Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
APPLE COSTUME HEADPIECE
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
1976
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, BATTING
Catalogue Number
P20160005000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
APPLE COSTUME HEADPIECE
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
1976
Materials
FABRIC, BATTING
No. Pieces
1
Height
37
Width
16.5
Description
COSTUME HEAD COVER MIMICKING AN APPLE STEM. HEAD COVER MADE OUT OF YELLOW, RIBBED FABRIC IN A BALACLAVA-STYLE WITH CIRCULAR FACE HOLE WITH STRETCH ELASTIC AROUND DIAMETER. BOTTOM EDGE IS UNHEMMED, EXCEPT FOR BACK CENTER PANEL. GREEN FELT ATTACHMENTS AS LEAVES AND BROWN STRETCHY MATERIAL COVERING STEM SHAPED OBJECT ATOP HEAD PIECE. "ANINE' STITCHED IN RED THREAD ON THE INSIDE BACK HEM. CONDITION: YELLOW FABRIC DULLED IN COLOUR. SLIGHT FRAYING NEAR HEAD PIECE'S EDGES. HOLE IN BACK SEAM.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
LEISURE
POLITICS
History
THIS ARTIFACT IS AN APPLE COSTUME HEAR COVER. ACCORDING TO INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE DONOR, ANINE VONKEMAN, UPON DONATION IT WAS “WORN BY THE DONOR ON A PARADE FLOAT IN BENTHUIZEN, THE NETHERLANDS, WHERE SHE LIVED AT THE TIME. [IT WAS] MADE BY THE DONOR’S MOTHER, TRUDY VONKEMAN, AND PART OF A COSTUME DEPICTING THE DONOR AS AN APPLE. THE DONOR’S CHEEKS PAINTED RED. THE PARADE TOOK PLACE AROUND 1975-1976. THE DONOR MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO CANADA ON 6 NOVEMBER 1981. MANY OF THE FAMILY’S POSSESSIONS WERE PACKED IN A HURRY FOR THE MOVE, INCLUDING THE COSTUME HEAD COVER.” THIS ARTIFACT WAS DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AFTER BEING FEATURED IN THE GALT’S EXHIBITION CURATED BY WENDY AITKENS TITLED, "CHANGING PLACES: IMMIGRATION & DIVERSITY," WHICH RAN FROM 31 OCTOBER 2015 TO 17 JANUARY 2016. INFORMATION ON THE TEXT PANEL IN THAT EXHIBIT STATED THAT THE PARADE THAT IT WAS WORN FOR WAS CELEBRATING THE DUTCH QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY. IT ALSO STATES, “THE HAT MADE IT INTO THE SHIPPING CONTAINER, WHICH BROUGHT THE VONKEMAN FAMILY’S BELONGINGS FROM HOLLAND TO CANADA… THE REST OF THE COSTUME DIDN’T MAKE IT INTO THE CONTAINER.” A TEXT PANEL IN THE “CHANGING PLACES” EXHIBIT EXPLAINED: “AVAILABLE FARMLAND WAS LIMITED IN HOLLAND AFTER THE END OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR, SO [THE PARENTS OF] WIM VONKEMAN (THE DONOR’S FATHER) AND THEIR LARGE FAMILY IMMIGRATED TO SOUTHWESTERN ALBERTA IN THE EARLY 1950S, WHERE THE FAMILY WORKED IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS BEFORE BRANCHING OUT. EVENTUALLY WIM’S PARENTS STARTED MORNINGSTAR DAIRY. WIM REMAINED IN THE NETHERLANDS WHERE HE WORKED WITH THE NAVY [AND] MARRIED TRUDY… THEY HAD THREE CHILDREN: ANINE, ALWIN AND HERWIN. IN 1979, WIM AND TRUDY BROUGHT THEIR CHILDREN TO VISIT FAMILY HERE AND WHEN THEY RETURNED HOME THE TWO BOYS TALKED OF MOVING TO CANADA WHEN THEY FINISHED SCHOOL… DETERMINED THAT HER FAMILY WOULDN’T BE SEPARATED, TRUDY SUGGESTED THEY ALL GO TOGETHER. WIM’S BROTHER JOHN AGREED TO SPONSOR THE FAMILY AND WHEN THE LETTER OF ACCEPTANCE ARRIVED THEY QUICKLY PACKED UP THEIR BELONGINGS IN A SHIPPING CONTAINER… IN NOVEMBER 1981, WIM’S FAMILY – ALONG WITH AN AIREDALE TERRIER, A CAT, AND A GUINEA PIG – MOVED INTO THE VONKEMAN DAIRY FARM HOUSE IN IRON SPRINGS. UNFORTUNATELY, BOTH CANADA AND THE NETHERLANDS WERE EXPERIENCING A RECESSION SO SELLING THE HOUSE IN HOLLAND TOOK TIME AND JOBS HERE WERE DIFFICULT TO FIND. WIM WORKED ON THE MORNINGSTAR DAIRY FARM WITH HIS BROTHER JOHN… THE CHILDREN STARTED SCHOOL RIGHT AWAY AND THE TWO OLDER KIDS EXPANDED THE ENGLISH THEY HAD LEARNED IN THEIR DUTCH SCHOOLS. HERWIN HAD NOT LEARNED ANY ENGLISH AS HE HAD NOT STARTED HIS SCHOOLING BUT HE VERY QUICKLY CAUGHT UP. WIM AND TRUDY KNEW DUTCH, GERMAN, AND ENGLISH, BUT TRUDY CARRIED A DICTIONARY WITH HER AND READ THE KIDS’ SCHOOL BOOKS TO IMPROVE HER ENGLISH. WIM STARTED A HOUSE-PAINTING BUSINESS [AND WORKED AS A] MANAGER FOR A COMPANY… THE FAMILY MOVED INTO PICTURE BUTTE. HE AND OTHER DUTCH NEWCOMERS STARTED THE DUTCH CANADIAN CLUB AND THE KIDS JOINED THE 4H CLUB.” ACCORDING TO INFORMATION PROVIDED ABOUT THE FAMILY IN THE RECORD P20150005000, THE DONOR’S FATHER – WIM VONKEMAN – WAS BORN IN THE NETHERLANDS IN 1929. AFTER IMMIGRATING TO CANADA WITH HIS FAMILY IN 1981, THEY SETTLED IN THE PICTURE BUTTE AREA. VONKEMAN WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE DUTCH CANADIAN CLUB, AND WAS ACTIVE WITH THE GROUP UNTIL HIS DEATH IN 2004. ON JANUARY 21, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONOR’S MOTHER, TRUDY VONKEMAN, ABOUT A COSTUME SHE DONATED IN 2015 (P20150005000). SHE EXPLAINED: “MY HUSBAND’S FAMILY WENT [TO CANADA] IN 1952 – HE WAS THE ELDEST SON AND HAD A NICE JOB IN HOLLAND, SO HE STAYED BEHIND. THEN WE MET AND MARRIED AND HAD KIDS, AND IN 1979 WE WENT ON HOLIDAYS [IN CANADA] WITH THE KIDS FOR FOUR WEEKS… THEY ENJOYED IT VERY MUCH AND WHEN WE WERE BACK IN HOLLAND I HEARD MY TWO SONS [SAYING] ‘AFTER SCHOOL WE GO TO CANADA’… I SAID TO MY HUSBAND, ‘LET’S GO THEN AS A FAMILY, I DON’T WANT TO SPLIT THE FAMILY LATER’… THERE WAS A BIG FAMILY WAITING [IN CANADA] AND MY PARENTS DIED [IN 1979 AND 1980] SO THERE WAS NO REASON NOT TO DO IT [WHILE] WE WERE STILL YOUNG ENOUGH. I WAS 47 AND MY HUSBAND WAS 51, BUT STILL WE MADE IT. THE WHOLE FAMILY LOOKED AFTER US [AND] THERE WAS A JOB ON THE FARM [OUTSIDE PICTURE BUTTE]... WE DIDN’T NEED TO IMMIGRATE BECAUSE IT WAS EVEN BETTER IN HOLLAND THAN WHEN WE CAME HERE. STILL, ONE OF THE LAST THINGS MY HUSBAND SAID TO ME [WAS] ‘WE HAD LESS MONEY HERE IN CANADA, BUT I’M GLAD WE WENT.’” ACCORDING TO INFORMATION PROVIDED FOR THE ARTIFACT P20150022003, THE DONOR ANINE VONKEMAN WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1967. ABOUT HER IMMIGRATION TO CANADA SHE STATED, “IN 1979 WE CAME HERE AND WE HAD A FANTASTIC TIME AND WE TRAVELLED AROUND IN CAMPERS AND WENT INTO B.C. AND SAW THE MOUNTAINS. IT WAS AWESOME… WE KNEW THAT WE LIKED CANADA AND WE LIKED OUR COUSINS AND IT WAS A NEW ADVENTURE, BUT IT’S PRETTY PERMANENT YOU KNOW.” COMING TO CANADA WAS, ACCORDING TO VONKEMAN, A “HUGE CULTURE SHOCK” AS SHE WAS USED TO BEING ABLE TO BIKE EVERYWHERE IN HOLLAND. SHE EXPLAINS THAT LIVING ON AN ISOLATED FARM WAS CHALLENGING AND “WITH GRAVEL ROADS … [I] COULD NOT REALLY CYCLE ANYWHERE. I TRIED … I HAD GROWN UP ON MY BIKE REALLY, AND LIVED IN A SMALL COMMUNITY … AND THEN HAVING TO TAKE THE SCHOOL BUS AND LEARN THE LANGUAGE [WAS ALSO A CULTURE SHOCK].” VONKEMAN MAINTAINS A STRONG CONNECTION TO HER DUTCH HERITAGE AND EXPLAINS THAT WHEN SHE WAS YOUNGER SHE “REMEMBER[S] … CONSCIOUSLY NOT GETTING MY CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP BECAUSE I WANTED TO GO BACK TO HOLLAND AND LIVE THERE FOR A WHILE AND WORK THERE AND THAT STAYED WITH ME THROUGH THE U OF L.” SHE CONTINUED: “I HAVE NOT GOTTEN MY CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP YET BECAUSE IT’S VERY EXPENSIVE AT THIS POINT … AND THAT WAS THE OTHER THING THAT THE RULES CHANGED, I CAN’T REMEMBER WHEN, BUT NOW THAT I MARRIED A CANADIAN, I CAN HAVE DUAL CITIZENSHIP … THE RULES WERE CHANGED SO THAT IF YOU WERE 18 WITHIN FIVE YEARS OF IMMIGRATING YOU ARE ALLOWED TO MAINTAIN YOUR DUTCH CITIZENSHIP IF YOU APPLY FOR CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP.” VONKEMAN CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1986 TO ATTEND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE (U OF L) AND STARTED WORKING AT THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ART GALLERY (SAAG) IN 1992, TWO WEEKS AFTER GRADUATING FROM THE U OF L. SHE BEGAN AS THE PUBLIC PROGRAMS COORDINATOR AND “WAS DOING MEDIA STUFF, VOLUNTEER COORDINATION, SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATION AND STARTED THE ART AUCTION.” BY 2004, VONKEMAN WAS WORKING AT THE GALT AS MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING EXHIBIT TEXT PANEL INFORMATION. SEE PERMANENT FILES FOR P20150005000 AND P20150022000 FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE VONKEMAN FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20160005000
Acquisition Date
2015-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail