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Date Range From
1880
Date Range To
1890
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20170002000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1880
Date Range To
1890
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
103.2
Width
5
Description
BEADED BELT WITH A GEOMETRIC PATTERN SET AGAINST A GREEN BEADED BACKGROUND. PATTERN ALTERNATES BETWEEN TWO MIRRORED BLACK, YELLOW, BLUE TRIANGLES WITH THEIR BASES AT EITHER WIDTH END OF THE BELT MEETING IN THE CENTER AT THEIR POINTS AND LARGE RED AND BLUE WITH A GREEN CENTERED TRIANGLES WITH THEIR BASE AT ONE WIDTH END AND THEIR POINTS EXTENDED TO THE OPPOSING END. BEADS ARE SEWN INTO A COTTON, CANVAS FABRIC. TWO ANIMAL HIDE TIES (EACH A DIFFERENT LENGTH FROM 6.2 TO 11.8) ON EACH END AT EACH CORNER OF BELT. BACK SIDE IS RAW FABRIC WITH SEAM AT CENTER CONNECTING THE TWO HALVES. ENDS ARE HEMMED WITH TIES SEWN TO THE OUTSIDE. CONDITION: SEVERE DISCOLOURATION TO FABRIC BACKING AND SEVERE WEAR TO ANIMAL HIDE TIES. MANY LOSS THREADS OVER ENTIRE SURFACE OF BACK. BEADS AND BEADING IN EXCELLENT CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
INDIGENOUS
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
UPON THE DONATION OF THIS BELT TO THE GALT MUSEUM, THE DONOR – PATRICIA LYNCH-STAUNTON – EXPLAINED THAT THIS BELT BELONGED TO ALFRED HARDWICH LYNCH-STAUNTON, WHO SERVED IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN FORT MACLEOD. HE RANCHED IN THE LUNDBRECK AREA AND SUPPLIED HORSES TO THE MOUNTIES. THE DONOR SAID THAT SHE HAD “NO KNOWLEDGE OF HOW [ALFRED HARDWICK] CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE BELT. A NOTE ON THE INITIAL DOCUMENTATION ATTRIBUTES THE DATE OF THIS BELT TO CA. 1880-1890. THE ACTING CURATOR OF THE NATIVE NORTH AMERICAN DEPARTMENT OF THE GLENBOW, JOANNE SCHMIDT, AGREED WITH THE DONOR’S BELIEF THAT THE BELT WAS BLACKFOOT. THROUGH THE COMPARISON OF THE BEADED MOCCASINS AND BELTS IN THE GLENBOW’S COLLECTION WITH THIS BELT, SCHMIDT EXPLAINED THAT THE DESIGN ON THE BELT WAS MOSTLY FOUND ON THOSE FROM SIKSIKA, BUT SHE HAS ALSO SEEN THE DESIGN IN PIIKANI AND KAINAI BEADWORK THOUGH THERE ARE NOT MANY EXAMPLES IN THE COLLECTION. ALSO BY USING THE GLENBOW’S COLLECTION AS A POINT OF REFERENCE, THE CURATOR BELIEVES THAT THE BELT IS SIMILAR IN APPEARANCE TO THOSE OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO EARLY 20TH-CENTURY MUSEUM HOLDINGS. SCHMIDT ALSO PROVIDED AN EXPLANATION OF THE DESIGN FROM THE CANADIAN MUSEUM OF HISTORY. IT STATES, “ONE OF THE EARLIEST DESIGNS USED WAS ‘MIISTA-TSIKA-TUKSIIN,’ OR MOUNTAIN DESIGN. OTHER DESIGNS INCLUDED SQUARES, DIAMONDS, BARS, SLOTTED BARS AND STRIPES… TODAY SUCH DESIGNS ARE CALLED ‘MAAH-TOOHM-MOOWA-KA-NA-SKSIN,’ OR FIRST DESIGNS.” IT WAS FURTHER EXPLAINED THAT A COMPLICATING FACTOR IN IDENTIFYING THE BELT’S ORIGINS IS THE FACT THAT THE BLACKFOOT TENDED TO USE WHITE OR BLUE AS THE BACKGROUND COLOUR, NOT GREEN AS IS PRESENTED IN THE LYNCH-STAUNTON DONATION. ON 19 JANUARY 2017, MUSEUM STAFF FURTHER CONSULTED WITH RYAN HEAVY HEAD, FORMER DIRECTOR OF KAINAI STUDIES AT RED CROW COMMUNITY COLLEGE, REGARDING THE BELT’S DESIGN. HE EXPLAINED, “THE GREEN BACKGROUND IS ATYPICAL OF BLACKFOOT BEADWORK, WHICH IS NORMALLY BLUE. THE ‘MOUNTAIN DESIGN’ [DISPLAYED ON THE BELT] IS A COMMON MOTIF IN BLACKFOOT BEADWORK, BUT AGAIN THE COLOURS ARE NOT TYPICAL IN THIS EXAMPLE.” RYAN SPECULATED THAT DURING THE TIME OF DISEASE (WHEN THIS BELT APPEARS TO HAVE ORIGINATED) THERE WAS SOME DISRUPTION IN TRADITIONAL LIFE AND THAT COULD BE REFLECTED IN THE COLOUR CHOICES. ALTERNATIVELY, THE BELT MAY HAVE BEEN MADE BY THE GROS VENTRES FROM NORTHEAST MONTANA. THE DONOR, PATRICIA LYNCH-STAUNTON, IS THE GREAT-GRANDDAUGHTER OF ALFRED HARDWICK LYNCH-STAUNTON. THIS BELT WAS PASSED DOWN THROUGH THE FAMILY, FIRST FROM A. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON, THEN TO THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, F. C. LYNCH-STAUNTON, THEN TO HER FATHER, A. G. LYNCH-STAUNTON, FINALLY TO THE DONOR WHO BROUGHT IT TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THE “A. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON FAMILY HISTORY” WRITTEN FOR THE MUSEUM USING ONLINE SOURCES, THE GLENBOW ARCHIVES, AND THE BOOK TITLED “HISTORY OF THE EARLY DAYS OF PINCHER CREEK AND SOUTHERN MOUNTAINS OF ALBERTA.” “ALFRED HARDWICK LYNCH-STAUNTON (1860-1932) WAS BORN IN HAMILTON, ON AND CAME TO FORT MACLEOD IN 1877 TO JOIN THE NWMP. ACCORDING TO THE PINCHER CREEK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, HE WAS SENT TO ESTABLISH A HORSE BREEDING FARM AT PINCHER CREEK IN 1878. AFTER RETIRING FROM THE NWMP IN 1880, LYNCH-STAUNTON STATED THE FIRST CATTLE RANCH IN THE PINCHER CREEK AREA WITH JAMES BRUNEAU AND ISSAC MAY, AND LATER HOMESTEADED WEST OF TOWN. ALONG WITH HIS RANCH, LYNCH-STAUNTON MARRIED SARAH MARY BLAKE (1864-1933) IN 1890 AND THEY HAVE FIVE CHILDREN: VICTORIA, FRANDA, FRANCIS, JOHN, AND D’ARCY… A.H.’S BROTHER RICHARD LYNCH-STAUNTON (1867-1961) CAME AS FAR WEST AS MEDICINE HAT IN 1883 WITH HIS FATHER, F. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON, WHO WAS IN CHARGE OF THE SURVEY PARTY. RICHARD CAME WEST AGAIN, TO PINCHER CREEK, IN 1885 OR 1886. IN ABOUT 1900, HE ACQUIRED LAND NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ON TODD CREEEK, WHICH BECAME THE ANTELOPE BUTTE RANCH. RICHARD AND A. H. WERE IN PARTNERSHIP FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS IN CATTLE-RANCHING AND, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, WITH THE BUTCHER SHOP. IN 1901, RICHARD MARRIED ISABELLE MARY WILSON (1868-1971), AND THEIR SON FRANK LYNCH-STAUNTON (1905-1990), ALBERTA’S 11TH LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR FROM 1979 TO 1985. LYNCH-STAUNTON DESCENDANTS CONTINUE TO RANCH IN THE LUNDBRECK/PINCHER CREEK AREA.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING CORRESPONDENCE WITH DONOR AND PEOPLE CITED IN ABOVE HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P20170002000
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
OBSIDIAN CORE
Date Range From
4000BP
Date Range To
1700
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
OBSIDIAN
Catalogue Number
P20150027000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
OBSIDIAN CORE
Date Range From
4000BP
Date Range To
1700
Materials
OBSIDIAN
No. Pieces
1
Height
8.5
Length
32.7
Width
24.7
Description
SHINY, BLACK OBSIDIAN ROCK. VARIOUS GROOVES AND FLAKE SCARS ON THE OVERALL SURFACE OF THE ROCK.
Subjects
MASONRY & STONEWORKING T&E
INDIGENOUS
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
ARCHAEOLOGY
History
THIS OBSIDIAN ROCK WAS DONATED ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2015 BY NANCY BIGGERS IN MEMORY OF HER LATE PARENTS, BOYD AND MARY BIGGERS. IT WAS LOCATED ON THE FAMILY FARM BY BOYD BIGGERS. ACCORDING TO A STATEMENT GIVEN BY NANCY AT THE TIME OF DONATION, "... FARMERS NEED TO CLEAR THEIR LAND OF ... ROCKS IN ORDER TO PLANT AND HARVEST THEIR FIELDS. BOYD WAS DOING THIS ONE DAY (IN THE EARLY 1980S) AND CAME ACROSS A BEAUTIFUL SHINY BLACK ROCK. HE WAS IMPRESSED BY [ITS] COLOURING AND THE VARIOUS GROOVES, SO RATHER THAN THROWING IT ON TO THE PILE WITH THE OTHER ROCKS, HE DECIDED TO TAKE IT HOME. ... MARY, BEING A SCHOOL TEACHER, TOLD HIM THAT IT APPEARED TO BE OBSIDIAN, WHICH THE ABORIGINALS USED TO MAKE ARROWHEADS AND TOOLS. MARY RETIRED FROM TEACHING IN 1986 AND THUS BOYD DECIDED TO SELL THE FARM. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE ... [AND] THE OBSIDIAN CAME WITH THEM ... AS IT WAS A REMINDER OF THEIR FARM LIFE. IT WAS USED AS A DECORATIVE PIECE IN BOTH OF THE HOMES IN WHICH THEY LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE." ON SEPTEMBER 8, 2015, ARCHEOLOGIST, NEIL MIRAU, OF ARROW ARCHAEOLOGY LIMITED STATED VIA EMAIL THAT THE ROCK HAD BEEN BROUGHT TO THE AREA BY HUMANS AND THAT IT WAS RELATIVELY EASY TO DETERMINE THE SOURCE OF THE OBSIDIAN FROM ITS GENERAL APPEARANCE. HE WAS ALMOST CERTAIN THAT THIS PIECE OF OBSIDIAN CAME FROM THE OBSIDIAN CLIFFS IN WHAT IS NOW YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WYOMING. HE WROTE, “OBSIDIAN DOES NOT OCCUR NATURALLY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND REALLY THE ONLY WAY FOR IT TO GET HERE, ESPECIALLY THIS TYPE OF ROCK IS TO BE CARRIED BY HUMANS. OBSIDIAN ... WAS PRIZED BY PAST CULTURES AND IT MAKES VERY ATTRACTIVE AND VERY SHARP TOOLS AND PROJECTILE POINTS. THIS PARTICULAR PIECE HAS FLAKE SCARS SHOWING THAT IT WAS WORKED BY HUMANS. IT WAS LIKELY, GIVEN ITS ‘VALUE,’ CARRIED BY ITS OWNER TO FLAKE PIECES OFF EVERY ONCE IN AWHILE TO MAKE A NEW TOOL. OBSIDIAN IS ONE OF THE RARE TYPES OF STONE THAT IS CURATED BY PAST HUMANS, THAT IS, ALTHOUGH HEAVY, THEY WOULD HAVE CARRIED IT WITH THEM TO MAKE TOOLS WITH.” HE ALSO WROTE THAT OBSIDIAN FROM WYOMING THAT HAS BEEN FOUND IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA HAS ARRIVED “EITHER THROUGH TRADE OR BY LONG DISTANCE TRAVEL OF PEOPLE FROM HERE TO THERE AND RETURN," AND THAT THERE IS EVIDENCE OF BOTH METHODS. MIRAU INFERS THAT IT COULD HAVE BEEN DROPPED THERE THREE OR FOUR CENTURIES AGO, OR MANY THOUSANDS OF YEARS AGO. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPY OF THE NANCY BIGGER’S INFORMATION, EMAIL TRANSCRIPTS, MAPS OF THE LOCATION OF THE BIGGERS’ FARM WHERE ARTIFACT WAS FOUND, AND A PHOTOGRAPH OF BOYD AND MARY BIGGERS.
Catalogue Number
P20150027000
Acquisition Date
2015-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20160008003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1976
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Diameter
9.0
Description
BUTTON. FLOURESCENT ORANGE. TYPED IN BLACK INK: "REMEMBER NELSON SMALL LEGS JR." AROUND THE OUTSIDE OF THE BUTTON, WITH "MAY 16, 1976" IN THE CENTRE. REVERSE IS SILVER COLOURED METAL WITH A SAFETY PIN FOR FASTENING. VERY GOOD CONDITION. FRONT OF BUTTON IS WELL SCUFFED.
Subjects
INDIGENOUS
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
POLITICS
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A SERIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN. FROM JOHN'S INTERVIEW: JOHN EXPLAINED HOW IT WAS THAT HE CAME TO MEET NELSON SMALL LEGS JR: “MY FAMILY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN THE SPRING OF ’66, ON ABOUT THE TIME THAT INDIAN AFFAIRS WAS REALLY BIG ON GETTING INDIGENOUS KIDS TO GO TO JUNIOR HIGH AND HIGH SCHOOL IN THE CITIES AND BOARD WITH WHITE FAMILIES. AND NELSON AND HIS BROTHER DEVALON, BOTH WOUND UP IN LETHBRIDGE AS A PART OF THAT PROGRAM … DUE TO LIKE THE EFFORTS BETWEEN THE INDIAN AFFAIRS AND THE CATHOLIC CHURCH THEY WERE PRETTY BIG ON GETTING THAT THING DONE. AND COKE’S MOM WAS A PRETTY STRONG CATHOLIC. I FIT IN ABOUT AS WELL AS THEY DID, BEING A LONG-HAIRED KID FROM DOWN SOUTH.” JOHN WENT ON TO DISCUSS THE BULLYING THAT HAPPENED AT SCHOOL: “THERE WERE A NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO WERE RATHER UNPLEASANT BULLIES WHO LIKED TO PICK ON ANYONE WHO DIDN’T BELONG, WHO DIDN’T FIT IN. AND THEY WERE PRETTY GOOD AT IT … SO IF YOU’RE ALONE, OR IF YOU’RE PERCEIVED AS WEAK OR DIFFERENT, YOU COULD FIND YOURSELF GETTING THE SHIT KICKED OUT OF YOU AT LUNCH HOUR UNLESS YOU TOOK A POWDER AND WENT DOWNTOWN, WHATEVER. ONE OF THESE BULLIES, ONE DAY I WAS COMING BACK TO SCHOOL – I’D LIKE TO GO OVER AND HANG OUT AT A COUPLE OF THEM, AT MCFADDEN’S MOTORCYCLE SHOP OR BERT AND MAC, THEIR OTHER SHOP, BURT AND MAC’S, AND LOOK AT BIKES – AND AS I GOT BACK TO SCHOOL I HEARD SOMEBODY TALK, SOMEBODY SHOUTED THAT ONE OF THESE BULLIES WAS GETTING HIS COMEUPPANCE AS IT WERE. AND IT WAS MY FRIEND, CAME TO BE MY FRIEND, NELSON WHO HAD HEARD THAT THESE GUYS WERE PICKING ON SOME OF THE KIDS FROM THE BLOODS AT HAMILTON [JUNIOR HIGH]. AND HE CAME OVER FROM CATHOLIC CENTRAL, HUNG A GOOD BEATING ON HIM, AND LET HIM KNOW THAT IT WASN’T A VERY LONG WALK AND WERE HE TO HEAR OF THIS HAPPENING AGAIN HE’D CERTAINLY FIND HIS WAY BACK. AND IF YOU KNOW, HE NEEDED FRIENDS, HE HAD A COUPLE INCLUDED HIS BROTHER THAT WE CALL BUTCHER SHOP, BECAUSE IF YOU MESSED WITH DEVY YOU’D LOOK LIKE YOU’D BEEN THROUGH THE BUTCHER SHOP.” HE CONTINUED: “AS YEARS WENT ON WE GOT TO BE FRIENDS. IN THE LATE ‘60S, EARLY ‘70S WE LIKED - THE COUNTER-CULTURE APPEALED TO BOTH OF US AND LETHBRIDGE HAD A SERIOUS COUNTER-CULTURE SCENE. AND EVERYONE KNEW ONE ANOTHER AND GOT ALONG WITH ONE ANOTHER, AND HELPED ONE ANOTHER, AND ON AND OFF THEY GO. KINDA LOST TOUCH WITH ONE ANOTHER OVER THE YEARS, I WAS PLAYING MUSIC. WE PLAYED A SHOW IN BROCKET ON NIGHT, AT THE YOUTH CENTRE THERE, AND COKE AND HIS BROTHER ORGANIZED IT AND WE HAD A REAL NICE TIME GETTING BACK TOGETHER. IT WOULD’VE BEEN, I DON’T KNOW, ’71, ’72. AND I WENT DOWN SOUTH. I SPENT SOME TIME IN EUROPE IN ’73, CAME BACK, DIDN’T LIKE BEING AROUND SO MUCH BOOZE AND DOPE IN LETHBRIDGE, WENT DOWN SOUTH TO SCHOOL. I WAS VERY INTERESTED IN THE THEN BRIDGING NATIVE RIGHTS MOVEMENT, HAVING GROWN UP ON MY GRANDPARENTS’ PLACE IN NORTHERN MINNESOTA ON THE LEECH LAKE CHIPPEWA RES, SPENT A LOT OF TIME ON PINE RIDGE AS A KID, WHERE MY DAD RAN CATTLE NEARBY IN SANDHILLS IN NEBRASKA. AND WHEN I CAME BACK, RAN INTO COKE, TALKED ABOUT WHAT HE WAS DOING AND WORKED TOGETHER FOR A LONG TIME, AND AFTER HIS PASSING, WITH HIS BROTHER. WE KNEW ONE ANOTHER, WE TRUSTED ONE ANOTHER, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEDAY THINGS GET BETTER. SITTING HERE NOW, ALMOST 40 YEARS LATER, GOT ANOTHER TRUDEAU IN OTTAWA, MAKING SOME BIG PROMISES TO INDIGENOUS PEOPLES. AND I REALLY HOPE THAT THEY CAN COME THROUGH BECAUSE THINGS GOT TO CHANGE, AND CHANGE FAST, AND GO A LONG WAYS. THERE’S A LITTLE LEAD, THERE’S LEAD IN THE WATER IN FLINT AND THAT’S A NATIONAL EMERGENCY DOWN THERE. HOW MANY COMMUNITIES, HOW MANY ABORIGINAL COMMUNITIES IN CANADA CAN YOU DRINK THE WATER IN? AND HOW LONG HAVE THEY HAD BOIL WATER ORDERS? GOT A SUPREME COURT DECISION NOW THAT SAYS THAT NATIVE CHILDREN HAVE BEEN DISCRIMINATED AGAINST IN EDUCATION. THE SOCIAL WORKER WHO LAUNCHED THAT FIGHT SPENT 5 YEARS UNDER FEDERAL GOVERNMENT SURVEILLANCE FOR FILING A HUMAN RIGHTS COMPLAINT. THE NEW GOVERNMENT SAID THEY’RE GOING TO DO SOMETHING, LET’S HOPE SO. AND LET’S HOPE THAT THE WOMEN AND GIRLS QUIT DISAPPEARING AND THAT THINGS GET BETTER. AND THERE’S A REAL OPPORTUNITY FOR EVERYBODY AT THIS POINT. AND THE RENEWED PUSH AGAINST INDIAN LANDS AND INDIAN RESOURCES AND WATER SCARES THE HELL OUT OF ME.” JOHN DISCUSSED NELSON’S SUICIDE AND THE REASON HE DID IT: “SHORTLY AFTER MY FRIEND TOOK HIS OWN LIFE, THE PROTESTS, THE TREATMENT OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES IN CANADA ON THE 16TH OF MAY 1976, DREW ATTENTION TO THE LOOMING FIGHT OVER THE MACKENZIE VALLEY PIPLELINE. THE BRIDGE OF ADMISSION LOOKING INTO WHICH, TO TESTIFY IN FRONT OF A FEW DAYS BEFORE. THESE BUTTONS WERE PUNCHED OUT, AND WIDELY DISTRIBUTED IN INDIAN COUNTRY ALL OVER CANADA, ESPECIALLY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. COCO WAS THE, WAS THEN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA DIRECTOR OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN MOVEMENT. HE WAS A HAPPY, FUN-LOVING, SPIRITUAL GUY. NEVER WENT ANYWHERE PEOPLE WEREN’T GLAD PEOPLE TO SEE HIM. THE PEOPLE DID LOOK UP TO HIM, YOUNG PEOPLE, OLD PEOPLE. AND HIS DEATH WAS A TREMENDOUS LOSS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA, TO HIS FAMILY. HIS DAUGHTERS GREW UP WITHOUT A DAD, HIS GRANDFATHER HAD TO BURY A GRANDSON, AND THE NATIVE PEOPLE LOST A POWERFUL SPOKESMAN, A VISIONARY LEADER, SOMEBODY WHO COULD BRING PEOPLE TOGETHER. COKE GREW UP HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, HE WENT TO JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. BOARDED WITH A WHITE FAMILY, WENT TO JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL HERE. PLAYED FOOTBALL FOR CATHOLIC CENTRAL. AND I KNOW HE’S FONDLY REMEMBERED BY AN AWFUL LOT OF MY CONTEMPORARIES. SOME PEOPLE I DIDN’T EVEN KNOW THAT KNEW COCO, BECAUSE HE WAS MY FRIEND WHEN I RUN INTO THEM IN TOWN YEARS AND YEARS LATER THEY TELL ME STORIES. ONE WAS A WOMAN WHO WAS A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE FORCE, WHEN I WAS MAKING AN ACCIDENT REPORT SHE SAID, “YOU KNOW, JOHN, THAT’S THE FIRST GUY I EVER FRENCH KISSED.” AND I HOPE – I’D LIKE TO SEE THIS [BUTTON] STAY HERE BECAUSE I WOULD LIKE TO SEE HIM REMEMBERED. AND I WOULD HOPE THAT AS TIME GOES ON, LETHBRIDGE WILL PAY MORE ATTENTION TO THE ORIGINAL INHABITANTS OF THIS AREA, AND THE POWERFUL ROLE THAT THE KAINAI, THE PEOPLE OF PIKANI HAVE PLAYED HERE GOING BACK TO TIME AND MEMORIAL AND ON AN ONGOING BASIS. THAT THINGS GET BETTER FOR THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN THIS AREA AND THAT LIVE IN THIS CITY. AND THAT THE OPPORTUNITY FOR EVERYONE TO LEARN FROM ANOTHER, LIVE TOGETHER, HELP ONE ANOTHER, LOVE ONE ANOTHER. I KNOW THAT’S SOMETHING THAT MY BROTHER BELIEVED IN, BELIEVED IN VERY STRONGLY. AND SOMETHING REALLY, THE LAST TIME I SPOKE WITH HIM, THE WEEK BEFORE HE DIED, WE TALKED ABOUT, TALKED ABOUT THE FUTURE FOR HIS CHILDREN THAT WAS VERY MUCH IN KEEPING WITH MARTIN LUTHER KING’S “I HAVE A DREAM” SPEECH. HIS DREAM FOR HIS DAUGHTERS TO GROW UP WHERE THEY’D BE JUDGED ON THE QUALITY OF THEIR CHARACTER, THEIR ABILITIES, AND THE WORK THEY DID, INSTEAD OF MAYBE THE COLOUR OF THEIR SKIN AND THEIR BACKGROUND.” FROM NEWSPAPER ARTICLES: NELSON SMALL LEG JR’S OBITUARY, PUBLISHED MAY 20, 1976, GIVES THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: NELSON, PASSED AWAY AT THE AGE OF 23, THE SON OF NELSON AND FLORENCE. HE “WAS THE FIRST INDIAN AIR CADET TO BE IN THE NO. 11 LETHBRIDGE SQUADRON AIR CADETS OF CANADA, SINCE IT WAS ORGANIZED IN 1941. AT THE TIME HE WAS 14 YEARS OLD AND LIVING IN LETHBRIDGE, WHILE ATTENDING ST. PATRICK’S SCHOOL, GRADE 7. NELSON ATTENDED ONE YEAR OF SCHOOL AT ST. PATRICK’S SCHOOL, LETHBRIDGE. HE CONTINUED AT CATHOLIC CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL FOR FIVE YEARS, WHERE HE GRADUATED IN 1972. HE THEN ENROLLED AT THE LETHBRIDGE COMMUNITY COLLEGE WHERE HE STUDIED FOR TWO YEARS. HE PLAYED BOMMER FOOTBALL WHILE IN GRADE EIGHT AND NINE. THROUGHOUT HIS HIGH SCHOOL YEARS HE PLAYED FOOTBALL FOR THE CATHOLIC CENTRAL COUGARS. IN THE FALL OF 1974 HE BECAME INVOLVED WITH THE AMERICAN INDIAN MOVEMENT (AIM).” A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON MAY 21, 1976 DESCRIBES NELSON FURTHER: “’OPTIMISTIC’ IS A WORD THAT PARADOXICALLY KEEPS COMING UP WHEN THOSE WHO KNEW NELSON SMALL LEGS JR. DESCRIBE HIM. ‘HE HAD FAITH – THAT’S WHY HIS DEATH IS SO DEVASTATING,’ SAID JOAN RAYN, A UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY ANTHROPOLOGY PROFESSOR WHO WORKED WITH MR. SMALL LEGS IN THE CALGARY URBAN TREATY INDIAN ALLIANCE. … DR. RYAN DESCRIBED MR. SMALL LEGS AS A STRONG MAN WITH A DEEP SENSE OF HIS OWN WORTH AND A DEEP SENSE OF COMMITMENT TO CANADIAN SOCIETY.” IT CONTINUED: “SUNDAY NELSON SMALL LEGS SHOT HIMSELF, SAYING IN A SUICIDE NOTE THAT HE GAVE HIS LIFE TO PROTEST THE CONDITIONS IN WHICH HIS PEOPLE LIVE.” THE ARTICLE WENT ON FURTHER TO SAY: “REV. JOHN WILSON, VICE-PRINCIPAL OF CATHOLIC CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL, REMEMBERS MR. SMALL LEGS AS A FAIRLY BRIGHT STUDENT AND A MAINSTAY ON THE DEFENSIVE LINE OF THE CATHOLIC CENTRAL COUGARS FOOTBALL TEAM THAT WON THE LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP IN 1972. MR. SMALL LEGS, HE SAYS, ENCOUNTERED IDENTITY PROBLEMS THAT WERE COMMON AMONG INDIAN STUDENTS WHO CAME FROM THE RESERVES TO BOARD IN THE CITY AND ATTEND A WHITE SCHOOL. HE GOT ALONG WELL WITH HIS TEACHERS AND OTHER STUDENTS, BUT AT ONE POINT ANOTHER INDIAN STUDENT TOLD HIM HE WAS BECOMING A WHITE MAN, FATHER WILSON SAID.” IT CONCLUDED: “DR. RYAN AGAIN: ‘HE (MR. SMALL LEGS) ADVOCATED PEACEFUL CONFRONTATION BASED ON REAL ISSUES AND PARTICIPATED IN SUCH CONFRONTATION IN ORDER TO BRING SOME ATTENTION TO THE PLIGHT OF HIS PEOPLE. HE HAD HOPED THAT THE WORLD WOULD BE A BETTER PLACE FOR HIS CHILDREN AS A RESULT OF HIS ACTIVITY TO MAKE IT SO.’” IN AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON MAY 22, 1976, DETAILS ABOUT NELSON’S DEATH ARE RELAYED: “MR. SMALL LEGS WAS FOUND DEAD SUNDAY AT HIS HOME SIX MILES NORTH OF HERE. HE HAD APPARENTLY DIED OF A SELF-INFLICTED RIFLE SHOT WOUND IN THE CHEST. NOTES FOUND BESIDE THE BODY, WHICH WAS DRESSED IN FULL INDIAN REGALIA AND DRAPED IN A PEIGAN BAND FLAG, SAID THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA DIRECTOR FOR AIM GAVE HIS LIFE TO PROTEST CONDITIONS FOR INDIANS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ‘MY SUICIDE SHOULD OPEN UP THE EYES OF NON-INDIANS INTO HOW MUCH WE HAVE SUFFERED,’ ONE NOTE SAID. ‘FOR 100 YEARS, INDIANS HAVE SUFFERED. MUST THEY SUFFER FOR ANOTHER 100 YEARS? SOMEONE HAS TO TAKE THE FIRST STEP. I GIVE MY LIFE UP IN PROTEST TO THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT FOR ITS TREATMENT OF INDIAN PEOPLE FOR THE PAST 100 YEARS.’” THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, QUOTING ROY LITTLE CHIEF, AIM DIRECTOR FOR CENTRAL ALBERTA: “’TODAY, COCO (A NICKNAME) IS A MARTYR AND A FATHER TO THE WHOLE NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN NATION.’” IT ALSO QUOTED ED BURNSTICK, CANADIAN NATIONAL DIRECTOR FOR AIM: “TO BE FREE INDIANS MUST HAVE A SAY IN THE DIRECTION THEIR LIVES TAKE AND THE DESTINY WHICH WILL AWAIT THEIR CHILDREN, MR. BURNSTICK SAID.” ACCORDING TO THE ARTICLE, NELSON “WAS BURIED IN TRADITIONAL BUCKSKIN DRESS … FRIENDS AND TEACHERS FOUND HIM OUTGOING, RIGHT TO THE EVE OF HIS DEATH.” FINALLY AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON JUNE 24, 1976 MAKES MENTION OF THE BUTTONS: JUNE 24, 1976: “WHILE RED BUTTONS COMMEMORATING THE SUICIDE OF NELSON SMALL LEGS JR, MAY 16 MADE AN APPEARANCE IN AT LEAST ONE CONVENTION DISTRIBUTION POINT, A SENIOR ASSOCIATION OFFICIAL SAID THE PROTEST SUICIDE BY THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA AIM DIRECTION IS ‘TOO PERSONAL’ A MATTER FOR THE ASSOCIATION TO INVOLVE ITSELF. MR. SMALL LEGS, A PEIGAN, TOOK HIS LIFE TO PROTEST CONDITIONS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA INDIANS, PRESS FOR A PROBE OF THE FEDERAL INDIAN AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT AND DEMAND THE RESIGNATION OF DEPARTMENT MINISTER JUDD BUCHANAN.”
Catalogue Number
P20160008003
Acquisition Date
2016-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail