Skip header and navigation

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Length
17.5
Diameter
17.5
Description
BLACK AND SILVER GLAZED, CERAMIC VASE WITH RED AND GOLD DESIGNS PAINTED ON OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE VASE. ONE DESIGN SHOWCASES A CRANE FLYING TOWARDS A TREE BRANCH, WHILE THE OTHER SHOWCASES TWO CRANES PERCHED ON A LARGE TREE BRANCH BENEATH A RED DISC/MOON. “MADE IN JAPAN” IS STAMPED INTO BASE OF VASE. CONDITION: THE LIP OF THE VASE HAS A 4.3 CM CHIP AND IS MISSING 7.6 CM ALONG TOP EDGE. LOOSE OF PAINT AND OVERALL FINISH OF DESIGN. SLIGHT CHIPPING AROUND BASE.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
FURNISHINGS
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THAT THIS VASE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” THIS VASE WAS VISIBLE THROUGHOUT MRS. NISHIYAMA’S CHILDHOOD. SHE EXPLAINED, “[THE VASE] WAS MORE AN EVERYDAY THING.” IT WAS PLACED BY THE DOOR OF THE FARM HOUSE. AND “[THE] ONLY THING THAT WAS IN THERE WAS [MY MOTHER’S] UMBRELLA.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S HAIR ORNAMENTS AND COMB ALSO DONATED WITH THE VASE (P20160042002-004). THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
100
Length
41
Width
49
Description
WOODEN CHAIR COATED IN A LIGHT WOOD-COLOURED PAINT. LION’S FEET LEGS IN THE FRONT, DETAILS ON FRONT OF THE LEGS NEAR THE GROUND AND NEAR THE SEAT; DECORATED KNOBS ON TOP OF THE SIDES OF CHAIR. THE BACK SUPPORT IS MADE UP OF ONE WIDE PANEL AND ONE THIN PANEL HORIZONTALLY PARALLEL WITH ORNATE DETAIL WITH OVAL IN THE CENTER OF THE BACKREST. BACKREST IS 4 CM IN WIDTH. WOODEN STRIPES BETWEEN BACK LEGS AND ON EITHER SIDE BETWEEN LEGS. CONDITION: VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION: SLIGHT WEAR ALONG CORNERS OF CHAIR; DARKER WOOD COLOUR SHOWS THROUGH THESE WORN SPOTS ESPECIALLY ON THE TOP OF THE CHAIR; GLUED ON CORNER OF BACK OF CHAIR DESIGN NEAR THE TOP RIGHT CORNER.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
PROFESSIONS
History
ON MAY 16TH, 2017 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR GERALD TODD ABOUT A CHAIR HE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. TODD BEGAN, “I GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM MY DAD WILLIAM (BILL) TODD. WHEN MY DAD PASSED AWAY, MY MOTHER PASSED IT ON TO ME. I USED IT AT MY DESK AT HOME, WHERE I WOULD SIT ON IT NOW AND THEN TO DO MY PAPERWORK.” HE CONTINUED, “MY DAD GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM [WHEN] HE WAS THE PUBLIC SUPERINTENDENT FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT OF ALBERTA. [HE WAS IN THIS POSITION WHEN] THEY WERE RENOVATING THE COURTHOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE – JUST EAST OF CITY HALL – AND WHEN THEY WERE DEMOLISHING THINGS IN THERE, THEY FOUND [THIS CHAIR]. THEY TOLD MY DAD TO THROW IT AWAY, BUT INSTEAD HE ASKED IF HE COULD HAVE IT. THEY TOLD HIM ‘YEAH TAKE IT,’ AND SO HE DID. HE PROBABLY RECEIVED THE CHAIR IN THE MID-1960S – I THINK THAT’S WHEN THEY STARTED TO REVAMP THE COURTHOUSE. I KNOW HE DIED IN ’76, SO I’M JUST GUESSING. IT COULD HAVE BEEN SOONER OR A LITTLE LATER [WHEN HE RECEIVED IT]. BUT AT THAT TIME I WASN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE CHAIR MYSELF, [SO I NEVER LEARNED WHAT JUDGES SAT IN IT]… ALL HE TOLD ME [ABOUT IT] WAS THAT IT WAS A JUDGE’S CHAIR IN THE COURTHOUSE. AS FAR AS ANYTHING ELSE GOES, I DON’T KNOW. I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, IT’S JUST A CHAIR’ [I DID NOT BECOME INTERESTED IN IT UNTIL] MY MOTHER SAID, ‘DO YOU WANT THE CHAIR?’ MAYBE SIX MONTHS OR SO [AFTER MY DAD’S PASSING]. I SAID, ‘SURE. DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT IT?’ AND SHE SAID, ‘NO, YOUR DAD NEVER TOLD ME. HE JUST BROUGHT IT HOME, PUT IT BY HIS DESK AND THAT WAS IT.’ IT WAS SORT OF A REMEMBRANCE OF MY DAD WORKING.” “[MY DAD] WORKED FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT [WITH THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA] STARTING IN THE ‘50S,” TODD EXPLAINED, “HE WORKED FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS AND THEN BECAME THE SUPERINTENDENT FOR PUBLIC WORKS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ANYWHERE THERE WAS A GOVERNMENT BUILDING – FROM THE [CROWSNEST] PASS, TO MEDICINE HAT, TO LETHBRIDGE, AND ALL OVER SOUTHERN ALBERTA – HE WAS IN CHARGE OF THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS.” TODD EXPLAINED THIS CHAIR IS THE ONLY THING FROM A BUILDING HIS FATHER WORKED IN THAT HE ENDED UP BRINGING HOME: “IT WAS JUST ONE ITEM OUT OF PROBABLY MANY THINGS BEING THROWN AWAY. HE JUST HAD ROOM FOR THE CHAIR, SO THAT’S ALL HE TOOK. THEY THREW AWAY THE DESK AND THE JUDGE’S CABINETS, WHICH HE WAS QUITE UPSET [ABOUT], BUT [HE COULD NOT KEEP IT ALL].” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHY, OUT OF EVERYTHING, HIS FATHER WOULD HAVE SELECTED THIS CHAIR TO BRING TO HOME, TODD SPECULATED, “I THINK IT WAS BECAUSE IT WAS A UNIQUE CHAIR TO HIM AND IT WAS SAT ON BY A JUDGE IN THE COURTHOUSE. [MY FATHER] LIKED THE CHAIR. HE SAT IN IT QUITE A BIT AND IT BRINGS LITTLE MEMORIES OF HIM TO ME. I’D WATCH HIM GO DOWN AND SIT IN THE CHAIR IN THE BASEMENT, WHICH WAS FINISHED. [IT WAS WHERE HE] HAD HIS DESK [AND WHERE HE WOULD] TINKER AROUND. [THE CHAIR] WAS SOMETHING [MY DAD HAD] FOR REMEMBERING HIS WORK. IT WOULD BRING BACK MEMORIES TO MY DAD OF WHAT HE HAD DONE.” “MY DAD WAS IN POLITICS BEFORE. HE DID QUITE A BIT OF WORK WITH THE ALBERTA GOVERNMENT – THE SOCIAL CREDIT GOVERNMENT IT WAS – AND HE HAD JOHN LANDERYOU HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, HARTLEY FROM FORT MACLEOD, AND OTHER FELLAS THAT I DON’T REMEMBER THAT HE ASSOCIATED WITH. HE TOOK IN A LOT OF FUNCTIONS WITH THE GOVERNMENT,” TODD STATED, REMEMBERING HIS FATHER, “MY DAD WAS A GREAT GUY. HE WAS ALWAYS GOOD TO ME. HE GOT ALONG WITH PEOPLE VERY WELL. HE WAS VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE. HE COULD SIT DOWN AND TALK TO ANYBODY.” “[DONATING MY FATHER’S CHAIR TO THE MUSEUM] MAKES ME FEEL GREAT, BECAUSE IT [WILL BE SOMEWHERE] WHERE PEOPLE ARE GOING TO GET TO LOOK AT IT [AND CONNECT WITH ITS HISTORY].” THE OBITUARY OF WILLIAM TODD WAS PUBLISHED IN THE APRIL 29, 1975 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READ, “BORN IN BUTTE, MONTANA… TODD CAME TO CANADA WITH HIS PARENTS AT THE AGE OF TWO. HIS PARENTS HOMESTEADED IN THE NEWLANDS DISTRICT SIXTEEN MILES NORTH OF LETHBRIDGE WHERE HE LIVED AND WORKED UNTIL 1920 WHEN HE LEFT THE FARM AND WORKED IN A COAL MINE IN COMMERCE, AND LATER IN COALHURST, WHERE HE MET AND MARRIED MARY (BABE) VICKERS IN 1931. AFTER A SHORT TIME THEY MOVED BACK TO HIS PARENTS’ FARM, WHERE HE FARMED AS WELL AS [WORKED] IN THE COAL MINE AT SHAUGHNESSY.” IT CONTINUES, “IN 1945, HE MOVED TO NOBLEFORD WHERE HE OPERATED THE TODD BROTHERS SEED CLEANING PLANT. IN 1956, HE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE… HE WAS A VERY ARDENT WORKER FOR BETTER GOVERNMENT FOR ALBERTA AND SPENT A GREAT DEAL OF TIME TO THAT END.” WILLIAM AND MARY TODD HAD ONE SON, DONOR GERALD TODD. WILLIAM TODD PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON APRIL 26TH, 1975 AT THE AGE OF 72 YEARS. A BRIEF HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE COURTHOUSES TITLED, “BETTER GET TO KNOW A BUILDING -- LETHBRIDGE’S 1952 COURTHOUSE,” WAS PUBLISHED ON JANUARY 30, 2016 BY THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY FOR THEIR FACEBOOK PAGE. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT POST: “LETHBRIDGE’S ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ LOCATED AT 4 AVENUE AND 11 STREET SOUTH IS ACTUALLY THE 3RD COURTHOUSE LETHBRIDGE HAS HAD. IT WAS OPENED OFFICIALLY IN SEPTEMBER 1952 AND SERVED AS A COURTHOUSE UNTIL 1983 WHEN IT WAS SUPERSEDED BY THE PRESENT COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH. WHILE THE 1952 COURTHOUSE WAS BUILT AS A PROVINCIAL COURTHOUSE, THE ARCHITECTS WERE FROM LETHBRIDGE AND THE DESIGN AND PLACEMENT WAS DONE TO TIE IN WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S URBAN RENEWAL PLANS AND THE CITY’S PLANS FOR CIVIC CENTRE... THE NEW 1952 COURTHOUSE BECAME THE ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ IN JUNE 1983 WHEN THE COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH WAS BUILT TO REPLACE IT." PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, AND LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY TEXT.
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
LIBRARY CARD CATALOGUE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAPER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140025001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LIBRARY CARD CATALOGUE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2010
Materials
WOOD, PAPER, METAL
No. Pieces
31
Height
100.75
Length
103.25
Width
46
Description
.1 – WOOD CABINET CONTAINING 30 DRAWERS IN SIX ROWS (.2 - .31). CABINET’S FOUR LEGS AND EDGES ARE SQUARED, WITH THREE METAL ANGLED BRACKETS AND TWO WOODEN CORNER BRACES ATTACHING THE CABINET BODY TO THE LEGS. WOOD IS STAINED BLONDE. STAMPED TEXT IN BLUE INK ON UNDERSIDE OF CABINET READS "MADE IN CANADA". GENERAL WEAR AND SCUFFS OVERALL, ESPECIALLY ALONG TOP FRONT EDGE AND BOTTOM FRONT SKIRTING PANEL. DRIPS OF WHITE PAINT ON EDGES OF BOTH FRONT LEGS AND CABINET BACK EDGES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. 100.75 X 46 X 103.25 ALL DRAWERS (.2 - .31) ARE WOOD WITH BRASS LABELPLATES AND MEASURE 9.75 X 14.5 X 41. .2 – FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .3 – FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .4 – EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD. .5 – HALF FULL OF LOOSE CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .6 - EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD. .7 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .8 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. DRAWER ROD BRACKET IS MISSING ONE SCREW AND HANGS LOOSE. .9 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .10 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .11 - EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL; DRAWER ROD IN PLACE. .12 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .13 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .14 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .15 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .16 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .17 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1990”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .18 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .19 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 A-J”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .20 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 J-S”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .21 – HALF FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 S-Z”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .22 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1990 A-K DONE”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .23 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. NO LABEL. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .24 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. AUTHORITY”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .25 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. AUTHORITY”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .26 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .27 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .28 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .29 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “CDN… PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .30 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .31 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK.
Subjects
FURNITURE
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
FURNISHINGS
History
THIS CARD CATALOGUE WAS PRODUCED AND USED BY STAFF AT THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY. ON MAY 1, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LINDA MCELRAVY, WHO WORKED AT THE LIBRARY’S MAIN BRANCH STARTING IN 1978, RETIRING FROM HER POSITION AS ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SERVICES IN 2008. MCELRAVY EXPLAINED THE CATALOGUING PROCESS AND SUGGESTED THAT IT MAY HAVE BEEN HOUSED IN THE LIBRARY’S SENATOR BUCHANAN ROOM (A REFERENCE RESOURCE OF LOCAL HISTORIES AND GENEALOGIES) AT ONE TIME. MCELRAVY SAID: “WE USED [CARD CATALOGUES] PRIOR TO AUTOMATING OUR CATALOGUE WHICH WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE EARLY ‘80S… THERE ARE AT LEAST THREE INDEXES [INSIDE THIS SPECIFIC CATALOGUE]… WE USED TO CREATE CARD INDEXES FOR COLLECTIONS AND THINGS THAT YOU COULDN’T FIND… THROUGH NORMAL CATALOGUING PROCESSES. SO, THE FIRST ONE IS… THE SONG INDEX AND THAT WAS MADE UP OF ANALYTICS OF SHEET MUSIC MAGAZINE AND COLLECTIONS AND SONGS – ALL MUSIC AS OPPOSED TO JUST THE LYRICS. SO WE WOULD TAKE COLLECTIONS OF SONGS IN OUR LIBRARY COLLECTION, WE DIDN’T USE ANYTHING THAT WAS NOT AVAILABLE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY – SO IT WASN’T A GENERAL THING IT WAS SPECIFIC, A SPECIFIC TOOL TO OUR COLLECTION… IF SOMEONE WANTED A PARTICULAR PIECE OF MUSIC… WE WOULD BE ABLE TO FIND THAT HERE RATHER THAN PEOPLE STANDING AT THE SHELF, LEAFING THROUGH ALL OF THAT… [AT] THE OTHER END OF THE BANK OF CARDS IS THE PLAY INDEX AND THAT’S THE SAME IDEA – THERE WOULD BE ‘AUTHOR’, ‘PLAYWRIGHT’ AND ‘TITLE’ CARDS PUT IN FOR EACH OF THE PLAYS IN COLLECTIONS THAT WE HAD AT LPL. AND THE MIDDLE ONE WAS THE INDEX TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD – I THINK SOME OF IT GOES BACK TO ’99 AND BEFORE AND FOR THAT ONE THE STAFF WOULD CUT OUT ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND THEN THEY WOULD PUT SUBJECT HEADINGS ON THEM AND MAKE A CORRESPONDING CARD FOR THE CATALOGUE SO THAT THAT WOULD GIVE PEOPLE ACCESS TO THAT [FILE]...” MCELRAVY CONTINUED: “I THINK [THE AUTOMATION OF THE LIBRARY CATALOGUE] WAS IN THE MID ‘80S… [AFTER THAT PROCESS] I’M NOT SURE HOW OFTEN THEY USED [THE CARD CATALOGUES] ANYMORE… PERHAPS IT WAS JUST A QUESTION OF HANGING ON TO IT FOR THE SAKE OF HANGING ON TO IT.. I DON’T SUPPOSE REALLY FOR TOO LONG AFTER THAT IT WOULD [HAVE BEEN] USEFUL… [THE CARD CATALOGUE] REPRESENTS A LOT OF WORK… IT WAS EXPENSIVE TIME-WISE, IT WAS EXPENSIVE MATERIALS-WISE AND IT WAS EXPENSIVE SPACE-WISE… EVEN WITH THE DIGITIZED, AUTOMATED CATALOGUE, THOSE GENERIC ENTRIES DIDN’T NECESSARILY HAVE ANALYTICS… SO THAT’S WHY WE CONTINUED WITH THIS FOR A WHILE AND THEN EVENTUALLY IT JUST SEEMED TO BE NOT WORTH THE EFFORT TO DO IT… IT JUST SEEMED SAD TO ME THAT IT WAS ALMOST LIKE IT WASN’T RECOGNIZED BECAUSE IT WAS TOO OLD – IT HAD HAD ITS DAY BUT THERE’S NO PURPOSE FOR IT ANYMORE… I THINK THAT THIS CERTAINLY SERVED ITS PURPOSE FOR ITS TIME AND IT’S PART OF THE CONTEXT OF THE PERIOD… I OFTEN THINK TODAY WITH INTERNET AND WITH ALL THE ONLINE ACCESS THAT PEOPLE HAVE TO INFORMATION… WHEN YOU HAVE A QUESTION WHAT DO PEOPLE DO NOW? THEY PULL OUT THEIR PHONE, AND THEY GOOGLE, AND THEY GET THE ANSWER. WHEREAS, BEFORE ANY OF THIS HAPPENED THAT WAS WHAT THE LIBRARY DID, THAT WAS THE ROLE OF THE REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. THE LIBRARY IS THERE NOT JUST TO PROVIDE RECREATIONAL READING BUT TO PROVIDE INFORMATION. I’M NOT SAYING THEY’RE NOT DOING THAT ANYMORE, THEY ARE, IN A VERY MUCH MORE SOPHISTICATED WAY BUT THIS WAS ONE OF THE WAYS THAT WE HANDLED THE NEED TO PROVIDE INFORMATION TO PEOPLE.” THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM THE LIBRARY’S WEBSITE. IN 1911 A CITY BYLAW WAS PASSED FOR THE PROVISION OF A LOCAL LIBRARY TO BE ESTABLISHED, AND EIGHT YEARS LATER LETHBRIDGE’S FIRST LIBRARY SERVICE WAS OPERATED OUT OF TWO ROOMS IN THE YMCA BUILDING. IN 1922, THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY BUILDING IN GALT GARDENS OPENED, WITH AN EXTENSION ADDED IN 1951. IN 1956 A NORTH BRANCH WAS OPENED, AND A SOUTH BRANCH FOLLOWED IN 1974. THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY MAIN BRANCH ON STAFFORD DRIVE SOUTH WAS COMPLETED IN 1974, WITH AN EXTENSION AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CHINOOK ARCH REGIONAL LIBRARY SYSTEM IN 1992. IN 1989 THE LIBRARY ADOPTED THE DYNIX AUTOMATED CATALOGUE SYSTEM, AND IN 1997 INTRODUCED PUBLIC INTERNET ACCESS COMPUTERS. IN 2010, THE CROSSINGS BRANCH OPENED IN WEST LETHBRIDGE. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ONLINE SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P20140025001
Acquisition Date
2014-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BALE OR HAY HOOK
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, WOOD, IRON
Catalogue Number
P20150010009
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BALE OR HAY HOOK
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
METAL, WOOD, IRON
No. Pieces
1
Height
11.0
Length
24.5
Width
12..7
Description
HAY CROOK OR BALE HOOK. METAL AND WOODEN HANDLE, WITH CAST IRON HOOK. MAIN PORTION OF THE HANDLE IS WOODEN, WITH A MEDIUM AND LIGHT GREY PAINTED FINISH. WHERE THE HANDLE ATTACHES TO THE HOOK IS SILVER COLOURED METAL, WITH A MEDIUM LIGHT BLUE PAINTED FINISH. THE HOOK ITSELF IS CAST IRON, WITH A RED PAINTED FINISH. OVERALL IN FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. STRUCTURALLY THE HOOK IS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION, BUT THE PAINTED SURFACES ARE ALL VERY WORN. THE WOODEN HANDLE APPEARS TO HAVE BEEN FINISHED IN A LIGHT GREY FIRST, WITH A LATER ADDITION OF MEDIUM GREY PAINT. BOTH OF THE GREY FINISHS ARE VERY SCUFFED AND SCRATCHED AND THERE IS A LOT OF EXPOSED WOOD. THE MEDIUM BLUE FINISH OF THE METAL PORTION OF THE HANDLE HAS FLAKED OFF IN SEVERAL AREAS. SEVERAL MORE AREAS OF THE FINISH ARE LOOSE. THE RED FINISH ON THE CAST IRON IS VERY WORN, REVEILING BOTH UNFINISHED METAL AND A LIGHT BLUE PAINT.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS HAY CROOK OR BALE HOOK WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). ALL FOUR MEN AGREE THAT THE HOOK WAS USED TO HELP FIGHT HAYSTACK FIRES ON LOCAL FARMS. BROWN EXPLAINS THE DIFFICULTY OF DEALING WITH A HAYSTACK FIRE AND WHY THE HOOK WAS SO USEFUL: “WITH A HAYSTACK FIRE, ONCE IT STARTS ON FIRE, THE WHOLE STACK IS WRECKED, EVEN THOUGH IT DOESN’T BURN, BECAUSE THE SMOKE GOES THROUGH IT, THE HAY IS CONTAMINATED AND THE ANIMALS AREN’T GOING TO EAT IT, SO YOU PRETTY WELL HAVE TO KNOCK IT DOWN ANYWAY. AS SOON AS YOU PUT WATER ON IT, IT WILL SMOLDER, AND SMOLDER, AND SMOLDER. PROBABLY ONE OF THE HARDEST FIRES TO PUT OUT IS A HAYSTACK FIRE, BECAUSE YOU CAN’T GET THE WATER TO IT. … YOU PUT YOUR WATER, YOU SOAK ON TOP OF THE BALES AND IT JUST WON’T SOAK IN, SO YOU HAVE TO TAKE EVERY BALE APART, BREAK EVERY PIECE APART, EVERY LITTLE BALE, BREAK IT DOWN, HOSE IT DOWN, NEXT BALE, BREAK IT APART, HOSE IT DOWN, AND CONTINUE.” LAZENBY RECALLED SEEING THE HAY CROOK ON THE TRUCK WHEN HE FIRST STARTED AND EXPLAINED: “I’M NOT A FARM KID AND I DIDN’T KNOW WHAT IT WAS.” HE ASKED WHAT IT WAS, RECEIVING THE REPLY: “’WELL, IT’S A BALE HOOK’ AND I SAID, ‘SO I’M NOT TRYING TO BE A SMART ALECK HERE, BUT WHY DO WE HAVE BALE HOOKS ON THE ENGINE?’ THEY SAID, ‘WELL, IN CASE WE GO TO A HAY BALE FIRE.’ YOU KNOW, ASK A SIMPLE QUESTION, YOU GET A SIMPLE ANSWER, RIGHT? … I NEVER SAW ONE USED AND … THIS IS ONE OF THOSE PIECES OF EQUIPMENT THAT GOT PHASED OUT SHORTLY AFTER THE BEGINNING OF MY CAREER. … THIS WAS ONE OF THOSE PIECES THAT WE FOUND THAT WE JUST DIDN’T HAVE A USE FOR. YOU CAN MOVE HAY BALES WITH OTHER MEANS THAN TO HAVE A SET OF BALE HOOKS ON THE TRUCKS, SO THEY WENT AWAY.” PETIT RECALLED USING THE HOOK AND ADDED: “IT WAS USUALLY ON THE PUMP WHEN THEY RESPONDED TO GRASS FIRES … SOMETIMES WE’D TAKE THAT, NOT USUALLY TO FIGHT THE FIRE, BUT WHEN YOU HAD TO KNOCK [THE BALES] DOWN, YOU HAD TO DRAG THE BALES OUT OF THE WAY. OTHERWISE THEY WOULD START THE FIRE ALL OVER AGAIN. IT WASN’T USED THAT MUCH BUT WE DID GO TO QUITE A FEW FIRES, YOU KNOW, STACKS OF BALES.” DZUREN AGREED: “WELL, IT’S THE BAILING HOOK. AND THAT’S JUST TO MOVE ANY, WHETHER IT’S A BALE OF STRAW OR ANY OTHER ITEM THAT HAD TO BE MOVED AWAY FROM THE FIRE, OR JUST, YOU KNOW, SEGREGATED FROM WHAT WAS ALREADY BURNING.” HE RECALLED THAT IT WAS IN USE WHEN HE STARTED IN 1959 AND ADDED “IT WOULD HAVE BEEN ON ONE OF THE VEHICLES … PARTICULARLY … COUNTY VEHICLES THAT WOULD RESPOND OUT TO THE COUNTY, TO THE FARM FIRE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010009
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DIAL-LESS, “NORTHERN ELECTRIC”
Date Range From
1936
Date Range To
1995
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BAKELITE, PLASTIC, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20140046001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DIAL-LESS, “NORTHERN ELECTRIC”
Date Range From
1936
Date Range To
1995
Materials
BAKELITE, PLASTIC, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
14.5
Length
22
Width
15.5
Description
BLACK BAKELITE TELEPHONE WITH HANDSET RECEIVER AND SPIRALED RUBBER CORD. BASE IS RECTANGULAR WITH HANDSET CRADLE AT TOP. A ROUND PLATE OF PAINTED BLACK METAL WITH A HOLLOW MIDDLE IS AT CENTRE FRONT IN PLACE OF A NUMBER DIAL. HOLLOW MIDDLE HOLDS CIRCULAR WHITE PIECE OF PAPER BEHIND TRANSPARENT FILM. BLACK POWER CABLE HAS WHITE PLASTIC END WITH FOUR METAL PRONGS. MAKER’S STAMP ON THE UNDERSIDE OF HANDSET READS “NORTHERN ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED – PATENTED 1922 1923 RD 1936 – FI – MADE IN CANADA”. BOTTOM OF BASE IS METAL PLATE WITH STAMP READING “NO. 1” AND FOUR BROWN FELT FEET. AREAS OF MINOR WEAR AND LOSS OF FINISH THROUGHOUT, WHITE RESIDUE ON POWER CORD. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
FURNISHINGS
History
THIS TELEPHONE WAS TAKEN BY THE DONOR, PHIL EDMUNDSON, OUT OF THE MARQUIS HOTEL UPON ITS CLOSURE IN NOVEMBER 1985. EDMUNDSON WAS THE OWNER/OPERATOR OF MARQUIS FLOWER SHOP, ONE OF THE RETAIL BUSINESSES HOUSED ON THE HOTEL’S MAIN FLOOR. THE HOTEL OPENED IN 1928 ON THE CORNER OF 4TH AVENUE AND 7TH STREET SOUTH, AND WAS DEMOLISHED IN 1988. ON NOVEMBER 18, 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON INTERVIEWED THE DONOR ABOUT THE TELEPHONE AND HIS FAMILY’S HISTORY IN RELATION TO THE MARQUIS HOTEL. PHIL EDMUNDSON SAID: “MY DAD [FRED EDMUNDSON] CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1938 TO TAKE OVER THE MARQUIS FLOWER SHOP… HE PAID $50 FOR THE INVENTORY AND THE STORE FIXTURES, AND AGREED TO TAKE ON THE DEBT… THE FLOWER SHOP HAD [ALREADY] BEEN THERE FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS… THE FLOWER SHOP HAD A MAIN FLOOR ENTRANCE AND DISPLAY AREA AND COOLER… DOWN IN THE BASEMENT IT HAD AN AREA FOR AN OFFICE AND A WORK ROOM… [ALSO] IN THE BASEMENT, THEY HAD SOME ROOMS CALLED ‘SAMPLE ROOMS’… WHERE TRAVELLING SALESMEN COMING TO LETHBRIDGE TO SELL THEIR WARES [COULD] SET UP A SAMPLE ROOM SHOWING ALL THEIR WARES AND THEN THEY WOULD INVITE MERCHANTS TO COME IN TO MAKE SELECTIONS OF WHAT THEY THOUGHT THEY WOULD LIKE TO HAVE… THIS TELEPHONE WAS FROM ONE OF THE SAMPLE ROOMS IN THE BASEMENT. THESE WERE VERY SPARSE ROOMS WITH JUST TABLES AROUND THE WALLS… BECAUSE EACH ROOM HAD A TELEPHONE IN IT, THEY WERE ABLE TO CONNECT WITH DIFFERENT BUSINESSES TO MAKE APPOINTMENTS… AS YOU CAN SEE [THIS TELEPHONE] HAS NO DIAL… IT CONNECTED TO THE SWITCHBOARD WHICH WAS AT THE MAIN DESK OF THE HOTEL. AND EVERY TIME YOU WANTED TO TALK TO SOMEONE, YOU WOULD HAVE TO CALL THE FRONT DESK BY LIFTING THE RECEIVER AND THEN THEY WOULD HAVE TO CONNECT YOU EITHER TO ONE OF THE ROOMS IN THE HOTEL OR BY CALLING OUT TO ANOTHER PHONE WITHIN THE CITY.” EDMUNDSON CONTINUED: “OVER THE YEARS, THE FLOWER SHOP KEPT TAKING OVER MORE AND MORE OF THE BASEMENT AREA… BECAUSE WE NEEDED MORE WORK SPACE, STORAGE SPACE, AND COOLER SPACE… TO KEEP THE FLOWERS FRESH IN… AT HOLIDAY TIMES WE WOULD TAKE OVER ONE OF THE SAMPLE ROOMS AND USE IT AS AN EXTRA STORAGE SPACE… THEN EVENTUALLY WE JUST TOOK OVER THE SAMPLE ROOM AND WE HAD IT ALL THE TIME… WE [USED THIS PHONE] TO HAVE COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE SAMPLE ROOM THAT WE USED AND THE REST OF THE FLOWER SHOP… [EVENTUALLY] WE GOT A REGULAR DIAL PHONE THAT WE COULD CALL BACK AND FORTH ON AND PUT IT IN PLACE OF THIS PHONE… [SO THEN] WE ACTUALLY USED IT AT OUR HOME. WE HAD AN OUTSIDE TELEPHONE PLUG SO WE COULD PLUG IT IN AND LEAVE IT OUT THERE… IT WAS GREAT FOR GARDENING.” OF THE HOTEL IN GENERAL, EDMUNDSON SAID: “IT WAS A COMMUNITY CONGLOMERATE OF PEOPLE THAT HAD GOTTEN TOGETHER TO HAVE IT ESTABLISHED AND BUILT… THEY WANTED TO BE ABLE TO BRING CONVENTIONS AND MEETINGS TO TOWN, SO IT WAS THE PREMIER HOTEL IN THE CITY… IT WAS QUITE A FANCY BUILDING… IT HAD A BANQUET ROOM THAT WOULD HOLD UP TO 250 PEOPLE… A MEZZANINE WHICH WAS UP BETWEEN THE FIRST FLOOR OF ROOMS ABOVE THE STREET LEVEL BUSINESSES… THEY WOULD SERVE TEA UP THERE IN THE AFTERNOON… SVEN ERICKSEN [RAN] THE MARQUIS COFFEE SHOP AND THE DINING ROOM AND BAKE SHOP… IT WAS THE PLACE TO GO FOR FINE DINING IN THE CITY… THE DRUG STORE WAS RIGHT ON THE CORNER OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE… IT WAS A VERY BUSY LOCATION… THERE WERE A LOT OF DIGNITARIES [WHO STAYED] AT THE HOTEL, LIKE BING CROSBY WHEN HE CAME TO TOWN… AND JOHN DIEFENBAKER… THE MARQUIS WAS THE PLACE TO MEET.” OF THE HOTEL’S DEMISE, EDMUNDSON SAID: “THEY WERE IN RECEIVERSHIP FOR A WHILE IN 1985, AND ROYAL BANK WERE THE RECEIVERS AND THEY WERE RUNNING THE OPERATION. BUT THERE WAS A PROBLEM WITH THE BOILER, AND IN NOVEMBER IT GOT VERY COLD, VERY FAST. THE BOILER WAS UNABLE TO KEEP UP AND FINALLY GAVE IT UP. AND RATHER THAN TRY TO GET IT FIXED… THE ROYAL BANK SAID ‘THAT’S IT, WE’RE DONE, YOU’RE OUT OF HERE’… WE WERE QUITE SHOCKED… AND THE GUESTS OF THE HOTEL – THERE WERE LOTS OF FULL-TIME GUESTS STAYING IN THE ROOMS – THEY WERE GIVEN PRACTICALLY NO TIME TO VACATE. THEY WERE OUT IN THE COLD… [THE BANK] CONCEDED TO LET US STAY FOR AN EXTRA TWO WEEKS WHILE WE MOVED OVER TO A NEW LOCATION [AT 312 6TH STREET SOUTH]. IT WAS QUITE SOMETHING BECAUSE WE HAD ALL OUR CHRISTMAS MERCHANDISE [SO] RATHER THAN MOVE IT, WE DECIDED WE’D PUT IT ALL ON SALE. SO WE HAD A HUGE SALE [AND] WE SOLD PRACTICALLY EVERYTHING… WE TOOK [ALL THE FIXTURES] WITH US; THE PHONES, PHONE BOOKS, EQUIPMENT, DESKS… THE LIGHTS THAT WERE HANGING FROM THE CEILING, [THE] KINDS OF THINGS WE COULD USE IN THE NEW LOCATION… THEY WERE THINGS THAT WE HAD INSTALLED OVER THE YEARS… WE FELT THAT WE HAD TO PUT THEM IN, SO WE WERE GOING TO TAKE THEM OUT… IN THE MEANTIME WE HAD TO HOOK UP A TEMPORARY WATER SUPPLY BECAUSE THEY SHUT OFF ALL THE UTILITIES TO THE BUILDING EXCEPT THE ELECTRICITY. SO WE HAD NO HEAT DURING THAT EXTREMELY COLD WEATHER… IT WAS [THREE YEARS] LATER BEFORE [THE HOTEL] WAS KNOCKED DOWN. IT STOOD DERELICT FOR QUITE A WHILE… IT WAS KIND OF HARD TO SEE THAT… [PEOPLE] WERE REALLY UPSET THAT THIS BEAUTIFUL STRUCTURE … WOULD BE DESTROYED AND BE GONE FROM THE LANDSCAPE AND CHANGING THE LOOK OF THE DOWNTOWN… IT WAS A GREAT LOCATION [AND] WE REALLY ENJOYED OUR TIME THERE. IT’S TOO BAD THINGS HAVE TO CHANGE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND RECORD P20140046002 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140046001
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TELEPHONE BOOK COVER, “MARQUIS HOTEL”
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, LINEN, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140046002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TELEPHONE BOOK COVER, “MARQUIS HOTEL”
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1985
Materials
CARDBOARD, LINEN, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
29.75
Width
24.5
Description
BOOK COVER MADE OF RIGID CARDBOARD, BOUND IN WAXED RED LINEN. EMBOSSED GOLD LETTERING ON FRONT READS “THE MARQUIS HOTEL” AND “INNS CANADA – A DIVISION OF MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATES LIMITED”. METAL POST FASTENING MECHANISM ATTACHED TO INNER SPINE WITH TWO METAL GROMMETS. LINEN IS WORN AWAY ALONG EDGES AND CORNERS OF COVER, SPINE IS SEPARATED FROM BOTTOM LEFT CORNER OF FRONT COVER, METAL FASTENING POST IS BENT, GRIME ON INSIDE PANEL OF BACK COVER. OVERALL FAIR CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
FURNISHINGS
History
THIS TELEPHONE BOOK COVER WAS TAKEN BY THE DONOR, PHIL EDMUNDSON, OUT OF THE MARQUIS HOTEL UPON ITS CLOSURE IN NOVEMBER 1985. EDMUNDSON WAS THE OWNER/OPERATOR OF MARQUIS FLOWER SHOP, ONE OF THE RETAIL BUSINESSES HOUSED ON THE HOTEL’S MAIN FLOOR. THE HOTEL OPENED IN 1928 ON THE CORNER OF 4TH AVENUE AND 7TH STREET SOUTH, AND WAS DEMOLISHED IN 1988. ON NOVEMBER 18, 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON INTERVIEWED THE DONOR ABOUT THE TELEPHONE BOOK COVER AND HIS FAMILY’S HISTORY IN RELATION TO THE MARQUIS HOTEL. PHIL EDMUNDSON SAID: “MY DAD [FRED EDMUNDSON] CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1938 TO TAKE OVER THE MARQUIS FLOWER SHOP… HE PAID $50 FOR THE INVENTORY AND THE STORE FIXTURES, AND AGREED TO TAKE ON THE DEBT… THE FLOWER SHOP HAD [ALREADY] BEEN THERE FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS… THE FLOWER SHOP HAD A MAIN FLOOR ENTRANCE AND DISPLAY AREA AND COOLER… DOWN IN THE BASEMENT IT HAD AN AREA FOR AN OFFICE AND A WORK ROOM.” EDMUNDSON CONTINUED: “ONE OF THESE [TELEPHONE BOOK COVERS] WOULD HAVE BEEN IN EVERY ONE OF THE GUEST ROOMS AND OTHER PLACES AS WELL. WE HAD THEM IN THE FLOWER SHOP AND IT’S REALLY GOOD BECAUSE IT DOES PROTECT THE REGULAR TELEPHONE BOOK FROM GETTING DESTROYED BECAUSE IT’S A REAL NICE HARD COVER… IT IS EMBOSSED WITH THE MARQUIS LOGO… NOT THE ORIGINAL LOGO… AT ONE POINT THE MARQUIS HOTEL WAS PART OF THE INNS OF CANADA HOTEL CONGLOMERATE… AND SO THEY ALSO HAVE THAT LOGO EMBOSSED ON THE COVER.” OF THE HOTEL IN GENERAL, EDMUNDSON SAID: “IT WAS A COMMUNITY CONGLOMERATE OF PEOPLE THAT HAD GOTTEN TOGETHER TO HAVE IT ESTABLISHED AND BUILT… THEY WANTED TO BE ABLE TO BRING CONVENTIONS AND MEETINGS TO TOWN, SO IT WAS THE PREMIER HOTEL IN THE CITY… IT WAS QUITE A FANCY BUILDING… IT HAD A BANQUET ROOM THAT WOULD HOLD UP TO 250 PEOPLE… A MEZZANINE WHICH WAS UP BETWEEN THE FIRST FLOOR OF ROOMS ABOVE THE STREET LEVEL BUSINESSES… THEY WOULD SERVE TEA UP THERE IN THE AFTERNOON… SVEN ERICKSEN [RAN] THE MARQUIS COFFEE SHOP AND THE DINING ROOM AND BAKE SHOP… IT WAS THE PLACE TO GO FOR FINE DINING IN THE CITY… THE DRUG STORE WAS RIGHT ON THE CORNER OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE… IT WAS A VERY BUSY LOCATION… THERE WERE A LOT OF DIGNITARIES [WHO STAYED] AT THE HOTEL, LIKE BING CROSBY WHEN HE CAME TO TOWN… AND JOHN DIEFENBAKER… THE MARQUIS WAS THE PLACE TO MEET.” OF THE HOTEL’S DEMISE, EDMUNDSON SAID: “THEY WERE IN RECEIVERSHIP FOR A WHILE IN 1985, AND ROYAL BANK WERE THE RECEIVERS AND THEY WERE RUNNING THE OPERATION. BUT THERE WAS A PROBLEM WITH THE BOILER, AND IN NOVEMBER IT GOT VERY COLD, VERY FAST. THE BOILER WAS UNABLE TO KEEP UP AND FINALLY GAVE IT UP. AND RATHER THAN TRY TO GET IT FIXED… THE ROYAL BANK SAID ‘THAT’S IT, WE’RE DONE, YOU’RE OUT OF HERE’… WE WERE QUITE SHOCKED… AND THE GUESTS OF THE HOTEL – THERE WERE LOTS OF FULL-TIME GUESTS STAYING IN THE ROOMS – THEY WERE GIVEN PRACTICALLY NO TIME TO VACATE. THEY WERE OUT IN THE COLD… [THE BANK] CONCEDED TO LET US STAY FOR AN EXTRA TWO WEEKS WHILE WE MOVED OVER TO A NEW LOCATION [AT 312 6TH STREET SOUTH]. IT WAS QUITE SOMETHING BECAUSE WE HAD ALL OUR CHRISTMAS MERCHANDISE [SO] RATHER THAN MOVE IT, WE DECIDED WE’D PUT IT ALL ON SALE. SO WE HAD A HUGE SALE [AND] WE SOLD PRACTICALLY EVERYTHING… WE TOOK [ALL THE FIXTURES] WITH US; THE PHONES, PHONE BOOKS, EQUIPMENT, DESKS… THE LIGHTS THAT WERE HANGING FROM THE CEILING, [THE] KINDS OF THINGS WE COULD USE IN THE NEW LOCATION… THEY WERE THINGS THAT WE HAD INSTALLED OVER THE YEARS… WE FELT THAT WE HAD TO PUT THEM IN, SO WE WERE GOING TO TAKE THEM OUT… IN THE MEANTIME WE HAD TO HOOK UP A TEMPORARY WATER SUPPLY BECAUSE THEY SHUT OFF ALL THE UTILITIES TO THE BUILDING EXCEPT THE ELECTRICITY. SO WE HAD NO HEAT DURING THAT EXTREMELY COLD WEATHER… IT WAS [THREE YEARS] LATER BEFORE [THE HOTEL] WAS KNOCKED DOWN. IT STOOD DERELICT FOR QUITE A WHILE… IT WAS KIND OF HARD TO SEE THAT… [PEOPLE] WERE REALLY UPSET THAT THIS BEAUTIFUL STRUCTURE … WOULD BE DESTROYED AND BE GONE FROM THE LANDSCAPE AND CHANGING THE LOOK OF THE DOWNTOWN… IT WAS A GREAT LOCATION [AND] WE REALLY ENJOYED OUR TIME THERE. IT’S TOO BAD THINGS HAVE TO CHANGE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND RECORD P20140046001 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140046002
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.