
Length
30.5
Description
A-B: RED COWBOY BOOTS (LEFT AND RIGHT BOOT). THE LEATHER BOOT BODIES ARE RED WITH GOLD ACCENTS AND GOLD OPENING TRIMS. LEATHER SOLES HAVE BEEN RE-HEELED. INTERIORS LABELLED “ACME BOOT” AND INK STAMPED, “MADE IN THE USA”. GOOD CONDITION. ON BOTH BOOTS, THERE IS A RED DYE LOSS IN VARIOUS PLACES, ESPECIALLY AT THE TOES. SOME OF THE GOLD ACCENTS ARE SCUFFED. REGULAR WEAR TO THE BOTTOM SOLES. THERE IS WEAR TO THE INSIDE SOLES (MORE SEVERELY ON BOOT A). BOTH BOOTS ARE MISSHAPEN (BOOT B TO A GREATER EXTENT). ON BOOT A, THERE IS A LOOSE THREAD ON THE TOE DESIGN. THERE IS A LOOSE YELLOW THREAD ON THE INSIDE HEEL ON BOOT B.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. THESE COWBOY BOOTS WERE PART OF THE STAGE OUTFIT WORN BY JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY HISTORY. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER EXPLAINED SHE MET HER HUSBAND, JOE HORHOZER, WHEN HE CAME TO WORK FOR SUPINA’S MERCANTILE. FOR THE STORY OF HOW THEY MET, PLEASE SEE RECORDS P20150016003 AND P20150016004. WHEN DESCRIBING HER HUSBAND'S MUSIC CAREER, HORHOZER SAID, “I WOULD CALL HIM THE LEAD INSTRUMENT BECAUSE AN ACCORDION IS, EH? AND HE WAS EXCEPTIONALLY GIFTED WITH THE ACCORDION; THAT’S WHAT EVERYBODY SAID, THAT THERE ISN’T ANYONE, AT LEAST AROUND THIS COUNTRY, THAT COULD COMPARE WITH HIM.” DESCRIBED IN THEIR SOUVENIR BOOK PUBLISHED IN 1941 AS “PROFESSIONAL RADIO ENTERTAINERS”, THE ‘ALBERTA RANCH BOYS’ WERE FORMED WHEN THE LOCAL EXHIBITION AND STAMPEDE PARADE WAS FOUND WANTING FOR A “COWBOY BAND” AS PART OF ITS LINEUP. ACCOLADES FOR THE PARADE ACT FOLLOWED, INSPIRING THE GROUP “TO EMBARK ON THE LONG ROAD TO FAME AND FORTUNE”. IN A YEAR’S TIME – AND AFTER TOURING THROUGH ALBERTA AND BC – THE BAND ENDED UP IN VANCOUVER. THERE IT ESTABLISHED ITSELF, ACCORDING TO THE BOOKLET, AS “WESTERN CANADA’S MOST VERSATILE STAGE AND DANCE FAVOURITE,” BROADCASTING ITS COWBOY MELODIES FOR OVER TWO CONTINUOUS YEARS VIA CKWX (VANCOUVER’S LARGEST RADIO STUDIO AT THE TIME). DURING THE WAR, IT DONATED ITS TALENTS TO THE PROMOTION OF WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES. ONE VICTORY RALLY SONG FOR STAMPS WAS “WE’VE BOUGHT THEM BEFORE AND WE’LL BUY THEM AGAIN.” BY EARLY JAN-FEB 1943, THE BAND HAD PEAKED. ONE MEMBER IS REPORTED TO HAVE ENLISTED IN THE CANADIAN ARMY WHILE OTHERS, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, “GOT SICK”. “THEY DID A LOT IN TORONTO.” RECALLED EVERAL IN AN INTERVIEW. “[IT WAS FROM] TORONTO THEN THEY COULD HAVE GONE [TO NEW YORK] - THAT’S WHERE THEY WERE OFFERED THE BIG JOB OF RECORDING AND BEING ON TV…BUT THEN [JOE] SAYS THAT HE DOESN’T CARE, BECAUSE HE SAYS IF HE WOULD HAVE WENT, HE WOULDN’T HAVE MET ME, SO, I MEAN, THAT WAS A NICE THING TO SAY. HE SAYS LIFE TURNED OUT GOOD FOR HIM.” EVERAL WAS NOT AWARE OF THIS AT THE TIME OF THEIR MEETING. AFTER FINDING OUT, SHE SAID, “WELL, I THOUGHT, GEE WHIZ, WELL, HE JUST ISN’T AN EVERYDAY JOE AND EVERYBODY IN TOWN KNEW HIM AND ADMIRED HIM. YEAH, IT MADE ME A LITTLE MORE HAPPY.” THESE RED COWBOY BOOTS WERE PART OF THE COSTUME JOE HORHOZER WORE WHEN HE PERFORMED WITH THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS, AND LATER THE 'COUNTRY CAPERS,' A LETHBRIDGE-BASED BAND FOR WHICH HE PLAYED THE ACCORDION BEGINNING IN 1958. IT WAS EVERAL WHO DYED THEM THE BRIGHT RED COLOUR: “HE ASKED ME [TO DYE THE BOOTS]. HE SAID HE WANTED TO CHANGE, THEY WERE GETTING TO LOOK KIND OF SHABBY, AND I DON’T KNOW WHY HE PICKED RED, BUT THAT’S WHAT HE DID SO, THAT’S WHAT I - ACTUALLY THESE STOOD UP QUITE WELL [LAUGHS]. THE REGULAR COLOUR WAS - I THINK THEY WERE BLACK-LIKE. BLACK WITH WHITE... THOSE WERE THE ONLY BOOTS THAT HE HAD.” OF THE PERFORMANCE COSTUME EVERAL HORHOZER SAID: “WHEN THEY STARTED PLAYING AT THE TRIANON THEN, I TELL YOU, THEY START WEARING MORE BAND [CLOTHES] - LIKE THEY HAD DIFFERENT BLAZERS, COLOURED BLAZERS – BLUE ONES AND RED ONES AND ALL WORE BLAZERS THEN ‘CAUSE THEY WANTED TO BECOME LIKE A DANCE BAND, I GUESS YOU’D SAY.” “HE WOULD NEVER FORGET THAT TIME [WITH THE RANCH BOYS],” HORHOZER SAID OF HER HUSBAND, “HE TALKED ABOUT IT ALL THE TIME. HOW THEY MET SO MANY [PEOPLE], LIKE THEY’D PLAY AT PRIVATE PARTIES FOR WEALTHY PEOPLE. HE ABSOLUTELY LOVED HIS MUSIC. HE LIVED FOR HIS MUSIC.” BACK HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, EVERAL’S HUSBAND JOE WENT ON TO PERFORM WITH THE COUNTRY CAPERS, PLAYING ACCORDION FOR A WEEKLY BROADCAST VIA THE LOCAL TV STATION CJLH. IN 1961, THE STATION AND THE BROADCAST WERE PRESENTED WITH A NATIONAL LIBERTY AWARD FOR “TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP” AND “BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING.” IN HIS TIME, ‘LITTLE JOE’ PLAYED WITH ROY ROGERS, GENE AUTRY AND TOMMY HUNTER. HE DIED IN 2010 AT AGE 89. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND FURTHER PUBLICATIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20150016005
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

PROJECTOR, MOTION-PICTURE

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/artifact13342
Other Name
MOTIOGRAPH AA PROJECTOR
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, GLASS, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20120038001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MOTIOGRAPH AA PROJECTOR
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
STEEL, GLASS, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
4
Height
202
Length
57
Description
A. PROJECTOR, FILM. GREY METAL BODY FIXED AT FRONT WITH MOTIOGRAPH AA PROJECTOR MECHANISM. BACK OF THE BODY HAS POWER (“ON/OFF”) AND IGNITE SWITCHES; BACK HAS GAUGES WITH GLASS COVERS MARKING HOURS (“16270”) AND 0-100 MV. BACK HAS SILVER LABEL WITH BLACK TEXT “STRONG X-16 TWO-SIDE LAMPHOUSE, D.C. VOLTS 28-32, D.C. AMPS. 60-95, TYPE NO. 76002-3, SERIAL NO. 65196, MFD. BY THE STRONG ELECTRIC CORP., TOLEDO, OHIO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 76100” AND A BLUE STICKER ON LABEL “CSA SPECIAL TESTING LABORATORIES, S108124, ACCEPTANCE”. BACK HAS THREE BLACK DIALS MARKED “V”, “H”, “F”; FRONT HAS THREE BLACK DIALS MARKED “V”, “H”, “F” ON BLACK METAL PLATE WITH WHITE TEXT “VERT”, “HORTZ”, “FOCUS”. BASE HAS A WHITE SWITCH BENEATH THE MAIN LAMP HOUSE. LAMP HOUSE SIDE HAS HINGED COVER WITH SILVER AND RED PLATE FIXED TO COVER, “CAUTION, USE FACE MASK, OBSERVE SAFETY RULES, ALLOW LAMP TO COOL 10 MIN BEFORE OPENING DOORS”. FRONT HAS REEL MOUNTS FIXED TO TOP AND BOTTOM; TOP REEL MOUNT IS MARKED “A-675” AND HAS SILVER SHIPPING REEL WITH 35MM FILM ATTACHED (B); BOTTOM REEL MOUNT IS MARKED A-676 AND HAS EMPTY SILVER SHIPPING REEL ATTACHED (D). BENEATH REEL MOUNT IS MOUNTED ELECTRIC CHANGEOVER MECHANISM; UNFINISHED STEEL WITH SILVER SCREWS AND INSERTS; SILVER PLATE ON FRONT OF MECHANISM HAS RED TEXT READING “ZIPPER” AND BLACK TEXT READING “ELECTRIC CHANGEOVER, PATENT 1796970, OTHER PATS. PEND., MODEL 14-14, SERIAL 2537, VOLTS 117 A.C., AMPS 2, MFD. BY ESSANNAY ELECTRIC MFG., G.G., 1438 N. CLARK ST., CHICAGO 10, ILL.” MOTIOGRAPH AA PROJECTOR MECHANISM HAS LENS ATTACHED AT FRONT (C); MOTIOGRAPH AA PROJECTOR MECHANISM HAS RED DIAL BESIDE FRONT CHAMBER COVER WITH WHITE TEXT “FRAME”. MOTIOGRAPH AA PROJECTOR MECHANISM HAS HINGED CHAMBER COVER WITH FRONT FIXED SILVER PLATE WITH RED TEXT READING “MOTIOGRAPH” IN RED, AND YELLOW AND BLACK LABEL READING “SHARP’S THEATRE SUPPLIES LIMITED, FILM EXCHANGE BUILDING, PHONE M-4076—CALGARY, ALBERTA.” INSIDE HINGED CHAMBER COVER IS WHITE LABEL “UL, MODEL AA, FRAMING LAMP 120V 25W, MOTIOGRAPH INC., CHICAGO”. BENEATH IS LOWER CHAMBER WITH STEEL AND GLASS HINGED COVER. BASE OF LAMP HOUSE PEDESTAL IS SCRATCHED; INSIDE OF MOTIOGRAPH AA PROJECTOR MECHANISM TOP CHAMBER IS DETACHED BLACK METAL SLIDE WITH CENTER CUT OUT AND RED KNOB AT THE END. OVERALL PROJECTOR AND COMPONENTS IN GOOD CONDITION. B. FILM REEL, 37.2CM DIAMETER X 4.3CM DEEP, INCLUDES 35MM FILM. SHIPPING REEL; UNFINISHED PRESSED STEEL; FIXED WITH UNMARKED WHITE TAPE. REEL IS HANDMARKED WITH RED “T”. C. LENS, PROJECTOR, 41.7CM LONG X 11.5CM DIAMETER. CINEMASCOPE/ANAMORPHIC (LONG LENS) FORMAT. BRASS END COMPONENT IS STAMPED “SUPER SNAPLITE”, “KOLLMORGEN OPTICAL CORP”, “BX 241 F:1.9 3 ¼ IN.” SILVER LENS COMPONENT IS MARKED “MADE IN JAPAN, 19313, PROMINAR ANAMORPHIC”. LENS FRONT IS BLACK; LENS GOES TO 350 FEET. D. FILM REEL, 37CM DIAMETER X 5.3CM DEEP, SHIPPING. UNFINISHED PRESSED STEEL, EMPTY, HANDMARKED IN RED “2” AND ON MASKING TAPE IN BLACK “7”. FIXED TO LOWER REEL MOUNT ON PROJECTOR.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
LEISURE
History
ON APRIL 11, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LARRY AND ANDREA BECKER, OWNERS OF THE FORMER WATERTON THEATRE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WHERE THE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT WAS USED. DURING THE INTERVIEW, THE BECKERS ELABORATED ON HOW THEIR THEATRE CLOSED, HOW THE EQUIPMENT WAS USED IN THEIR THEATRE, AND HOW AL ANCTIL CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE THEATRE PROJECTION EQUIPMENT. LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HOW ANCTIL BECAME THE OWNER AND DONOR OF THE EQUIPMENT, STATING, “THIS EQUIPMENT IS BUILT AND DESIGNED TO EXHIBIT 35 MM MOTION PICTURE FILM. IN 2011, WHEN WE DISPOSED OF THE EQUIPMENT, FILM WAS BECOMING OBSOLETE. IT WAS NO LONGER AVAILABLE TO US AS AN EXHIBITION MEDIUM, SO WE WERE FACED WITH THE CHALLENGE OF CONVERTING TO A DIGITAL PROJECTION, IF WE WANTED TO CONTINUE SHOWING MOTION PICTURES. WE HAD TO GET RID OF THIS, AND AL [ANCTIL] THOUGHT HE HAD A USE FOR IT. AT THE TIME, HE WAS SELLING US COFFEE. WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP IN THE THEATRE, SO WE HAD THAT RELATIONSHIP WITH AL; AND I’M NOT SURE WHY AL WANTED IT…I DON’T KNOW IF HE EVER INTENDED TO USE IT. I THINK, UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES, IT MIGHT BE USEFUL, IF SOMEBODY COULD ACCESS SOME 35 MM FILM TO RUN THROUGH IT. WHEN WE HEARD THAT AL WANTED IT, WE SAID “SURE, YOU CAN HAVE IT AL. WE NO LONGER HAVE ANY USE FOR IT.”” “IT WAS THE COST OF THE CONVERSION [THAT INFLUENCED OUR DECISION TO CLOSE]. INITIALLY, WHEN ALL OF THE THEATRES WERE FACED WITH THE CONVERSION, WITHIN A VERY SHORT WINDOW, THE DEMAND FOR THE EQUIPMENT WAS VERY HIGH; COSTS WERE VERY HIGH, AND IT JUST WASN’T FINANCIALLY VIABLE IN A SEASONAL OPERATION, SO WE DECIDED NOT TO PROCEED, AT THAT TIME, WITH THE DIGITAL UPGRADING/CONVERSION. WE WERE WORKING QUITE HARD, BECAUSE WE WERE RUNNING A COFFEE SHOP, AN ICE CREAM STORE, AND A MOVIE THEATRE. THE MOVIE THEATRE WAS THE FUN PART OF IT.” “WE WERE AT THE END OF OUR LAST SEASON IN 2011, AND WE HAD WORKED OUT AN ARRANGEMENT WITH THE TENANT, TO TAKE IT OVER, TO RUN IT AS A ‘STAGE AND GRILL’ KIND OF OPERATION. THEY WERE GOING TO PUT A KITCHEN IN, AND SERVE MEALS, AND PRESENT MUSIC ACTS ON STAGE.” ON THE PROJECTOR, LARRY BECKER INDICATED, “IT WAS OLD [IN 2011]. IT WAS VERY WELL-DESIGNED, AND BUILT EQUIPMENT, WHEN IT WAS NEW. THE PROJECTOR IS…THE HEART OF THE OPERATION, AND IT’S A MOTIOGRAPH PROJECTOR WITH THE MOTIOGRAPH SOUND HEAD…AND THAT WAS PROBABLY NEW IN THE LATE '40S OR EARLY ‘50S, WHEN THE MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY WAS IN AN ABSOLUTE HEY-DAY. HUGE INVESTMENTS WERE MADE IN DEVELOPING HIGH QUALITY EQUIPMENT FOR THE MOTION PICTURE EXHIBITIONS. THIS PROJECTOR, EVEN THOUGH IT WAS VERY OLD, BENEFITTED FROM THAT DESIGN PERIOD, AND WAS STILL WORKING REASONABLY WELL.” “WE REPLACED THE LAMP HOUSE [FROM AN OLD CARBON ARC LAMP TO…A ZENON BULB AS A LIGHT SOURCE]. [WE PICKED UP BULBS AND EQUIPMENT] FROM ‘TEN STORIES’. “[THERE WOULD BE A] BELL HERE, BEFORE WE PUT THE PLATTER SYSTEM IN… [THE BELL] WAS ATTACHED TO THE PROJECTOR, AND THIS WAS WHEN THESE SMALL 20 MINUTE REELS WOULD BE LOADED ON TO THIS REEL LINE, AND WHEN THERE WAS ABOUT 2 OR 2 1/2 MINUTES FILM LEFT ON THE PAY-OUT REEL…[THE] BELL WOULD START TO RING; START TO TURN AT A SPEED, AND THAT WAS TO SIGNAL THE PROJECTIONIST TO GET READY, BECAUSE HE WAS GOING TO HAVE TO DO A CHANGE-OVER. WHEN THAT BELL RANG, THE PROJECTIONIST WOULD LOOK THROUGH A PORT IN THE PROJECTION ROOM, AND LOOK FOR A LITTLE DOT UP IN THE RIGHT HAND CORNER OF THE FILM. THERE WOULD BE TWO OF THEM. WHEN YOU HEARD THE BELL, YOU’D STRIKE THE LAMP WITH THE OLD CARBON ARCS; GET THE LAMP HOUSE RUNNING. THEN YOU’D SEE THE FIRST DOT, THAT WAS YOUR SIGNAL TO START THE PROJECTOR, THEN, WHEN YOU SAW THE SECOND DOT, THERE WAS A PEDAL ON THE FLOOR, OR A HAND SWITCH, THAT YOU WOULD ACTIVATE, AND THAT WOULD CLOSE THE SHUTTER ON ONE PROJECTOR, AND OPEN IT ON THE OTHER ONE. IF THE PROJECTIONIST WAS GOOD, IT WAS SEAMLESS. THE AUDIENCE WOULD NEVER KNOW THAT THERE WAS A REEL CHANGE.” “THERE WOULD BE TWO PROJECTORS RUNNING SIDE-BY-SIDE. I DID OPERATE IT FOR A WHILE, WITH THE CHANGE-OVERS, BUT THAT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I REALLY WANTED TO CHANGE ABOUT WATERTON. I WANTED JUST TO MAKE MY JOB A LOT EASIER. [THAT WAS] THE INTRODUCTION OF THE PLATTER SYSTEM, AND THE ZENON LAMP.” LARRY BECKER DISCUSSED THE PURPOSE OF THE LENS IN USE WITH PROJECTOR EQUIPMENT, STATING, “FILM WAS STILL AVAILABLE IN BOTH FORMATS, AND WHEN IT CAME IN, WE HAD TO KNOW WHICH FORMAT IT WAS, BECAUSE THEN WE WOULD USE THE APPROPRIATE LENS. [THE LENS] WAS STILL IN USE. PRODUCTION COSTS WERE PROBABLY…A LITTLE HIGHER IF THEY WERE SHOOTING IN THE CINEMASCOPE. I THINK THE FLAT LENS, THE 185 ASPECT RATIO WAS A BETTER RATIO FOR TELEVISION. I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT, IF THEY THOUGHT THAT THE MOVIE WAS GOING TO HAVE A SHORT RUN IN THEATRES, AND THEN A BROADER AUDIENCE ON TELEVISION, THEN THAT FORMAT [185 ASPECT RATIO] WAS MORE SUITABLE. WE REPLACED [THE ORIGINAL LENSES].” THE BECKERS SPOKE ABOUT THEIR ARRIVAL IN WATERTON AND THEIR HISTORY WORKING IN THEATRES, WITH LARRY BEGINNING HIS CAREER WORKING IN THE PALACE THEATRE IN CALGARY, ALBERTA. IN 1975, THE BECKERS BECAME INTERESTED IN PURCHASING THE THEATRE IN WATERTON, AND BY 1976 THEY WERE RUNNING THE WATERTON THEATRE. LARRY NOTED HOW THE BECKERS BECAME INVOLVED WITH THE WATERTON THEATRE “I WAS TRAVELING TO WATERTON. I HAD NEVER BEEN TO WATERTON. I HAD AN OCCASION TO GO TO GREAT FALLS. IT WAS ON…A BUSINESS TRIP, AND IT WAS OVER A WEEKEND. I LOOKED AT THE MAP, AND I THOUGHT, “IF WE LEAVE AROUND DINNERTIME ON FRIDAY, WE CAN SPEND A NIGHT IN WATERTON…AND THEN WE CAN CONTINUE TO GREAT FALLS THE NEXT DAY.” GOT INTO WATERTON, AND, BY THIS TIME, THE SUN HAD SET, AND I STILL DIDN’T REALIZE I WAS IN THE MOUNTAINS. I SORT OF LOOKED AROUND. I DIDN’T HAVE A ROOM BOOKED, AND GOT A ROOM IN ALLEN’S LAKESHORE BUNGALOWS, WHICH WERE ON THE SHORE OF WATERTON LAKE, AT THAT TIME, AND WHEN I GOT UP IN THE MORNING, AND LOOKED AROUND, I COULDN’T BELIEVE WHERE I WAS. I MEAN, IT WAS JUST THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING…IT WAS STUNNINGLY, GORGEOUS! THEN I THOUGHT, “I’LL TAKE A STROLL AROUND TOWN”, AND THERE WAS A MOVIE THEATRE. OF COURSE, BEING IN THE BUSINESS, I’VE GOT TO STOP AND YOU…FIND OUT WHAT’S GOING ON THERE. I CHATTED WITH A YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE LOOKING AFTER THE PLACE FOR LOTTIE BREWERTON. LOTTIE, AND HER HUSBAND, GORDON, HAD BUILT IT BACK IN ’35. LOTTIE WAS GORDON’S WIDOW. SHE WASN’T INVOLVED IN THE OPERATION, BUT SHE HAD SOME YOUNG FAMILY THAT WERE HELPING HER OUT, SO, IN THE CONVERSATION, THEY SAID, “YOU KNOW, I THINK LOTTIE WANTS TO SELL.” I WENT BACK TO CALGARY, AND NEVER REALLY THOUGHT TOO MUCH ABOUT IT UNTIL SEVERAL MONTHS LATER, AND IT WAS SORT OF ON MY MIND, AND I THOUGHT, “WELL, I’M GOING TO GET AHOLD OF LOTTIE AND SEE WHAT THE DEAL IS HERE?” “IT NEEDED WORK. IT’S NOT A BIG MONEY-MAKING OPERATION IN WATERTON, SO IT WAS…HARD TO DO THE THINGS THAT NEEDED TO BE DONE. OVER THE YEARS, WE KIND OF KEPT IT GOING…BUT IT WAS ALWAYS…AN EXPERIENTIAL THING. IT WAS KIND OF AN ANTIQUE IN ITSELF. IT WAS NEVER INTENDED TO BE LIKE THE CITY THEATRES – IT’S A MUCH MORE CASUAL ENVIRONMENT.” “I LIKE THE STYLE OF THE BUILDING. IT’S A GORGEOUS OLD BUILDING – TUDOR-REVIVAL. IT’S GOT AN INTERESTING HISTORY. BACK IN THE MID-‘30S, PARKS CANADA WAS ENCOURAGING DEVELOPMENT IN WATERTON, AND WAS GIVING OUT THE COMMERCIAL LEASES, BUT THEY ALSO WANTED SORT OF AN ARCHITECTURAL THEME TO THE TOWNSITE. THEY HAD AN ARCHITECTURAL DIVISION, AND THEY HAD ARCHITECTS ON STAFF, AND IT WAS THAT BRANCH OF PARKS CANADA, THAT DESIGNED THAT BUILDING, AND MANY OF THE OTHER BUILDINGS IN WATERTON. IT’S GOT SOME CHARM. IT’S NICE THAT WAY.” ANDREA BECKER ADDED, “IT’S…A PRIVILEGE TO BE A WATERTON BUSINESS OWNER. IT’S A VERY SMALL COMMUNITY, AND IT’S A LIFESTYLE KIND OF ENVIRONMENT, AS WELL, FOR THE BUSINESS PEOPLE THERE. WE…FEEL THAT IT IS A SPECIAL THING TO DO…” LARRY BECKER SPOKE TO HIS TRAINING WORKING IN THEATRES AND HIS EARLY START IN THE WATERTON THEATRE, “WHEN I STARTED DOING PROJECTION WORK, IT WAS A LICENSED TRADE IN THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA, AND, IN THE EARLY DAYS OF MOTION PICTURE EXHIBITION, THE FILM STOCK WAS A SILVER NITRATE FILM STOCK WHICH WAS, LITERALLY, EXPLOSIVE. PROJECTION ROOMS, INCLUDING THE ONE IN WATERTON, WERE BUILT LIKE A BUNKER. THEY WERE CEMENT ROOMS, WITH FIRE SHUTTERS, THAT WOULD SLAM SHUT IF SOMETHING WENT WRONG IN THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM TO BECOME A PROJECTIONIST WAS A 3 YEAR PROGRAM, AND THERE WAS DIFFERENT CATEGORIES OF LICENSING. WHEN I STARTED IN [1977] I OWNED THE THEATRE IN FORT MACLEOD AND I HAD TO DO AN APPRENTICESHIP, IN MY OWN THEATRE, BEFORE I WAS ALLOWED TO OPERATE THE EQUIPMENT. I BECAME A CERTIFIED PROJECTIONIST. I MENTION THE EARLY DAYS WITH THE SILVER NITRATE FILM, WHICH WAS HIGHLY FLAMMABLE, AND DANGEROUS. THAT HAD BEEN REPLACED BY ACETATE FILM, LONG BEFORE I BECAME INVOLVED, AND SO THE FILM STOCK WAS NO LONGER…COMBUSTIBLE, AND SO IT WAS A MUCH SAFER ENVIRONMENT. NONETHELESS, SOME OF THE OLD REGULATIONS SORT OF CARRIED FORWARD, AND SLOWLY CHANGED.” I WAS NEVER A PROJECTIONIST IN MEDICINE HAT AND CALGARY. I WAS JUST IN MANAGEMENT, SO I WASN’T THAT FAMILIAR WITH ALL OF THIS [WHEN WE BOUGHT THE WATERTON THEATRE]. IT WAS A BIT OF A LEARNING PROCESS FOR ME. I ENDED UP DOING AN APPRENTICESHIP IN MY OWN THEATRE IN FORT MACLEOD. I HIRED A PROJECTIONIST THE FIRST COUPLE OF YEARS IN WATERTON, AND I HAD TO BRING SOMEBODY DOWN FROM CALGARY TO RUN THE PROJECTOR. WHEN I GOT INTO FORT MACLEOD, I WANTED TO DO MY OWN PROJECTION WORK, AND THAT’S WHEN I DID THE APPRENTICESHIP.” [THE PROJECTIONIST WE BROUGHT TO WATERTON] WAS A FELLOW BY THE NAME OF DOUG COOPER…HE WAS FAMILIAR WITH THIS EQUIPMENT. THE CHANGES HAD STARTED IN THE CITY, BUT HE WAS FAMILIAR WITH DOING THIS KIND OF WORK. HE HAD LEARNED ON IT TOO, SO IT WASN’T A MYSTERY TO HIM. HE WAS ABLE TO MANAGE IT QUITE WELL. [WE HIRED] A DIFFERENT GUY EACH YEAR. DOUG WAS THE FIRST YEAR.” “ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WAS INTERESTING ABOUT THE THEATRE WHEN I TOOK IT OVER IS THAT, FOR LIGHT SOURCES IN THE PROJECTION ROOM, THE LAMPS THAT ILLUMINATED THE SCREEN WERE BURNING CARBON ARCS. CARBON ARCS CAME IN A BOX; YOU INSTALLED THEM IN THE LAMP HOUSE. WHEN YOU STARTED THE MOVIE, YOU’D STRIKE THEM TOGETHER, AND THEY WOULD CREATE AN ARC AND FLAME BETWEEN THESE CARBON RODS. THAT WAS WHAT PRODUCED THE LIGHT. IT WAS MAGNIFIED BY A MIRROR DOWN THROUGH THE LENS, AND WITH THE SCREEN. WITH THAT KIND OF A LIGHT SOURCE, YOU HAD TO BE IN THE PROJECTION ROOM…ALL THE TIME. YOU COULDN’T LEAVE THE PROJECTION ROOM WHILE THE MOVIE WAS RUNNING. AS A MATTER OF FACT, PROJECTION ROOMS HAD TOILETS IN THEM DURING THAT PERIOD. CHANGING THAT OUT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT I DID, BECAUSE IT MADE IT A LOT EASIER TO GET OUT OF THE PROJECTION ROOM. THE OTHER THING – THE FILM WAS RUN OFF OF 18 20-MINUTE REELS AT THAT TIME, SO THERE WERE 2 PROJECTORS. WE WERE CONSTANTLY CHANGING BACK AND FORTH, FROM ONE PROJECTOR TO THE OTHER. GETTING RID OF THE CARBON ARC LAMP HOUSES, AND INSTALLING A PLATTER SYSTEM, WHICH ALLOWED…THE PROGRAM TO BE SPLICED TOGETHER ON THE SINGLE REELS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND HISTORIES OF THE WATERTON THEATRE, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120038001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120038001
Acquisition Date
2012-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HMV BAG
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20170004004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HMV BAG
Date
2017
Materials
PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.7
Width
35.7
Description
WHITE, PLASTIC SHOPPING BAG. BOTH SIDES ARE THE SAME. “HMV” IS ON THE BAG IN PINK LETTERING. THE BAG ALSO HAS INFORMATION ABOUT THE BAG INCLUDING “ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY” ALONG THE BOTTOM EDGE. THERE IS A HOLE IN THE TOP SIDE OF THE BAG FOR THE HANDLE. VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION. THE BAG IS SLIGHTLY WRINKLED. THERE IS SLIGHT WEAR TO THE HANDLE THROUGH USE.
Subjects
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
RETAIL TRADE
BUSINESS
History
IN THE EARLY MONTHS OF 2017 THE MUSIC FRANCHISE, HMV CANADA, BEGAN TO THE PROCESS OF CLOSING DOWN ALL 120 OF THEIR STORES ACROSS CANADA. AFTER 30 YEARS OF BUSINESS, THE COMPANY WENT INTO RECEIVERSHIP. PARK PLACE MALL IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE HAD AN HMV LOCATION OF ITS OWN, WHICH OPENED IN 1994. THIS SHOPPING BAG IS AN EXAMPLE OF SHOPPING BAGS USED AT THE LETHBRIDGE LOCATION OF HMV DURING THE TIME OF RECEIVERSHIP. IT IS ALSO PHYSICAL SYMBOL OF BRICK-AND-MORTAR SHOPPING MALLS. ON 27 FEBRUARY 2017, IN AN INTERVIEW WITH COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, THE MANAGER OF THE HMV LETHBRIDGE, BRENDAN FRIZZLEY, REFLECTED ON HIS PAST EXPERIENCE AT THE MUSIC STORE, THE SIGNIFICANCE OF MUSIC STORES, AND ON THE RECEIVERSHIP PERIOD. FOR MORE INFORMATION OF FRIZZLEY’S CONNECTION TO THE STORE, PLEASE SEE P20170004001-2. IN THE INTERVIEW, FRIZZLEY SPOKE ABOUT THE CHANGE IN MALL TRAFFIC, “[THERE IS] SUCH A DROP IN TRAFFIC, AS PEOPLE START TO MOVE AWAY FROM MALLS. [THIS IS EXEMPLIFIED BY] THE FACT THAT I’LL HAVE SATURDAYS WHERE I’LL PULL AS MUCH AS I USED TO PULL ON A SLOW MONDAY EIGHT YEARS AGO, IN TERMS OF JUST PEOPLE COMING IN. WE’VE MADE SO MANY CHANGES TO BE ABLE TO MAKE THAT WORK FROM ON OUR SIDE, WHETHER IT’S GETTING BETTER DEALS FOR EVERY CD THAT WE SELL, OR JUST CHANGING THE GENERAL PRICE OF THINGS, OR HAVING THINGS THAT MAKE MORE MONEY… PEOPLE AREN’T SHOPPING IN MALLS ANYMORE. THERE’S STILL PEOPLE COMING IN, ESPECIALLY AROUND CHRISTMAS TIME, BUT IT’S NOT THE SAME AS IT USED TO BE. I REMEMBER MY FIRST CHRISTMAS [WORKING] HERE. WE HAD THREE TILLS – WE’D RUN ALL THREE OF THEM – AND THERE’D BE STILL CRAZY LINES. THAT WAS FOR ALL OF DECEMBER, AND THEN THIS YEAR, BLACK FRIDAY AND BOXING DAY BOTH HAPPENED, AND I DIDN’T HAVE TO OPEN A THIRD TILL…PEOPLE DON’T WANT SHOPPING TO BE A MULTI-HOUR STROLLING EXPERIENCE. WE’VE ALL GOT TO FACE THE ‘BUYING ONLINE,’ AND IF IT’S NOT ‘BUYING ONLINE’, [IT'S] BUYING ‘BIG BOX’. IF YOU WALK INTO WALMART OR COSTCO AND YOU’RE OUT IN AN HOUR, AND YOU GOT EVERYTHING THAT YOU NEED, THAT’S SO MUCH BETTER THAN A DAY AT THE MALL. I DON’T THINK THE THINGS AT THE MALL ARE INTERESTING ENOUGH ANYMORE FOR PEOPLE TO WANT TO PORE OVER THEM, AND HAVE THAT EXPERIENCE WHERE YOU WANDER AROUND THE MALL. THE KIDS WOULD GO OFF ONE WAY; PARENTS WOULD GO OFF THE OTHER. MOM AND DAD WOULD EVENTUALLY SPLIT UP, AS THEY GOT PULLED DIFFERENT WAYS. EVERYONE WOULD SORT OF WANDER AROUND; THEY’D MEET UP AT THE FOOD COURT, AT A CERTAIN TIME, AND THAT WOULD BE THAT, AND IT’S JUST NOT AN EXPERIENCE PEOPLE WANT [ANYMORE]. I THINK PEOPLE FEEL PULLED A LOT OF DIFFERENT WAYS, AND WE’VE GOTTEN VERY GOOD AT GETTING GOOD RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES, AT THE SAME TIME… MILLENNIALS HAVE FOUND REALLY INTERESTING, ENGAGING WAYS OF OCCUPYING THEIR TIME…YEAH, YOU KNOW PEOPLE ARE THERE TO BUY CERTAIN THINGS AT THE MALL… IF PEOPLE ARE COMING IN FOR A PARTICULAR ITEM AT MY STORE, THEY’RE PROBABLY NOT HITTING ANY OTHER STORE…NOBODY WANTS TO SHOP AROUND. AND THAT’S FINE. I’M NOT A MALL PERSON… WHEN I’M BUYING SOMETHING, I’M PROBABLY GETTING IT OFF AMAZON. I’LL BE IN THE MALL, HEADING OUT TO MY CAR, AND I’LL BE ON MY PHONE ON AMAZON BUYING THE THING THAT I WANT TO BUY, BECAUSE I WANT TO BE ABLE TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THAT. I DON’T WANT TO SHOP AROUND IN THE MALL. AND IT’S KIND OF SURREAL THAT I LIVE IN A PLACE THAT SELLS THE THINGS I WANT, BUT I DON’T SEE EXACTLY WHAT I WANT HERE, SO RATHER THAN JUST HAVE TO SETTLE AND BUY THE BEST ONE, I’M JUST GOING TO GET ON MY PHONE…” MACLEAN STATED THAT THERE IS A “KIND OF REVOLUTION OF DIGITAL, IN TERMS OF, NOT JUST THE [HMV] ITSELF, BUT EVEN THE MALL.” FRIZZLEY ELABORATED ON THAT: “[Y]OU APPROACH THIS AWKWARD, POST-WORK SOCIETY WHERE YOU’VE KILLED RETAIL… WE CAN HAVE A LOT OF PEOPLE UNEMPLOYED REALLY QUICKLY IF WE’RE DOING THIS. THAT’S THE BIGGEST THING THERE. I THINK THE LOSS OF - WE ALREADY LOST THE GOOD SIDES OF RETAIL YEARS AGO WHEN WE KILLED THE EXPERTS AND KILLED SPECIALTY STORES…” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ARTICLES REGARDING THE RECEIVERSHIP AND LIQUIDATION OF HMV CANADA.
Catalogue Number
P20170004004
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PORCELAIN
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Materials
PORCELAIN
No. Pieces
1
Height
6
Diameter
21.5
Description
CHINA BOWL WITH AN IRREGULAR RIM THAT EXTENDS A FLORAL PETAL MOTIF ALONG BOWL’S INSIDE EDGE. CENTRE FEATURES COUNTRY LANDSCAPE INCLUDING A COTTAGE, SURROUNDED BY STAMP MARK IN GOLD STENCIL AND SCRIPT, “COMPLIMENTS OF N. F. SUPINA”. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT CRACKING IN THE BOTTOM. THE BASE IS SCUFFED AND DIRTY. THERE ARE SOME MARKS ON THE OUTSIDE EDGE.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
BUSINESS
COMMEMORATIVE
DOMESTIC
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING HORHOZER AND HER FAMILY. THIS BOWL IS A REMINDER OF THE STORE THAT WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF LIFE IN THE SUPINA FAMILY. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “MY DAD ALWAYS GAVE A CHRISTMAS GIFT. SO ONE YEAR HE GAVE THE PLATE AND ANOTHER YEAR HE GAVE THIS BOWL AND ACTUALLY THAT’S ALL I KNOW ABOUT IT… [A]LL THE CUSTOMERS, THE ONES THAT DEALT THERE ALL THE TIME [GOT A CHRISTMAS PRESENT]. THE GOOD PAYING ONES AND THE NOT-SO-GOOD PAYING ONES, I THINK THEY PROBABLY EVEN GOT IT TOO, BUT, AS LONG AS THEY WERE CUSTOMERS THEN THEY GOT ONE… MY MOTHER SAVED [IT] FIRSTLY, BECAUSE THEY REALLY MEANT SOMETHING - PART OF THE STORE I GUESS SHE’D SAY. SO, HAD THEM FOR A LONG, LONG TIME… MY MOM HAD ALL KINDS OF ORNAMENTS AROUND AND SHE’D JUST PUT THEM ON A TABLE OR WHATEVER. SHE WOULD CHANGE HER ORNAMENTS EVERY ONCE AND AWHILE, AND THEN SHE’D PUT THESE IN THE CUPBOARD." ABOUT THE HISTORY OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE, HORHOZER EXPLAINS: “I WAS BORN INTO [THE STORE]. MY DAD STARTED SMALL. HIS DAD HAD A LITTLE CONFECTIONARY; THEN HE TURNED IT INTO A GROCERY STORE AND THEN HE SOLD IT TO MY DAD. MY DAD WAS THE ONE THAT TOOK IT OVER, THAT WAS ALREADY TAKING PLACE WHEN I WAS BORN. THERE WAS NO SPECIFIC MEMORY [OF THAT TRANSITIION] BECAUSE THAT’S ALL I KNEW REALLY.” “… MY DAD WAS BORN IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA. [HIS FAMILY] CAME HERE WHEN HE WAS TWO. [HIS YOUNGER SIBLINGS], THE FIVE BROTHERS AND THE ONE SISTER, WERE ALL BORN IN THAT SAME LITTLE HOUSE THERE. AND THAT’S WHERE MY GRANDPA HAD STARTED THE STORE, IT WAS JUST A CONFECTIONARY. EVENTUALLY IT GREW INTO QUITE A BUSINESS… IN THOSE DAYS, IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, SO THEY HAD FIVE HORSES AND BUGGIES THAT WERE RUNNING, WORKING, AND MY UNCLE ALWAYS LOOKED AFTER THE HORSES AND MAINTAINED THEM. THEY’D GO AND THEY’D PICK UP THE ORDER. LOTS OF THE PEOPLE THEN COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, BUT MY DAD COULD SPEAK CZECH, AND THEN THEY’D USUALLY SEND – HE HAD ALL KINDS OF NATIONALITIES WORKING FOR HIM - [A PERSON OF MATCHING ETHNICITY], THAT KNEW THEIR LANGUAGE TO PICK UP THE ORDER. THEY BROUGHT IT BACK TO THE STORE, AND THEN DELIVERED IT BACK TO THE CUSTOMER, THAT WAS REAL SERVICE IN THOSE DAYS, ESPECIALLY WITH HORSE AND BUGGY IN THOSE WINTRY DAYS, AFTER THAT IT DEVELOPED INTO TRUCKS. THERE WERE LOTS OF MINERS IN THOSE DAYS AND WERE GOOD CUSTOMERS… HE AT ONE TIME EMPLOYED THIRTY-SIX PEOPLE IN THE STORE THERE.” AN ARTICLE IN LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON MAY 5, 2004 STATES THAT NICK SUPINA PURCHASED THE STORE FROM HIS FATHER, MIKE SUPINA, IN 1918. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER CONTINUED TO SPEAK ABOUT THE BEGINNING DAYS OF THE SUPINA’S STORE: “MY GRANDPA WAS WORKING IN THE MINE. I DON’T KNOW HOW IT CAME THAT HE HAD THIS LITTLE BUSINESS… IT’S MY DAD THEN THAT HAD TO LOOK AFTER THE FAMILY BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY MONEY. THERE WAS FIVE BOYS SO HE HAD THEM ALL. THEY WERE ALL CLOSE TOGETHER IN AGE. THERE’S STEVE AND BILLY AND JOHN AND MIKE… UNCLE STEVE, IS THE SECOND, HE’S THE ONE THAT STAYED WITH MY DAD, AND JOHNNY DID TOO. THEN THE OTHER TWO PURSUED THEIR OWN BUSINESSES. BILLY HAD A BUSINESS IN RED DEER AND SMALL BUSINESSES IN TWO OTHER PLACES. THEN MIKE, HE WENT TO THE STATES AND—OH, THAT WAS GEORGE, PARDON ME. HE HAD A SHOE STORE WHICH WAS VERY, VERY SUCCESSFUL. MIKE WAS THE ONLY ONE THAT WASN’T IN BUSINESS. THAT WAS BECAUSE HE WAS IN THE WAR…” THINKING BACK ON HER MEMORIES OF SUPINA’S, HORHOZER DESCRIBES, “[I]N THOSE DAYS YOU HAD GOOD FRUIT. I REMEMBER THE DELICIOUS PEACHES. I HAVEN’T SEEN A PEACH LIKE THAT SINCE… LOTS OF TIMES, THE FRUIT WOULD GO OVER-RIPE, LIKE YOUR APRICOTS AND PEACHES. MY MOTHER WOULD GO AND GET ALL THE OVER-RIPE FRUIT AND TAKE IT HOME AND MAKE BEAUTIFUL PIES AND TAKE THE PIES BACK TO THE STORE AND SELL THEM. SHE WAS A WONDERFUL BAKER. THEY DID EVERYTHING LIKE THAT TO HELP MAKE MORE MONEY. SOMETIMES MY DAD WOULD HAVE A SPECIAL ON, 3 CENTS A LOAF [OF BREAD. I HAD LOTS OF ADS FROM THE STORE, AND YOU’D GET SUCH A KICK OUT OF SEEING HAMBURGER, TWENTY-FIVE CENTS A POUND AND THINGS LIKE THAT. SO, YES I REMEMBER.” HORHOZER BEGAN WORKING AT THE STORE AT THE AGE OF 14: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.’” HORHOZER BELIEVED THAT AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE STORE’S SUCCESS WAS “… BECAUSE, [OF] THE SERVICE MAINLY. JUST THINK, GOING THERE, GETTING YOUR ORDERS, BRINGING THEM BACK, DOING THEM UP, THEY’D MAKE SURE THINGS WERE TOP QUALITY. THEY GOT TO KNOW EVERY CUSTOMER, OF COURSE, AND THEY KNEW WHAT THEY LIKED. HE HAD WONDERFUL PEOPLE WORKING FOR HIM. THEY JUST GAVE FANTASTIC SERVICE ALL THE TIME. PLUS, MY DAD WAS GRUFF, BUT HE WAS VERY, VERY KIND TO POOR PEOPLE THAT COULDN’T AFFORD –THERE’S LOTS THAT YEARS AFTER HE HAD PASSED AWAY [PEOPLE] WOULD COME UP TO ME AND SAY, ‘IF IT WASN’T FOR YOUR DAD, JOHNNY WOULDN’T HAVE HAD CHEESE,’ OR SOMETHING. I DIDN’T KNOW A THING ABOUT IT, BECAUSE HE WAS ONE THAT NEVER, EVER TOLD ANYBODY… THEN AT CHRISTMAS TIME HE WOULD GO TO THE STORE AND HE HAD A LIST OF EVERYBODY THAT HE KNEW WAS EXCEPTIONALLY POOR, AND HE WOULD FILL BASKETS. HE WOULD DO IT ALL BY HIMSELF… HE WOULDN’T TELL MY MOTHER AND I. HE WAS SO TIGHT-MOUTHED, FILL ALL THESE BASKETS AND DELIVER THEM TO THE PEOPLE HIMSELF WITHOUT TELLING A SOUL ABOUT IT. HE WAS THAT KIND OF PERSON. HE WAS VERY KIND THAT WAY.” SUPINA’S MERCANTILE SERVED LETHBRIDGE UNTIL IT CLOSED IN 1960. HORHOZER REMAINED IN RETAIL IN VARIOUS SHOPS IN THE CITY, INCLUDING THE DEPARTMENT STORE WOOLCO UNTIL HER RETIREMENT IN 1988. HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE IN 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS OLD. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT SUPINA’S MERCANTILE AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

42 records – page 1 of 3.