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Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BALE OR HAY HOOK
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, WOOD, IRON
Catalogue Number
P20150010009
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BALE OR HAY HOOK
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
METAL, WOOD, IRON
No. Pieces
1
Height
11.0
Length
24.5
Width
12..7
Description
HAY CROOK OR BALE HOOK. METAL AND WOODEN HANDLE, WITH CAST IRON HOOK. MAIN PORTION OF THE HANDLE IS WOODEN, WITH A MEDIUM AND LIGHT GREY PAINTED FINISH. WHERE THE HANDLE ATTACHES TO THE HOOK IS SILVER COLOURED METAL, WITH A MEDIUM LIGHT BLUE PAINTED FINISH. THE HOOK ITSELF IS CAST IRON, WITH A RED PAINTED FINISH. OVERALL IN FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. STRUCTURALLY THE HOOK IS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION, BUT THE PAINTED SURFACES ARE ALL VERY WORN. THE WOODEN HANDLE APPEARS TO HAVE BEEN FINISHED IN A LIGHT GREY FIRST, WITH A LATER ADDITION OF MEDIUM GREY PAINT. BOTH OF THE GREY FINISHS ARE VERY SCUFFED AND SCRATCHED AND THERE IS A LOT OF EXPOSED WOOD. THE MEDIUM BLUE FINISH OF THE METAL PORTION OF THE HANDLE HAS FLAKED OFF IN SEVERAL AREAS. SEVERAL MORE AREAS OF THE FINISH ARE LOOSE. THE RED FINISH ON THE CAST IRON IS VERY WORN, REVEILING BOTH UNFINISHED METAL AND A LIGHT BLUE PAINT.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS HAY CROOK OR BALE HOOK WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). ALL FOUR MEN AGREE THAT THE HOOK WAS USED TO HELP FIGHT HAYSTACK FIRES ON LOCAL FARMS. BROWN EXPLAINS THE DIFFICULTY OF DEALING WITH A HAYSTACK FIRE AND WHY THE HOOK WAS SO USEFUL: “WITH A HAYSTACK FIRE, ONCE IT STARTS ON FIRE, THE WHOLE STACK IS WRECKED, EVEN THOUGH IT DOESN’T BURN, BECAUSE THE SMOKE GOES THROUGH IT, THE HAY IS CONTAMINATED AND THE ANIMALS AREN’T GOING TO EAT IT, SO YOU PRETTY WELL HAVE TO KNOCK IT DOWN ANYWAY. AS SOON AS YOU PUT WATER ON IT, IT WILL SMOLDER, AND SMOLDER, AND SMOLDER. PROBABLY ONE OF THE HARDEST FIRES TO PUT OUT IS A HAYSTACK FIRE, BECAUSE YOU CAN’T GET THE WATER TO IT. … YOU PUT YOUR WATER, YOU SOAK ON TOP OF THE BALES AND IT JUST WON’T SOAK IN, SO YOU HAVE TO TAKE EVERY BALE APART, BREAK EVERY PIECE APART, EVERY LITTLE BALE, BREAK IT DOWN, HOSE IT DOWN, NEXT BALE, BREAK IT APART, HOSE IT DOWN, AND CONTINUE.” LAZENBY RECALLED SEEING THE HAY CROOK ON THE TRUCK WHEN HE FIRST STARTED AND EXPLAINED: “I’M NOT A FARM KID AND I DIDN’T KNOW WHAT IT WAS.” HE ASKED WHAT IT WAS, RECEIVING THE REPLY: “’WELL, IT’S A BALE HOOK’ AND I SAID, ‘SO I’M NOT TRYING TO BE A SMART ALECK HERE, BUT WHY DO WE HAVE BALE HOOKS ON THE ENGINE?’ THEY SAID, ‘WELL, IN CASE WE GO TO A HAY BALE FIRE.’ YOU KNOW, ASK A SIMPLE QUESTION, YOU GET A SIMPLE ANSWER, RIGHT? … I NEVER SAW ONE USED AND … THIS IS ONE OF THOSE PIECES OF EQUIPMENT THAT GOT PHASED OUT SHORTLY AFTER THE BEGINNING OF MY CAREER. … THIS WAS ONE OF THOSE PIECES THAT WE FOUND THAT WE JUST DIDN’T HAVE A USE FOR. YOU CAN MOVE HAY BALES WITH OTHER MEANS THAN TO HAVE A SET OF BALE HOOKS ON THE TRUCKS, SO THEY WENT AWAY.” PETIT RECALLED USING THE HOOK AND ADDED: “IT WAS USUALLY ON THE PUMP WHEN THEY RESPONDED TO GRASS FIRES … SOMETIMES WE’D TAKE THAT, NOT USUALLY TO FIGHT THE FIRE, BUT WHEN YOU HAD TO KNOCK [THE BALES] DOWN, YOU HAD TO DRAG THE BALES OUT OF THE WAY. OTHERWISE THEY WOULD START THE FIRE ALL OVER AGAIN. IT WASN’T USED THAT MUCH BUT WE DID GO TO QUITE A FEW FIRES, YOU KNOW, STACKS OF BALES.” DZUREN AGREED: “WELL, IT’S THE BAILING HOOK. AND THAT’S JUST TO MOVE ANY, WHETHER IT’S A BALE OF STRAW OR ANY OTHER ITEM THAT HAD TO BE MOVED AWAY FROM THE FIRE, OR JUST, YOU KNOW, SEGREGATED FROM WHAT WAS ALREADY BURNING.” HE RECALLED THAT IT WAS IN USE WHEN HE STARTED IN 1959 AND ADDED “IT WOULD HAVE BEEN ON ONE OF THE VEHICLES … PARTICULARLY … COUNTY VEHICLES THAT WOULD RESPOND OUT TO THE COUNTY, TO THE FARM FIRE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010009
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DROP LEG HOLSTER W/ BATON HOLDER, “CAT”
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, PLASTIC, VELCRO
Catalogue Number
P20100048002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DROP LEG HOLSTER W/ BATON HOLDER, “CAT”
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
NYLON, PLASTIC, VELCRO
No. Pieces
1
Height
5.5
Length
50
Width
67.5
Description
PIECE OF BLACK NYLON FOLDED INTO A TRIANGULAR SHAPED POCKET WITH A FLAP CLOSURE AND PLASTIC BUCKLE CLASP. TWO BLACK WOVEN NYLON STRAPS ARE SEWN HORIZONTALLY TO BACK OF POCKET WITH PLASTIC BUCKLES AT THEIR ENDS. TWO BLACK WOVEN NYLON STRAPS ARE SEWN VERTICALLY TO THE UPPER BACK OF POCKET AND CONNECTED TO A RECTANGULAR BLACK NYLON SLEEVE. LOOSE ENDS OF STRAPS ARE TAPED DOWN WITH BLACK DUCT TAPE. PIECE OF BLACK VELCRO GLUED TO BACK OF POCKET, WITH EXCESS GLUE RESIDUE VISIBLE AROUND EDGES. INSIDE OF FLAP IS MARKED WITH LETTER “ C A T” IN WHITE INK. MINOR WEAR ALONG OUTER SEAMS. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS DROP LEG HOLSTER WAS USED BY MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE TACTICAL UNIT. SERGEANT GEORGE CARSCADDEN, WHO SERVED WITH THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE TACTICAL UNIT FROM 1999 TO 2012, DESCRIBED THE USE OF THIS HOLSTER AS SUCH: “THIS IS ONE OF THE HOLSTERS FROM THE TACTICAL TEAM… I CAN SEE BY THE STYLE OF IT THAT IT IS LIKE ONE THAT I HAD… LOOKS LIKE [THE OFFICER] HAD DONE SOME MODIFICATIONS TO THAT, WHICH MAKES TOTAL SENSE, WHERE THEY’VE GOT THE GLUE [AND VELCRO] ON THERE… TO MAKE IT MORE RETENTIVE, SO IT STICKS TO YOU [AND] DOESN’T MOVE AROUND… THE DEXTERITY THAT YOU [NEED], EVEN WITH GLOVES ON, THIS WOULD BE A PRETTY DIFFICULT THING TO TRY TO GET [A WEAPON] OUT OF. YOU [HAVE TO] UNDO THE FLAP, AND THEN YOU GRAB YOUR PISTOL. THE NEW HOLSTERS, YOU JUST [HIT THE SIDE]. THERE’S A COUPLE OF DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES TO GET THE PISTOL OUT A LITTLE BIT QUICKER, AND IF YOU HAVE GLOVES ON, IT’S WAY EASIER… BUT GENERALLY ALL PISTOLS ARE SECONDARY WEAPONS IN TACTICAL OPERATIONS.” FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT SGT. CARSCADDEN’S SERVICE WITH THE LRPS TACTICAL UNIT, SEE RECORD P20100050001. SEE PERMANENT FILE P20100050001-GA FOR FULL CARSCADDEN INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20100048002
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HANDGUN CONVERSION BARREL W/ CASE, “SIMUNITION”
Date Range From
1999
Date Range To
2009
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, CARDBOARD, FOAM
Catalogue Number
P20100050004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HANDGUN CONVERSION BARREL W/ CASE, “SIMUNITION”
Date Range From
1999
Date Range To
2009
Materials
STEEL, CARDBOARD, FOAM
No. Pieces
5
Height
3.25
Length
19
Width
9.25
Description
.A – RECTANGULAR CARDBOARD LID, PRINTED IN BLACK, WHITE AND RED. TEXT ALONG THE TOP READS “SIMUNITION – DIVISION OF SNC INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES INC. – CONVERSION KIT S&W 594X SERIE – FOR USE IN MILITARY/LAW ENFORCEMENT – TRAINING UNDER DIRECTION OF QUALIFIED INSTRUCTOR – CQT FX”. “UBJ 9746” IS WRITTEN ON TOP IN BLACK PEN. EDGES OF LID HAVE MINOR WEAR. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 3.25 X 19 X 9.25 .B – RECTUANGULAR SHEET OF GREY FOAM, WITH SEMI-CIRCLE SHAPE CUT INTO ONE LONG EDGE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 1 X 18 X 8.5 .C – HOLLOW STEEL CYLINDER, TAPERED AT ONE END WITH A MOLDED TRIANGULAR SHAPE AT THE OPPOSITE END. STAMPED WITH TEXT READING “S&W 594X SNCSC 0392-06 – WARNING: FX AND CQT AMMO ONLY – NO STD AMMO”. MINOR OXIDATION ON STEEL; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 2 X 11.5 X 2.25 .D – RECTANGULAR CARDBOARD BOX BASE WITH FOAM-LINED INSIDE. FOAM HAS RECESSED CAVITY RESEMBLING THE IRREGULAR SHAPE OF .C. OUTSIDE OF BOX IS WORN ALONG BOTTOM AND HAS BROWN STAIN ON ONE SIDE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. 3.5 X 18.5 X 9
Subjects
ARMAMENT-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS SIMUNITION BARREL CONVERSION KIT WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE TACTICAL UNIT DURING TRAINING PROCEDURES. SERGEANT GEORGE CARSCADDEN, WHO SERVED WITH THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE TACTICAL UNIT FROM 1999 TO 2012, DESCRIBED THE USE OF THIS BARREL CONVERTER AS SUCH: “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN BOUGHT FOR THE TEAM EARLIER ON WHEN THEY HAD SMITH AND WESSON [PISTOLS]… [SIMUNITION IS] A PAINT PELLET ROUND, BUT SMALLER, AND FITS INTO YOUR PISTOL AND OPERATES SIMILAR LIKE A BULLET WOULD. IT MAKES A SOUND, AND EJECTS THE ROUND, AND FIRES A PAINT PELLET PROJECTILE [THAT] LEAVES A RED OR BLUE MARKING ON THE INDIVIDUAL TO INDICATE WHERE YOU WERE HIT. THAT WAY IT MAKES IT MORE REALISTIC WHEN DEALING WITH DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCENARIOS FOR THE OFFICERS AND FOR THE BAD GUYS [KNOWN AS QUARRY IN TRAINING PROCEDURES]. AS WE GOT MORE OF THESE [SIMUNITION CONVERTERS], WE WOULD THEN GIVE SIMUNITION TO THE BAD GUYS. AT THE BEGINNING, IT WAS US, THE TACTICAL TEAM OPERATORS, THAT WOULD HAVE THEM, AND THE QUARRIES WOULD NOT… IT WAS GOOD FOR [QUARRIES] TO HAVE IT, BECAUSE IT SHOWS THAT THE OFFICER MAY HAVE… TO GET OUT OF THE WAY AS WELL, SO IT IS REALLY GOOD ADVANCED TRAINING FOR TEACHING [OFFICERS] HIGHER LEVEL SKILL… A PERSON [WHO IS] RUNNING AROUND, OR MOVING, TO BE ABLE TO SHOOT THEM – THIS SHOWS THAT IT IS VERY DIFFICULT TO DO THAT. IT’S A GREAT ADVANCEMENT IN TRAINING.” ON JULY 28, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SGT. CARSCADDEN ABOUT HIS SERVICE WITH THE LRPS TACTICAL UNIT. CARSCADDEN SAID: “FIRST OF ALL, I JUST WENT AS A QUARRY… ALL DIFFERENT SPECIALTY UNITS THAT HAVE SOME KIND OF TACTICAL SCENARIO LIKE TO HAVE QUARRIES TO [HELP TRAIN THEM] TO DO THEIR JOB BETTER, SO I THOUGHT ‘I’LL GO WORK AS A QUARRY TO SHOW THEM I’M INTERESTED’. A QUARRY IS GENERALLY A BAD GUY – YOU PRETEND YOU’RE HIDING, OR MOVING OR YELLING OR RUNNING AWAY AND TRYING TO EVADE THEM, AND THEY ARE TRYING TO CAPTURE YOU… IT TOOK A COUPLE OF YEARS, BUT I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH… IN THE MOVEMENT OF THE TEAM THAT THERE WERE [POSITIONS OPEN]… THERE IS A PHYSICAL, AND INTERVIEW, SOME TESTS… I WENT THROUGH AND STUDIED, AND DID THE BEST THAT I COULD… MAKING SURE YOU ARE IN GOOD PHYSICAL SHAPE BECAUSE YOU ARE CARRYING AN EXTRA 50 POUNDS OF GEAR… THAT’S JUST THE GEAR THAT YOU ARE CARRYING ON YOURSELF, NOT A RAM OR DIFFERENT TYPE OF EQUIPMENT THAT YOU MIGHT BE MOVING INTO PLACE FOR DIFFERENT TACTICS… I WAS AROUND 35 [YEARS OLD]. I WAS AN OLDER GUY APPLYING FOR THIS POSITION, BUT I WAS IN GOOD SHAPE AND HAD SOME GOOD EXPERIENCES THAT MADE ME COMPETITIVE, SO I DON’T THINK YOUR AGE TAKES YOU OUT OF THE EQUATION IF YOU ARE REALLY DETERMINED.” CARSCADDEN CONTINUED: “I’VE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE IN A LOT OF DIFFERENT POSITIONS WITHIN [THE TACTICAL] UNIT… I STARTED OFF AS AN ASSAULTER… THE PERSON WHO CARRIES ALL THE GEAR, SO YOU’RE IN THE BACK… THE LAST PERSON THAT COMES IN. IT’S A GOOD POSITION TO START OFF WITH. IT MAKES IT SAFER FOR WHEN YOU’RE GOING INTO THESE HIGH-RISK ENVIRONMENTS… FROM THERE I WAS GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE OBSERVER, THEN A SNIPER, THEN FROM THERE… A BREECHER. SO YOU ARE BREECHING DOORS AND WINDOWS. [THEN] I WENT TO THE FRONT OF THE TACTICAL LINE-UP, WHICH IS THE SCOUT… THEN THE LAST SIX YEARS THAT I WAS ON THE TACTICAL TEAM, I WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE, THE TEAM LEADER… AND I WAS RUNNING OPERATIONS IN CONJUNCTION WITH OUR CANINE UNIT AND OUR EXPLOSIVES DISPOSAL UNIT… THE TRAINING IS REALLY GOOD. [THE TEAM] TRAINS EVERY TWO WEEKS, AND DO LOTS OF MOVEMENTS AND SHOOTING AND TACTICS. IT’S A PERISHABLE SKILL, THAT IF YOU DON’T REPEAT AND PRACTICE IT ALL THE TIME, IT DIMINISHES… PRACTICE IS IMPORTANT. IT ALLOWS YOU TO BE BETTER AT YOUR GAME... YOU NEED TO HAVE A MINDSET [OF] BEING NOT ONLY PHYSICALLY TOUGH, BUT MENTALLY TOUGH, WHEN YOU DEAL WITH THINGS IN A HIGH-RISK ENVIRONMENT… YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE A LITTLE BIT OF DRIVE TO GET YOU THROUGH THINGS.” CARSCADDEN CONCLUDED: “ONE OF THE THINGS I’M PROUD OF ON THE TACTICAL SIDE IS THAT I WAS THE OFFICER WHO WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN BRINGING LESS LETHAL CAPABILITY TO THE TEAM… [WE] MAKE THE DIFFERENCE IN SAVING SOMEBODY’S LIFE. WE HELP THEM THROUGH THAT TIME OF NEED… WE HAVE ESTABLISHED WHERE, IN THE PAST IF THAT PERSON COULD HAVE ACTUALLY BEEN SHOT AND INJURED, IF NOT FATALLY SHOT, THAT PERSON NOW CAN BE DEALT WITH A LESS LETHAL MEANS… WE ARE ABLE TO RESTRAIN, ARREST, WITH THESE LESS LETHAL CAPABILITIES. THAT MAKES THE DIFFERENCE FOR THEM… THE EXPERIENCES THAT I HAD IN PEEL [SHOWED ME LESS LETHAL CAPABILITIES] IN OPERATION AND HOW IT WORKED… THEY WERE ONE OF THE FIRST SERVICES IN CANADA TO HAVE THE RUBBER BULLET… WHEN YOU’RE LOOKING AT DIFFERENT TACTICS AND HOW YOU CAN DO IT BETTER, THAT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I RECOGNIZED, THAT [LETHBRIDGE] COULD BRING THIS ON. IT WOULD BE BETTER FOR OUR TEAM AND OUR COMMUNITY: AS OPPOSED TO SHOOTING SOMEBODY AND STOPPING THEM THAT WAY, WE COULD USE THE [RUBBER BULLET] OR BEANBAG ROUND AND THAT WOULD BE ABLE TO HELP STOP THESE PEOPLE [BUT] SAVE THEIR LIVES… IT REALLY OPENS PEOPLE’S EYES WHEN THEY SEE THAT THERE’S A LOT OF OTHER RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO PUT IN PLACE FOR DIFFERENT TACTICS. AND WHEN PEOPLE SEE THERE’S ANOTHER WAY OF DOING BUSINESS, IT’S HELPFUL FOR US TO PROGRESS AND PUSH FORWARD… THESE PIECES OF EQUIPMENT ARE HERE TO ALLOW US TO KEEP THINGS CONTROLLED AND TO MAKE US DO OUR JOB BETTER… I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE INVOLVED WITH A VERY SPECIALIZED UNIT AND I’M VERY PROUD OF IT.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT.
Catalogue Number
P20100050004
Acquisition Date
2010-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail