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Other Name
"ALBERTA MEAT MARKET"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, WOOD, IRON
Catalogue Number
P20180025000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"ALBERTA MEAT MARKET"
Date
1955
Materials
STEEL, WOOD, IRON
No. Pieces
3
Height
115
Length
427
Width
24
Description
A. COMMERCIAL ADVERTISING SIGN, NEON. BODY STEEL PAINTED WITH TWO-TONE BLUE ON FRONT; FRONT HAS RED WOODEN LETTERS MOUNTED TO METAL FRAME AT BACK, SPELLING “ALBERTA" WITH WHITE NEON LETTERS OVERLAID. FRONT HAS WHITE LETTERS PAINTED ON BLUE BODY WITH OVERLAID WHITE NEON LETTERS READING “MEAT MARKET”. NEON LETTERS COMPRISED OF CONNECTED CLEAR, GLASS TUBES WITH BACKS PAINTED WHITE, AND UNPAINTED FRONTS; LETTERS ARE CONNECTED AND PAINTED BLACK BETWEEN INDIVIDUAL LETTERS; NEON LETTERS CONNECT INTO SIGN . LETTERS FASTENED TO FRONT OF SIGN BODY WITH BRACKETED GLASS EXTENSIONS, AND WITH SILVER WIRES TIED TO LETTERS. SIGN BODY IS RECTANGULAR WITH CUT-OUT SPACE IN CENTER WITH “ALBERTA" WOOD LETTERS IN FRONT OF CUT-OUT SPACE. SIGN BODY SLOPES DOWN FROM UPPER RIGHT CORNER; LOWER EDGE OF BODY SLOPES UP FROM RIGHT CORNER. SIGN FRONT HAS NEON TUBING ALONG UPPER EDGE ON BLUE FRAME, WITH SHORTER NEON TUBE RUNNING ACROSS FRAMING NEON TUBING ON THE LEFT SIDE. FRONT OF SIGN HAS LOGO BETWEEN “MEAT” AND “MARKET” NEON TEXT; LOGO COMPRISED OF RED BANNER EXTENDING FROM SIDES OF WHITE SHIELD IN CENTER; SHIELD HAS BLUE BORDER WITH BLUE “N” IN CENTER; RED BANNERS HAVE WHITE BORDERS AND WHITE TEXT ACROSS LOGO “NATIONAL NEON”.RED WOODEN LETTER “L” WARPED AND SPLITTING AT FRONT. TOP OF SIGN BODY STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT AND BLACK SOILING. BACK OF SIGN HAS FIXED BRACKETS ALONG EDGES WITH HOLES PUNCHED AT TOP AND BOLTED AT BOTTOMS TO SIGN BACK. BACK HAS BLACK POWER CORD EXTENDING WITH YELLOW POWER PLUG AT END; BACK HAS PAINT PEELING, IS STAINED AND RUSTED. BACK OF RED WOODEN LETTER “R” IS CRACKED; BACKS OF RED WOODEN LETTERS STAINED WITH YELLOW AND BLUE PAINT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. NEON TUBING REMNANT, LETTERS “TA”, 41 CM LONG X 54 CM WIDE. GLASS TUBING FILLED WITH WHITE, PAINTED BLACK ON BACKS AND AT ENDS. ENDS BENT AND FITTED WITH METAL CAPS WITH WIRES EXTENDING TO FIT INTO FRONT OF SIGN. LETTERS “TA” FASHION IN CURSIVE FONT AND CONNECTED; TUBE LOOPS OVER AT JUNCTION IN “A” AND GOING UP THE “T”. LOWER END OF “A” HAS BLUE PAINT STAINING; PAINT CHIPPED AROUND ENDS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. NEON TUBING REMNANT, LETTERS “AT”, 28 CM LONG X 50 CM WIDE. CLEAR GLASS TUBING, EMPTY, GLASS IS YELLOWED. TUBING PAINTED BLACK ON BACK, AT LOWER BASE, AND AT ENDS. ENDS BENT AND FITTED WITH METAL CAPS WITH WIRES EXTENDING TO FIT INTO FRONT OF SIGN. TUBES LOOP OVER AT JUNCTION IN “A” AND AT THE TOP LINE IN “T”. PAINT CHIPPED ON BACK AND FRONT; END CAPS RUSTED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
IN 2018, THE GALT MUSEUM RECEIVED A COMMERCIAL NEON SIGN FROM THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE CRIGHTON FAMILY. IN THE 1920S, GEORGE CRIGHTON OPENED CRIGHTON MEAT MARKET ON 3RD AVENUE BETWEEN 7TH AND 8TH STREET IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE, AND OPENED THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET AS A SECOND SHOP AT 510—6TH AVENUE SOUTH. THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET REMAINED OPERATED BY THE CRIGHTON FAMILY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 2012. THE ORIGINAL NEON SIGN FROM THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET WAS REMOVED AND DONATED ON NOVEMBER 22, 2018. IN APRIL 2019, THE SIGN UNDERWENT RESTORATIONS TO REPAIR THE NEON LETTERING AT L.A. NEON, LETHBRIDGE, PRIOR TO ITS INSTALLATION IN THE GALT MUSEUM PERMANENT DISPLAYS ON JULY 9, 2019. ON DECEMBER 19, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ELAINE BROWN, WHOSE FATHER-IN-LAW, DAVE BROWN, OWNED NATIONAL NEAN DISPLAYS LTD., AND WHOSE HUSBAND, ALLAN BROWN, WORKED FOR NATIONAL NEON. ON THE “ALBERTA MEAT MARKET” SIGN, BROWN RECALLED, “THAT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST SIGNS THAT THEY MADE…THE WOOD ON IT, IS WHY I KNEW THAT IT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST ONES.” “[ALLAN] USED TO GO AROUND EVERY EVENING, ONCE A WEEK, AND CHECK AND MAKE SURE [THE SIGNS] WERE ALL KEPT UP. IF ANY OF THE NEON WAS BROKEN, THEN THEY WOULD IMMEDIATELY GO AND REPAIR IT SO THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘AS IS’. HE WORKED [AT NATIONAL NEON] ALL DAY.” “[ALLAN] WAS PROUD OF THEM ALL. HE KNEW EXACTLY WHERE EVERY SIGN WAS. ANY ONE THAT HE WOULD PUT UP, HE COULD GO IN AND REPAIR QUICKLY, BECAUSE HE KNEW EXACTLY WHERE EVERYTHING WAS.” “ALLAN USED TO PAINT AND HANG SIGNS, [HIS BROTHER] JIM USED TO BLOW THE NEON AND [HIS BROTHER] BUSTER WOULD ALSO HANG SIGNS.” BROWN FURTHER ELABORATED ON THE HISTORY OF NATIONAL NEON DISPLAYS, STATING, “BEFORE [WE MARRIED IN 1957] ALLAN’S DAD, DAVE, BOUGHT THE BUSINESS WITH HIS THREE SONS…[IT WAS] NATIONAL NEON DISPLAYS LTD.” “IT WAS [AN EXISTING] BUSINESS OWNED BY ANOTHER BROWN…[DAVE] WAS INTERESTED IN IT, SO HE WENT IN AND DID ALL THE LEGWORK TO SEE IF HE COULD MAKE A GO OF IT. OBVIOUSLY, HE DECIDED HE COULD BECAUSE HE [AND THE SONS] BOUGHT IT.” “[ALLAN’S FAMILY] HADN’T BEEN [MAKING SIGNS] BEFORE BUT I PRESUME THEY KNEW THAT THEY COULD MAKE IT GO AND THEY COULD MAKE SIGNS. GRANDPA BROWN SAID THAT HE THOUGHT THEY COULD MAKE IT GO AND THEY DID.” “[ALLAN] DIDN’T THINK THE PLASTIC [SIGNS], WITH JUST THE FACE, WERE AS EYE-CATCHING AS THE NEON SIGNS NOR WERE THEY AS NICE TO LOOK AT WHEN THEY WERE ON. HE REALLY TOOK AN INTEREST IN IT; HE REALLY TRIED TO KEEP IT UP QUITE WELL. THEN HE RETIRED AND WE SOLD TO A MAN FROM CALGARY. I DON’T KNOW WHAT HAPPENED AFTER THAT BUT I THINK NEON PRODUCTS OWNS IT NOW, SO THEY SHUT [THE ORIGINAL] BUILDING DOWN. ALLAN HAD SOLD THE BUILDING AFTER HE RETIRED AND THEN THEY SHUT [THE] BUILDING DOWN AFTER THAT.” “WE HOPED THAT NATIONAL NEON WOULD BE IN PEOPLE’S MINDS AS BEING HERE AND BUILDING THOSE SIGNS…NATIONAL NEON WAS HERE AS A COMPANY AND EXPANDED FROM HERE. [ALLAN] USED TO GO INTO B.C. AND SASKATCHEWAN, TO EDMONTON…TO SELL THEM. IT WASN’T JUST A LOCAL BUSINESS. IT WAS ALL OVER, B.C., SASKATCHEWAN, ALBERTA—AND I THOUGHT IT WAS REALLY INTERESTING THAT THEY’D PICK ONE OF THE FIRST SIGNS THAT [ALLAN] BUILT TO TAKE DOWN AND PRESERVE. I’M SURE [ALLAN] WOULD HAVE BEEN HAPPY WITH THAT.” ON NOVEMBER 28, 2019, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MIRIAM SMITH AND BOB CRIGHTON REGARDING THEIR MEMORIES OF THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, OWNED AND OPERATED BY THEIR GRANDFATHER GEORGE CRIGHTON, FATHER JAMES CRIGHTON, AND THEMSELVES. ON THE HISTORY OF THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, MIRIAM SMITH RECALLED, “THE CRIGHTON FAMILY MOVED FROM SCOTLAND IN 1920…[GRANDPA CRIGHTON] OPENED THE STORE; HE RAN THE 6TH AVENUE STORE. HE RAISED HIS SONS OUT OF THERE. DAD WAS A BUTCHER IN SCOTLAND; THEY ALL BECOME BUTCHERS. BOBBY LEFT; TOMMY LEFT; DAVEY, HE WAS A BUTCHER; GEORGE WENT TO CAMPBELL RIVER.” “[DAD TOOK OVER THE SHOP ON 6TH AVENUE] ’38, OR ’39.” BOB CRIGHTON ELABORATED, “[DAD] TRIED TO ENLIST, BUT HE HAD THE STORE ON 3RD AVENUE, AND HE WENT BROKE THERE. THAT WAS CALLED CRIGHTON’S MEAT MARKET AT THAT TIME...HE HAD TO PAY ALL OF HIS BILLS OFF, SO MY GRANDPA ASKED HIM TO TAKE OVER THE 6TH AVENUE STORE. SO HE TOOK OVER THE 6TH AVENUE STORE, AND CHANGED IT TO THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET.” “[WHEN DAD GOT THE NEW NEON SIGN] I REMEMBER HIM PUTTING IT UP. DAD RENOVATED THE STORE AND WE GOT NEW MEAT COUNTERS, AND WHEN HE GOT THE NEW SIGN UP, I WATCHED THEM PUT IT UP. NATIONAL NEON PUT IT UP…I WAS 12-14 YEARS OLD.” MIRIAM SMITH RECALLED, “I WORKED THERE WHEN I WENT TO SCHOOL. I HAD TO ANSWER THE TELEPHONE ON SATURDAYS, OR HOLIDAYS…IT WAS A BUSY STORE. I REMEMBER ALONG 6TH AVENUE AND 5TH STREET, YOU COULDN’T FIND A PLACE TO PARK BECAUSE IT WAS SO BUSY. I REMEMBER, AT LUNCHTIME, I USED TO SAY, 'I’M GOING TO GO FOR MY LUNCH NOW,' AND THERE USED TO BE SILVER’S ACROSS THE STREET. MY DAD WOULD ALWAYS SAY, ‘NO, YOU CAN’T GO. I’VE GOT TO FIX THE COUNTER AND GET MY PARSLEY OUT.' HE ALWAYS HAD HIS COUNTER VERY BEAUTIFULLY DONE.” “THE PHONE WOULD RING OFF THE HOOK, ESPECIALLY [WITH] EVERYBODY WANTING TO ORDER THEIR MEAT. IT WAS PLEASANT VISITING WITH THE DIFFERENT PEOPLE. SOME OF THEM I KNEW; SOME OF THEM I DIDN’T. BUT I FOUND MOST PEOPLE VERY NICE TO CHAT WITH. I REMEMBER MY DAD, AND DORIS HUNT (H.B.HUNT), THE DOCTOR’S WIFE. SHE USED TO COME IN, AND SHE WAS QUITE A BOISTEROUS LADY, AND SHE SPOKE HER MIND. I REMEMBER ONE TIME SHE SAID TO MY DAD, 'JIMMY, THAT ROAST BEEF YOU GAVE ME LAST WEEK WAS TOUGHER THAN HELL.' WELL, MY DAD SAID TO HER, 'YOU KNOW, DORIS, I REMEMBER YOUR HUSBAND TOOK MY APPENDIX OUT, AND THEY COME BACK AGAIN.'" MIRIAM SMITH NOTED, "I REMEMBER THE TIME THAT DAD GAVE THE TURKEY TO THE KID…THE KID HAD NO MONEY, AND HE COME FOR HAMBURGER.” BOB CRIGHTON ELABORATED, “HAMBURGER, AT CHRISTMAS TIME. IT WAS 40 BELOW OUTSIDE, AND HE [CAME] DOWN…HE SAID, ‘I WANT A POUND OF HAMBURGER, MR. CRIGHTON.' [DAD] SAYS, ‘WHAT ARE YOU HAVING FOR CHRISTMAS SUPPER?' 'HAMBURGER.' 'JUST A MINUTE.' SO, [DAD] GETS A TURKEY, AND A HAM, AND SAUSAGE. GOT A BAG FOR HIM, AND HE SAYS, 'THERE – MERRY CHRISTMAS.'" “DAD WAS A PRETTY GENEROUS MAN! WHEN ANDY KERGEN DIED, JUDY [CAME] IN. SHE WAS CRYING. SHE HAD A $200.00 BILL; SHE COULDN’T PAY IT. SHE HAD $5.00 TO PUT ON THE BILL. DAD SAYS, “GIVE ME THE BILL, JUDY.” HE LOOKED AT THE BILL; HE TOOK HIS WALLET OUT AND PAID THE BILL, AND THEN GAVE HER THE RECEIPT.” MIRIAM SMITH CONTINUED, “I ALWAYS REMEMBER WHEN WE WERE KIDS GROWING UP, WE ALWAYS HAD LOTS OF MEAT. WHATEVER WAS LEFT OVER AT THE STORE [WOULD] COME HOME…WE COULD BRING ANYBODY WE WANTED, MOTHER DIDN’T MIND. THE MEAT PLATTER WOULD BE PLACED IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TABLE, AND THE WATER PITCHER. NOBODY WANTED TO SIT BESIDE THE WATER PITCHER, BECAUSE ALL YOU DID WAS POUR WATER.” MIRIAM SMITH NOTED, “[WE, THE CHILDREN, BOUGHT DAD OUT] IN 1965.” ON DECEMBER 11, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED KEN CRIGHTON, GRANDSON OF JAMES [JIM] CRIGHTON. KEN CRIGHTON WORKED WITH THE FAMILY IN ALBERTA MEAT MARKET. ON HIS MEMORIES OF WORKING IN THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, KEN CRIGHTON NOTED, “I WAS THERE EVERY DAY FOR 30 SOME YEARS…MY DAD AND HIS TWO BROTHERS WERE OPERATING IT WHEN I WAS A KID. [I] GOT TOLD TO GET DOWN THERE, AND HELP CLEAN UP; DO SOME CHORES; HELP WITH DELIVERIES; THEN I WORKED INTO LEARNING HOW TO CUT MEAT.” “[MY GRANDFATHER OWNED IT] JAMES ANDERSON CRIGHTON, BUT EVERYONE CALLED HIM ‘JIM’.” “[MY] FIRST MEMORIES OF GOING THERE TO WORK WAS HAVING TO RIDE ON YOUR BIKE, OR WALK FROM SCHOOL RIGHT AFTER SCHOOL, TO HELP CLEAN UP EITHER AT 4 O’CLOCK OR 4:30. IT ALWAYS SEEMED TO ME THAT I WAS DOING THE BULK OF THE WORK, AND THEY WERE DOING MOST OF THE BEER-DRINKING.” “EVERY NIGHT YOU HAD TO EMPTY ALL THE MEAT OUT OF THE COUNTER, COVER IT OVER, TAKE IT, PUT IT IN THE BIG COOLER; TAKE ALL THE PLATTERS OUT OF THE COUNTER, WASH THEM, DRY THEM…EVERYTHING FROM SWEEPING THE FLOOR, TO RAKING THE FLOOR. WE USED TO HAVE SAWDUST ON THE FLOOR TO SOAK UP ALL THE BLOOD AND FAT THAT WOULD FALL DOWN. YOU’D RUN A RAKE THROUGH IT TO PICK UP ALL THE BIG CHUNKS OF GARBAGE, AND THEN TWICE A WEEK YOU’D SWEEP UP ALL THE SAWDUST, AND REPLACE IT WITH FRESH SAWDUST. THAT ENDED WHEN THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT CHANGED…WHEN I WAS ABOUT 12-13, SO THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN 1972.” “[THE SHOP WAS OPEN] SIX DAYS A WEEK. WE WERE ONLY CLOSED, THEN, ON SUNDAYS.” “EVERY DAY, WEEKDAYS AFTER SCHOOL, AND SATURDAYS, I WOULD HELP THE GUY THAT WOULD DO DELIVERIES. WE’D RUN OUT A COUPLE, OR THREE, LOADS OF DELIVERIES TO HOUSES. IT WAS DIFFERENT BACK THEN. WE HAD SOME CUSTOMERS WHO WOULD ORDER THEIR STUFF IN THE MORNING FOR WHAT THEY WANTED FOR LUNCH. THEN THEY PHONE IN THE AFTERNOON, AND ORDER FOR WHAT THEY WANTED FOR SUPPER, WHICH, LATER ON, BECAME THE, “NO, YOU GET ONE DELIVERY A DAY.”” KEN CRIGHTON RECALLED THE LAYOUT OF THE SHOP, STATING, “THE FRONT HALF OF THE BUILDING, WHERE THE CUSTOMERS WERE, WAS PROBABLY ONLY ABOUT THE FIRST THIRD, MAYBE HALF OF THE BUILDING. A GLASS COUNTER/COOLER [WAS] ALONG THE MIDDLE, AND BEHIND IT WAS WHERE WE HAD OUR CUTTING BLOCKS AND SAW. [THERE WAS A] LITTLE COUNTER FOR A PHONE, [A] LITTLE COUNTER TO DO BOOKS ON, [AND] A 6’ WIDE AREA FOR THE CUSTOMERS TO STAND. EVERYTHING WAS SERVED. THERE WAS NO ‘THEM PICKING IT OUT’ AT THE COUNTER. IT WAS ALL DONE AND WRAPPED IN BROWN PAPER BY US.” “ON THE LEFT SIDE, [THERE WAS] A GOOD 15’ TO 20’ WALK-IN COOLER. THEN, ALONG THE WEST WALL, WE HAD A SMALL FREEZER WITH SHELVES. [IT] HAD NINE LITTLE DOORS THAT [OPENED] UP, AND SLIDE TRAYS IN. WHEN YOU’RE DOING FREEZER BEEF ORDERS, YOU’D USE THAT TO FREEZE THEM UP. [THERE WAS] A LITTLE WALK-IN FREEZER TO HOLD THE BOXES, PROBABLY ONLY 3’ BY 6’. [THERE WAS] A COUNTER [AT] THE BACK END, WITH A STOVE, THAT WE WOULD USE TO COOK UP CORNED BEEF, [AND] A FEW OTHER COLD MEATS.” “WE HAD A DOUBLE DOOR ON THE SIDE THAT WENT TO THE ALLEY, THAT WE WOULD BRING THE STUFF IN OFF THE TRUCK. USUALLY IT WAS TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS, WE WOULD GET THE BIG ORDERS OF HANGING BEEF IN. WE HAD TWO HUGE 2’ BY 6’ PIECES OF WOOD THAT WERE ON BIG HOOKS THAT WERE PROPPED UP IN THE ATTIC. THEN YOU WOULD HANG YOUR BIG MEAT HOOKS ON THEM. YOU COULD GET 8 HIND QUARTERS, AND 6-8 FRONT QUARTERS HANGING UP IN THERE. ONE DAY WAS THE DAY YOU WOULD BREAK THEM DOWN INTO PIECES, AND THEN PUT THEM INTO THE COOLER, OR SAVE THE QUARTERS IF YOU HAD A WHOLE QUARTER FOR A FREEZER ORDER.” “[I LEARNED THE TRADE] MOSTLY BY WATCHING…BY THE TIME I WAS 15-16, [I WAS] IN THERE DOING EVERY SINGLE THING THEY’RE DOING: RUNNING THE BAND SAW, THE GRINDER, MIXING UP BURGERS, MAKING PATTIES, THE WHOLE DEAL. [I] DIDN’T REALLY GET TO SERVE CUSTOMERS TILL [I WAS] OLDER. A LOT OF THE CUSTOMERS, EVEN THEN, DIDN’T WANT ME SERVING THEM, [THEY] WANTED THE OLD MAN, OR ONE OF THE OLDER GUYS. I’M SURE LOTS OF FAMILY BUSINESSES RUN INTO THAT, WHERE THE OLD-TIME CUSTOMERS ONLY WANT THE OLDER PEOPLE LOOKING AFTER THEM.” “[THE SHOP DID WELL] I THINK BECAUSE, PROBABLY A LOT OF REPUTATION, AND PERSONALIZED SERVICE. BUT, AFTER A WHILE, IT GOT TO BE THAT YOU WERE RUNNING INTO A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WOULD WANT YOUR QUALITY/YOUR SERVICE BUT AT THE SAME SALE PRICE THAT THE BIG STORES WOULD HAVE. THAT WAS THE FRUSTRATION OF IT…I WOULD SAY PROBABLY 90% OF THE CLIENTELE WERE REPEATS, AND YOU HAD YOUR STEADY CORE CUSTOMERS…THEY WOULD GET WHAT THEY LIKED.” “[IN THE 1980S] THERE WAS MYSELF, DAD, [AND] HE HAD TWO OTHER YOUNGER PEOPLE WORKING, ONE NAMED LEN, WHO WAS CUTTING MEAT, AND ANOTHER [WOMAN] NAMED IDA, WHO CUT. BUSINESS STARTED TO TAPER OFF THEN. HE LAID OFF IDA, AND THEN ME, AND LEN, AND DAD WOULD PRETTY WELL OPERATE THE WHOLE SHOW. THAT WAS ABOUT 1990.” “[DAD] WAS VERY, I THINK, ASTUTE AT THE BUSINESS…[HE] HAD TO BE, BECAUSE THAT WAS THEIR LIVING. THEY HAD NOTHING ELSE TO FALL BACK ON. [HE HAD TO] MAKE IT WORK. HE WAS REALLY GOOD WITH THE CUSTOMERS. HE ENJOYED SERVING THE CUSTOMERS MORE THAN THE GRUNT WORK IN THE BACK. HE COULD DO IT, BUT HE PREFERRED BEING UP FRONT, WORKING WITH THE PEOPLE. ME AND MY UNCLE RON COULD STAY IN THE BACK ALL DAY. I COULD STAND THERE AT THAT BLOCK, AND WE COULD CUT MEAT 8 HOURS STRAIGHT. [IT] WOULDN’T BOTHER US. I COULD HANDLE SERVING THE CUSTOMERS, BUT I PREFERRED JUST WORKING.” “[BUSINESS] REALLY STARTED DECLINING…I REALLY NOTICED IT AROUND 2008, 2009. FOR THE LAST WHILE, [I] JUST HAD MYSELF AND ONE OTHER YOUNG FELLOW, GARRY, WORKING THERE. IT WAS TO THE POINT WHERE YOU COULDN’T MAKE ENOUGH SALES TO AFFORD ANOTHER PERSON, BUT IT WAS TOO BUSY FOR ONE. GARRY WAS STARTING TO HAVE A FAMILY, AND NEEDED MORE MONEY. HE LEFT TO GO WORK SOMEWHERE ELSE. SO, I HUNG ONTO IT, AND JUST DID IT ALL BY MYSELF FOR THE LAST FOUR YEARS. BEING THE ONLY GUY THERE, EVERY HOUR OF EVERY DAY, FOR TEN HOURS A DAY, STARTED TO GET TO ME. IT GOT TO THE POINT WHERE, IN 2011, EARLY 2012, I JUST THOUGHT, “THERE’S NO POINT IN WORKING LIKE THIS, AND NOT MAKING ANYTHING. I MIGHT AS WELL DO NOTHING, AND MAKE THE SAME AMOUNT.”” KEN CRIGHTON SOLD ALBERTA MEAT MARKET IN 2012. MIRIAM SMITH SPOKE TO HER THOUGHTS ON THE SIGN BEING DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM, NOTING, “I’M VERY HAPPY. I THINK IT’S A GOOD PLACE FOR IT, AND I THINK KENNETH, AND EVERYBODY FEELS THAT WAY.” KEN CRIGHTON CONFIRMED, “I’M ECSTATIC! I WOULD RATHER IT BE HERE. OUR WHOLE FAMILY’S LOST OUR IDENTITY/ERASED [IT] BY HAVING IT JUST THROWN AWAY. ON THE OTHER HAND, I DIDN’T WANT IT STILL ON THE BUILDING, [WITH] THE BUILDING BEING USED FOR A DIFFERENT PURPOSE, AND HAVING THE NAME ASSOCIATED. [IT] FELT LIKE THE NAME BELONGED TO THE CRIGHTON’S MORE THAN THE COMMUNITY, OR WHOEVER OWNED THE BUILDING.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, FAMILY OBITUARIES, AND ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180025000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180025000
Acquisition Date
2018-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE HERALD AGENT"
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
TIN, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180004000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE HERALD AGENT"
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
TIN, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
30.6
Width
25.8
Description
METAL SIGN WITH DOUBLE-SIDED PRINTING ON LIGHT BROWN BACKGROUND. SIGN SHOWS BLACK SQUARE BACKGROUND WITH RED TRIM AND LIGHT BROWN TEXT WITH RED TRIM READING “AGENT FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD HERE, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD SERVES THE SOUTH”; SIGN HAS SMALL BLACK TEXT PRINTED AT BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER “TMOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO. LTD. MONTREAL”. BACK OF SIGN IS PRINTED THE SAME. SIGN HAS JAGGED METAL EDGE BENT DOWN ON LEFT SIDE; SIGN IS RUSTED FRONT AND BACK AND FADED; SIGN IS SCRATCHED IN FRONT UPPER RIGHT CORNER AND CORRODED LOWER LEFT CORNER. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
PROFESSIONS
History
ON MARCH 19TH, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONTACTED DAN PLOURDE, THE "AGENT FOR...HERALD" SIGN'S SELLER. THE SIGN WAS PURCHASED BY THE GALT MUSEUM AT URBAN PRAIRIE ANTIQUE MALL ON MARCH 21, 2018. PLOURDE, A PICKER, LEASES MALL SPACE AT URBAN PRAIRIE AS A LOCATION TO SELL HIS PICKS. PLOURDE TOLD MACLEAN THAT THE HERALD SIGN CAME FROM A RURAL PROPERTY NEAR CHIN LAKE. THE RURAL LOCATION FEATURED "QUONSETS" FULL OF OTHER ITEMS, INCLUDING GAS MEMORABILIA AND FURNITURE. THE ORIGINAL OWNER OF THE SIGN, WHO LIVED AT THE PROPERTY WAS NO LONGER LIVING. THE OWNER, CONTINUED PLOURDE, CONDUCTED HIS OWN PICKING "IN BACK ALLEYS IN LETHBRIDGE 60 YEARS AGO". PLOURDE ATTEMPTED TO SELL THE SIGN IN FORT MACLEAD BEFORE RECOGNIZING THAT ITS MARKET WAS GREATER IN LETHBRIDGE. FOR COPIES OF INFORMATION REGARDING THE SIGN, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180004000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180004000
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PORCELAIN
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Materials
PORCELAIN
No. Pieces
1
Height
6
Diameter
21.5
Description
CHINA BOWL WITH AN IRREGULAR RIM THAT EXTENDS A FLORAL PETAL MOTIF ALONG BOWL’S INSIDE EDGE. CENTRE FEATURES COUNTRY LANDSCAPE INCLUDING A COTTAGE, SURROUNDED BY STAMP MARK IN GOLD STENCIL AND SCRIPT, “COMPLIMENTS OF N. F. SUPINA”. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT CRACKING IN THE BOTTOM. THE BASE IS SCUFFED AND DIRTY. THERE ARE SOME MARKS ON THE OUTSIDE EDGE.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
BUSINESS
COMMEMORATIVE
DOMESTIC
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING HORHOZER AND HER FAMILY. THIS BOWL IS A REMINDER OF THE STORE THAT WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF LIFE IN THE SUPINA FAMILY. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “MY DAD ALWAYS GAVE A CHRISTMAS GIFT. SO ONE YEAR HE GAVE THE PLATE AND ANOTHER YEAR HE GAVE THIS BOWL AND ACTUALLY THAT’S ALL I KNOW ABOUT IT… [A]LL THE CUSTOMERS, THE ONES THAT DEALT THERE ALL THE TIME [GOT A CHRISTMAS PRESENT]. THE GOOD PAYING ONES AND THE NOT-SO-GOOD PAYING ONES, I THINK THEY PROBABLY EVEN GOT IT TOO, BUT, AS LONG AS THEY WERE CUSTOMERS THEN THEY GOT ONE… MY MOTHER SAVED [IT] FIRSTLY, BECAUSE THEY REALLY MEANT SOMETHING - PART OF THE STORE I GUESS SHE’D SAY. SO, HAD THEM FOR A LONG, LONG TIME… MY MOM HAD ALL KINDS OF ORNAMENTS AROUND AND SHE’D JUST PUT THEM ON A TABLE OR WHATEVER. SHE WOULD CHANGE HER ORNAMENTS EVERY ONCE AND AWHILE, AND THEN SHE’D PUT THESE IN THE CUPBOARD." ABOUT THE HISTORY OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE, HORHOZER EXPLAINS: “I WAS BORN INTO [THE STORE]. MY DAD STARTED SMALL. HIS DAD HAD A LITTLE CONFECTIONARY; THEN HE TURNED IT INTO A GROCERY STORE AND THEN HE SOLD IT TO MY DAD. MY DAD WAS THE ONE THAT TOOK IT OVER, THAT WAS ALREADY TAKING PLACE WHEN I WAS BORN. THERE WAS NO SPECIFIC MEMORY [OF THAT TRANSITIION] BECAUSE THAT’S ALL I KNEW REALLY.” “… MY DAD WAS BORN IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA. [HIS FAMILY] CAME HERE WHEN HE WAS TWO. [HIS YOUNGER SIBLINGS], THE FIVE BROTHERS AND THE ONE SISTER, WERE ALL BORN IN THAT SAME LITTLE HOUSE THERE. AND THAT’S WHERE MY GRANDPA HAD STARTED THE STORE, IT WAS JUST A CONFECTIONARY. EVENTUALLY IT GREW INTO QUITE A BUSINESS… IN THOSE DAYS, IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, SO THEY HAD FIVE HORSES AND BUGGIES THAT WERE RUNNING, WORKING, AND MY UNCLE ALWAYS LOOKED AFTER THE HORSES AND MAINTAINED THEM. THEY’D GO AND THEY’D PICK UP THE ORDER. LOTS OF THE PEOPLE THEN COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, BUT MY DAD COULD SPEAK CZECH, AND THEN THEY’D USUALLY SEND – HE HAD ALL KINDS OF NATIONALITIES WORKING FOR HIM - [A PERSON OF MATCHING ETHNICITY], THAT KNEW THEIR LANGUAGE TO PICK UP THE ORDER. THEY BROUGHT IT BACK TO THE STORE, AND THEN DELIVERED IT BACK TO THE CUSTOMER, THAT WAS REAL SERVICE IN THOSE DAYS, ESPECIALLY WITH HORSE AND BUGGY IN THOSE WINTRY DAYS, AFTER THAT IT DEVELOPED INTO TRUCKS. THERE WERE LOTS OF MINERS IN THOSE DAYS AND WERE GOOD CUSTOMERS… HE AT ONE TIME EMPLOYED THIRTY-SIX PEOPLE IN THE STORE THERE.” AN ARTICLE IN LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON MAY 5, 2004 STATES THAT NICK SUPINA PURCHASED THE STORE FROM HIS FATHER, MIKE SUPINA, IN 1918. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER CONTINUED TO SPEAK ABOUT THE BEGINNING DAYS OF THE SUPINA’S STORE: “MY GRANDPA WAS WORKING IN THE MINE. I DON’T KNOW HOW IT CAME THAT HE HAD THIS LITTLE BUSINESS… IT’S MY DAD THEN THAT HAD TO LOOK AFTER THE FAMILY BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY MONEY. THERE WAS FIVE BOYS SO HE HAD THEM ALL. THEY WERE ALL CLOSE TOGETHER IN AGE. THERE’S STEVE AND BILLY AND JOHN AND MIKE… UNCLE STEVE, IS THE SECOND, HE’S THE ONE THAT STAYED WITH MY DAD, AND JOHNNY DID TOO. THEN THE OTHER TWO PURSUED THEIR OWN BUSINESSES. BILLY HAD A BUSINESS IN RED DEER AND SMALL BUSINESSES IN TWO OTHER PLACES. THEN MIKE, HE WENT TO THE STATES AND—OH, THAT WAS GEORGE, PARDON ME. HE HAD A SHOE STORE WHICH WAS VERY, VERY SUCCESSFUL. MIKE WAS THE ONLY ONE THAT WASN’T IN BUSINESS. THAT WAS BECAUSE HE WAS IN THE WAR…” THINKING BACK ON HER MEMORIES OF SUPINA’S, HORHOZER DESCRIBES, “[I]N THOSE DAYS YOU HAD GOOD FRUIT. I REMEMBER THE DELICIOUS PEACHES. I HAVEN’T SEEN A PEACH LIKE THAT SINCE… LOTS OF TIMES, THE FRUIT WOULD GO OVER-RIPE, LIKE YOUR APRICOTS AND PEACHES. MY MOTHER WOULD GO AND GET ALL THE OVER-RIPE FRUIT AND TAKE IT HOME AND MAKE BEAUTIFUL PIES AND TAKE THE PIES BACK TO THE STORE AND SELL THEM. SHE WAS A WONDERFUL BAKER. THEY DID EVERYTHING LIKE THAT TO HELP MAKE MORE MONEY. SOMETIMES MY DAD WOULD HAVE A SPECIAL ON, 3 CENTS A LOAF [OF BREAD. I HAD LOTS OF ADS FROM THE STORE, AND YOU’D GET SUCH A KICK OUT OF SEEING HAMBURGER, TWENTY-FIVE CENTS A POUND AND THINGS LIKE THAT. SO, YES I REMEMBER.” HORHOZER BEGAN WORKING AT THE STORE AT THE AGE OF 14: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.’” HORHOZER BELIEVED THAT AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE STORE’S SUCCESS WAS “… BECAUSE, [OF] THE SERVICE MAINLY. JUST THINK, GOING THERE, GETTING YOUR ORDERS, BRINGING THEM BACK, DOING THEM UP, THEY’D MAKE SURE THINGS WERE TOP QUALITY. THEY GOT TO KNOW EVERY CUSTOMER, OF COURSE, AND THEY KNEW WHAT THEY LIKED. HE HAD WONDERFUL PEOPLE WORKING FOR HIM. THEY JUST GAVE FANTASTIC SERVICE ALL THE TIME. PLUS, MY DAD WAS GRUFF, BUT HE WAS VERY, VERY KIND TO POOR PEOPLE THAT COULDN’T AFFORD –THERE’S LOTS THAT YEARS AFTER HE HAD PASSED AWAY [PEOPLE] WOULD COME UP TO ME AND SAY, ‘IF IT WASN’T FOR YOUR DAD, JOHNNY WOULDN’T HAVE HAD CHEESE,’ OR SOMETHING. I DIDN’T KNOW A THING ABOUT IT, BECAUSE HE WAS ONE THAT NEVER, EVER TOLD ANYBODY… THEN AT CHRISTMAS TIME HE WOULD GO TO THE STORE AND HE HAD A LIST OF EVERYBODY THAT HE KNEW WAS EXCEPTIONALLY POOR, AND HE WOULD FILL BASKETS. HE WOULD DO IT ALL BY HIMSELF… HE WOULDN’T TELL MY MOTHER AND I. HE WAS SO TIGHT-MOUTHED, FILL ALL THESE BASKETS AND DELIVER THEM TO THE PEOPLE HIMSELF WITHOUT TELLING A SOUL ABOUT IT. HE WAS THAT KIND OF PERSON. HE WAS VERY KIND THAT WAY.” SUPINA’S MERCANTILE SERVED LETHBRIDGE UNTIL IT CLOSED IN 1960. HORHOZER REMAINED IN RETAIL IN VARIOUS SHOPS IN THE CITY, INCLUDING THE DEPARTMENT STORE WOOLCO UNTIL HER RETIREMENT IN 1988. HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE IN 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS OLD. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT SUPINA’S MERCANTILE AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"RED DAWN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180029001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"RED DAWN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
104
Width
68.8
Description
POSTER WITH IMAGE ON FRONT OF PURPLE AND BLUE SKY WITH SUNRISE AND PARATROOPERS DESCENDING OVER TOWN SURROUNDED BY MOUNTAINS AT BOTTOM EDGE. POSTER HAS WHITE BORDERS; POSTER HAS WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON IMAGE “IN OUR TIME NO FOREIGN ARMY HAS EVER OCCUPIED AMERICAN SOIL. UNTIL NOW” AND RED PRINTED TEXT BELOW WITH RUSSIAN SYLLABICS OVER “RED DAWN”; POSTER HAS WHITE CREDITS ALONG BOTTOM EDGE, “A VALKYRIE FILM A SIDNEY BECKERMAN PRODUCTION RED DAWN…” WITH LISTING OF CAST AND CREW MEMBERS. LOWER LEFT CORNER OF IMAGE HAS TEXT WARNING “PG-13, PARENTS ARE STRONGLY CAUTIONED TO GIVE SPECIAL GUIDANCE FOR ATTENDANCE OF CHILDREN UNDER 13, SOME MATERIAL MAY BE INAPPROPRIATE FOR YOUNG CHILDREN”, AND TEXT BESIDE “[COPYRIgHT SYMBOL” 1984 UNITED ARTISTS CORPORATION”; LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF IMAGE HAS LOGO “METRO GOLDWYN MAYER UNITED ARTISTS, DIAMOND JUBILEE, SIXTY YEARS OF GREAT ENTERTAINMENT”; POSTER HAS TEXT ALONG LOWER BORDER “PROPERTY OF NATIONAL SCREEN CORPORATION LICENSED FOR USE ONLY IN CONNECTION WITH THE EXHIBITION OF THIS PICTURE AT THE THEATRE LICENSING THIS MATERIAL. LICENSEE AGREES NOT TO TRADE, SELL OR GIVE IT AWAY, OR PERMIT OTHERS TO USE IT, NOR SHALL LICENSEE BE ENTITLED TO ANY CREDIT UPON RETURN OF THIS MATERIAL. THIS MATERIAL EITHER MUST BE RETURNED OR DESTROYED IMMEDIATELY AFTER USE. LITHO. IN U.S.A., RED DAWN 840077”. BACK OF POSTER HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN RED INK IN LOWER LEFT CORNER “KEVIN MCLEAN $2.00” AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE INK “RED DAWN”. POSTER HAS TEARS AT RIGHT AND LEFT EDGES, AND LOWER EDGE; FRONT IS CREASED; BACK OF CORNERS HAS LOSS FROM REMOVAL OF ADHESIVES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
LEISURE
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIEWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS DONATED BY MACLEAN REFLECTED HIS LIFE AND IDENTITY THROUGH HIS TIME IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE “RED DAWN” FILM POSTER, MACLEAN ELABORATED, “THE POSTER [WAS] UP [IN MY ROOM].” “[IN] THE 1980S, AS A KID, AND I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS JUST ME ‘CAUSE I WAS A NEWS JUNKIE, THE COLD WAR WAS A BIG DEAL IN THE EARLY ‘80S. THERE WERE SHOWS ON TV THAT WERE SCARING THE CRAP OUT OF ME. THERE WAS ONE CALLED "THE DAY AFTER" AND THAT WAS IN ’83. THEN IN 1984 THIS MOVIE COMES OUT WHICH IS CALLED RED DAWN WHICH IS, AGAIN, ABOUT RUSSIAN COMMUNIST INVASIONS OF NORTH AMERICA. IT’S A SMALL TOWN THAT ALL THESE TROOPS DROP INTO. TO SAY THE LEAST, I WAS SEMI-OBSESSED WITH THE SUBJECT MATTER.” “IF YOU WATCHED "THE DAY AFTER"…ON ONE HAND, THAT KIND OF SUBJECT MATTER CAN FEEL FOREIGN AND ABSTRACT AND NOT RELEVANT. BUT, IF AT THE SAME TIME YOU’RE A KID, AND YOUR PARENTS ARE WATCHING THE NEWS EVERY NIGHT, AND YOU HAVE AN INTEREST IN WHAT’S GOING ON—A LOT OF KIDS DON’T CARE BUT FOR SOME REASON, I WAS VERY INTERESTED. THEN YOU THOUGHT, “NO, THIS IS A VERY REAL PROSPECT. THIS COULD ACTUALLY HAPPEN.” I WAS TERRIFIED ABOUT IT. BUT, AT THE SAME TIME, I WAS ALSO ATTRACTED TO IT, LIKE A FLAME. IT WAS…ROCKETS…I DON’T KNOW WHAT IT WAS BUT I WAS ACTIVELY INTERESTED IN [THEM]. THEN AT SOME POINT, THAT PIVOTED, WHICH IS WHEN I KNOW I WAS LOOKING AT THE SOLDIER OF FORTUNE MAGAZINES AND THEN I STARTED BUYING COMIC BOOKS…WORLD WAR TWO COMIC BOOKS.” “WE DIDN’T HAVE MUCH TV OUT IN PICTURE BUTTE. [OTHER PEOPLE] PROBABLY HAD LOTS OF CHANNELS IN LETHBRIDGE. ONE CHANNEL WE DID HAVE—I THINK WE ONLY HAD THREE—WAS CBC. I REMEMBER [MY PARENTS] WATCHING THE NATIONAL. I THINK [THERE] WAS [A SHOW] CALLED THE JOURNAL WITH BARBARA FRUM [THAT MY PARENTS] WOULD WATCH AT TEN O’CLOCK EVERY SINGLE NIGHT. I WOULD SNEAK OUT OF MY ROOM AND HIDE BEHIND THE COUCH, AND [THE COLD WAR IS] ON THE NEWS EVERY SINGLE NIGHT.” “IN TERMS OF [THE COLD WAR] MANIFESTING ITSELF LOCALLY…I THINK TRUDEAU’S IN POWER, AND THERE’S A WHOLE DEBATE ABOUT CANADA HAVING NUKES IN THIS COUNTRY. ULTIMATELY, IT DIDN’T HAPPEN. BUT, THE U.S. WAS TESTING CRUISE MISSILES IN ALBERTA, AND NOT FAR FROM MY FRIEND’S HOUSE OUT NEAR PICTURE BUTTE, WHEN THE TALK OF A CRUISE MISSILE BEING TESTED IN ALBERTA WAS IN THE NEWS, ACTIVELY, PEOPLE WERE UNHAPPY AND PROTESTING. A BUNCH OF TRACTOR TRAILERS PULLED UP ON THE TOP OF A HILL, TWO MILES AWAY FROM [MY FRIEND’S] HOUSE, WITH U.S. LICENSE PLATES. OTHERWISE, THEY WERE TOTALLY UNMARKED. THEY BUILT THIS RADAR INSTALLATION UP ON THE TOP OF THE HILL, WHERE IT REMAINED…FOR THREE DAYS OR [SO]…AND THEN IT ALL DISAPPEARED.” “I CAN’T SAY THAT I KNOW FOR A FACT THAT IT WAS RELATED TO CRUISE MISSILE TESTING.” “GENERALLY TO SAY…WITH THESE [OBJECTS] I CAN DRAW A BIT OF A LINE FROM MY HAVING POSSESSED THEM ALL THE WAY, IN SOME FORM…THEY WOULD HAVE HAD AN IMPACT ON [MY] IDENTITY AND WHO I THINK I AM TODAY. I DON’T VALUE THEM BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE UTILITY AND THEY DON’T HAVE PRACTICAL VALUE. I DON’T LOOK AT THEM ALL THE TIME, BUT I KNOW THAT THEY HAVE SOME IMPORTANCE LIFE-WISE.” “IN SCHOOL, THERE WAS A GAME THAT WE WERE PLAYING. THIS IS AT A TIME WHEN THERE’S ONE COMPUTER FOR THE ENTIRE SCHOOL. IT WAS AN APPLE…AND IT WAS A WW2-BASED GAME. MY INTEREST, INITIALLY, WAS IN CONTEMPORARY-TYPE STUFF. THEN WE’RE PLAYING THIS GAME WHICH I’M NOT REALLY–IT’S ABSTRACT TO ME. WE’RE JUST PLAYING THIS GAME AND THEN, BECAUSE I’M INTO THIS, I’M BUYING MAGAZINES CALLED SOLDIER OF FORTUNE, AND I CAN REMEMBER FLIPPING THROUGH THE PAGES OF [THE] PROXY WAR IN AFGHANISTAN. [THE RUSSIANS] HAD GONE INTO AFGHANISTAN, AND I SAW A WW2 PICTURE AND I CONNECTED IT TO THIS GAME AND I [THOUGHT], “OH, THIS IS A REAL THING.” THEN, ALL OF A SUDDEN, THIS CONTEMPORARY STUFF IS OF LESSER INTEREST AND THEN IT BECOMES MORE SECOND WORLD WAR INTEREST AFTER THAT.” “MAYBE I STILL AM [THAT PERSON] TODAY A BIT…IN DIFFERENT RESPECTS. [THE OBJECTS] TAKE UP SOME SPACE BUT I COULDN’T LET THEM GO BECAUSE THEY’RE SYMBOLS, IN A WAY. THEY’RE ONLY THAT BECAUSE OF WHAT IS IN MY HEAD, SO I THOUGHT AT SOME POINT IT WAS GOOD TO [DONATE THEM]…IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MAYBE EASIER TO LET SOME OF THIS STUFF GO.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029001
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WOOD, LEATHER
Date Range From
1952
Date Range To
1975
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
100
Length
41
Width
49
Description
WOODEN CHAIR COATED IN A LIGHT WOOD-COLOURED PAINT. LION’S FEET LEGS IN THE FRONT, DETAILS ON FRONT OF THE LEGS NEAR THE GROUND AND NEAR THE SEAT; DECORATED KNOBS ON TOP OF THE SIDES OF CHAIR. THE BACK SUPPORT IS MADE UP OF ONE WIDE PANEL AND ONE THIN PANEL HORIZONTALLY PARALLEL WITH ORNATE DETAIL WITH OVAL IN THE CENTER OF THE BACKREST. BACKREST IS 4 CM IN WIDTH. WOODEN STRIPES BETWEEN BACK LEGS AND ON EITHER SIDE BETWEEN LEGS. CONDITION: VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION: SLIGHT WEAR ALONG CORNERS OF CHAIR; DARKER WOOD COLOUR SHOWS THROUGH THESE WORN SPOTS ESPECIALLY ON THE TOP OF THE CHAIR; GLUED ON CORNER OF BACK OF CHAIR DESIGN NEAR THE TOP RIGHT CORNER.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
PROFESSIONS
History
ON MAY 16TH, 2017 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR GERALD TODD ABOUT A CHAIR HE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM. TODD BEGAN, “I GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM MY DAD WILLIAM (BILL) TODD. WHEN MY DAD PASSED AWAY, MY MOTHER PASSED IT ON TO ME. I USED IT AT MY DESK AT HOME, WHERE I WOULD SIT ON IT NOW AND THEN TO DO MY PAPERWORK.” HE CONTINUED, “MY DAD GOT [THE CHAIR] FROM [WHEN] HE WAS THE PUBLIC SUPERINTENDENT FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT OF ALBERTA. [HE WAS IN THIS POSITION WHEN] THEY WERE RENOVATING THE COURTHOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE – JUST EAST OF CITY HALL – AND WHEN THEY WERE DEMOLISHING THINGS IN THERE, THEY FOUND [THIS CHAIR]. THEY TOLD MY DAD TO THROW IT AWAY, BUT INSTEAD HE ASKED IF HE COULD HAVE IT. THEY TOLD HIM ‘YEAH TAKE IT,’ AND SO HE DID. HE PROBABLY RECEIVED THE CHAIR IN THE MID-1960S – I THINK THAT’S WHEN THEY STARTED TO REVAMP THE COURTHOUSE. I KNOW HE DIED IN ’76, SO I’M JUST GUESSING. IT COULD HAVE BEEN SOONER OR A LITTLE LATER [WHEN HE RECEIVED IT]. BUT AT THAT TIME I WASN’T REALLY INTERESTED IN THE CHAIR MYSELF, [SO I NEVER LEARNED WHAT JUDGES SAT IN IT]… ALL HE TOLD ME [ABOUT IT] WAS THAT IT WAS A JUDGE’S CHAIR IN THE COURTHOUSE. AS FAR AS ANYTHING ELSE GOES, I DON’T KNOW. I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, IT’S JUST A CHAIR’ [I DID NOT BECOME INTERESTED IN IT UNTIL] MY MOTHER SAID, ‘DO YOU WANT THE CHAIR?’ MAYBE SIX MONTHS OR SO [AFTER MY DAD’S PASSING]. I SAID, ‘SURE. DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT IT?’ AND SHE SAID, ‘NO, YOUR DAD NEVER TOLD ME. HE JUST BROUGHT IT HOME, PUT IT BY HIS DESK AND THAT WAS IT.’ IT WAS SORT OF A REMEMBRANCE OF MY DAD WORKING.” “[MY DAD] WORKED FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT [WITH THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA] STARTING IN THE ‘50S,” TODD EXPLAINED, “HE WORKED FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS AND THEN BECAME THE SUPERINTENDENT FOR PUBLIC WORKS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ANYWHERE THERE WAS A GOVERNMENT BUILDING – FROM THE [CROWSNEST] PASS, TO MEDICINE HAT, TO LETHBRIDGE, AND ALL OVER SOUTHERN ALBERTA – HE WAS IN CHARGE OF THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS.” TODD EXPLAINED THIS CHAIR IS THE ONLY THING FROM A BUILDING HIS FATHER WORKED IN THAT HE ENDED UP BRINGING HOME: “IT WAS JUST ONE ITEM OUT OF PROBABLY MANY THINGS BEING THROWN AWAY. HE JUST HAD ROOM FOR THE CHAIR, SO THAT’S ALL HE TOOK. THEY THREW AWAY THE DESK AND THE JUDGE’S CABINETS, WHICH HE WAS QUITE UPSET [ABOUT], BUT [HE COULD NOT KEEP IT ALL].” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHY, OUT OF EVERYTHING, HIS FATHER WOULD HAVE SELECTED THIS CHAIR TO BRING TO HOME, TODD SPECULATED, “I THINK IT WAS BECAUSE IT WAS A UNIQUE CHAIR TO HIM AND IT WAS SAT ON BY A JUDGE IN THE COURTHOUSE. [MY FATHER] LIKED THE CHAIR. HE SAT IN IT QUITE A BIT AND IT BRINGS LITTLE MEMORIES OF HIM TO ME. I’D WATCH HIM GO DOWN AND SIT IN THE CHAIR IN THE BASEMENT, WHICH WAS FINISHED. [IT WAS WHERE HE] HAD HIS DESK [AND WHERE HE WOULD] TINKER AROUND. [THE CHAIR] WAS SOMETHING [MY DAD HAD] FOR REMEMBERING HIS WORK. IT WOULD BRING BACK MEMORIES TO MY DAD OF WHAT HE HAD DONE.” “MY DAD WAS IN POLITICS BEFORE. HE DID QUITE A BIT OF WORK WITH THE ALBERTA GOVERNMENT – THE SOCIAL CREDIT GOVERNMENT IT WAS – AND HE HAD JOHN LANDERYOU HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, HARTLEY FROM FORT MACLEOD, AND OTHER FELLAS THAT I DON’T REMEMBER THAT HE ASSOCIATED WITH. HE TOOK IN A LOT OF FUNCTIONS WITH THE GOVERNMENT,” TODD STATED, REMEMBERING HIS FATHER, “MY DAD WAS A GREAT GUY. HE WAS ALWAYS GOOD TO ME. HE GOT ALONG WITH PEOPLE VERY WELL. HE WAS VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE. HE COULD SIT DOWN AND TALK TO ANYBODY.” “[DONATING MY FATHER’S CHAIR TO THE MUSEUM] MAKES ME FEEL GREAT, BECAUSE IT [WILL BE SOMEWHERE] WHERE PEOPLE ARE GOING TO GET TO LOOK AT IT [AND CONNECT WITH ITS HISTORY].” THE OBITUARY OF WILLIAM TODD WAS PUBLISHED IN THE APRIL 29, 1975 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READ, “BORN IN BUTTE, MONTANA… TODD CAME TO CANADA WITH HIS PARENTS AT THE AGE OF TWO. HIS PARENTS HOMESTEADED IN THE NEWLANDS DISTRICT SIXTEEN MILES NORTH OF LETHBRIDGE WHERE HE LIVED AND WORKED UNTIL 1920 WHEN HE LEFT THE FARM AND WORKED IN A COAL MINE IN COMMERCE, AND LATER IN COALHURST, WHERE HE MET AND MARRIED MARY (BABE) VICKERS IN 1931. AFTER A SHORT TIME THEY MOVED BACK TO HIS PARENTS’ FARM, WHERE HE FARMED AS WELL AS [WORKED] IN THE COAL MINE AT SHAUGHNESSY.” IT CONTINUES, “IN 1945, HE MOVED TO NOBLEFORD WHERE HE OPERATED THE TODD BROTHERS SEED CLEANING PLANT. IN 1956, HE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE… HE WAS A VERY ARDENT WORKER FOR BETTER GOVERNMENT FOR ALBERTA AND SPENT A GREAT DEAL OF TIME TO THAT END.” WILLIAM AND MARY TODD HAD ONE SON, DONOR GERALD TODD. WILLIAM TODD PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON APRIL 26TH, 1975 AT THE AGE OF 72 YEARS. A BRIEF HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE COURTHOUSES TITLED, “BETTER GET TO KNOW A BUILDING -- LETHBRIDGE’S 1952 COURTHOUSE,” WAS PUBLISHED ON JANUARY 30, 2016 BY THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY FOR THEIR FACEBOOK PAGE. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT POST: “LETHBRIDGE’S ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ LOCATED AT 4 AVENUE AND 11 STREET SOUTH IS ACTUALLY THE 3RD COURTHOUSE LETHBRIDGE HAS HAD. IT WAS OPENED OFFICIALLY IN SEPTEMBER 1952 AND SERVED AS A COURTHOUSE UNTIL 1983 WHEN IT WAS SUPERSEDED BY THE PRESENT COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH. WHILE THE 1952 COURTHOUSE WAS BUILT AS A PROVINCIAL COURTHOUSE, THE ARCHITECTS WERE FROM LETHBRIDGE AND THE DESIGN AND PLACEMENT WAS DONE TO TIE IN WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S URBAN RENEWAL PLANS AND THE CITY’S PLANS FOR CIVIC CENTRE... THE NEW 1952 COURTHOUSE BECAME THE ‘OLD COURTHOUSE’ IN JUNE 1983 WHEN THE COURTHOUSE ON 4 STREET SOUTH WAS BUILT TO REPLACE IT." PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, AND LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY TEXT.
Catalogue Number
P20170019000
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail