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Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WEDDING HEADPIECE
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
TULLE, METAL, SYNTHETIC FABRIC
Catalogue Number
P20150016004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WEDDING HEADPIECE
Date
1949
Materials
TULLE, METAL, SYNTHETIC FABRIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
47.5
Width
20
Description
LAVENDER-COLOURED HEADPIECE AND VEIL WITH LACE. THE METAL FRAMED HEADPIECE INCLUDES SYNTHETIC BOW AND FAUX MINIATURE FLOWERS. PURPLE BAND TRIMS TULLE VEIL (ALSO LAVENDER IN COLOUR). FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. THE TULLE IS SLIGHTLY BRITTLE. THE HEADBAND AND THE BOW ON IT ARE MISSHAPEN. THE VEIL IS WRINKLED. THERE IS A RED STAIN ON THE BACK HEM OF THE VEIL. THERE IS SLIGHT FRAYING ALONG THE BOTTOM AND MINOR LOSS OF THREAD AT THE HEM.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY HISTORY. THIS HEADPIECE WAS PART OF THE OUTFIT EVERAL HORHOZER WORE ON THE DAY OF HER MARRIAGE TO JOE HORHOZER. EVERAL MET JOE WHEN HE CAME TO SUPINA’S TO WORK. SHE REMEMBERS: “HE WAS HIRED BY MY DAD TO WORK IN THE BUTCHER SHOP [AFTER] HE CAME OFF TOUR. I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.' AND, MY AUNT HAPPENED TO BE VISITING, AND WHEN I WENT HOME FOR LUNCH SHE SAID, ‘OH, HAVE YOU GOT A STEADY BOYFRIEND?’ AND I SAID, ‘NO, BUT I’M GONNA HAVE ONE SOON.’ THAT’S HOW IT ALL HAPPENED. HE DIDN’T HAVE A CAR AT THE TIME AND HE SAYS, ‘I CAN’T TAKE YOU TO THE SHOW OR ANYTHING BECAUSE I DON’T HAVE A CAR,’ BUT, HE SAYS, ‘I’M SAVING FOR ONE, AND AS SOON AS I GET ONE…’ AND HE CAME OVER AND CALLED ON ME. MY DAD WAS THERE, BUT I DON’T THINK MY DAD THOUGHT IT WOULD DEVELOP INTO ANYTHING. MY MOTHER WAS QUITE HAPPY ABOUT HIM AND MY GRANDMA TOO, SHE WAS STAYING WITH US AT THE TIME. SO, ANYWAY THAT’S HOW IT STARTED.” WHEN THEY FIRST ENCOUNTERED EACH OTHER, EVERAL DID NOT KNOW ABOUT JOE’S MUSICAL CAREER: “I THINK IT WAS THAT SAYING, 'LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT,' THAT HAPPENED TO BE IT FOR ME, AND HE SAID IT WAS FOR HIM TOO. THERE MUST HAVE BEEN SOME CHEMISTRY THERE, BUT IT HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH HIM BEING POPULAR OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT. IT TURNED OUT JUST FINE.” HORHOZER GOES ON, “[W]E WENT TOGETHER - WELL IT WAS ABOUT A YEAR BEFORE [GETTING MARRIED]. WE DID BREAK UP FOR A WHILE AND THAT’S WHEN MY [LAUGHS] - THAT WAS KIND OF A CROOKED THING, BUT [MY DAD] WANTED US, OF COURSE, TO BREAK UP, SO IT WAS AROUND VALENTINE’S DAY WE BROKE UP. THEN [MY DAD] TOOK ME TO [MONTREAL]. I SAID, ‘YOU KNOW I’VE ALWAYS WANTED TO GO TO MONTREAL,’ CAUSE THAT’S WHERE HE DID HIS BUYING, SO HE TOOK ME TO MONTREAL. AND WHILE WE’RE IN MONTREAL, JOE’S WRITING TO ME ABOUT EVERY DAY. OTHERWISE I WOULD HAVE NEVER GOT TO GO THERE. SO THEN, I GOT BACK [AND] WE GOT TOGETHER AND THEN THAT’S WHEN WE MARRIED. YES, IT WAS WITHIN THE SAME YEAR, YES.” THE COUPLE MARRIED IN 1949. AS MENTIONED ABOVE THIS HEADPIECE, AS WELL AS A VEIL ALSO DONATED, WAS WORN BY HORHOZER ON THEIR WEDDING DAY. HORHOZER EXPLAINS, “THIS IS WHEN I GOT MARRIED. WE ELOPED, SO I JUST HAD THIS HEADDRESS AND A NICE WHITE SUIT AND THIS VEIL BEHIND IT… I HAD A NICE WHITE SUIT MADE FOR MYSELF; IT WAS VERY NICE. JOE BOUGHT ME AN ORCHID AND IT WAS VERY NICE, BUT NO SUCH THING AS A DRESS OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT… WELL, FOR ONE THING, MY DAD, OF COURSE, WAS TOTALLY AGAINST THE MARRIAGE. I [STILL] WORKED FOR [MY DAD] AND EVERYTHING, BUT HE NEVER SPOKE TO ME FOR FIVE YEARS. HE WAS JUST AGAINST THE MARRIAGE AND SO WE THOUGHT WELL WE’LL SAVE AN AWFUL LOT OF TROUBLE [BY ELOPING]. MY DAD WASN’T ONE YOU COULD TALK TO. PROBABLY IF I WOULD HAVE TALKED TO HIM, I THINK HE WOULD HAVE HAD SOMETHING [LIKE A WEDDING CEREMONY] FOR ME, BUT, I JUST WAS SO KIND OF NERVOUS ABOUT IT. WE JUST THOUGHT THAT WOULD BE THE BEST THING TO DO, WOULD BE TO ELOPE THE THING THAT I FEEL SO BAD ABOUT IS THAT OUR PARENTS WEREN’T THERE. I ALWAYS FELT BAD ABOUT MY MOTHER NOT BEING THERE. JOE AND I WENT TO ST. PATS, AND THAT WAS IN THE BASEMENT, AND WE GOT MARRIED THERE… I HAD TO WAIT. WE WANTED TO GET MARRIED WHEN I WAS 20, BUT THE PRIEST COULDN’T MARRY TILL YOU WERE 21. OF COURSE MY DAD MADE THE PRIEST STICK TO THAT BECAUSE HE WAS FRIENDS WITH FATHER CHRISTIAN, SO WE HAD TO WAIT TILL I WAS 21. [LAUGHS]… THEN ALL WE DID WAS GO TO GREAT FALLS AND THAT WAS THAT. WE DIDN’T HAVE MONEY BECAUSE I DIDN’T GET ANY MONEY AT ALL FROM MY DAD, WE WERE ON OUR OWN SO WE HAD TO BE VERY CAREFUL AT THAT TIME OF WHAT WE SPENT SO WE JUST WENT THERE, AND COME BACK AND STARTED, STARTED OUR LIFE. RENTED A LITTLE PLACE OVER ON THE 3RD AVE. NORTH THERE, AN APARTMENT, SO THAT WAS ABOUT IT.” AFTER THE MARRIAGE, EVERAL’S FATHER DID NOT SPEAK TO NEITHER EVERAL NOR JOE FOR FIVE YEARS. WHEN ASKED WHY HER FATHER WAS AGAINST THE MARRIAGE, HORHOZER REPLIED, “WELL, IT KIND OF SURPRISES ME, BECAUSE HE USED TO HAVE COFFEE WITH JOE ALL THE TIME; THEY WERE GOOD FRIENDS. I GUESS IT’S WAS BECAUSE HIS SISTER MARRIED SOMEBODY THAT WORKED IN THE STORE AND IT TURNED OUT TO BE A COMPLETE DISASTER. HE HAD TO PAY TO GET HER OUT OF THE BIG MESS HE THOUGHT, WELL, THE SAME THING WOULD HAPPEN TO ME. WHEN WE GOT MARRIED THEN [JOE LEFT SUPINA'S], AND HE THEN WORKED FOR EMERSON MOTORS, PLAYING JUST ABOUT EVERY NIGHT. THAT’S WHAT WE BOUGHT OUR HOUSE WITH. HE SAVED US MONEY AND AS SOON AS THE FIRST HOUSES THAT CAME AVAILABLE, THAT YOU COULD PUT A DOWN PAYMENT ON, WE BOUGHT ONE. [MY DAD] CAME TO SEE THE HOUSE, AND THE MINUTE HE SAW THE HOUSE THEN HE WAS HAPPY… HE DID COME ON HIS OWN TO LOOK AT IT. THEN WE INVITED HIM OVER FOR DINNER AND HE CAME. AND THEN MY MOTHER WOULD COME EVERY WEDNESDAY BECAUSE I STARTED WORKING, AND SO SHE’D COME EVERY WEDNESDAY AND MAKE SUPPER AND THAT, AND SO MY DAD WOULD COME. SO FROM THEN ON HE CAME EVERY WEDNESDAY. OH, AT CHRISTMAS OR WHENEVER WE WOULD INVITE HIM… AND HE WAS FINE EVER AFTER THAT.” JOE AND EVERAL HAD TWO CHILDREN TOGETHER: MELODEE MUTCH AND RAE FLANAGAN. JOE HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON OCTOBER 21, 2010 AT THE AGE OF 89 YEARS. HORHOZER WAS THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND FURTHER PUBLICATIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20150016004
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1957
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, VINYL, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170005002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1957
Materials
FABRIC, VINYL, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.5
Length
25.5
Diameter
19.5
Description
BLACK CONDUCTOR’S HAT WITH GOLD ACCENTS; BLACK VINYL BRIM WITH GREEN COLOURED FABRIC ON BOTTOM; TWO PARALLEL GOLD-COLOURED BANDS STITCHED ONTO HAT; “CPR CONDUCTOR” IS STITCHED ONTO FRONT OF HAT IN A BRONZE-COLOURED THREAD; TWO BLACK EYELETS LOCATED ON BOTH SIDES OF THE HAT. INSIDE IS LINED WITH GREY FABRIC. INSIDE TAG READS "4 - SCULLY 7 1/8 MONTREAL" PRINTED IN BLACK INK. THE "4" HAS BEEN CROSSED OUT AND "5" HAS BEEN WRITTEN BY HAND BOTH IN BLUE INK. TAN LEATHER RIM AROUND THE INSIDE CIRCUMFERENCE OF HAT. GOOD CONDITION: WHITE BAND INSIDE OF HAT BRIM IS STAINED GREY; PIECES OF YELLOWED PAPER ARE STUCK INTO BOTH SIDES OF THE HAT; CIRCULAR-SHAPED INDENT IS PRESENT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TOP OF THE HAT. SEVERE WEAR/STAIN IN CENTER OF THE INSIDE OF HAT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
THIS CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (CPR) CONDUCTOR CAP BELONGED TO JAMES (JIM) FRANCES LOGAN, WHO WORKED FOR THE CPR IN LETHBRIDGE FOR FORTY-FOUR YEARS FOLLOWING WORLD WAR I. IN A PHONE CALL THAT TOOK PLACE ON JULY 16, 2018 BETWEEN LOGAN'S GRANDSON, CALVIN LOGAN AND GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CALVIN LOGAN STATED HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED FOR CPR FROM 1913 TO 1957. ON MARCH 9, 2017 MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CALVIN LOGAN, WHO HAD POSSESSION OF THE CAP AT THE TIME OF DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “MY FATHER (DENZIL LOGAN) GAVE ME THIS HAT PROBABLY FIFTEEN YEARS AGO. IT CAME FROM HIS FATHER, JAMES FRANCES LOGAN… MY DAD FELT IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT I HAVE SOMETHING, A KEEPSAKE, OF MY GRANDFATHER’S AND WITH THAT, I’VE ALWAYS ADMIRED [THE CAP]. I REMEMBER IT IN MY FATHER’S POSSESSION, IN HIS HOUSE. [THE CAP WAS] ON A SHELF IN HIS STUDY." "MY GRANDFATHER LIVED HERE SINCE THE EARLY 1900’S AND MY DAD WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1926, SO THIS HAT KIND OF HAS A REAL SIGNIFICANCE FOR ME IN LETHBRIDGE," LOGAN EXPLAINED, "MY GRANDFATHER WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE WORKED FOR THE CPR FOR WELL OVER FORTY YEARS AND WAS VERY PROUD OF HIS POSITION AND ROLE IN THE CPR." “I WOULD BE OVER AT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HOME; GRANDMA WOULD THERE AND [GRANDPA] WOULD BE ON THE ROAD,” LOGAN SAID AS HE RECALLED HIS EARLIEST MEMORIES OF HIS GRANDFATHER AND THE CPR, “HE ALSO WOULD ALWAYS BE WEARING OVERALLS AND I AM STILL A PERSON THAT LOVES TO WEAR OVERALLS TOO. THE FIRST PAIR OF OVERALLS [I HAD] WHEN I GOT TO BE OLDER WERE FROM MY GRANDFATHER. THEY WERE BLUE AND WHITE STRIPED OVERALLS. HE HAD LOTS OF PAIRS OF THEM FROM HIS DAYS AT THE CPR. I HAVE INHERITED THAT KIND OF TRADITION FROM MY GRANDFATHER, I GUESS.” “MY OTHER MEMORY [WOULD BE] WHEN I GOT TO BE PROBABLY SEVEN OR EIGHT WHEN [CPR] OFFERED OUR FAMILY TO RIDE THE LAST ACTUAL PASSENGER TRAIN THAT RAN FROM LETHBRIDGE TO CALGARY. THE IMMEDIATE FAMILY MEMBERS OF MY GRANDFATHER WERE INVITED TO JOIN HIM ON THE TRAIN. WE GOT TO RIDE FROM LETHBRIDGE, OVER THE HIGH LEVEL BRIDGE, TO CALGARY AND BACK AGAIN… THAT IS THE ONLY TRIP AS A KID THAT I DO REMEMBER." "ANOTHER ONE OF MY MEMORIES," LOGAN CONTINUED, "IS OF THE TRAIN THAT THEY HAD AT GALT GARDENS. I WOULD IMAGINE MYSELF AS A CONDUCTOR AND BACK THEN YOU COULD GO RIGHT INSIDE THE TRAIN. ONE MINUTE I WAS THE ENGINEER AND THE NEXT MINUTE I WAS THE CONDUCTOR. I WAS TRYING TO IMAGINE MYSELF AS A TRAIN PERSON AND WORKING WITH THE ENGINES SO LARGE AND JUST HOW COOL IT WOULD BE AS A KID GROWING UP THINKING OF MYSELF WORKING ON THESE BIG HUGE STEAM ENGINE TRAINS." "[WHEN I WAS YOUNG], I WANTED TO SEE WHERE [MY GRANDFATHER] WAS WORKING AND WHAT HE DID, BUT OFTEN TIMES IT WAS VERY DIFFICULT TO DO THAT BECAUSE OF THE TYPE OF JOB HE HAD. MY LAST MEMORIES OF THE RUN THAT HE HAD WERE FROM WHEN HE WORKED AS A CONDUCTOR IN THE REGULAR RUN FROM LETHBRIDGE TO YAK AND THEN IT WAS A RETURN TRIP FROM YAK TO LETHBRIDGE. THAT WAS THE LAST ROUTE HE WAS RUNNING BEFORE HE RETIRED,” LOGAN RECALLED. “I’D ALWAYS FELT A CONNECTION [TO TRAINS],” LOGAN CONTINUED, “NOT ONLY THROUGH MY GRANDFATHER, BUT ALSO THROUGH MY FATHER. A GREAT DEAL OF LIVESTOCK WAS HAULED IN THOSE DAYS THROUGH TRAIN AND FOR MANY OF THE PUBLIC YARDS ACROSS CANADA, TRAINS WERE THEIR WAY OF SHIPPING CATTLE TO DIFFERENT AREAS FOR PROCESSING. EVERY DAY OF [MY DAD’S] WORK WAS LOADING BOXCARS WITH CATTLE. I WAS AROUND THE YARDS PROBABLY MORE THAN MOST KIDS, BECAUSE MY DAD ON A SATURDAY OR SUNDAY WOULD HAVE TO STOP IN AT THE YARDS. I WOULD ALWAYS BE THE FIRST ONE IN THE CAR TO COME WITH HIM, I SAW MANY A CATTLE LOADED UP INTO THE BOXCARS. MY CLEARER MEMORIES [OF THE RAILWAY YARDS] WERE MORE SO OF MY FATHER’S CONNECTION WITH THE RAILWAY. [I ALSO REMEMBER] THERE WERE TIMES WHEN THERE WERE TRAIN ACCIDENTS [MY FATHER WOULD BE] CALLED OUT.” LOGAN WENT ON TO DESCRIBE HIS GRANDFATHER’S HISTORY, “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN IN POTSDAM, NEW YORK. [AROUND THAT TIME] THERE WAS A LOT OF OPPORTUNITY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I THINK THE REASON MY GRANDFATHER ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE WAS BECAUSE HIS FATHER HAD ACQUIRED LAND HERE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA… [MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER] OWNED QUITE A NUMBER OF ACRES IN THAT AREA OF LETHBRIDGE. SO AS FAR AS THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF HOW THEY ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T REALLY KNOW THAT PART OF IT, BUT I DO KNOW THAT MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER DID OWN A FARM AND IT WAS A PART OF THE FAIRWAY PLAZA AREA TODAY.” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE APRIL 6TH, 1944 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD LISTED JAMES LOGAN JR. AS ONE OF THE EIGHT REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE CRANBROOK SECTION OF C.P.R. EMPLOYEES (FROM THE TERRITORY COVERING CROW’S NEST TO CRESTON) TO ATTEND A PROVINCIAL C. P. R. MEETING ABOUT VICTORY BOND SALE METHODS IN VANCOUVER. JAMES FRANCIS LOGAN’S OBITUARY WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1983. IT READS: “LOGAN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MAY 8TH, 1983 AT THE AGE OF 90 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. DOROTHY LOGAN… MR. LOGAN WAS BORN MAY 9TH, 1892 AT OGDENSBURG, NEW YORK AND CAME TO CANADA AND LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, WHERE HE FIRST WORKED IN THE MINES. HE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE 20TH BATTERY FROM 1914 TO 1918 AND WAS THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF 25TH CANADIAN FIELD ARTILLERY. HE WORKED FOR THE C. P. R. FOR 44 YEARS AND AT THE TIME OF HIS RETIREMENT WAS A CONDUCTOR.” FOR INFORMATION ABOUT J. F. LOGAN’S EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR I, PLEASE SEE ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 19861018001. PLEASE REFERENCE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD CLIPPINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20170005002
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
APPLE COSTUME HEADPIECE
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
1976
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, BATTING
Catalogue Number
P20160005000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
APPLE COSTUME HEADPIECE
Date Range From
1975
Date Range To
1976
Materials
FABRIC, BATTING
No. Pieces
1
Height
37
Width
16.5
Description
COSTUME HEAD COVER MIMICKING AN APPLE STEM. HEAD COVER MADE OUT OF YELLOW, RIBBED FABRIC IN A BALACLAVA-STYLE WITH CIRCULAR FACE HOLE WITH STRETCH ELASTIC AROUND DIAMETER. BOTTOM EDGE IS UNHEMMED, EXCEPT FOR BACK CENTER PANEL. GREEN FELT ATTACHEMENTS AS LEAVES AND BROWN STRETCHY MATERIAL COVERING STEM SHAPED OBJECT ATOP HEAD PIECE. "ANINE' STITCHED IN RED THREAD ON THE INSIDE BACK HEM. CONDITION: YELLOW FABRIC DULLED IN COLOUR. SLIGHT FRAYING NEAR HEAD PIECE'S EDGES. HOLE IN BACK SEAM.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
LEISURE
POLITICS
History
THIS ARTIFACT IS AN APPLE COSTUME HEAR COVER. ACCORDING TO INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE DONOR, ANINE VONKEMAN, UPON DONATION IT WAS “WORN BY THE DONOR ON A PARADE FLOAT IN BENTHUIZEN, THE NETHERLANDS, WHERE SHE LIVED AT THE TIME. [IT WAS] MADE BY THE DONOR’S MOTHER, TRUDY VONKEMAN, AND PART OF A COSTUME DEPICTING THE DONOR AS AN APPLE. THE DONOR’S CHEEKS PAINTED RED. THE PARADE TOOK PLACE AROUND 1975-1976. THE DONOR MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO CANADA ON 6 NOVEMBER 1981. MANY OF THE FAMILY’S POSSESSIONS WERE PACKED IN A HURRY FOR THE MOVE, INCLUDING THE COSTUME HEAD COVER.” THIS ARTIFACT WAS DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES AFTER BEING FEATURED IN THE GALT’S EXHIBITION CURATED BY WENDY AITKENS TITLED, "CHANGING PLACES: IMMIGRATION & DIVERSITY," WHICH RAN FROM 31 OCTOBER 2015 TO 17 JANUARY 2016. INFORMATION ON THE TEXT PANEL IN THAT EXHIBIT STATED THAT THE PARADE THAT IT WAS WORN FOR WAS CELEBRATING THE DUTCH QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY. IT ALSO STATES, “THE HAT MADE IT INTO THE SHIPPING CONTAINER, WHICH BROUGHT THE VONKEMAN FAMILY’S BELONGINGS FROM HOLLAND TO CANADA… THE REST OF THE COSTUME DIDN’T MAKE IT INTO THE CONTAINER.” A TEXT PANEL IN THE “CHANGING PLACES” EXHIBIT EXPLAINED: “AVAILABLE FARMLAND WAS LIMITED IN HOLLAND AFTER THE END OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR, SO [THE PARENTS OF] WIM VONKEMAN (THE DONOR’S FATHER) AND THEIR LARGE FAMILY IMMIGRATED TO SOUTHWESTERN ALBERTA IN THE EARLY 1950S, WHERE THE FAMILY WORKED IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS BEFORE BRANCHING OUT. EVENTUALLY WIM’S PARENTS STARTED MORNINGSTAR DAIRY. WIM REMAINED IN THE NETHERLANDS WHERE HE WORKED WITH THE NAVY [AND] MARRIED TRUDY… THEY HAD THREE CHILDREN: ANINE, ALWIN AND HERWIN. IN 1979, WIM AND TRUDY BROUGHT THEIR CHILDREN TO VISIT FAMILY HERE AND WHEN THEY RETURNED HOME THE TWO BOYS TALKED OF MOVING TO CANADA WHEN THEY FINISHED SCHOOL… DETERMINED THAT HER FAMILY WOULDN’T BE SEPARATED, TRUDY SUGGESTED THEY ALL GO TOGETHER. WIM’S BROTHER JOHN AGREED TO SPONSOR THE FAMILY AND WHEN THE LETTER OF ACCEPTANCE ARRIVED THEY QUICKLY PACKED UP THEIR BELONGINGS IN A SHIPPING CONTAINER… IN NOVEMBER 1981, WIM’S FAMILY – ALONG WITH AN AIREDALE TERRIER, A CAT, AND A GUINEA PIG – MOVED INTO THE VONKEMAN DAIRY FARM HOUSE IN IRON SPRINGS. UNFORTUNATELY, BOTH CANADA AND THE NETHERLANDS WERE EXPERIENCING A RECESSION SO SELLING THE HOUSE IN HOLLAND TOOK TIME AND JOBS HERE WERE DIFFICULT TO FIND. WIM WORKED ON THE MORNINGSTAR DAIRY FARM WITH HIS BROTHER JOHN… THE CHILDREN STARTED SCHOOL RIGHT AWAY AND THE TWO OLDER KIDS EXPANDED THE ENGLISH THEY HAD LEARNED IN THEIR DUTCH SCHOOLS. HERWIN HAD NOT LEARNED ANY ENGLISH AS HE HAD NOT STARTED HIS SCHOOLING BUT HE VERY QUICKLY CAUGHT UP. WIM AND TRUDY KNEW DUTCH, GERMAN, AND ENGLISH, BUT TRUDY CARRIED A DICTIONARY WITH HER AND READ THE KIDS’ SCHOOL BOOKS TO IMPROVE HER ENGLISH. WIM STARTED A HOUSE-PAINTING BUSINESS [AND WORKED AS A] MANAGER FOR A COMPANY… THE FAMILY MOVED INTO PICTURE BUTTE. HE AND OTHER DUTCH NEWCOMERS STARTED THE DUTCH CANADIAN CLUB AND THE KIDS JOINED THE 4H CLUB.” ACCORDING TO INFORMATION PROVIDED ABOUT THE FAMILY IN THE RECORD P20150005000, THE DONOR’S FATHER – WIM VONKEMAN – WAS BORN IN THE NETHERLANDS IN 1929. AFTER IMMIGRATING TO CANADA WITH HIS FAMILY IN 1981, THEY SETTLED IN THE PICTURE BUTTE AREA. VONKEMAN WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE DUTCH CANADIAN CLUB, AND WAS ACTIVE WITH THE GROUP UNTIL HIS DEATH IN 2004. ON JANUARY 21, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONOR’S MOTHER, TRUDY VONKEMAN, ABOUT A COSTUME SHE DONATED IN 2015 (P20150005000). SHE EXPLAINED: “MY HUSBAND’S FAMILY WENT [TO CANADA] IN 1952 – HE WAS THE ELDEST SON AND HAD A NICE JOB IN HOLLAND, SO HE STAYED BEHIND. THEN WE MET AND MARRIED AND HAD KIDS, AND IN 1979 WE WENT ON HOLIDAYS [IN CANADA] WITH THE KIDS FOR FOUR WEEKS… THEY ENJOYED IT VERY MUCH AND WHEN WE WERE BACK IN HOLLAND I HEARD MY TWO SONS [SAYING] ‘AFTER SCHOOL WE GO TO CANADA’… I SAID TO MY HUSBAND, ‘LET’S GO THEN AS A FAMILY, I DON’T WANT TO SPLIT THE FAMILY LATER’… THERE WAS A BIG FAMILY WAITING [IN CANADA] AND MY PARENTS DIED [IN 1979 AND 1980] SO THERE WAS NO REASON NOT TO DO IT [WHILE] WE WERE STILL YOUNG ENOUGH. I WAS 47 AND MY HUSBAND WAS 51, BUT STILL WE MADE IT. THE WHOLE FAMILY LOOKED AFTER US [AND] THERE WAS A JOB ON THE FARM [OUTSIDE PICTURE BUTTE]... WE DIDN’T NEED TO IMMIGRATE BECAUSE IT WAS EVEN BETTER IN HOLLAND THAN WHEN WE CAME HERE. STILL, ONE OF THE LAST THINGS MY HUSBAND SAID TO ME [WAS] ‘WE HAD LESS MONEY HERE IN CANADA, BUT I’M GLAD WE WENT.’” ACCORDING TO INFORMATION PROVIDED FOR THE ARTIFACT P20150022003, THE DONOR ANINE VONKEMAN WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1967. ABOUT HER IMMIGRATION TO CANADA SHE STATED, “IN 1979 WE CAME HERE AND WE HAD A FANTASTIC TIME AND WE TRAVELLED AROUND IN CAMPERS AND WENT INTO B.C. AND SAW THE MOUNTAINS. IT WAS AWESOME… WE KNEW THAT WE LIKED CANADA AND WE LIKED OUR COUSINS AND IT WAS A NEW ADVENTURE, BUT IT’S PRETTY PERMANENT YOU KNOW.” COMING TO CANADA WAS, ACCORDING TO VONKEMAN, A “HUGE CULTURE SHOCK” AS SHE WAS USED TO BEING ABLE TO BIKE EVERYWHERE IN HOLLAND. SHE EXPLAINS THAT LIVING ON AN ISOLATED FARM WAS CHALLENGING AND “WITH GRAVEL ROADS … [I] COULD NOT REALLY CYCLE ANYWHERE. I TRIED … I HAD GROWN UP ON MY BIKE REALLY, AND LIVED IN A SMALL COMMUNITY … AND THEN HAVING TO TAKE THE SCHOOL BUS AND LEARN THE LANGUAGE [WAS ALSO A CULTURE SHOCK].” VONKEMAN MAINTAINS A STRONG CONNECTION TO HER DUTCH HERITAGE AND EXPLAINS THAT WHEN SHE WAS YOUNGER SHE “REMEMBER[S] … CONSCIOUSLY NOT GETTING MY CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP BECAUSE I WANTED TO GO BACK TO HOLLAND AND LIVE THERE FOR A WHILE AND WORK THERE AND THAT STAYED WITH ME THROUGH THE U OF L.” SHE CONTINUED: “I HAVE NOT GOTTEN MY CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP YET BECAUSE IT’S VERY EXPENSIVE AT THIS POINT … AND THAT WAS THE OTHER THING THAT THE RULES CHANGED, I CAN’T REMEMBER WHEN, BUT NOW THAT I MARRIED A CANADIAN, I CAN HAVE DUAL CITIZENSHIP … THE RULES WERE CHANGED SO THAT IF YOU WERE 18 WITHIN FIVE YEARS OF IMMIGRATING YOU ARE ALLOWED TO MAINTAIN YOUR DUTCH CITIZENSHIP IF YOU APPLY FOR CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP.” VONKEMAN CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1986 TO ATTEND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE (U OF L) AND STARTED WORKING AT THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ART GALLERY (SAAG) IN 1992, TWO WEEKS AFTER GRADUATING FROM THE U OF L. SHE BEGAN AS THE PUBLIC PROGRAMS COORDINATOR AND “WAS DOING MEDIA STUFF, VOLUNTEER COORDINATION, SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATION AND STARTED THE ART AUCTION.” BY 2004, VONKEMAN WAS WORKING AT THE GALT AS MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING EXHIBIT TEXT PANEL INFORMATION. SEE PERMANENT FILES FOR P20150005000 AND P20150022000 FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE VONKEMAN FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20160005000
Acquisition Date
2015-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CHILDS WIDE BRIM HAT
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150013014
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CHILDS WIDE BRIM HAT
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
25.5
Width
17
Diameter
18.5
Description
WHITE RIBBED COTTON WIDE-BRIMMED BABY'S SUN HAT. THIN WHITE STRAP UNDER CHIN FASTENS INSIDE HAT WITH ONE SILVER-COLOURED SNAP. HAT IS MADE OF 6 TRIANGULAR PIECES THAT MEET AT CROWN. BRIM IS TWO SEPARATE PIECES, HELD TOGETHER WITH TWO NON-FUNCTIONAL MOTHER-OF-PEARL BUTTONS INSIDE THE BRIM. THE BRIM IS WIDER IN FRONT (6.3CM AT WIDEST POINT) THAN AT BACK (ONLY 4.5CM). INSIDE OF HAT LINED WITH WHITE COTTON. EXCELLENT CONDITION. ONLY VERY SLIGHT DISCOLOURATION/YELLOWING, ESPECIALLY ON BRIM.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS HAT BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013014
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BEANIE
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20150013022
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BEANIE
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
WOOL, LEATHER
No. Pieces
1
Length
22
Diameter
16
Description
NAVY BLUE WOOL CHILD'S JOCKEY STYLE CAP. EIGHT TRIANGULAR SECTIONS MEET AT CROWN BUTTON TO FORM BODY OF HAT. SHORT BRIM AT FRONT. A UNION JACK AND RED ENSIGN FLAG, WITH POLES CROSSED, EMBROIDERED ON FRONT. BELOW IS AN EMBROIDERED LIGHT GREEN MAPLE LEAF. SWEATBAND MADE OF MEDIUM BROWN LEATHER. WRITTEN ON SWEATBAND IN BLACK MARKER "BOBBY SMITH". LEATHER SWEATBAND IS SLIGHTLY CRACKED. EMBROIDERY ON FRONT SHOWS A FEW LOOSE THREADS: UNION JACK HAS 2 VERY SHORT LOOSE THREADS; RED ENSIGN ONE SLIGHTLY LONGER LOOSE THREAD, ALSO A STITCH IN THE FLAG APPEARS TO BE MISSING; STEM OF MAPLE LEAF HAS A VERY SHORT LOOSE THREAD.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS CAP BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013022
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, COTTON, RIBBON
Catalogue Number
P20150013023
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
WOOL, COTTON, RIBBON
No. Pieces
1
Height
25.5
Diameter
17
Description
NAVY BLUE WOOL CHILD'S SAILOR CAP. 3CM WIDE NAVY BLUE RIBBON AROUND HAT, WITH "H.M.S. MINOTAUR" EMBROIDERED IN GOLD THREAD. ON EITHER SIDE OF "H.M.S. MINOTAUR" THERE ARE TWO EMBROIDERED FLAGS ON GOLD COLOURED POLES: ONE IS A WHITE FLAG, RED RECTANGLE, WITH A GOLD CROWN IN THE CENTRE; SECOND IS A RED STRIPE ON THE BOTTOM, WHITE STRIPE ON THE TOP, WITH AN ANCHOR POSITIONED HORIZONTALLY BETWEEN THE TWO STRIPES. HAT IS LINED WITH NAVY BLUE COTTON. RIBBON HANGS DOWN LEFT SIDE OF HAT, FORMING TWO TAILS: ONE IS 16.1CM LONG, THE OTHER IS 14.2CM LONG. (MEASUREMENT OF THE HEIGHT OF HAT ACCOUNTS FOR THESE TAILS) SLIGHT DISCOLOURATION (SLIGHTLY BROWN/RED) ON LEFT SIDE BETWEEN "MINOTAUR" AND THE FLAGS. DIAMETER MEASUREMENT REFERS TO THE HEADBAND PORTION. THE TOP OF THE HAT HAS A DIAMETER OF 21.5CM.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS CAP BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013023
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BABY BONNET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, SATIN
Catalogue Number
P20150013009
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BABY BONNET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
WOOL, SATIN
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Length
15.5
Width
13.5
Description
CREAM KNITTED BABY BONNET. BLUE SCALLOPED CROCHETED TRIM. EMBROIDERED ALONG EDGE WITH BLUE FLORAL AND LEAF PATTERN. BLUE SATIN BOWS AT CHIN WITH SAME BLUE RIBBON TO TIE BELOW CHIN. ENDS OF RIBBON ARE FRAYED, OTHERWISE BONNET IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS BONNET BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. UPDATE: ON 26 OCTOBER 2017, DONOR ROBERT SMITH RESPONDED BY EMAIL TO AN ENQUIRY BY MUSEUM STAFF ON THIS OBJECT’S MANUFACTURE, SAYING THAT, “MY MOTHER DID KNIT AND SEW, AND HAD A TREADLE-TYPE SINGER SEWING MACHINE [AND] WHILE I CAN'T BE SURE, IT IS LIKELY THAT SHE MADE THE BEAR'S CLOTHES AND THE BABY BONNET.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013009
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BALE OR HAY HOOK
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, WOOD, IRON
Catalogue Number
P20150010009
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BALE OR HAY HOOK
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
METAL, WOOD, IRON
No. Pieces
1
Height
11.0
Length
24.5
Width
12..7
Description
HAY CROOK OR BALE HOOK. METAL AND WOODEN HANDLE, WITH CAST IRON HOOK. MAIN PORTION OF THE HANDLE IS WOODEN, WITH A MEDIUM AND LIGHT GREY PAINTED FINISH. WHERE THE HANDLE ATTACHES TO THE HOOK IS SILVER COLOURED METAL, WITH A MEDIUM LIGHT BLUE PAINTED FINISH. THE HOOK ITSELF IS CAST IRON, WITH A RED PAINTED FINISH. OVERALL IN FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. STRUCTURALLY THE HOOK IS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION, BUT THE PAINTED SURFACES ARE ALL VERY WORN. THE WOODEN HANDLE APPEARS TO HAVE BEEN FINISHED IN A LIGHT GREY FIRST, WITH A LATER ADDITION OF MEDIUM GREY PAINT. BOTH OF THE GREY FINISHS ARE VERY SCUFFED AND SCRATCHED AND THERE IS A LOT OF EXPOSED WOOD. THE MEDIUM BLUE FINISH OF THE METAL PORTION OF THE HANDLE HAS FLAKED OFF IN SEVERAL AREAS. SEVERAL MORE AREAS OF THE FINISH ARE LOOSE. THE RED FINISH ON THE CAST IRON IS VERY WORN, REVEILING BOTH UNFINISHED METAL AND A LIGHT BLUE PAINT.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS HAY CROOK OR BALE HOOK WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). ALL FOUR MEN AGREE THAT THE HOOK WAS USED TO HELP FIGHT HAYSTACK FIRES ON LOCAL FARMS. BROWN EXPLAINS THE DIFFICULTY OF DEALING WITH A HAYSTACK FIRE AND WHY THE HOOK WAS SO USEFUL: “WITH A HAYSTACK FIRE, ONCE IT STARTS ON FIRE, THE WHOLE STACK IS WRECKED, EVEN THOUGH IT DOESN’T BURN, BECAUSE THE SMOKE GOES THROUGH IT, THE HAY IS CONTAMINATED AND THE ANIMALS AREN’T GOING TO EAT IT, SO YOU PRETTY WELL HAVE TO KNOCK IT DOWN ANYWAY. AS SOON AS YOU PUT WATER ON IT, IT WILL SMOLDER, AND SMOLDER, AND SMOLDER. PROBABLY ONE OF THE HARDEST FIRES TO PUT OUT IS A HAYSTACK FIRE, BECAUSE YOU CAN’T GET THE WATER TO IT. … YOU PUT YOUR WATER, YOU SOAK ON TOP OF THE BALES AND IT JUST WON’T SOAK IN, SO YOU HAVE TO TAKE EVERY BALE APART, BREAK EVERY PIECE APART, EVERY LITTLE BALE, BREAK IT DOWN, HOSE IT DOWN, NEXT BALE, BREAK IT APART, HOSE IT DOWN, AND CONTINUE.” LAZENBY RECALLED SEEING THE HAY CROOK ON THE TRUCK WHEN HE FIRST STARTED AND EXPLAINED: “I’M NOT A FARM KID AND I DIDN’T KNOW WHAT IT WAS.” HE ASKED WHAT IT WAS, RECEIVING THE REPLY: “’WELL, IT’S A BALE HOOK’ AND I SAID, ‘SO I’M NOT TRYING TO BE A SMART ALECK HERE, BUT WHY DO WE HAVE BALE HOOKS ON THE ENGINE?’ THEY SAID, ‘WELL, IN CASE WE GO TO A HAY BALE FIRE.’ YOU KNOW, ASK A SIMPLE QUESTION, YOU GET A SIMPLE ANSWER, RIGHT? … I NEVER SAW ONE USED AND … THIS IS ONE OF THOSE PIECES OF EQUIPMENT THAT GOT PHASED OUT SHORTLY AFTER THE BEGINNING OF MY CAREER. … THIS WAS ONE OF THOSE PIECES THAT WE FOUND THAT WE JUST DIDN’T HAVE A USE FOR. YOU CAN MOVE HAY BALES WITH OTHER MEANS THAN TO HAVE A SET OF BALE HOOKS ON THE TRUCKS, SO THEY WENT AWAY.” PETIT RECALLED USING THE HOOK AND ADDED: “IT WAS USUALLY ON THE PUMP WHEN THEY RESPONDED TO GRASS FIRES … SOMETIMES WE’D TAKE THAT, NOT USUALLY TO FIGHT THE FIRE, BUT WHEN YOU HAD TO KNOCK [THE BALES] DOWN, YOU HAD TO DRAG THE BALES OUT OF THE WAY. OTHERWISE THEY WOULD START THE FIRE ALL OVER AGAIN. IT WASN’T USED THAT MUCH BUT WE DID GO TO QUITE A FEW FIRES, YOU KNOW, STACKS OF BALES.” DZUREN AGREED: “WELL, IT’S THE BAILING HOOK. AND THAT’S JUST TO MOVE ANY, WHETHER IT’S A BALE OF STRAW OR ANY OTHER ITEM THAT HAD TO BE MOVED AWAY FROM THE FIRE, OR JUST, YOU KNOW, SEGREGATED FROM WHAT WAS ALREADY BURNING.” HE RECALLED THAT IT WAS IN USE WHEN HE STARTED IN 1959 AND ADDED “IT WOULD HAVE BEEN ON ONE OF THE VEHICLES … PARTICULARLY … COUNTY VEHICLES THAT WOULD RESPOND OUT TO THE COUNTY, TO THE FARM FIRE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010009
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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