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Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170029004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
61
Width
17.5
Description
HAND-PAINTED SIGN ON COMPRESSED WOOD BOARD; SIGN IS PAINTED WHITE WITH RED HAND-PAINTED TEXT “NO SMOKING”. SIGN HAS TWO ROUND HOLES (0.7CM DIAMETER) DRILLED AT EITHER END; FRONT OF SIGN HAS CHIPS AT LOWER LEFT CORNER AND RIGHT EDGE ON FRONT; FRONT OF SIGN HAS PAINT SMUDGES AND SCUFFS. BACK OF SIGN HAS CHIPS ON LEFT EDGE, UPPER LEFT CORNER, AND RIGHT EDGE; RIGHT HOLE ON BACK IS TORN AND SPLIT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
BUSINESS
History
THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE RECREATION AND CULTURE DEPARTMENT DONATED OBJECTS FROM THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE UPON RENOVATIONS TO THE YATES THEATRE IN SEPTEMBER 2017. THE OBJECTS DONATED WERE USED IN THE YATES AFTER ITS CONSTRUCTION IN THE 1960S. ON DECEMBER 18, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND LINDA BAYLY REGARDING THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH AND MEMORIES OF THE YATES THEATRE. ED AND LINDA BAYLY IDENTIFIED THE OBJECTS DONATED FROM THE YATES AND RECALLED THEIR OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE OBJECTS. ON THE SIGN, ED BAYLY ELABORATED, “THAT WAS DONE BY OUR SIGN WRITER IN THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE. WE HAD A REGULAR SIGN WRITER THAT DID THE…TRAFFIC SIGNS AND THINGS SUCH AS THAT. THEY USED TO PAINT THEM BUT THEY DON’T DO THAT ANYMORE OF COURSE. THEY USE THAT VINYL STUFF NOW. WE WERE SO DEPENDENT UPON VOLUNTEERS TO MAKE SURE THAT THEY DID THAT TYPE OF THING. WE COULDN’T HAVE OPERATED WITHOUT THE VOLUNTEERS THAT WERE THERE. THEY DID SO MUCH OF IT. IT HAS CHANGED LATELY…IT’S MORE AND MORE DIFFICULT TO FIND PEOPLE THAT ARE WILLING OR ABLE TO DO THAT.” “[THERE WAS NO SMOKING] IN THE AUDITORIUM. IT’S A PUBLIC PLACE YOU KNOW, WITH 500 PEOPLE IN THERE. IT MAKES IT DIFFICULT IF YOU DO HAVE ANY SORT OF FIRE IN THERE. [IN THE EARLIEST DAYS] YOU COULD SMOKE THEN, AS FAR AS I REMEMBER. IN MOVIE THEATRES AT THAT TIME YOU COULD SMOKE IN THERE WHICH OF COURSE IS A THING OF THE PAST NOW.” “[THAT WAS CHANGED BY THE] CITY.” “WITH THE SIGN LATER, YOU COULD POINT IT OUT TO THEM SAYING, 'REMEMBER, THIS IS WHAT WE EXPECT YOU TO DO.' AND THEY COULDN’T SAY, 'WELL, I DIDN’T KNOW THAT.'” LINDA BAYLY ADDED, “THIS NO SMOKING SIGN RIGHT HERE REMINDS ME OF THE TIME WHEN MUSICAL THEATRE WAS DOING THE SOUND OF MUSIC AND THEY HAD SEVERAL LADIES DRESSED UP AS NUNS. ONE GIRL WAS A SMOKER. I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DID IT BECAUSE SHE WAS A SINGER AS WELL. I CAN SEE ALL THESE GIRLS IN THEIR NUN’S HABITS WAITING TO GO ON STAGE, STANDING UNDER THIS SIGN AND SMOKING LIKE A MAD FIEND. YOU THOUGHT, 'AHA, YOU SHOULDN’T BE DOING THIS', FOR ONE THING ON STAGE FOR ANOTHER BECAUSE YOU WEREN’T ALLOWED, ON STAGE, TO BE SMOKING. BUT PARTICULARLY IN THEIR NUN’S COSTUMES. THEY ALL LOOKED SO BEAUTIFUL EXCEPT FOR THIS ONE GIRL WHO JUST HAD TO HAVE THAT CIGARETTE BEFORE SHE WENT ON STAGE.” “ALL THE CURTAINS [WERE] MADE OUT OF FABRIC AND THERE’S PROPS AND ALL KINDS OF STUFF GOING ON ALL THE TIME. THERE’S OFTEN SAWDUST FROM THE WORKSHOP AND FROM THE PEOPLE WORKING BACKSTAGE. [IT TURNED TO NO SMOKING] FOR THE SAFETY AND A GOOD SENSE REASON.” “[THERE WAS NO SMOKING] IN THE AUDITORIUM, NO DRINKS, WATER OR ANYTHING. THEY’D TRY TO BUY POP OR SOMETHING AT THE CONCESSION AREA AND TAKE IT INTO THE THEATRE, NONE OF THAT WAS ALLOWED RIGHT FROM THE OUTSET.” MACLEAN ADDITIONALLY INTERVIEWED JEFF CARLSON ON NOVEMBER 15, 2017. CARLSON WORKED FULL-TIME IN THE YATES THEATRE PRODUCING, WRITING, AND DIRECTING WITH NEW WEST THEATRE, LETHBRIDGE. CARLSON ELABORATED ON THE SIGN, “IT MAY HAVE BEEN IN THE LOADING DOCK. I’M TRYING TO RECALL WHERE IT WAS BUT I’M SURE I HAVE HUNDREDS OF PICTURES OF US SMOKING UNDERNEATH THIS SIGN BECAUSE THAT WAS THE ONLY PLACE WE SMOKED IN THE THEATRE. IT’S HARD TO IMAGINE NOW THAT WE SMOKED ALL THE TIME IN REHEARSALS, WE SMOKED ON STAGE. WE’D HAVE TO HAVE A GIANT ASHTRAY SITTING OUT THERE. WE USED TO SMOKE IN THE AUDITORIUM WHILE DIRECTING, SO TO SEE THE ‘NO SMOKING’ SIGN BRINGS BACK A LOT OF MEMORIES. WE JUST KEPT MOVING. FIRST WE COULD SMOKE ANYWHERE – THERE’S PHOTOS OF ED BAYLY WITH A CIGARETTE AND A BEER RUNNING LIGHTS IN THE BOOTH. THEN WE’RE ONLY ALLOWED TO SMOKE BACKSTAGE AND THEN EVENTUALLY, ONLY ALLOWED TO SMOKE IN THE LOADING DOCK. I DON’T KNOW WHAT YEAR THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN FROM BUT IT WAS THERE EVER SINCE I WAS IN THE BUILDING.” “BACK IN THE DAY, EVERYONE SMOKED. IN THEATRE, IN ANY OF THE PERFORMING ARTS, I THINK SMOKING WAS A BIT OF THE CULTURE EVEN TO THIS DAY. BALLET DANCERS AND ARTISTS ARE SOME OF THE…HEAVIEST CHAIN SMOKERS THERE ARE. WORKING BALLETS AT THE UNIVERSITY THEATRE AND THESE BEAUTIFUL DANCERS WILL BE OUT THERE…THEY WOULD WAFT INTO THE WINGS WHERE SOMEBODY WOULD HAVE A LIT CIGARETTE AND GIVE IT RIGHT TO THEM. THEY WOULD TAKE A COUPLE OF PUFFS, BLOW OUT, AND GO RIGHT BACK ONSTAGE. IT’S CRAZY TO ME ‘CAUSE WE SMOKED – WE’D DO A TWO-HOUR SHOW AND DURING THE SHOW, IF YOU WEREN’T ONSTAGE, YOU WERE PROBABLY IN THE BACK LOADING DOCK JUST OFF TO THE STAGE LEFT WING, SMOKING AWAY. EVERYONE IN THE AUDIENCE COULD SMELL IT. THESE ARE THINGS WE NEVER CONSIDERED UNTIL WE MADE THE INTELLIGENT CHOICE TO BAN SMOKING EVERYWHERE AND NOW IF SOMEBODY LIGHTS UP A CIGARETTE IN A TEN THOUSAND SQUARE-FOOT AREA, YOU SMELL IT IMMEDIATELY AND GO, ‘HOW DID WE USED TO DO THAT?’ THAT’S A GREAT OLD SIGN.” “THE SMOKERS ALWAYS HAD A PUSH-BACK ON IT. IN HINDSIGHT, IT MAKES PERFECT, INTENSE SENSE BUT AT THE TIME, THEY’RE LIKE 'THIS IS MY--I CAN SMOKE WHEREVER I DARN WELL WANT TO.' ONE OF THE CHALLENGES THAT WE FACE IN THEATRE NOWADAYS…[IS] SMOKING WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE PLAY. IT WAS WRITTEN INTO IT. EVERY TABLE HAD AN ASHTRAY AND A CIGARETTE CASE. YOU DIDN’T HAVE PACKAGES OF CIGARETTES, YOU HAD YOUR LOVELY CIGARETTE CASE THAT YOU OFFERED AROUND. NOW, YOU’RE NOT ALLOWED, SO HOW DO YOU DO THESE PLAYS WITH HISTORICAL VALUE WHERE SMOKING WAS, YOU KNOW FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE, SMOKING WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF PEOPLE’S LIVES? SOMETIMES THEY’RE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE PLAY, THEY’RE WRITTEN RIGHT INTO IT. WHEN WE DO CHANGE THE RULES, IT’S DIFFICULT AND I DON’T KNOW IF YOU GET WAIVERS OR HOW YOU GO ABOUT IT. I’M WORKING WITH ONE GROUP RIGHT NOW TRYING TO GET AN ELECTRONIC CIGARETTE TO FUNCTION AND BE SOMEWHAT BELIEVABLE ONSTAGE. WE’RE TRYING BUT NOW EVEN THE ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES…PEOPLE ARE LOOKING DOWN THEIR NOSE AT THEM SO IT’S A DIFFERENT WORLD…IT’S A CHALLENGE.” ED AND LINDA BAYLY RECALLED THEIR YEARS SPENT WORKING WITH THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE, WITH ED BAYLY NOTING, “I WAS MANAGER AT THE YATES FOR 35 YEARS. I WAS INVOLVED WITH THE LOCAL DRAMA GROUPS FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE THAT SO THAT WAS PARTIALLY THE REASON THAT I WAS CHOSEN FOR THE JOB. I HAD THE CONTACTS." “WHAT I REMEMBER MOST OF ALL WAS THE FACT THAT THE CITY PUT THE FUNDING FOR THE YATES UP TO THE PUBLIC IN A PUBLIC PLEBISCITE, AND IT WAS TURNED DOWN TWICE BEFORE THEY WENT AHEAD WITH THE MONEY THAT THEY HAD AND BUILT THE PLACE. PEOPLE WERE SAYING, 'WELL, WHAT DO YOU WANT THAT FOR, NO ONE’S EVER GOING TO USE IT.' THEN WE HAD THE OPENING AND FRED WEATHERUP, WHO WAS THE OWNER OF ENERSON MOTORS, BROUGHT IN SOME GO-GO DANCERS AND THEY HAD CARS PARKED OUT IN FRONT OF THE YATES, AND THAT SORT OF BROUGHT IN OTHER PEOPLE THAT WEREN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE ARTS AND THEY GOT A CHANCE TO SEE THE PLACE.” “THE REST OF THE PROVINCE GOT THE JUBILEE AUDITORIUMS WHICH WE DIDN’T. THOSE ARE WAY BIGGER OF COURSE AND A LOT MORE EXPENSIVE. WE WERE VERY FORTUNATE IN THIS MATTER–WE HAD A BEQUEST FROM THE YATES FAMILY THAT PRETTY WELL PAID FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE BUILDING. AFTER A VERY FEW YEARS, YOU [STARTED TO] WONDER HOW YOU GOT ALONG WITHOUT IT BECAUSE IT WAS IN CONSTANT USE, AND STILL IS. IT WAS VERY WELL BUILT AND IT WILL CONTINUE TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY FOR ANY NUMBER OF YEARS BECAUSE WE’RE IN THE PROCESS OF RENOVATING IT, ADDING ON TO IT.” “I WAS HIRED ON BEFORE THE BUILDING WAS FINISHED SO I WAS THERE DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF IT. I HAD SOME INPUT. IT WAS EXCITING. [THE] JOB WAS DIFFERENT ALL THE TIME. THEY HAD THESE GROUPS COME IN, AND…IT WAS AN EVERYDAY EVENT FOR ME. THEY ALL USED TO SAY, 'HOW COME YOU STAY SO CALM?' AND I WOULD SAY 'WELL, BECAUSE I DO IT EVERY DAY, AND YOU ONLY DO IT ONCE A YEAR.'” LINDA BAYLY SPOKE ABOUT HER OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE YATES THEATRE, NOTING, “I WAS THE SECRETARY IN THE FRONT OFFICE AND WORKED WITH MAKING BOOKINGS FOR THE BUILDING AND GENERAL SECRETARIAL WORK AT THAT TIME. ED WAS THE TECHNICIAN FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE HE BECAME HE MANAGER. HE HAD TO MAKE SURE ALL THESE RULES BACKSTAGE WERE LOOKED AFTER AND ATTENDED TO AND COMPLETED.” JEFF CARLSON ELABORATED ON HIS TIME WITH THE YATES THEATRE, STATING, “I SPENT MY ENTIRE PRETTY MUCH LIFE…IN THE YATES, IN THE GENEVIEVE YATES MEMORIAL THEATRE. I STARTED GOING TO THE YATES PROBABLY IN THE ‘70S WITH THE KIWANIS MUSIC FESTIVAL AND SCHOOL BAND AND CHOIR EVENTS…BACK IN LAKEVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. AFTER THAT I STARTED ACTING IN THEATRE AND EVENTUALLY PRODUCING AND DIRECTING THEATRE UP UNTIL LESS THAN A YEAR AGO.” “[AT THE TIME] I FIGURED 'NOW THIS IS FUN, I LIKE THIS, I THINK I’M OKAY AT IT' SO I GAVE MYSELF SOME DEADLINES. I SAID, 'I’LL PURSUE THIS UNTIL I’M THIRTY AND IF I HAVEN’T MADE A CAREER IN IT BY THEN, THEN I WILL DO MY FALLBACK EDUCATION OR POLITICAL SCIENCE OR RUSSIAN HISTORY.' I HAD BITTEN OFF A BIT OF IT AT THAT POINT. BUT, BY THE AGE OF THIRTY, I WAS WORKING FULLTIME IN THEATRE, WRITING, DIRECTING, PRODUCING PRODUCTIONS FOR NEW WEST THEATRE AT THE YATES.” “[I WAS] PROFESSIONALLY EMPLOYED AT THE YATES BY [THE] LATE ‘80S, EARLY ‘90S. THERE WAS A MIX THERE BECAUSE WE WERE DOING FULL-TIME THEATRE PRODUCTIONS BY THE LATE ‘80S BUT THEN I TOOK TIME OFF TO TAKE A TOURING COMPANY THROUGH ALBERTA AND B.C., FOR NEW WEST THEATRE. [I] ENDED UP LIKING IT SO MUCH THAT I STAYED IN VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. [I] CAME BACK FOR A TWO-WEEK VISIT ON MY WAY TO TORONTO TO GO INTO FILM AND TV. AS I WAS HERE FOR TWO WEEKS, THE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR QUIT AND THEY SAID, 'PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE – ', AND SO I SAID, 'I’LL DO IT FOR A YEAR.' THAT IS NOW TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. IT WAS JUST CIRCUMSTANCES.” “WE [HAD] REPLACED THE SEATS IN THE YATES AND REPAINTED THE WHOLE THING. IT WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MISTAKES THAT WAS MADE, IN MY OPINION, WAS THAT BLUE COLOUR WE PUT ON THE WALLS. THEY CHANGED [THE PAINT COLOUR] TO THIS LIGHT BLUE THAT CAUSED THE LIGHTING DESIGNS TO BE SUCH A CHALLENGE.” “WE DID EVERYTHING. WE RAN THE LIGHTS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, FOCUSED THE LIGHTS. THEY MADE ME SEW COSTUMES. I REMEMBER MAKING A POODLE SKIRT FOR A SHOW IN 1986. I’VE LEARNED HOW TO MAKE A POODLE SKIRT. IT WAS TERRIBLE, BUT I LEARNED HOW TO MAKE IT. IN MY DEGREE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, YOU HAVE TO GET SO MANY, WHAT THEY CALL ‘BACKSTAGE CREDITS’, IN RUNNING BACKSTAGE SHOWS, HANGING THE LIGHTS, DOING WARDROBE. THEY WAIVED THAT REQUIREMENT FOR ME BECAUSE, GROWING UP IN NEW WEST AND DOING EVERYTHING IN NEW WEST, THEY KNEW WE DID EVERYTHING. WE BUILT THE SETS, PAINTED THE SETS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, DID EVERYTHING. I WAS VERY FORTUNATE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170029004
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170029005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
91.6
Width
54.1
Description
WOOD BOARD WITH WHITE PAINTED BACKGROUND AND RED TEXT WITH YELLOW SHADOW READING “NOTICE” AND BLACK TEXT “AFTER YOUR REHEARSAL OR PERFORMANCE, PLEASE CLEAR THE STAGE AND RETURN EVERYTHING TO ITS PROPER PLACE. IF WE HAVE TO DO IT, THEN YOUR GROUP WILL BE CHARGED.” FRONT OF SIGN HAS BLACK PAINT SMEAR IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER AND LOWER LEFT CORNER; SIGN HAS PAINT STAINS ACROSS FRONT AND IS CHIPPED; SIGN HAS FOUR HOLES DRILLED IN EACH CORNER. BACK OF SIGN IS BROWN WITH WHITE PAINT SMEARS AND SPOTS, AND WHITE PAINT STAINING EDGES. BACK OF SIGN HAS GREY SPOTS STAINING AND LOWER EDGE OF SIGN SHOWS SIGNS OF WATER DAMAGER; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
BUSINESS
History
THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE RECREATION AND CULTURE DEPARTMENT DONATED OBJECTS FROM THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE UPON RENOVATIONS TO THE YATES THEATRE IN SEPTEMBER 2017. THE OBJECTS DONATED WERE USED IN THE YATES AFTER ITS CONSTRUCTION IN THE 1960S. ON DECEMBER 18, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND LINDA BAYLY REGARDING THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH AND MEMORIES OF THE YATES THEATRE. ED AND LINDA BAYLY IDENTIFIED THE OBJECTS DONATED FROM THE YATES AND RECALLED THEIR OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE OBJECTS. ON THE SIGN, ED BAYLY ELABORATED, “THAT WAS DONE BY OUR SIGN WRITER IN THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE. WE HAD A REGULAR SIGN WRITER THAT DID THE…TRAFFIC SIGNS AND THINGS SUCH AS THAT. THEY USED TO PAINT THEM BUT THEY DON’T DO THAT ANYMORE OF COURSE. THEY USE THAT VINYL STUFF NOW. THAT SORT OF GIVES YOU AN IDEA – THAT SIGN THERE THAT SAYS 'AFTER YOUR REHEARSAL OR PERFORMANCE PLEASE CLEAR THE STAGE AND RETURN EVERYTHING TO ITS PROPER PLACE. IF WE HAVE TO DO IT, THEN YOUR GROUP WILL BE CHARGED.' WE WERE JUST SO DEPENDENT UPON VOLUNTEERS TO MAKE SURE THAT THEY DID THAT TYPE OF THING. WE COULDN’T HAVE OPERATED WITHOUT THE VOLUNTEERS THAT WERE THERE. THEY DID SO MUCH OF IT. IT HAS CHANGED LATELY, TOO, IT’S MORE AND MORE DIFFICULT TO FIND PEOPLE THAT ARE WILLING OR ABLE TO DO THAT. SIGN OF THE TIMES I THINK…” “[THAT SIGN] IS REMINISCENT OF THE VOLUNTEERS THAT WE HAD. IT REMINDS ME OF THEM.” “[VOLUNTEERS WERE] INVALUABLE. NO WAY THAT WE COULD OPERATE WITHOUT THEM. THE NUMBER OF HOURS THAT THEY PUT IN WAS PHENOMENAL. FOR INSTANCE IN MUSICAL THEATRE IT WOULD TAKE CLOSE TO A HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS TO MOUNT A PRODUCTION AND THAT WAS WITH NOBODY GETTING PAID.” LINDA BAYLY ADDED, “THERE WAS AN ATTITUDE AT THE TIME OF ‘IT BEING JUST SO MUCH FUN TO BE INVOLVED’. ED’S FATHER USED TO COME OUT. HE WAS A CARPENTER BY TRADE AND HE JUST LOVED TO HELP. HIS MOTHER LOVED TO SEW COSTUMES AND THEY HAD THEIR LITTLE GROUP OF LADIES DOWN IN [THE] COSTUME ROOM MAKING COSTUMES. THE GUYS WOULD BUILD THE SET AND THEY WERE PART OF THEIR OWN LITTLE CREW. THERE WERE OTHERS THAT WERE KEEPING THINGS MOVING, STAGE MANAGERS, AND PEOPLE THAT WERE CUING. IT WAS JUST ALL A FUN THING TO DO. A LOT OF PEOPLE JUST WANT TO BE ON STAGE AND SING AND DANCE AND HEAR THE APPLAUSE AND IT’S WONDERFUL. IN THOSE YEARS WE WERE INVOLVED WITH MUSICAL THEATRE AND PLAYGOERS TO BE PART OF SOMETHING FUN TO GIVE TO THE AUDIENCE. THEY WOULD COME IN AND BUILD EVERYTHING, MAKE THE MESS, CLEAN UP THE MESS, LEAVE AND GO HOME FEELING GOOD ABOUT IT. TIMES HAVE CHANGED. ALL THEATRE GROUPS FOR EXAMPLE ARE SCRAMBLING RIGHT NOW BECAUSE OF THE YATES. THE YATES IS SO IMPORTANT BECAUSE IT’S A SMALLER THEATRE, BUT THEY’RE HAVING TO GO TO SCHOOLS AND THEY HAVE TO GO TO CHURCH BASEMENTS. THIS WAS A HOME FOR PEOPLE WHO LOVED THE ARTS AND IT WAS MUSIC AND DANCE…IT WAS GOOD.” “PEOPLE MADE LIFELONG FRIENDS - BECAUSE THEY HAD A PLACE TO GO.” MACLEAN ADDITIONALLY INTERVIEWED JEFF CARLSON ON NOVEMBER 15, 2017. CARLSON WORKED FULL-TIME IN THE YATES THEATRE PRODUCING, WRITING, AND DIRECTING WITH NEW WEST THEATRE, LETHBRIDGE. CARLSON ELABORATED ON THE SIGN, “THIS WAS VERY RELEVANT. NEVER ENFORCED. IT’S THE JOY OF COMMUNITY THEATRE. YES, THE STAFF WANTS TO BE AS COST-EFFECTIVE AS POSSIBLE AND MAKE SURE THAT…IF TEN O’CLOCK COMES AND THEY LEAVE AND EVERYTHING NEEDS TO BE CLEANED UP, THE STAFF’S THERE FOR TWO MORE HOURS, THEY’LL BE BILLED BACK. TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE, THAT’S NEVER BEEN ENFORCED BECAUSE IT IS COMMUNITY THEATRE, IT’S A COMMUNITY SPACE, AND EVERY PERSON THAT’S EVER WORKED IN THE YATES, THEIR HEART AND SOUL WAS THERE. IT WAS THERE TO DO WHAT’S RIGHT FOR THE COMMUNITY, SO I THINK IT WAS A STERN WARNING AND MOST OF US, BEING GOOD CANADIANS, FOLLOWED IT. I DON’T THINK IT WAS EVER ENFORCED. IT COULD HAVE BEEN AND THAT WAS THE THREAT.” “I DOUBT THIS WAS UP FIRST DAY. I COULD TELL YOU TALES ABOUT THE EARLY DAYS OF THEATRE WHERE…THE SHOW WOULD START AT EIGHT, BE DONE BY TEN THIRTY AND THEN WE WOULD DRINK AND SMOKE AND PLAY THE PIANO DOWN IN THE GREEN ROOM UNTIL THREE OR FOUR O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING. WE WERE A FAMILY, WE ALL LOVED AND TRUSTED EACH OTHER SO THERE WAS NEVER ANY FEAR THAT WE WERE GOING TO DAMAGE ANYTHING. I WISH PEOPLE WOULD SIGN THINGS ON THE BACK…SO YOU ALWAYS KNEW WHERE IT CAME FROM.” ED AND LINDA BAYLY RECALLED THEIR YEARS SPENT WORKING WITH THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE, WITH ED BAYLY NOTING, “I WAS MANAGER AT THE YATES FOR 35 YEARS. I WAS INVOLVED WITH THE LOCAL DRAMA GROUPS FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE THAT SO THAT WAS PARTIALLY THE REASON THAT I WAS CHOSEN FOR THE JOB. I HAD THE CONTACTS." “WHAT I REMEMBER MOST OF ALL WAS THE FACT THAT THE CITY PUT THE FUNDING FOR THE YATES UP TO THE PUBLIC IN A PUBLIC PLEBISCITE, AND IT WAS TURNED DOWN TWICE BEFORE THEY WENT AHEAD WITH THE MONEY THAT THEY HAD AND BUILT THE PLACE. PEOPLE WERE SAYING, 'WELL, WHAT DO YOU WANT THAT FOR, NO ONE’S EVER GOING TO USE IT.' THEN WE HAD THE OPENING AND FRED WEATHERUP, WHO WAS THE OWNER OF ENERSON MOTORS, BROUGHT IN SOME GO-GO DANCERS AND THEY HAD CARS PARKED OUT IN FRONT OF THE YATES, AND THAT SORT OF BROUGHT IN OTHER PEOPLE THAT WEREN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE ARTS AND THEY GOT A CHANCE TO SEE THE PLACE.” “THE REST OF THE PROVINCE GOT THE JUBILEE AUDITORIUMS WHICH WE DIDN’T. THOSE ARE WAY BIGGER OF COURSE AND A LOT MORE EXPENSIVE. WE WERE VERY FORTUNATE IN THIS MATTER–WE HAD A BEQUEST FROM THE YATES FAMILY THAT PRETTY WELL PAID FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE BUILDING. AFTER A VERY FEW YEARS, YOU [STARTED TO] WONDER HOW YOU GOT ALONG WITHOUT IT BECAUSE IT WAS IN CONSTANT USE, AND STILL IS. IT WAS VERY WELL BUILT AND IT WILL CONTINUE TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY FOR ANY NUMBER OF YEARS BECAUSE WE’RE IN THE PROCESS OF RENOVATING IT, ADDING ON TO IT.” “I WAS HIRED ON BEFORE THE BUILDING WAS FINISHED SO I WAS THERE DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF IT. I HAD SOME INPUT. IT WAS EXCITING. [THE] JOB WAS DIFFERENT ALL THE TIME. THEY HAD THESE GROUPS COME IN, AND…IT WAS AN EVERYDAY EVENT FOR ME. THEY ALL USED TO SAY, 'HOW COME YOU STAY SO CALM?' AND I WOULD SAY 'WELL, BECAUSE I DO IT EVERY DAY, AND YOU ONLY DO IT ONCE A YEAR.'” LINDA BAYLY SPOKE ABOUT HER OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE YATES THEATRE, NOTING, “I WAS THE SECRETARY IN THE FRONT OFFICE AND WORKED WITH MAKING BOOKINGS FOR THE BUILDING AND GENERAL SECRETARIAL WORK AT THAT TIME. ED WAS THE TECHNICIAN FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE HE BECAME HE MANAGER. HE HAD TO MAKE SURE ALL THESE RULES BACKSTAGE WERE LOOKED AFTER AND ATTENDED TO AND COMPLETED.” JEFF CARLSON ELABORATED ON HIS TIME WITH THE YATES THEATRE, STATING, “I SPENT MY ENTIRE PRETTY MUCH LIFE…IN THE YATES, IN THE GENEVIEVE YATES MEMORIAL THEATRE. I STARTED GOING TO THE YATES PROBABLY IN THE ‘70S WITH THE KIWANIS MUSIC FESTIVAL AND SCHOOL BAND AND CHOIR EVENTS…BACK IN LAKEVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. AFTER THAT I STARTED ACTING IN THEATRE AND EVENTUALLY PRODUCING AND DIRECTING THEATRE UP UNTIL LESS THAN A YEAR AGO.” “[AT THE TIME] I FIGURED 'NOW THIS IS FUN, I LIKE THIS, I THINK I’M OKAY AT IT' SO I GAVE MYSELF SOME DEADLINES. I SAID, 'I’LL PURSUE THIS UNTIL I’M THIRTY AND IF I HAVEN’T MADE A CAREER IN IT BY THEN, THEN I WILL DO MY FALLBACK EDUCATION OR POLITICAL SCIENCE OR RUSSIAN HISTORY.' I HAD BITTEN OFF A BIT OF IT AT THAT POINT. BUT, BY THE AGE OF THIRTY, I WAS WORKING FULLTIME IN THEATRE, WRITING, DIRECTING, PRODUCING PRODUCTIONS FOR NEW WEST THEATRE AT THE YATES.” “[I WAS] PROFESSIONALLY EMPLOYED AT THE YATES BY [THE] LATE ‘80S, EARLY ‘90S. THERE WAS A MIX THERE BECAUSE WE WERE DOING FULL-TIME THEATRE PRODUCTIONS BY THE LATE ‘80S BUT THEN I TOOK TIME OFF TO TAKE A TOURING COMPANY THROUGH ALBERTA AND B.C., FOR NEW WEST THEATRE. [I] ENDED UP LIKING IT SO MUCH THAT I STAYED IN VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. [I] CAME BACK FOR A TWO-WEEK VISIT ON MY WAY TO TORONTO TO GO INTO FILM AND TV. AS I WAS HERE FOR TWO WEEKS, THE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR QUIT AND THEY SAID, 'PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE – ', AND SO I SAID, 'I’LL DO IT FOR A YEAR.' THAT IS NOW TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. IT WAS JUST CIRCUMSTANCES.” “WE [HAD] REPLACED THE SEATS IN THE YATES AND REPAINTED THE WHOLE THING. IT WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MISTAKES THAT WAS MADE, IN MY OPINION, WAS THAT BLUE COLOUR WE PUT ON THE WALLS. THEY CHANGED [THE PAINT COLOUR] TO THIS LIGHT BLUE THAT CAUSED THE LIGHTING DESIGNS TO BE SUCH A CHALLENGE.” “WE DID EVERYTHING. WE RAN THE LIGHTS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, FOCUSED THE LIGHTS. THEY MADE ME SEW COSTUMES. I REMEMBER MAKING A POODLE SKIRT FOR A SHOW IN 1986. I’VE LEARNED HOW TO MAKE A POODLE SKIRT. IT WAS TERRIBLE, BUT I LEARNED HOW TO MAKE IT. IN MY DEGREE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, YOU HAVE TO GET SO MANY, WHAT THEY CALL ‘BACKSTAGE CREDITS’, IN RUNNING BACKSTAGE SHOWS, HANGING THE LIGHTS, DOING WARDROBE. THEY WAIVED THAT REQUIREMENT FOR ME BECAUSE, GROWING UP IN NEW WEST AND DOING EVERYTHING IN NEW WEST, THEY KNEW WE DID EVERYTHING. WE BUILT THE SETS, PAINTED THE SETS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, DID EVERYTHING. I WAS VERY FORTUNATE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170029005
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2015
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20170029003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2015
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
130
Length
80
Width
27
Description
SPOTLIGHT PAINTED BLUE; BODY FIXED ON STAND WITH THREE WHEELS AT BASE. SPOTLIGHT HAS LONG CYLINDRICAL BODY WITH FRONT OPENING TO SHOW LIGHT AND GLASS COVER INSIDE. LEFT SIDE HAS BLACK POWER CORD WOUND ON HOOK ATTACHED TO BODY. RIGHT SIDE HAS RED AND WHITE TEXT SCREWED ON “STRONG TROUPERETTE II"; RIGHT SIDE HAS LEVER WITH RED HANDLE RUNNING ON TRACK FROM THE FRONT TO HALFWAY ALONG BODY. TOP HAS TWO LEVERS WITH ROUND RED KNOBS AT BACK, AND SIX SILVER LEVERS WITH BENT ENDS AND TIERED HEIGHTS. BACK HAS TWO RED HANDLES AND BLACK POWER CORD ATTACHMENT; BACK HAS RED PLATE WITH SILVER DETAILING, BORDER AND TEXT “SPOTLIGHT STRONG TROUPERETTE, VOLTS 115/120, AMPS 5, TYPE 45002-1, SER. NO. 71283, THE STRONG ELECTRIC CORP., TOLEDO, O., U.S.A., 45100, MADE IN U.S.A.”. BACK HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “YATES 63” ON RED PLATE. BACK HAS BLACK “ON/OFF” SWITCH BELOW RED AND SILVER PLATE. METAL STAND IS RUSTED; BASE HAS CHIPPED PAINT AND WHITE PAINT STAINING; BODY HAS CHIPPED PAINT AND SIDES HAVE DISCOLOURED WHITE TAPE AND ADHESIVE STAINING; BODY IS RUSTED AT EDGES. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LIGHTING DEVICE
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE RECREATION AND CULTURE DEPARTMENT DONATED OBJECTS FROM THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE UPON RENOVATIONS TO THE YATES THEATRE IN SEPTEMBER 2017. THE OBJECTS DONATED WERE USED IN THE YATES AFTER ITS CONSTRUCTION IN THE 1960S. ON DECEMBER 18, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND LINDA BAYLY REGARDING THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH AND MEMORIES OF THE YATES THEATRE. ED AND LINDA BAYLY IDENTIFIED THE OBJECTS DONATED FROM THE YATES AND RECALLED THEIR OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE OBJECTS. ON THE SPOT LAMP, ED BAYLY ELABORATED, “THEY’RE PRETTY STRAIGHTFORWARD TO OPERATE AND WE TRIED TO ENCOURAGE, PARTICULARLY WHEN SCHOOLS CAME IN, TO HAVE THE STUDENTS OPERATE THEM, IF THEY WERE WILLING OR ABLE OR WANTED TO. THEY COULDN’T DO MUCH HARM TO THAT. THE FOLLOW SPOT…IT’S LIKE A BIG FLASHLIGHT, WHEN YOU FOCUS ON WHATEVER YOU WANT TO POINT UP. YOU SEE IT ON TV WHEN THE ICE SKATERS, OR FIGURE SKATERS ARE DOING THEIR THING, FOLLOW THEM AROUND WITH THAT.” “[THE SPOT LAMP] COULD HAVE BEEN A BIT MORE POWERFUL, BUT WE COULDN’T AFFORD TO GET MUCH MORE THAN WHAT WE DID GET AT THE TIME. WE COULDN’T JUSTIFY IT…I DON’T THINK WE WERE AWARE OF WHAT WAS NEEDED UNTIL WE GOT INTO OPERATION. THEN IT BECAME EVIDENT THAT WE NEEDED ALL SORTS OF DIFFERENT LIGHTS.” “WE HAD TWO OF [THE SPOT LAMPS] THAT WE BOUGHT LATER ON AND [WERE] PRETTY GOOD. WE HAVE SINCE REPLACED THEM WITH MORE POWERFUL ONES, BUT THEY WERE QUITE ADEQUATE FOR OUR NEEDS AT THAT TIME. THEY FILLED A GAP THAT WE HAD THERE, FOR A FOLLOW SPOT WHICH ENABLED US TO DO MORE.” LINDA BAYLY ADDED, “I REMEMBER HAVING TO USE THAT [LAMP] ONE TIME. THERE WAS A GENTLEMAN IN TOWN BY THE NAME OF BOB (REID) AND HE WORKED IN…AN ELECTRICAL SHOP AND IF ED WAS ON HOLIDAYS, THEN BOB WOULD COME IN AND USE THE FOLLOW SPOT AND DID THE LIGHTING FOR [THE] SHOW. BUT [ONE DAY] BOB COULDN’T COME OVER AND SO THEY ASKED ME TO DO THE LIGHTING. I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT LIGHTING, BUT ED SAT ME DOWN AND SAID, 'NOW, HERE’S YOUR PLOT. DO THIS. DO THAT. AND AT THIS TIME DO WHATEVER.' THERE WERE TWO OCCASIONS. ONE WAS A PIANO RECITAL. [A] LOCAL TEACHER WANTED TO HAVE ALL HER STUDENTS PERFORM ON A STAGE ON A GRAND PIANO--AND WOULD I LIGHT THIS SHOW FOR HER? IT WAS INTERESTING BECAUSE SHE WANTED TO CHANGE THE LIGHTS FOR DIFFERENT MOODS. I COULD HAVE A BLUE LIGHT ON AND THEN CHANGE IT TO A RED LIGHT ON. SHE ASKED ME FOR A HARD ROLLING YELLOW. I HAVE NO IDEA TO THIS DAY WHAT SHE REALLY WANTED. I THINK I GAVE HER A BLUE LIGHT AND SHE WENT AWAY JUST AS HAPPY AS COULD BE. ANOTHER TIME THEY HAD A BRIDAL SHOW IN THERE AND WHOEVER WAS STAGE MANAGING THE BRIDAL SHOW SAID, 'NOW, AT THIS POINT WE WANT YOU TO SHINE A SPOT ON THAT ENTRYWAY, AND IT’S GOING TO BE THE BRIDE IN HER BEAUTIFUL FINERY. JUST HAVE HER LIT UP AND IT’S GOING TO BE WONDERFUL.' I FOLLOWED HER DIRECTIONS, HAD THE LIGHT OVER THERE AND THE OTHER GIRL THAT WAS THE MODEL FOR THE SHOW CAME OVER AND STOOD IN THE DARK, SO I THEN HAD TO, VERY UNPROFESSIONALLY, SWING THE LIGHT OVER AND CATCH HER. ED WOULD NEVER HAVE DONE THAT. HE WOULD HAVE TURNED THE LIGHT OFF, MOVED THE THING, TURNED IT BACK ON AND BROUGHT IT UP PROPERLY, BUT I WAS REALLY HAPPY THAT I WAS NOT DOING LIGHTS.” MACLEAN ADDITIONALLY INTERVIEWED JEFF CARLSON ON NOVEMBER 15, 2017. CARLSON WORKED FULL-TIME IN THE YATES THEATRE PRODUCING, WRITING, AND DIRECTING WITH NEW WEST THEATRE, LETHBRIDGE. CARLSON ELABORATED ON THE SPOT LAMP, “ROSCOE [YATES] GAVE THE MONEY AND THEN CITY COUNCIL OF THE DAY, BRAVELY KEPT PUTTING IT OUT TO PLEBISCITE, 'SHOULD WE BUILD THIS THEATRE?' BY THE TIME THEY FINALLY GOT THE OKAY, THE MONEY HAD DEPRECIATED IN VALUE SO MUCH THAT THEY DIDN’T HAVE ENOUGH TO DO WHAT THEY SHOULD HAVE DONE IN THE FIRST PLACE. IT WOULD HAVE BEEN SMART FOR THE STAFF TO BE SURREPTITIOUSLY BUYING EQUIPMENT AT THE CHEAPER PRICES. I THOUGHT IT MAY HAVE BEEN…WES STEFAN, ONE OF THE MAINSTAYS OF THEATRE IN THE SEVENTIES AND EIGHTIES, UP UNTIL THE EARLY NINETIES BEFORE HE PASSED, [WHO] BOUGHT A BUNCH OF THESE, MAYBE FROM THE YATES AND HAD THEM IN HIS PERSONAL COLLECTION [BECAUSE]…I BORROWED THEM FROM WES TO USE FOR THEATRE PRODUCTIONS AND ON WES’ PASSING, THIS MAY HAVE GONE BACK TO THE YATES. I KNOW HE HAD A LOT OF THESE.” “THERE [WERE] ALSO SOME GUN-METAL GREY ONES…THOSE MAY HAVE BEEN WES’S THEN…WES USED THEM FOR COMEDY SHOWS. [I REMEMBER] DOING THE BOWMAN ARTS, PERFORMING ARTS SUMMER SCHOOL WHICH WOULD HAVE BEEN ‘81 OR ‘82 AND THAT WAS WITH JOAN WATERFIELD. WE GOT TO SPEND A DAY OVER IN THE YATES, AND WE GOT TO GO THROUGH EVERYTHING AND PLAY WITH EVERYTHING INCLUDING [THE SPOT LAMPS] IN THE BOOTH. BUT THE FIRST TIME I RECALL EVER ACTUALLY BEEN HIT WITH ONE…IT WAS LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL THEATRE PRODUCTION OF 'OKLAHOMA' AND I OPENED THE SHOW AS THE LEAD TO CURLY AND WE DID IT IN THE AUDIENCE. I STARTED IN THE AUDIENCE AND THE SHOW OPENED WITH THE BAND DOING THE BIG THING AND THEN BOOM! THE SPOTLIGHT WOULD PIN ME AGAINST A WALL AND IT WAS, 'OH WHAT A BEAUTIFUL MORNING, OH WHAT A BEAUTIFUL DAY.' THAT ONE FACE PROBABLY SHONE ON ME MANY TIMES. I’VE RUN IT MANY TIMES AND LIFTED IT UP AND DOWN STAIRS MANY TIMES AND IT WEIGHS LIKE A BILLION POUNDS.” “RIGHT NOW WITH TECHNOLOGY YOU’VE GOT ONES THAT ARE MUCH EASIER TO OPERATE ‘CAUSE THIS IS ALL LEVERS, SO THE FOCUS AND THE BRIGHTNESS IS ALL DONE THROUGH LEVERS, PLUS, FLIPPING THE SWITCHES WILL GIVE YOU DIFFERENT GEL COLOURS THAT YOU CAN THROW IN OR OUT THERE. YOU CAN EVEN PROBABLY FIT A GOBO INTO IT WHICH WOULD THROW A DESIGN ON THE STAGE. ANY THEATRE COMPANY THAT’S AROUND WOULD PROBABLY LOVE TO HAVE THAT IN THEIR ARSENAL BECAUSE IT DOES STILL WORK. IT’S AN AWESOME UNIT, IT STILL DOES THE TRICK, IT WAS USED UP UNTIL PROBABLY A MONTH AGO.” “AT SOME POINTS IT EVEN HAD TO HAVE TWO PEOPLE RUNNING IT. ONE OF US WOULD BE MOVING IT, OPERATING IT AROUND THE STAGE AND THE OTHER WOULD BE CHANGING THE FOCUS AND THE BRIGHTNESS, OR FLIPPING IN A DIFFERENT GEL COLOUR. IT WAS A TWO-HANDED OPERATION.” ED AND LINDA BAYLY RECALLED THEIR YEARS SPENT WORKING WITH THE YATES THEATRE IN LETHBRIDGE, WITH ED BAYLY NOTING, “I WAS MANAGER AT THE YATES FOR 35 YEARS. I WAS INVOLVED WITH THE LOCAL DRAMA GROUPS FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE THAT SO THAT WAS PARTIALLY THE REASON THAT I WAS CHOSEN FOR THE JOB. I HAD THE CONTACTS." “WHAT I REMEMBER MOST OF ALL WAS THE FACT THAT THE CITY PUT THE FUNDING FOR THE YATES UP TO THE PUBLIC IN A PUBLIC PLEBISCITE, AND IT WAS TURNED DOWN TWICE BEFORE THEY WENT AHEAD WITH THE MONEY THAT THEY HAD AND BUILT THE PLACE. PEOPLE WERE SAYING, 'WELL, WHAT DO YOU WANT THAT FOR, NO ONE’S EVER GOING TO USE IT.' THEN WE HAD THE OPENING AND FRED WEATHERUP, WHO WAS THE OWNER OF ENERSON MOTORS, BROUGHT IN SOME GO-GO DANCERS AND THEY HAD CARS PARKED OUT IN FRONT OF THE YATES, AND THAT SORT OF BROUGHT IN OTHER PEOPLE THAT WEREN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE ARTS AND THEY GOT A CHANCE TO SEE THE PLACE.” “THE REST OF THE PROVINCE GOT THE JUBILEE AUDITORIUMS WHICH WE DIDN’T. THOSE ARE WAY BIGGER OF COURSE AND A LOT MORE EXPENSIVE. WE WERE VERY FORTUNATE IN THIS MATTER–WE HAD A BEQUEST FROM THE YATES FAMILY THAT PRETTY WELL PAID FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE BUILDING. AFTER A VERY FEW YEARS, YOU [STARTED TO] WONDER HOW YOU GOT ALONG WITHOUT IT BECAUSE IT WAS IN CONSTANT USE, AND STILL IS. IT WAS VERY WELL BUILT AND IT WILL CONTINUE TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY FOR ANY NUMBER OF YEARS BECAUSE WE’RE IN THE PROCESS OF RENOVATING IT, ADDING ON TO IT.” “I WAS HIRED ON BEFORE THE BUILDING WAS FINISHED SO I WAS THERE DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF IT. I HAD SOME INPUT. IT WAS EXCITING. [THE] JOB WAS DIFFERENT ALL THE TIME. THEY HAD THESE GROUPS COME IN, AND…IT WAS AN EVERYDAY EVENT FOR ME. THEY ALL USED TO SAY, 'HOW COME YOU STAY SO CALM?' AND I WOULD SAY 'WELL, BECAUSE I DO IT EVERY DAY, AND YOU ONLY DO IT ONCE A YEAR.'” LINDA BAYLY SPOKE ABOUT HER OWN EXPERIENCES WITH THE YATES THEATRE, NOTING, “I WAS THE SECRETARY IN THE FRONT OFFICE AND WORKED WITH MAKING BOOKINGS FOR THE BUILDING AND GENERAL SECRETARIAL WORK AT THAT TIME. ED WAS THE TECHNICIAN FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS BEFORE HE BECAME HE MANAGER. HE HAD TO MAKE SURE ALL THESE RULES BACKSTAGE WERE LOOKED AFTER AND ATTENDED TO AND COMPLETED.” JEFF CARLSON ELABORATED ON HIS TIME WITH THE YATES THEATRE, STATING, “I SPENT MY ENTIRE PRETTY MUCH LIFE…IN THE YATES, IN THE GENEVIEVE YATES MEMORIAL THEATRE. I STARTED GOING TO THE YATES PROBABLY IN THE ‘70S WITH THE KIWANIS MUSIC FESTIVAL AND SCHOOL BAND AND CHOIR EVENTS…BACK IN LAKEVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. AFTER THAT I STARTED ACTING IN THEATRE AND EVENTUALLY PRODUCING AND DIRECTING THEATRE UP UNTIL LESS THAN A YEAR AGO.” “[AT THE TIME] I FIGURED 'NOW THIS IS FUN, I LIKE THIS, I THINK I’M OKAY AT IT' SO I GAVE MYSELF SOME DEADLINES. I SAID, 'I’LL PURSUE THIS UNTIL I’M THIRTY AND IF I HAVEN’T MADE A CAREER IN IT BY THEN, THEN I WILL DO MY FALLBACK EDUCATION OR POLITICAL SCIENCE OR RUSSIAN HISTORY.' I HAD BITTEN OFF A BIT OF IT AT THAT POINT. BUT, BY THE AGE OF THIRTY, I WAS WORKING FULLTIME IN THEATRE, WRITING, DIRECTING, PRODUCING PRODUCTIONS FOR NEW WEST THEATRE AT THE YATES.” “[I WAS] PROFESSIONALLY EMPLOYED AT THE YATES BY [THE] LATE ‘80S, EARLY ‘90S. THERE WAS A MIX THERE BECAUSE WE WERE DOING FULL-TIME THEATRE PRODUCTIONS BY THE LATE ‘80S BUT THEN I TOOK TIME OFF TO TAKE A TOURING COMPANY THROUGH ALBERTA AND B.C., FOR NEW WEST THEATRE. [I] ENDED UP LIKING IT SO MUCH THAT I STAYED IN VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. [I] CAME BACK FOR A TWO-WEEK VISIT ON MY WAY TO TORONTO TO GO INTO FILM AND TV. AS I WAS HERE FOR TWO WEEKS, THE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR QUIT AND THEY SAID, 'PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE – ', AND SO I SAID, 'I’LL DO IT FOR A YEAR.' THAT IS NOW TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. IT WAS JUST CIRCUMSTANCES.” “WE [HAD] REPLACED THE SEATS IN THE YATES AND REPAINTED THE WHOLE THING. IT WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MISTAKES THAT WAS MADE, IN MY OPINION, WAS THAT BLUE COLOUR WE PUT ON THE WALLS. THEY CHANGED [THE PAINT COLOUR] TO THIS LIGHT BLUE THAT CAUSED THE LIGHTING DESIGNS TO BE SUCH A CHALLENGE.” “WE DID EVERYTHING. WE RAN THE LIGHTS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, FOCUSED THE LIGHTS. THEY MADE ME SEW COSTUMES. I REMEMBER MAKING A POODLE SKIRT FOR A SHOW IN 1986. I’VE LEARNED HOW TO MAKE A POODLE SKIRT. IT WAS TERRIBLE, BUT I LEARNED HOW TO MAKE IT. IN MY DEGREE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, YOU HAVE TO GET SO MANY, WHAT THEY CALL ‘BACKSTAGE CREDITS’, IN RUNNING BACKSTAGE SHOWS, HANGING THE LIGHTS, DOING WARDROBE. THEY WAIVED THAT REQUIREMENT FOR ME BECAUSE, GROWING UP IN NEW WEST AND DOING EVERYTHING IN NEW WEST, THEY KNEW WE DID EVERYTHING. WE BUILT THE SETS, PAINTED THE SETS, HUNG THE LIGHTS, DID EVERYTHING. I WAS VERY FORTUNATE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170029003
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2018
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180016001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2018
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
127
Length
40.8
Width
11.5
Description
SINGLE-SPACE DUPLEX PARKING METER WITH AN ELECTRONIC MECHANISM. THE METER CASING IS GREY FEATURING TWO GREEN DOMES IN THE SHAPE OF MICKEY MOUSE EARS. THE METERS ARE LABELED “30-61” AND “30-62” ON THE FRONT AND ATTACH TO A HOLLOW, METAL POLE. A STICKER NEAR THE BOTTOM OF THE CASING READS “THIS CAR – INSERT VALID COINS ONLY – DISPLAY INDICATES TIME PURCHASED – CITY OF LETHBRIDGE – THIS CAR.” BOTH METERS HAVE A COIN SLOT AND A LABEL WHICH SAYS “FREE PARKING – WEEKDAYS AFTER 5:30 PM – ALL DAY WEEKENDS AND HOLIDAYS.” THE DIGITAL METERS ARE VISIBLE AT THE TOP OF THE HOUSING, BEHIND SEMI-TRANSPARENT PLASTIC. ON EITHER SIDE OF THE METER'S TIME DISPLAY, THE WORDS “MACKAY" AND "GUARDIAN” ARE INSCRIBED VERTICALLY. A METAL PLATE FASTENS TO THE REAR, AND TWO KEYHOLES PROTRUDE ABOVE IT. THROUGHOUT, THERE ARE MANY SCRATCHES AND PAINT CHIPS. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON JULY 4TH, 2018, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE REMOVED THIS PARKING METER FROM THE 300 BLOCK OF 3RD STREET SOUTH AND DONATED IT TO THE GALT MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES. ALL OF THE COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS IN LETHBRIDGE’S DOWNTOWN CORE HAVE SINCE BEEN REMOVED AND REPLACED WITH MULTI-SPACE PARKING KIOSKS. IN DECEMBER 2015, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE HOSTED AN INFORMATIONAL SESSION INFORMING LETHBRIDGE RESIDENTS ABOUT AN IMPENDING UPGRADE TO THE DOWNTOWN PARKING SYSTEM. VAL FELLGER WAS THE 2015 INITIATIVE’S PARKING COORDINATOR. FELLGER OUTLINED REASONS FOR UPDATING THE EXISTING PARKING SYSTEM IN A 2018 CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASE. THE ANNOUNCEMENT SAYS, “THE PRIMARY OBJECTIVE OF PAID AND TIME ZONED PARKING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE IS TO ACHIEVE PARKING TURNOVER WHICH RESULTS IN EQUITABLE AVAILABILITY OF PARKING TO SHOPPERS AND VISITORS TO DOWNTOWN…THERE ARE CURRENTLY A LITTLE OVER 1500 PARKING METERS IN THE DOWNTOWN. APPROXIMATELY 95 PERCENT OF THE PARKING METER INFRASTRUCTURE, PARKING METER HOUSINGS AND SUPPORT POLES ARE GREATER THAN 25 YEARS OLD. THESE HOUSINGS AND POLES ARE STARTING TO SHOW SIGNS OF WEAR AND LOOK UNKEMPT. MANY OF THE METERS CANNOT BE REPROGRAMMED TO ACCEPT NEW COINS OR OTHER PAYMENT OPTIONS.” THE CITY PONDERED THREE OPTIONS FOR THE IMPROVED SYSTEM: 100 PERCENT SINGLE-SPACE METERS WITH FOOT PATROL ENFORCEMENT, 100 PERCENT PAY-BY-PLATE MULTI-SPACE SMART MACHINES WITH MOBILE LICENSE PLATE RECOGNITION ENFORCEMENT, AND A HYBRID SYSTEM COMPRISED OF PAY-BY-PLATE MACHINES WITH MOBILE LICENSE PLATE RECOGNITION ENFORCEMENT AND IN ISOLATED LOCATIONS, INCLUDING BARRIER-FREE PARKING STALLS, SINGLE-SPACE SMART METERS WITH FOOT PATROL ENFORCEMENT. IN THE DOWNTOWN PARKING METER REPLACEMENT PROJECT STAKEHOLDER & PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT REPORT, 80 PERCENT OF THE PUBLIC SELECTED THE HYBRID SYSTEM. IN AUGUST 2017, THE CITY CHOSE A VENDOR, AND BY JUNE 2018 THE NEW SYSTEM WAS UP AND RUNNING. AS A RESULT, 1526 COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS WERE REMOVED FROM DOWNTOWN STREETS AND 170 MULTI-SPACE KIOSKS WERE INSTALLED. IN A CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASE FROM MAY 28, 2018, MAYOR CHRIS SPEARMAN SAYS, “THIS IS ANOTHER SIGN OF HOW OUR CITY IS GROWING UP. WE TALK A LOT ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING A “SMART CITY” AND USING TECHNOLOGY TO MAKE US MORE EFFICIENT. THAT’S WHAT THIS NEW SYSTEM DOES.” FELLGER ADDED, “THE KIOSKS ARE SOLAR POWERED MAKING THEM MORE COST EFFECTIVE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY TO OPERATE THAN THE PREVIOUS PARKING METERS THAT USED AA BATTERIES.” ON DECEMBER 12, 2018, KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S ACTING PARKING COORDINATOR PHILLIP BERG. BERG ASSISTED FELLGER WITH THE PLANNING OF THE NEW PARKING SYSTEM. CONCERNING THE ROLLOUT OF THE METER REPLACEMENT PROJECT, BERG SAID, “IT WAS PRETTY HECTIC. PEOPLE WERE STILL A LITTLE RESISTANT TO CHANGE. WE HAD CONDITIONED PEOPLE TO A PARKING STYLE FOR THE LAST 50 TO 60 YEARS, AND IN ONE NIGHT WE CHANGED EVERYTHING OVER. SO THERE WAS A LOT OF RESISTANCE.” TO DEAL WITH THE RESISTANCE, BERG KEPT AN OPEN DIALOGUE WITH THE PUBLIC. “THERE WERE TIMES THAT MY PHONE DIDN’T STOP RINGING FOR DAYS, BUT WE’VE MADE A LOT OF CHANGES TO SCREEN DISPLAY AND SIGNAGE. [WE’VE DONE] EVERYTHING WE CAN POSSIBLY DO TO FACILITATE THE BEST PARKING MANAGEMENT STRATEGY WE CAN.” PRIOR TO THE PROJECT, BERG WORKED CLOSELY WITH THE COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS AS LETHBRIDGE’S PARKING AND TRAFFIC TECHNICIAN. HE SAID, “I DID ALL THE REPAIRS, MAINTENANCE, AND PROGRAMMING THAT HAPPENED WITH THESE SINGLE-SPACE METERS FOR THE LAST EIGHT YEARS. ANYTHING FROM RE-BUILDING HOUSINGS [TO] PUTTING THEM TOGETHER FROM DIFFERENT PIECES TO RE-PROGRAMMING THEM…THEY WERE BROKEN. THERE WAS A LOT OF PIECES THAT WERE ‘FRANKENSTEINED’ TOGETHER TO ALLOW THE METERS TO FUNCTION. THERE WERE TIMES THAT I WAS TAKING AND GRINDING DOWN PARTS TO MAKE THEM WORK. WHEN I FIRST STARTED, I CALLED THE MANUFACTURER OF THE HOUSINGS [AND ASKED TO ORDER PARTS]. THEY LAUGHED AT ME AND [SENT ME EVERYTHING THEY HAD LEFT FOR FREE]. I GOT ALL THESE OLD DUSTY BOXES WITH PIECES WRAPPED IN NEWSPAPER, AND I WOULD BUILD WHATEVER I COULD TO GET THEM OUT ON THE STREET.” BEFORE BERG, LARRY WYROSTOK WAS THE PARKING AND TRAFFIC TECHNICIAN FOR SEVEN YEARS, AND MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HIM ON DECEMBER 20, 2018. WYROSTOK SUGGESTED THAT THE TWO MAIN REASONS THAT THE PARKING METERS BROKE DOWN WERE THEIR AGE AND VANDALISM. REGARDING VANDALISM, HE SAID, “WE USED TO HAVE QUITE A BIT. [ONE TIME I WAS DRIVING BY THE COURT HOUSE] AND SOMEONE USED A ROLL OF DUCK-TAPE ON A METER, [AND] THEY JUST COVERED UP THE WHOLE THING. IT WAS PROBABLY TWO OR THREE INCHES THICK, JUST SO THAT THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PLUG IT. I TOOK ALL THE DUCK-TAPE OFF, AND THE METER SEEMED TO WORK FINE. YOU SEE ALL KINDS OF STUFF [ON THE STREET.]” WYROSTOK SUGGESTED THAT ANOTHER ASPECT OF THE JOB WAS COLLECTING THE COINS FROM THE METERS. HE SAID, “[I SPENT] A COUPLE OF DAYS A WEEK COLLECTING IN ALL KINDS OF WEATHER; RAIN, SLEET, AND SNOW. I CAN REMEMBER [DAYS THAT WERE] 35 DEGREES BELOW. [I WOULD PUT MY] METER KEY IN THE VAULT DOOR, AND IT WOULDN’T OPEN. IT WAS FROZEN SHUT. [SO I WOULD TAKE] A RUBBER MALLET AND GIVE THE [VAULT DOOR] A LITTLE TAP AND THEN [I WOULD] SPRAY SOME ETHER ON IT. IT COULD BE QUITE TEDIOUS BECAUSE [I HAD] 1500 METERS TO COLLECT FROM.” LIKE PARKING AND TRAFFIC TECHNICIANS, PARKING COMMISSIONAIRES ALSO HAD TO WORK IN ALL KINDS OF CONDITIONS. ON DECEMBER 18, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RETIRED PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE, MAVIS BASTIE ABOUT HER TIME WORKING WITH THE PARKING METERS IN LETHBRIDGE’S DOWNTOWN CORE. BASTIE MOVED FROM HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA IN 1993. SHE SAID, “WHEN I ARRIVED HERE THE VERY FIRST THING I DID THAT WEEK WAS GO OVER TO THE CORPS OF COMMISSIONAIRES HERE IN LETHBRIDGE AND SAID THAT I WANTED TO BECOME A COMMISSIONAIRE. I WAS IMMEDIATELY GIVEN A JOB, AND THAT JOB HAPPENED TO BE GOING OUT AND DOING PARKING, WHICH MEANT WALKING THE STREETS…WALKING THE STREETS WAS DOING THE METERS AND CHECKING VEHICLES.” BASTIE WORKED AS A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE FOR APPROXIMATELY TEN YEARS. DURING HER INTERVIEW, SHE EXPLAINED THAT THERE WERE FOUR PARKING BEATS WITHIN LETHBRIDGE, “THE FIRST ROUTE WAS MAINLY WALKING AROUND AND DOING THE TICKETING OF THE CARS THAT WERE AT METERS THAT WERE EXPIRED...BEAT ONE WAS DOWNTOWN, AND IT CAME OUT OF THE OLD POLICE STATION [TO THIRD AVENUE]…THIRD AVENUE BECAME BEAT TWO AND THEN BEAT THREE WAS A DRIVING [AND WALKING] AREA…BEAT THREE WOULD BE MORE OVER TOWARDS THE HOSPITAL…BEAT FOUR WAS JUST THE DRIVING, THAT MEANT DRIVING AROUND THE HOSPITAL.” BASTIE SUGGESTED THAT ONE OF THE BUSIEST TIMES OF YEAR TO BE A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE WAS DURING THE WHOOP-UP DAYS PARADE, “YOU’RE JOB IS TO MAKE SURE THAT PEOPLE REALIZE THAT JUST BECAUSE IT’S WHOOP-UP DAYS DOESN’T MEAN THAT THEY CAN GET AWAY WITH [PARKING ILLEGALLY]. YOU STILL HAVE TO PLUG THE METERS. IF THAT METER EXPIRES AND YOU DON’T MOVE YOUR VEHICLE YOU GET A TICKET.” BASTIE WAS THE ONLY FEMALE PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE IN LETHBRIDGE DURING THE 1990S. SHE SUGGESTED THAT DUE TO THIS SHE RECEIVED SUPPORT FROM HER COLLEAGUES AND THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE DEPARTMENT, “[IF SOMEONE WAS HARASSING ME] I JUST HAD TO PICK UP THE RADIO… THEY WERE THERE FOR YOU, AND I KNEW THAT NOBODY WOULD EVER HURT ME. THEY WOULDN’T DARE. IT WASN’T BECAUSE I COULDN’T TAKE THEM ON, BUT IT WAS BECAUSE THESE GUYS [WERE LOOKING OUT FOR ME]…YOU’VE ALWAYS GOT THE POLICE DEPARTMENT THERE BEHIND YOU, AND I HONESTLY HAVE TO SAY THAT WHEN I WORKED FOR THE CORP BACK IN THOSE YEARS, WE HAD THE MOST SENSATIONAL POLICE OFFICERS THAT I HAVE EVER HAD ANYTHING TO DO WITH.” FOR BASTIE THE BEST PART OF BEING A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE WAS WORKING WITH THE PUBLIC. SHE SAID, “[WORKING PARKING WAS] A GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO GET TO KNOW PEOPLE...[IT] WAS SOMETHING THAT I NEVER EXPECTED AND I DON’T THINK PEOPLE THINK OF WHEN THEY THINK OF PARKING… [I GOT TO] ASSOCIATE WITH SO MANY PEOPLE, AND IF [I SHOWED] THEM RESPECT THEY [SHOWED ME] RESPECT BACK…I FOUND YOU HAD TO HAVE A GOOD RAPPORT WITH THE BUSINESS OWNERS BECAUSE THE BUSINESS OWNERS APPRECIATED YOU. IF YOU NEEDED HELP, THEY WERE THERE FOR YOU. IF THEY NEEDED HELP, YOU WERE THERE FOR THEM.” OVERALL, BASTIE ENJOYED HER TIME WORKING AS A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE. SHE SAID, “WHEN I WORKED THE METERS, I LOVED IT. I ENJOYED WORKING PARKING AND EVERYTHING [THAT] IT INCLUDED…IF I HAD MY LIFE TO LIVE OVER, WOULD I DO IT [AGAIN]? DARN RIGHTS I WOULD.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASES, AND FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20180016001
Acquisition Date
2018-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SPUDNUTS
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WAX PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20200012001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SPUDNUTS
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2000
Materials
WAX PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
25.2
Width
12.5
Description
RECTANGULAR WAX PAPER BAG WITH AN OPENING ON TOP. THE FRONT HAS AN ORANGE VERTICAL LINE DESIGN FROM TOP TO BOTTOM. THERE IS A BROWN BLOCK LETTERED “SPUDNUTS” AT THE MID-PART OF THE BAG ON ORANGE BACKGROUND. THE BAG HAS A SERRATED TOP EDGE, AND A BACK FLAP SLIGHTLY LONGER THAN FRONT. ON THE BOTTOM IT SAYS “SPUDNUT OF CANADA LTD.” AND “VANCOUVER, B.C.” UNDERNEATH. BOTTOM HAS “INGREDIENTS: WHEAT FLOUR…(CAROTENE A).” THE BACK HAS A SERRATED TOP AND A SQUARE BOTTOM FOLDED. THE BASE SAYS “REED 4” AND HAS ORANGE STRIPE DESIGN.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
BUSINESS
History
ON MARCH 12, 2020 GALT MUSEUM CURATOR, AIMEE BENOIT, MET WITH FORMER LOCAL SPUDNUT SHOP OWNER WOLFGANG OTTO, AS WELL AS DENISE HAMMON— FORMER OWNER OF CRAZY CAKES. ACCORDING TO A MAY 8TH, 2009 LETHBRIDGE HERALD SEGMENT, THE SPUDNUT SHOP BUILDING LOCATED AT 1102 5TH AVENUE SOUTH WAS ORIGINALLY BUILT AS A MUSIC CONSERVATORY IN 1909. WOLFGANG STARTED MAKING SPUDNUTS IN 1965. HE THEN PURCHASED THE BUSINESS IN 1966 AND RAN IT UNTIL 2000, AND LATER CONTINUED TO MAKE SPUDNUTS AT CRAZY CAKES FROM 2007 UNTIL ITS CLOSING IN OCTOBER 2019. HE DESCRIBED THE SWEET SECRET BEHIND SPUDNUTS AS “THE INGREDIENTS [HAVE] TO BE [THE] SAME ALL THE TIME. THE TRICK IS THE POTATO FLOUR. THAT’S THE TRICK... IT’S ALL ABOUT POTATO.” WOLFGANG DONATED THE BAGS THE SPUDNUTS WERE SERVED IN TO THE MUSEUM, AND THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS DERIVED FROM THE INTERVIEW. FROM 1950 UNTIL 1956, THE SPUDNUT BUILDING WAS CALLED BABE’S SPUDNUT & ICE CREAM BAR. IT WAS BRIEFLY TAKEN OVER BY BYRON SCHURTZ WHO THEN SOLD IT TO GUNTHER LEBRO IN 1958. THEN, THE LEGACY WAS TAKEN UP BY WOLFGANG OTTO AND HIS WIFE ANGIE, ALSO KNOWN AS MR. AND MRS. SPUDNUT, IN 1966. WOLFGANG DESCRIBED HOW HE CAME TO LIVE AND WORK IN LETHBRIDGE AFTER GROWING UP IN GERMANY: “...I WAS BORN IN GERMANY…AT A TOWN THAT’S [CALLED] HUSUM...RIGHT ON THE NORTH SEA COAST… IN 1956, I MADE UP MY MIND TO COME TO CANADA…I ARRIVE[D] HERE...IN WINNIPEG AND THREE DAYS LATER, WAS A TRAINED DAIRY BUTTER MAKER WHICH I DID IN KENORA AND [THE OWNERS] WERE….DUTCH PEOPLE BUT BORN IN CANADA… [THEY] WERE VERY NICE TO ME… [I DID NOT KNOW ENGLISH]...THAT ARRIVED AFTER 1945. [KNOWING] THE DUTCH [PEOPLE]...HELPED ME A LOT BECAUSE I SPEAK HIGH AND LOW GERMAN… I CAME IN [1961]...TO LETHBRIDGE… I NEEDED A PLACE AND I FOUND AN APARTMENT UPSTAIRS AT THE SPUDNUT SHOP...AND THAT’S WHEN EVERYTHING STARTED… GUNTHER LEBRO…HAD THE SPUDNUTS SHOP [AND] WANTED TO GO BACK TO GERMANY... HE SAID, ‘ARE YOU INTERESTED?’ I SAID, ‘WELL LET ME SEE,’... SO, ONE DAY I START ROLLING HIS DOUGH AND HE SAID, ‘YOU MUST HAVE DONE IT BEFORE!’ THE WAY I WAS WORKING AT IT. I SAID ‘NO, MAYBE BECAUSE I PLAY ACCORDION.’… THAT’S THE WAY IT STARTED. THEN, WITHIN...SIX MONTH[S]...I TOOK OVER HIS SPUDNUTS SHOP.” WOLFGANG OUTLINED HIS INTERACTIONS WITH GUNTHER LEBRO AND HIS FAMILY. HE AT FIRST WORKED FOR LEBRO FOR: “SIX MONTHS…AND THEN HE WORKED FOR ME…AND THEN HE OPENED A SPUDNUTS SHOP IN CALGARY… AT THAT TIME HE HAD ONLY ONE [CHILD] AND THEN THEY HAD TWO MORE KIDS…I MET THE TWO…THEY WANTED TO SEE THEIR [PARENTS] BACKGROUND…WHERE THEY LIVED…WHICH I DID [SHARE WITH THEM]… BUT MRS. AND MR. LEBRO DIED...BUT THE KIDS [HAVE] BEEN OVER HERE, TWICE... NOT THE [OLDER CHILD] THAT WAS BORN HERE…THE OTHER [TWO]…KIDS [WERE] VERY HAPPY TO SEE THE BACKGROUND [AND] WHAT THEIR PARENTS DID HERE...[AND] WHERE THEY LIVED…” WHEN ASKED WHAT MADE WOLFGANG DECIDE TO TAKE OVER THE BUSINESS, HE RESPONDED: “TO BE ON MY OWN BECAUSE I HAD A BAD EXPERIENCE WITH THE DAIRY…THAT’S WHEN I TOOK UP GARBUTT BUSINESS COLLEGE. THEN I WORKED FIRST FOR THE…BUILDING SUPPLIES; CONSTRUCTION. I WORKED THERE TWO YEARS. [I] DID THE BOOKS…” WOLFGANG DESCRIBED THE DAY-TO-DAY AND YEARLY ROUTINE AT THE SHOP: “...I CAME IN [AT]…TWO [OR] THREE O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING… [I ALSO WORKED FOR] MCGAVINS... I REALLY SAT DOWN AND FIGURED IT OUT THAT WAS JUST PENNIES WHAT I MADE THERE... I EVEN BAKED FOR THEM ON SUNDAY. THERE WAS NOTHING IN IT... THEN, WHEN I HAD MY FIRST CHILD...WE STARTED HAVING SUNDAY OFF...OTHERWISE IT WAS SUNDAY ‘TIL SUNDAY...FOR TEN YEARS. THEN, AFTER THAT...[WE] EVEN CLOSED FOR TWO WEEKS [AND] FLEW TO GERMANY…WE WENT IN THE SUMMER-TIME; [WE] USED [TO GO] ALWAYS AROUND CHRISTMAS, JUST SHUT DOWN [THE SHOP]. BUT THEN, I WAS BE ABLE TO DO THAT IN THE SUMMER-TIME, TOO, SO THAT’S WHEN WE DID CHANGE IT FROM THE WINTER TO THE SUMMER, WHICH IS FAR NICER..." WOLFGANG TALKED ABOUT THE SPUDNUT FRANCHISE AND DONATED BAGS, “THAT’S THE CONTROL OF THE NAME OF THE INGREDIENTS…AND THAT [RECIPE] STARTED IN SALT LAKE CITY... [IT WAS MADE WITH] POTATOES, WHICH I BOUGHT HERE. I DON’T HAVE ANYMORE...AND THEY MADE A MISTAKE…[WHEN THEY INITIALLY] PRINTED THAT [BAG] IN WINNIPEG. I HAD ONE MILLION BAGS ORDERED IN THE 60’S, AND THEN I SEE THAT…ONE MISTAKE…POTATO FLOUR…I HAD TO SHIP THEM THERE...UNBELIEVABLE HOW MANY. BUT THEN I GOT ANOTHER DISCOUNT BECAUSE THEY MADE A MISTAKE… I’VE SENT TWICE TEN DOZEN BY AIRPORT TO OTTAWA... THERE [WAS] ONE [SPUDNUTS BAKERY] IN MEDICINE HAT, ONE IN REGINA, THEN LATER, IN CALGARY. BUT [IT] WAS NOT THE SAME. THEY DIDN’T GET…THE SAME FLOUR… I HAD THE FLOUR COMING IN FROM SALT LAKE CITY IN THOSE DAYS. THEN THEY FINALLY GAVE UP, BUT I HAD THE RECIPE SO I...[GOT THE INGREDIENTS ELSEWHERE]. THEN THEY GAVE UP. THEN I HAD [SUPPLIERS] IN CALGARY AND REGINA. HALF THERE, HALF IN CALGARY...” WOLFGANG TALKED ABOUT HOW HE ENJOYED RUNNING THE BUSINESS, “...[I NEVER KNEW] THAT I WOULD BE A BAKER... IT IS DIFFERENT WHEN YOU’RE ON YOUR OWN... I WOULD ONCE A WEEK DRIVE OUT TO COALDALE. FROM TEN ‘TIL ELEVEN-THIRTY, THERE WERE ABOUT 10-12 GERMANS, ALWAYS AT THE SAME TABLE... AND THEY [SAW] ME ON TV... WHEN I TOOK OVER IN [1966]...COALDALE GAVE ME ONLY SIX MONTHS… I EVEN HAD A GUY FROM THE GOVERNMENT CHECK MY BOOKS AND HE SAID, ‘CAN I ASK YOU?’ AND I SAID, ‘WELL SURE, GO AHEAD.’ [AND THEN HE ASKED] ‘HOW CAN YOU MAKE A LIVING ON WAGES…?’ I SAID, ‘LISTEN, I’M NOT [GOING] IN A RESTAURANT [TO] EAT.’ I SAID, ‘[MY WIFE COOKS FOR ME] SECONDLY, I DON’T HAVE A STEAK EVERY DAY. I HAVE A SPUDNUT.’ GUESS WHAT? NEXT DAY HE CAME BACK AND SAID, ‘...I UNDERSTAND YOU’… I SAID ‘BEFORE I PAY MYSELF, I PAY [FOR MY SUPPLIES].’” WOLFGANG ELABORATED ON THE TASTY OFFERINGS AT THE SHOP: “[SPUDNUTS WERE] THE MAIN [PRODUCT]...AND [I] MADE MY OWN ICE CREAM...” WOLFGANG DESCRIBED HOW CUSTOMERS WOULD COME FROM SWIMMING AT THE FRITZ SICK POOL TO THE SPUDNUTS SHOP: “...THEY CAME IN FOR THE OLD SPUDNUT, [THAT WAS] TWO FOR FIVE CENTS...AND THE FAMOUS DRINK...[CALLED] …GRAVEYARD…[WHICH HAD] SIX-SEVEN DIFFERENT SHOTS...[OF] STRAWBERRIES OR RASPBERRY...FROM THE GARDEN..." WOLFGANG SPOKE ABOUT SELLING HIS BUSINESS: "...I SHUT DOWN IN THE YEAR 2000, IN JUNE…I NEVER HAD A SALE SIGN ON THE WINDOW THAT I WILL SELL THE BUSINESS, BUT IT WAS FOR SALE– THE BUILDING…THEN I SAW...BILL [AND] DENISE… I SHOWED BILL ALL THE UPSTAIRS... THE [CONNECTION] WITH BILL AND DENISE, IT WAS AS IF I HAD SEEN THEM BEFORE...” “...WITHIN A WEEK [BILL AND DENISE INQUIRED] ‘HOW MUCH?’ I SAID [A PRICE]. [IT WAS ONLY] TWO [OR] THREE DAYS [BEFORE] I HAD MY CHEQUE IN MY HAND... I STARTED CRYING...BECAUSE I [HAD] BEEN IN THERE FOR SO LONG; NOW IT’S GONNA BE OVER... [THE PEOPLE WHO BOUGHT THE BUILDING] SAID TO ME, ‘YOU WANT TO HAVE IT ALL OR HALF?’ I SAID NO ‘…HALF NOW AND HALF LATER.’ THEN WITHIN TWO DAYS I HAVE THE CHEQUE, [I] CRADLED [AND] CARRIED [THE CHEQUE] LIKE A LITTLE BABY… THAT’S WHY WE ARE FRIENDS STILL TODAY... I SAID TO DENISE, ‘IF YOU GO BACK INTO THE SPUDNUT BUSINESS AND ICE CREAM, I [WILL] SHOW YOU,’ WHICH I DID [AND I STAYED ON]… I SEE BILL EVERY MORNING FOR MY COFFEE…” WOLFGANG RECALLED HOW HE FELT COMING BACK TO MAKE SPUDNUTS AT CRAZY CAKES: “OH! IN MY GLORY!... BILL KNEW MY TRICKS, TOO… HE PUT OPEN THE CURTAINS...BECAUSE...I GOTTA SEE THE AIR... IF THAT’S CLOSED, I COULDN’T WORK FOR YOU. GOT TO...CONNECT ME WITH NATURE..." DENISE HAMMON ADDED ON HER EXPERIENCE WORKING WITH WOLFGANG: “...WE’D ALL MEET THERE AT ABOUT TWO O’CLOCK OR TWO-THIRTY IN THE MORNING AND WE’D HAVE COFFEE, PUT THE DOUGH ON… IF THERE WAS SNACKS LEFT OVER FROM THE NIGHT BEFORE, FROM CRAZY CAKES, THEN WE’D HAVE A LITTLE TREAT OR SOMETIMES THE GIRLS WOULD LEAVE TREATS FOR US TO TRY... SO WE’D DO THAT IN THE MORNING, THEN WE’D GET TO WORK… WE WOULD DANCE IN THE MORNINGS. WOLFGANG WOULD BE ROLLING THE SPUDNUTS AND I’D GO AND PUT ON THE...MUSIC... A SONG WOULD COME ON AND I’D BE FRYING SO I’D PUT MY SPUDS IN THE FRYER AND RUN OUT AND WE’D HAVE A QUICK TWIRL AROUND IN THE FRONT OF THE SHOP... THEN I’D GO, ‘OKAY I HAVE TO RUN BACK.’ HE’D GO BACK TO ROLL AND I’D GO BACK TO SPUDS…” DENISE SPOKE ON CHANGES TO THE SPUDNUT BUILDING: “...WHEN WOLFGANG WAS THERE, EVERYTHING WAS GRANDFATHERED IN. HE WAS ABLE TO KEEP THE FRYER THE WAY IT WAS...EVERYTHING WAS OKAY... BUT, BECAUSE HE WAS CLOSED FOR SO LONG, AND WE BOUGHT IT, WE DIDN’T HAVE THE GRANDFATHER CLAUSE SO WE HAD TO RENOVATE; BECAUSE THE BATHROOM WAS IN THE KITCHEN WHEN WOLFGANG HAD IT AND THAT’S A NO-NO... WE GOT NEW EQUIPMENT, TOO… [THE MIXER] JUST DIED…NOT LONG BEFORE WE CLOSED… HER NAME WAS BETSY… [THE MIXER] USED TO BE GUNMETAL GREY AND MY DAUGHTER SPRAY-PAINTED HER PINK.” WOLFGANG SHARED WHAT HE THOUGHT SPUDNUTS WILL BE REMEMBERED FOR: “...WE TREATED CUSTOMERS LIKE FAMILY... I HAD ONE CUSTOMER, FROM CALGARY…BUT YOU COULD TELL HE WAS SHY... HE ASKED FOR A DOZEN DOUGHNUTS… I SAID, ‘YOU’RE IN THE WRONG PLACE.’ BUT HE WAS SHOCKED THE WAY I SAID IT… I SAID, ‘IF YOU SAY ‘SPUDNUTS’ YOU’RE IN THE RIGHT PLACE'... BUT YOU COULD TELL I NEVER SHOULD HAVE MENTIONED IT... I WOULD ALWAYS GO UP TO THE FRONT WHEN THE CHILDREN [CAME TO THE SHOP]... I [WOULD] GIVE THE SPUDNUT OUTSIDE, THE SPUDNUT HOLES... YOU GOTTA TREAT THEM RIGHT, THE LITTLE KIDS... LATER, THEY COME BACK AND TELL YOU THAT…YOU DID THAT... THE CONNECTION, ESPECIALLY WITH CHILDREN…I STILL MISS IT. BUT, I HAVE TO GIVE UP.” WOLFGANG CLOSED DOWN THE SHOP IN 2000: “WELL, MY WIFE, SHE SAID ‘WOLFGANG YOU HAVE TO QUIT’ I SAID ‘NO [I'LL] KEEP ON GOING,’ AND THEN...[THE] KIDS [WERE] GETTING OLDER TOO...AND I WAS 68.” WOLFGANG COMMENTED ON THE INFLUENCE OF SPUDNUTS, “I HAVE A LOT OF DREAMS THAT I’M STILL MAKING THE SPUDNUTS... I DID IT FOR TOO MANY YEARS... WHEN I WOULD MAKE ICE CREAM...[IF A MOTHER AND A CHILD CAME INTO THE SHOP I WOULD GIVE THEM]...ICE CREAM...IN A CONE, THEN PUT…SPRINKLES ON IT...JUST TO MAKE [THEM] HAPPY… I WAS KNOWN FOR THAT. TOWARDS THE END...WHEN THEY WOULD GO TO THE YMCA, AND THE KIDS TO KINDERGARTEN, I WOULD RUN OUT [AND] GIVE EACH ONE A SPUDNUT HOLE. KIDS...WOULD LOOK IN [THE SHOP FROM OUTSIDE]...[TO SEE IF] IF I WOULD COME OUT BECAUSE KIDS, THEY USE THEIR BRAINS; YOU GET SOMETHING FOR FREE... I WAS VERY WELL KNOWN FOR THAT AND I GAVE FAR MORE THEN I SHOULD BUT...I DID IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20200012001
Acquisition Date
2020-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, COTTON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
31
Diameter
13.4
Description
BLACK CANDLESTICK-STYLE TELEPHONE WITH RECEIVER AND SPEAKER. TELEPHONE SPEAKER IS ATTACHED TO BLACK ROUND BASE AND BLACK MIDDLE ROD WITH HOOK FOR HANGING THE RECEIVER; METAL STAND ON BROWN PADDED BASE WITH BLACK PLASTIC SPEAKER AT THE TOP. BASE HAS WHITE STAMPED TEXT AROUND BASE OF THE STAND “WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 26 15”. TELEPHONE HAS BLACK METAL PLATE BENEATH PLASTIC SPEAKER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT “9298W, WESTERN ELECTRIC, MADE IN U S A, PAT IN U S A JAN 14 1919”. BASE HAS TWO BROWN CLOTH-COVERED CORDS EXTENDING FROM BACK OF BASE; FIRST CORD IS CUT OFF, SECOND CORD IS ATTACHED TO BLACK PLASTIC RECEIVER. RECEIVER IS CONE-SHAPED WITH WIDER MOUTHPIECE AT END. RECEIVER IS WRAPPED WITH BLACK TAPE AROUND MIDSECTION; RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND CORD, “PAT. IN U.S.A. APRIL 16, 1918, MAY 20, 1913, JUNE 3, 1913”. RECEIVER HAS ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND BACK EDGE OF MOUTHPIECE “WESTERN ELECTRIC MADE IN U S A 143”. TELEPHONE HAS CHIPPED PAINT ON RECEIVER HOOK; SPEAKER OF TELEPHONE IS CHIPPED WITH LOSS IN PLASTIC; TELEPHONE BODY AND RECEIVER ARE STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
ON APRIL 3, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JOHN WENSVEEN REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A CANDLESTICK TELEPHONE. WENSVEEN HAD RETIRED FROM ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED AND HAD KEPT THE TELEPHONE AS A SOUVENIR FROM HIS TIME EMPLOYED. ON HOW HE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE TELEPHONE, WENSVEEN ELABORATED, “WHEN I RETIRED [IN THE FALL OF 1989] FROM THE ELEVATOR, THESE PHONES WERE NOT USED ANY MORE SO THEY WERE MORE OR LESS DISCARDED. WHEN I RETIRED I [WOULD] JUST TAKE ONE HOME. SO I DID. I DIDN’T STEAL IT OR ANYTHING BECAUSE THEY WEREN’T USED ANYMORE.” “[I WORKED FOR] THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ELEVATOR LATER KNOWN AS ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED.” “THESE [PHONES] WERE IN THE ELEVATOR AND AS LONG AS THEY WERE WORKING, WE USED THEM. [THE COMPANY] DIDN’T WANT TO GO TO ANOTHER PHONE AND HAVE THE SAME THING SITTING IN THE OFFICE…THE PHONE WOULD RING AND THEN YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO OVER THERE AND ANSWER IT. THEY DECIDED WE’VE GOT TO GET SOMETHING THAT WE CAN CARRY WITH US AND THAT’S WHAT WE DID. WE COULD HAVE GONE THROUGH A REGULAR PHONE AS SUCH BUT, AGAIN, YOU WOULD HAVE TO GO THROUGH THAT OFFICE AND ANSWER THE PHONE.” “WE HAD A BOX, [THE] WIRE WAS CONNECTED ON TO THE BOX…IT WAS ON THE WALL AND IT HAD DIFFERENT FLOORS MARKED IN A LITTLE SPACE [WITH] A LITTLE BUTTON BEHIND IT. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT ANOTHER FLOOR, YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU PRESSED THAT BUTTON FOR THAT PARTICULAR FLOOR. THEN THE PHONE WOULD RING. THEN YOU WOULD GET IT OVER THERE AND YOU WOULD ANSWER THE CALL.” “I STARTED IN ’58 AND I THINK WE USED THEM FOR ABOUT 15 YEARS AFTER THAT [UNTIL ABOUT 1972]." “WE WENT OVER TO WALKIE TALKIES…[WHEN] I STARTED WORK THERE...WE WERE USING ALL THESE PHONES AND THEY HAD ONE OF THESE PHONES ON EACH FLOOR. IF YOU WANTED TO CONTACT SOMEBODY, THAT’S WHAT YOU HAD TO USE. THAT’S WHAT WE DID AND, LATER ON THEY WERE OFF-LISTED AND PUT IN THE BASEMENT, AND MORE OR LESS FORGOT ABOUT. SO I DECIDED TO TAKE ONE HOME.” “THESE PHONES WERE NOT THAT CLEAR. WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH CLEARER…[YOU] HELD THE MIC CLOSE TO YOU. IF YOU WERE TOO FAR AWAY FROM THE PHONE AND SOMEONE WAS TALKING YOU COULDN’T PICK IT UP VERY WELL. IT WAS SOMETHING AT THE TIME, IT WAS GOOD AT THE TIME BECAUSE THERE WAS NOTHING ELSE. BUT WALKIE TALKIES WERE MUCH BETTER.” “WE USED THIS PHONE ALL THE TIME WHEN WORKING THERE, SO IT WAS SOMETHING THAT WE WERE USED TO USING…THAT’S THE MAIN REASON [I BROUGHT IT HOME]. I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE NICE TO TAKE ONE AS A REMEMBRANCE OF THE ELEVATOR AND I’LL USE IT HOW IT USED TO BE.” “I PUT IT OUTSIDE, I HAVE A SHED, AND I PUT IT IN THE SHED AND IT MORE OR LESS STAYED THERE...I THOUGHT EVENTUALLY IT WOULD BE A KEEPSAKE AND WOULD BE A REMINDER OF MY PLACE WHERE I WORKED. [NOW] I’M DOWNSIZING. I’M GOING TO BE MOVING OUT OF THE HOUSE AND I KNEW I HAD THIS IN THE SHED OUTSIDE. I THOUGHT MAYBE THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO SEE IF I CAN DONATE IT AND I DIDN’T WANT TO THROW IT OUT.” ON HIS TIME WITH ALBERTA TERMINALS LIMITED, WENSVEEN RECALLED, “I WORKED ON THE SCALE FOR 8 YEARS. THE SCALES WERE UPSTAIRS AND THEY HAD 6 PITS DOWN BELOW WHERE THE GRAIN WOULD BE DUMPED. IN THE EARLY DAYS THEY USED BOXCARS, CPR, AND THEY WOULD HOLD 1500 BUSHELS. THEY WERE MADE FOR [TRANSPORT] AND THE GRAIN WOULD COME UP…ABOVE THE SCALE AND WE COULD CONTROL THAT AND WE WOULD WEIGH IT. I WORKED UP THERE FOR ABOUT 8 YEARS. THEN A POSITION CAME AVAILABLE DOWNSTAIRS FOR RECEIVING AND SHIPPING SO I PUT IN FOR IT AND I GOT THAT POSITION. I DID THE RECEIVING AND SHIPPING LATER ON, TAKING GRAIN IN AND SHIPPING GRAIN OUT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180007000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180007000
Acquisition Date
2018-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"MARQUIS HOTEL"
Date Range From
1928
Date Range To
2015
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20150037000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"MARQUIS HOTEL"
Date Range From
1928
Date Range To
2015
Materials
CERAMIC, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.08
Width
12.4
Description
BLACK, CERAMIC ASHTRAY. THE INSIDE OPENING OF THE ASHTRAY IS 6.4 CM. THE LETTERING ON THE TOP SAYS “THE MARQUIS HOTEL, LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA.” THERE IS AN ABSTRACTED FLORAL DESIGN ON EITHER SIDE OF THIS LETTERING. THE FLOWERS ARE PAINTED RED AND THEIR STEMS PAINTED GREEN. THIS WORDING AND DESIGN REPEATS ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE. THE LETTERING ON THE BOTTOM SAYS, “MADE IN JAPAN 29.” VERY GOOD CONDITION. USED WITH SOME WEAR APPARENT. BLACK PAINT IS WEARING OFF ON SOME PARTS OF THE SURFACE. SIGNIFICANT WEAR TO THE RED AND GREEN PAINT OF THE DECALS.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
BUSINESS
History
ON DECEMBER 16, 2015, DONOR CHRIS MORRISON INFORMED COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN THAT SHE CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE ASHTRAY WHEN SHE AND HER HUSBAND BECAME STEWARDS OF A WATERTON CABIN IN 1976. THE CABIN, LOCATED AT 103 CAMERON FALLS, WAS OWNED BY HER MOTHER-IN-LAW DOROTHY MORRISON (D. 1995). IT WAS AMONG ASSORTED FURNISHINGS LEFT BEHIND WHEN DOROTHY MOVED OUT AND CHRIS MOVED IN. THE DONOR’S RECOLLECTION OF THE ASHTRAY’S USE IMMEDIATELY PRIOR TO IT BECOMING HER PROPERTY WAS AS A CONTAINER. MORRISON SAID, “IT WAS IN A [CABIN] WASHSTAND AND USED TO HOLD LITTLE OBJECTS LIKE ROLLED UP KEROSENE LANTERN TAPE WICKS”. ACCORDING TO MORRISON, IT WAS ALSO KNOWN AS “GRANDPA’S ASHTRAY”. GRANDPA REFERS TO JAMES J. MORRISON OF LETHBRIDGE. “HE ONLY SMOKED CIGARS” SAID THE DONOR, WHEREAS HER MOTHER-IN-LAW DOROTHY DID NOT SMOKE AT ALL. THE ASHTRAY’S USE AS A CONTAINER FOR LANTERN WICKS AND SMALL ITEMS CONTINUED RIGHT UP TO THE DAY THAT IT WAS OFFERED TO THE GALT IN 2015. ACCORDING TO HER OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, DOROTHY MORRISON, PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON NOVEMBER 26, 1995 AT THE AGE OF 83 YEARS. JAMES JACOB MORRISON, DOROTHY’S FATHER-IN-LAW, PASSED ON FEBRUARY 18TH, 1975 AT AGE 93. THE ASHTRAY IS MARKED WITH “MARQUIS HOTEL,” WHICH COULD REFER TO THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL THAT OPENED IN JUNE 1928. REALIZING A NEED FOR A FIRST-CLASS HOTEL IN LETHBRIDGE, ESPECIALLY ONE WITH A BANQUET HALL, THE BUSINESSMEN OF THE BOARD OF TRADE COMMITTED THEMSELVES TO THE HOTEL IN 1927. AFTER ITS OPENING, THE BOARD OF TRADE WOULD HOLD THEIR REGULAR, NOON-HOUR MEETINGS AT THE HOTEL FOR MANY YEARS TO COME. THE HOTEL CLOSED ITS DOORS IN 1985 AND THE BUILDING WAS DEMOLISHED IN 1988. THIS INFORMATION COMES FROM LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND A WRITE-UP ABOUT THE HOTEL IN THE PUBLICATION TITLED "WHERE WAS IT? A GUIDE TO EARLY LETHBRIDGE BUILDINGS," BY IRMA DOGTEROM. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND A COPY OF THE INFORMATION FROM THE PUBLICATION CITED ABOVE.
Catalogue Number
P20150037000
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CARTON, MILK
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160019000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CARTON, MILK
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1970
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
24
Length
7.4
Width
7.2
Description
CARDBOARD MILK CARTON. SIDE ONE HAS “HOMOGENIZED MILK” ON TOP FOLD IN GREEN BLOCK LETTERING. FADED, BLACK INK STAMP ON THIS FOLD SAYS “?A 2 -45.” ON THE MAIN SECTION OF THIS SIDE THERE IS THE PURITY LOGO (“PURITY” IN PURPLE CURSIVE FONT), A PURPLE AND GREEN FLOWER, AND THE WORDS “CREAM IN EVERY DROP” IN PURPLE CURSIVE. ON THE BASE OF THIS PANEL IT SAYS “… HEAD OFFICE LETHBRIDGE.” THE OPPOSING SIDE (SIDE 3) IS SIMILAR, BUT WITH THE INDICATION OF “NET CONTENTS ONE QUART” AT THE BASE OF THE PANEL. SIDE 2’S TOP FOLD SAYS, “THE CONTAINER COVERED BY CANADIAN PATENTS 1941 – 395.645 1957 – 542-432… MANUFACTURED UNDER LICENSE FROM EX-CELL-O CORPORATION.” THE MAIN SECTION HAS THE PURITY LOGO AND THE SLOGANS “IT’S PURE. THAT’S SURE” AND “YOURS TO LOVE. OURS TO PROTECT.” ADDITIONALLY THIS SIDE INDICATED THAT THE MILK IS “PASTURIZED” AND IS “NOT LESS THAN 3.25% B.F.” PARALLEL TO THAT IS SIDE 4 WITH A TOP FOLD THAT HAS “SPOUT” MARKED ON IT. ON THE TOP FOLD, IT SAYS “PUREPAK” “YOUR PERSONAL MILK CONTAINER.” THE MAIN SECTION OF THIS HAS A GREEN ILLUSTRATION OF A CHURCH WITH “ATTEND THE CHURCH OF YOUR CHOICE…” ON THE BOTTOM OF THE CARTON, THERE ARE NUMBERS AND/OR LETTERS THAT WERE STAMPED INTO THE BOTTOM. A “W” IS VISIBLE. GOOD CONDITION. COLOUR OF CARDBOARD HAS YELLOWED OVERALL. THERE ARE VARIOUS STAINS ON THE SURFACE. BLACK STAINING AROUND THE CHURCH ILLUSTRATION. THE TOP FLAP OF THE CARTON IS DETERIORATING (BENT/TORN) WITH NOTICEABLE LOSS OF MATERIAL ON ONE SIDE’S CORNER.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
THE DONOR, HANK VROOM, FOUND THE MILK CARTON IN LETHBRIDGE APPROXIMATELY A DECADE BEFORE THE DATE OF DONATION (JULY 2016), AS A RESULT OF HIS CITY EMPLOYMENT AS A GARBAGE TRUCK DRIVER. THE LOCATION OF THE FIND IS UNKNOWN. IN THE TIME SINCE HIS POSSESSION, THE CARTON HAS BEEN IN A PLASTIC BAG IN A CUPBOARD. ACCORDING TO ADDITIONAL RESEARCH INTO THE EXISTENCE OF THIS TYPE OF MILK CARTON AND BRAND, IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THIS CARTON ORIGINATED PRIOR TO THE MID-1970S BECAUSE MILK MEASUREMENTS WERE CHANGED FROM QUARTS TO LITERS AROUND THAT TIME AND THIS CARTON’S MEASUREMENT IS INDICATED IN QUARTS. IN THE LATE 1950’S, PURITY DAIRY ADVERTISED BEING 100% PURE-PAK, MEANING THAT ALL MILK PRODUCTS CAME IN CARDBOARD CARTONS. BLOW MOLD PLASTIC CONTAINERS REPLACED CARDBOARD SHORTLY AFTER. WITH THE INDICATION OF THE 1957 PATENT NUMBER ON THE CARTON, THIS PLACES THE DATE OF THE MILK CARTON BETWEEN 1957 AND THE 1970S. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT PURITY DAIRY IS FROM THE RECORD FOR ARTIFACT P20070013001: SIMONIE (SAM) FABBI STARTED FABBI DAIRY IN 1923 IN LETHBRIDGE. HE WAS AN ITALIAN IMMIGRANT WHO BEGAN THE BUSINESS WITH THREE COWS AND SOME LARD BUCKETS. THE DAIRY WAS LOCATED AT 12 STREET B NORTH. AT THAT TIME, MILK WAS TRANSPORTED USING LARD PAILS OR CANS, WHICH, WITH THE HELP OF SAM’S SONS, WOULD BE LADLED INTO CUSTOMER’S CONTAINERS. FABBI DAIRY EXPANDED TO THE SOUTHSIDE DAIRY HILL IN THE EARLY 1930S. SHORTLY AFTERWARDS, FABBI DAIRY BOUGHT CITY DAIRY. SONS STAN AND ROMEO BOUGHT THE BUSINESS FROM THEIR FATHER IN 1936. AT THIS POINT, MILK WAS PACKAGED AND SOLD IN GLASS BOTTLES IN PINT, QUART OR GALLON SIZES. THE DAIRY HAD ITS OWN COWS, WHICH WERE MILKED DAILY AND WOULD PASTURE IN THE COULEES. BY 1936, HOWEVER, MILK AND CREAM WERE BROUGHT IN FROM OFFSITE. BETWEEN 1939 AND 1944, THE FABBI DAIRY BOUGHT PAVAN DAIRY AND THE BELLEVUE DAIRY. AT THAT POINT IN TIME, MANY SMALL DAIRIES WERE SUBJECT TO PASTEURIZATION LAWS, AND CHOSE TO CLOSE DOWN RATHER THAN CONVERT. FABBI DAIRY PURCHASED MAJESTIC THEATRE IN THE LATE 1930S OR EARLY 1940S FOR $10,000 FROM MAYOR SHACKERFORD, CONVERTING IT INTO A MILK BOTTLING PLANT. FABBI DAIRY CHANGED ITS NAME TO PURITY DAIRY, AND EXPANDED THROUGHOUT THE LATE 1940S AND 1950S, OPENING UP BUSINESSES IN MEDICINE HAT (1948), CALGARY (1950), EDMONTON (1950), CRANBROOK (1958), RED DEER AND TABER. ALL THESE LOCATIONS HAD DAIRIES EXCEPT FOR TABER, WHICH HAD A DEPOT. ACCORDING TO KEN FABBI, STAN FABBI’S SON, STAN AND ROMEO ESTABLISHED A DAIRY IN CALGARY WITHOUT A LICENSE. THE ONLY WAY TO OBTAIN A LICENSE FOR A DAIRY AT THAT TIME WAS TO BUY OUT AN EXISTING DAIRY. EXPANSION WAS SEEN AS NECESSARY TO THE FABBI BROTHERS, IF THEY WERE TO REMAIN IN BUSINESS. THE PURITY DAIRY IN CALGARY WAS DEEMED ILLEGAL, AND IN THE EARLY 1960S, STAN AND ROMEO FABBI WERE HANDCUFFED AND ARRESTED. PUBLIC SYMPATHY FOR THE FABBI BROTHERS ENABLED THEM TO PURCHASE A LICENSE AFTER THE INCIDENT. PURITY DAIRY HAD MANY INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS THAT OTHER DAIRIES IN TOWN DID NOT HAVE, LIKELY CONTRIBUTING TO THE DAIRY’S POPULARITY WITH THE PUBLIC. PURITY DAIRY WAS THE FIRST DAIRY IN WESTERN CANADA TO RELY SOLELY ON THE USE OF MILK TANKERS, WHICH VISITED VARIOUS LOCALS TO PICK UP MILK AND BRING IT TO THE DAIRY. PRIOR TO 1957, FARMERS WERE REQUIRED TO DELIVER MILK IN CANS TO THE DAIRY THEMSELVES. PURITY DAIRY HAD A SUBSTANTIAL FLEET OF RETAIL DELIVERY VEHICLES. IN ITS EARLY DAYS, HORSES WERE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE DELIVERY SYSTEM. AT ONE POINT, 17 HORSES WERE BEING USED FOR DELIVERY PURPOSES. IN 1959, PURITY DAIRY REPLACED ITS LAST THREE HORSES WITH DELIVERY TRUCKS. IN THE 1950S, PURITY DIARY BEGAN TO STREAMLINE PRODUCTION. BUTTER WAS PRODUCED IN MEDICINE HAT, WHILE THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH PRODUCED ICE CREAM, NOVELTIES, BUTTER MILK, AND SOUR CREAM, IN ADDITION TO MILK AND COTTAGE CHEESE. THE EDMONTON PLANT SHARED MILK PRODUCTION WITH LETHBRIDGE, AND BECAME THE SOLE PRODUCER OF BLOW MOLD PLASTIC FOR PURITY DAIRY. BUSINESS BEGAN TO FALL IN THE 1960S, AND IN 1971 STAN AND ROMEO FABBI SOLD PURITY DAIRY TO CO-OP DAIRY, WHICH WAS SUBSEQUENTLY KNOWN AS PURITY CO-OP LTD. BEFORE THE SALE, PURITY DAIRY EMPLOYED ABOUT 200 FULL-TIME STAFF AND SUPPLIED MILK PRODUCTS TO THOUSANDS OF ALBERTANS DAILY. THE LETHBRIDGE PLANT EMPLOYED ABOUT 70 PEOPLE, AND MANUFACTURED ICE CREAM CONFECTIONS, COTTAGE CHEESE, BUTTER, YOGURT, BUTTERMILK, SOUR CREAM, AND FRUIT DRINKS. STAN’S WIFE, NETTI, SAID OF THE SALE, “WE LOST EVERYTHING…WE EXPANDED TOO FAST. I TOLD STAN ‘WHO CARES? I’VE GOT YOU AND WE STILL HAVE THREE MEALS A DAY.’” IN 1972, PURITY CO-OP LTD WAS BOUGHT OUT BY PALM DAIRY, WHICH WAS CLOSED DOWN FOLLOWING A DRAMATIC EXPLOSION IN 1978. IT REOPENED AT A DIFFERENT LOCATION ONE YEAR LATER. IN THE INTERIM, PRODUCTS WERE SHIPPED IN FROM THE CALGARY PLANT. STAN AND ROMEO FABBI DIED IN 1992 AND 1991, RESPECTIVELY. THIS INFORMATION WAS GATHERED IN 2008-09 FROM ANTOINETTE AND KEN FABBI, STAN’S WIFE AND SON, RESPECTIVELY, AND FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARCHIVES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR P20070013001. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR P20160019000 FOR ADDITIONAL LETHBRIDGE HERALD CLIPPINGS, PRINT RESEARCH, AND PATENT DOCUMENTS.
Catalogue Number
P20160019000
Acquisition Date
2016-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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