Skip header and navigation

11 records – page 1 of 1.

Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
37
Length
36.4
Width
20
Description
A. BUTTON ACCORDION, 37 CM TALL X 36.4 CM LONG X 20 CM WIDE. ACCORDION IS BROWN POLISHED WOOD WITH BLACK AND LIGHT BROWN TRIM; ACCORDION HAS BLACK PLASTIC BELLOWS AND SILVER PLATE OVER THREE ROWS OF WHITE BUTTONS AT SIDE; OPOPSITE END OF ACCORDION HAS FOUR ROWS OF WHITE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS SET IN SILVER PLATE ABOVE BLACK LEATHER STRAP. TOP OF ACCORDION HAS TWO SILVER BASS/TREBLE SWITCHES. BORDERS AROUND BELLOWS HAVE PEAL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID. ACCORDION IS MISSING BUTTON FROM FOURTH ROW OF BUTTONS, AND HAS TWO WOODEN SUBSTITUTE BUTTONS IN SECOND AND FOURTH ROWS. FRONT OF ACCORDION HAS WINDOW ABOVE BELLOWS WITH GLASS PLATE OVER WHITE PAPER AND BLACK TEXT “C. DALLAPE, TRENTO (ITALIA)”. ACCORDION HAS FOUR BRASS FEET ON SIDE WITH FOUR ROWS OF BUTTONS. WOOD IS WORN AT HANDLES AND EDGES; METAL PLATES AND ACCENTS HAVE CORROSION. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BLUE COTTON BAG, 72 CM LONG X 53 CM WIDE. BAG HAS HANDLE ATTACHED TO COVER FLAP; COVER FLAP HAS THREE BUTTON HOLES. BAG HAS TWO BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS ON FRONT ALONG TOP EDGE. BAG HAS PATCHES STITCHED WITH BLACK THREAD ON FRONT UPPER LEFT CORNER, ON BACK IN THE CENTER OF BAG, AND ON THE BACK BESIDE LEFT CORNER OF HANDLE. BAG IS TORN IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER AND FRAYED; BAG IS TORN ALONG LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES AND ON FRONT AT UPPER RIGHT EDGE; BACK HAS TORN HOLES AT BOTTOM. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LESLIE MORTON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A BUTTON ACCORDION. THE ACCORDION WAS OWNED AND PLAYED BY MORTON’S GRANDFATHER, GIUSEPPE (JOSEPH) "FABRO" BRIDAROLLI, AND WAS LATER OWNED BY HER UNCLE, SYLVIO "SYL" BRIDAROLLI, BEFORE BECOMING IN HER POSSESSION. MORTON DISCUSSED HER MEMORIES OF THE ACCORDION IN HER HOME, STATING, “IT’S A BUTTON ACCORDION…THERE’S BUTTON ACCORDIONS AND PIANO ACCORDIONS, AND I PLAY THE PIANO. IF I HAD A PIANO ACCORDION, I COULD AT LEAST PICK OUT THE NOTES BECAUSE I COULD READ THE MUSIC. THIS IS SOMETHING DIFFERENT. YOU HAVE TO BE A REAL MUSICIAN TO PLAY A BUTTON ACCORDION BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY BY EAR. THERE’S THE MELODY SIDE AND THE CHORD SIDE AND YOU JUST DO IT BY EAR. IF YOU LISTEN TO HIS TAPE [IN ARCHIVES]…HE WAS JUST TURNING 81 WHEN HE MADE THIS TAPE AND HE WAS TRYING TO REMEMBER SOME OF THE SONGS HE KNEW. ONE CAME OUT REALLY GOOD AND THEN HE GOT THE MELODY OF SOMETHING. HE WAS PICKING IT OUT AND HE WAS INTO THINGS HE WAS MORE FAMILIAR WITH. HE WAS VERY MUSICAL AND HAD A REAL EAR. IT’S SORT OF LIKE AN IRISH BUTTON ACCORDION BUT NOT QUITE. IT’S BIGGER.” “WHAT I REMEMBER [MY GRANDPARENTS] TELLING ME IS WHEN HE WAS HERE, HE HAD IT MADE FOR HIM IN ITALY AND IT WAS SENT OVER TO CANADA WHEN HE LIVED HERE. I ALSO UNDERSTOOD HE PLAYED IN ITALY BUT THIS ACCORDION WAS MADE FOR HIM THERE AND SENT OVER [IN THE 1920S].” “IT’S A TREASURE. I WOULD SAY OF ALL THE THINGS I FOUND IN MY PARENTS’ HOME AND ALL THE THINGS I’VE HAD TO FIND HOMES FOR, ALL THE THINGS THAT WOULD REMIND ME OF MY CHILDHOOD, THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING. EVER. IT EVOKES REALLY STRONG MEMORIES. THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT MUSIC IN A FAMILY. IF YOU CAN MEET TOGETHER AND YOU CAN SHARE MUSIC, WHICH OUR FAMILY DID, IT LEAVES AN IMPRESSION THAT YOU DON’T EVER FORGET.” “[THE ACCORDION] REALLY WAS FOR MY GRANDFATHER [GIUESEPPE “JOSEPH” BRIDAROLLI]. IT WAS FROM HIM. THAT’S WHERE THE [LOVE OF] MUSIC CAME FROM FOR ALL [MY FAMILY].” “WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL, WE WOULD GO OVER TO [MY GRANDPARENTS’] HOUSE AT 909 - 8TH STREET NORTH, [MY GRANDFATHER] ALWAYS PLAYED. HE’D JUST SIT IN HIS KITCHEN AND HE’D PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. HE WOULD SIT ON A BENCH BY THE BACK DOOR OUTSIDE AND HE WOULD PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. AT CHRISTMAS, MY GRANDPARENTS WOULD COME OVER [TO OUR HOME] AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. MY MOTHER WOULD PLAY THE VIOLIN, MY SISTER THE PIANO. SHE WAS BETTER THAN ME AND WE WOULD ALL SING CAROLS. FOR MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE THE SAME. HE ALWAYS WAS THERE PLAYING HIS ACCORDION. WHEN MY UNCLE AND AUNT CAME TO VISIT, IT WAS THE SAME THING. HE’D PLAY.” ON HER FAMILY’S HISTORY AND CONNECTION TO THE ACCORDION, MORTON ELABORTED, “[MY GRANDFATHER] STOPPED WORKING IN THE MINES IN THE FIFTIES. HE WAS STILL DOING IT IN THE FIFTIES. WHEN THEY CAME OVER FOR SUNDAY DINNER OR WE WENT OVER THERE [MY GRANDFATHER WOULD PLAY]. [WHEN] MY GRANDMOTHER WAS WELL ENOUGH, WE WOULD ALTERNATE [HOMES FOR DINNERS]. THEN WHEN IT GOT HARDER FOR HER [SUNDAY DINNER] WAS ALWAYS IN OUR HOME. I MADE A TAPE WHEN MY PARENTS WENT TO INDIA IN 1971, AND THAT’S WHEN MY UNCLE GOT MARRIED AS WELL. WE CORRESPONDED BY CASSETTE TAPE. THAT SOUNDS VERY ANTIQUATED NOWADAYS. THERE WAS NO EMAIL. PHONES WERE DIFFICULT WHEN YOU TRIED TO PHONE INDIA AND [WE] HAD TO YELL INTO THE PHONE. SO WE DECIDED TO MAKE CASSETTE TAPES…I WENT DOWN SEPTEMBER THE 5TH, 1971…AND I HAD HIM PLAY THE ACCORDION SO THAT I COULD SEND THIS TAPE TO MY PARENTS. [THIS TAPE HAS] HIS VOICE A LITTLE BIT IN THE BACKGROUND AND MINE A TINY BIT BUT IT’S HIS MUSIC THAT’S IMPORTANT. IT WAS SENT OVER TO INDIA FOR THEM AND WE’VE KEPT IT EVER SINCE. HE DIED IN ’72 AND WE PLAYED THAT ACCORDION TAPE A HUNDRED MILLION TIMES. MY UNCLE ALSO HAD ONE OF COURSE. HE WAS ALWAYS PLAYING. MY MOTHER TELLS A STORY, ALTHOUGH IT’S NOT A FAMILY ONE BUT SHE SAID THAT FRIENDS OF HIS, WHEN IT WAS THEIR BIRTHDAY, HE WOULD GO OVER SIT UNDER THEIR WINDOW AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. HE WOULD PLAY AT GATHERINGS OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY. HE PLAYED AT DANCES.” “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN SEPTEMBER 7TH 1890 AND MY GRANDMOTHER [MARIA BERTE] WAS JANUARY 9TH, 1893. THEY WERE FROM CAVENDINE, ITALY, WHICH IS IN THE PROVINCE OF TRENTO AND THAT’S WHERE THIS ACCORDION WAS MANUFACTURED…THEY WERE VERY POOR OVER THERE…I FOUND A PAPER IN THE MIDDLE OF THE FAMILY DOCUMENTS THAT, I DON’T SPEAK ITALIAN, BUT IT LOOKED LIKE A POVERTY DOCUMENT THAT HAS MY GRANDFATHER—HIS FATHER’S NAME ON IT. THEY WERE VERY POOR AND THEY WOULD HAVE COME HERE TO MAKE A BETTER LIFE FOR HIS FAMILY.” “I UNDERSTAND THAT MY GRANDFATHER CAME OVER BY HIMSELF PRIOR TO 1920. HE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE AND SIZED THINGS UP. HE WENT BACK TO ITALY AND GOT MARRIED TO MY GRANDMOTHER IN 1920. MY MOTHER WAS BORN OVER THERE. IT WAS 1924, IN OCTOBER WHEN HE BROUGHT HIS WIFE AND HIS YOUNG DAUGHTER, ANN, OVER. THEY CAME ON A BOAT AND LANDED IN THE MARITIMES, AND THEY MADE THEIR WAY TO LETHBRIDGE. THEY STARTED IN COALHURST FOR A SHORT WHILE…AND THEN THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. MY UNCLE WAS BORN HERE IN 1926.” “I CAN GUESS [MY GRANDPARENTS MOVED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA] BECAUSE [OF] MILLIE LUCIANI—THERE WERE BERTE FAMILIES HERE AND MY GRANDMOTHER WAS A BERTE. MILLIE LUCICANI’S FATHER[WAS A BERTE AND HE WAS A COUSIN OF MY [GRAND]MOTHER] … THERE WAS COMMUNICATION THERE THAT THIS WAS THE PLACE TO COME BECAUSE THEY WERE ALREADY HERE.” “WHEN MY GRANDFATHER DIED IN 1972, I HAD THIS ACCORDION AND THEN, AT A CERTAIN POINT I GAVE IT TO MY UNCLE, HIS SON, SYL. HE HAD IT IN FERNIE THEN IN MERRITT. HE DIED IN 2011 AND MY AUNT SENT IT TO ME. WE TALKED ABOUT LEAVING IT TO THE MUSEUM BUT I DIDN’T WANT TO LET GO OF IT YET. WHAT HAS SPURRED IT ON IS THAT THERE IS NOBODY ELSE TO PASS IT ON TO.” “I WAS GIVEN THIS BECAUSE, WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL I JUST LOVED IT. HE PLAYED AND I LOVED IT. MY UNCLE LOVED IT TOO, HE DIDN’T LIVE HERE AND BECAUSE IT WAS EASY AND MY PARENTS HAD TO LEAVE FOR INDIA, I GOT IT TEMPORARILY. IT DID BELONG MORE TO MY MOM AND MY UNCLE THAN TO ME, BUT I HAD IT FIRST FOR QUITE A WHILE.” “MY SISTER AND I WERE TALKING AND WE THOUGHT, WELL REALLY IT WAS MORE [OUR UNCLE’S] THAN OURS. THAT’S WHY [I GAVE IT TO HIM]. BY GOING TO ME IT WENT TO MY MOM AND SHE WAS THE ELDEST. BUT WHEN MY MOTHER WAS GETTING REALLY SICK AND HE WAS COMING TO VISIT HER AND SHE WASN’T GOING TO LIVE, THEN IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IT GO TO THE NEXT PERSON WHICH REALLY WOULD BE MY UNCLE. WE THOUGHT IT WAS THE RIGHT THING AND HE WAS ENCHANTED. IT WAS REALLY HIS AT THAT POINT.” “I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY IT SO I TRIED, BUT I HAD ARTHRITIS IN MY SHOULDERS SO I COULDN’T. I WOULD TAKE [IT] OUT EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE AND TRY TO PLAY “SILENT NIGHT”. I JUST TOOK IT WHEREVER I WENT AND TRIED TO LOOK AFTER IT.” “IT WOULD BE [ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN MY HOME] AND I’M SURE FOR MY UNCLE TOO. PICTURES ARE REALLY IMPORTANT TO OUR FAMILY AND TO ME. I KNOW TO MY UNCLE SYL AS WELL THIS WOULD BE [IMPORTANT] BECAUSE WE ALL REMEMBERED [MY GRANDFATHER] PLAYING ALL THE TIME. HE NEVER SAT DOWN WITHOUT IT ON HIS LAP. TO MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE EVEN STRONGER BECAUSE, OF COURSE, HE GREW UP WITH HIS FATHER PLAYING THE ACCORDION.” “MY GRANDPARENTS HAD TWO CHILDREN, MY MOTHER ANN, AND HER BROTHER SYL. SYL NEVER HAD ANY CHILDREN, THEY ADOPTED A GIRL ONCE BUT THAT WAS LONG AGO [AND] SHE’S OUT OF THE PICTURE. THERE’S MY AUNT, HIS WIFE, AND THERE’S ME. MY PARENTS HAVE PASSED AWAY AND MY SISTER, LAUREL, PASSED AWAY IN 2009 IN GENEVA. IF SOMETHING HAPPENS TO ME, THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO WAY THIS BRIDAROLLI FAMILY WILL CARRY ON. THE ANDERSON FAMILY [MY FATHER’S FAMILY] THERE WERE EIGHT OF THEM. THERE’S NOBODY ELSE. THERE’S ME AND I FEEL A LITTLE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE IT’S POSSIBLE THAT THE JOSEPH BRIDAROLLI FAMILY IS IN SOME WAY REMEMBERED. MY GRANDFATHER WAS A COAL MINER IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE ALSO WAS A PART OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY AND THEY WEREN’T RICH; THEY WEREN’T POWERFUL. THEY DIDN’T HOLD POSITIONS BUT I THINK THEIR STORY IS VERY IMPORTANT AS IMMIGRANTS FROM ITALY AND I’D LIKE TO TELL THEIR STORY. THAT’S THE REASON I BROUGHT IT. I THINK IT WOULD BE REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IN SOME WAY IT IS PERPETUATED BOTH FOR MY UNCLE AND MY MOTHER AS WELL AS HER PARENTS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180011000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"ALBERTA MEAT MARKET"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, WOOD, IRON
Catalogue Number
P20180025000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"ALBERTA MEAT MARKET"
Date
1955
Materials
STEEL, WOOD, IRON
No. Pieces
3
Height
115
Length
427
Width
24
Description
A. COMMERCIAL ADVERTISING SIGN, NEON. BODY STEEL PAINTED WITH TWO-TONE BLUE ON FRONT; FRONT HAS RED WOODEN LETTERS MOUNTED TO METAL FRAME AT BACK, SPELLING “ALBERTA" WITH WHITE NEON LETTERS OVERLAID. FRONT HAS WHITE LETTERS PAINTED ON BLUE BODY WITH OVERLAID WHITE NEON LETTERS READING “MEAT MARKET”. NEON LETTERS COMPRISED OF CONNECTED CLEAR, GLASS TUBES WITH BACKS PAINTED WHITE, AND UNPAINTED FRONTS; LETTERS ARE CONNECTED AND PAINTED BLACK BETWEEN INDIVIDUAL LETTERS; NEON LETTERS CONNECT INTO SIGN . LETTERS FASTENED TO FRONT OF SIGN BODY WITH BRACKETED GLASS EXTENSIONS, AND WITH SILVER WIRES TIED TO LETTERS. SIGN BODY IS RECTANGULAR WITH CUT-OUT SPACE IN CENTER WITH “ALBERTA" WOOD LETTERS IN FRONT OF CUT-OUT SPACE. SIGN BODY SLOPES DOWN FROM UPPER RIGHT CORNER; LOWER EDGE OF BODY SLOPES UP FROM RIGHT CORNER. SIGN FRONT HAS NEON TUBING ALONG UPPER EDGE ON BLUE FRAME, WITH SHORTER NEON TUBE RUNNING ACROSS FRAMING NEON TUBING ON THE LEFT SIDE. FRONT OF SIGN HAS LOGO BETWEEN “MEAT” AND “MARKET” NEON TEXT; LOGO COMPRISED OF RED BANNER EXTENDING FROM SIDES OF WHITE SHIELD IN CENTER; SHIELD HAS BLUE BORDER WITH BLUE “N” IN CENTER; RED BANNERS HAVE WHITE BORDERS AND WHITE TEXT ACROSS LOGO “NATIONAL NEON”.RED WOODEN LETTER “L” WARPED AND SPLITTING AT FRONT. TOP OF SIGN BODY STAINED WITH WHITE PAINT AND BLACK SOILING. BACK OF SIGN HAS FIXED BRACKETS ALONG EDGES WITH HOLES PUNCHED AT TOP AND BOLTED AT BOTTOMS TO SIGN BACK. BACK HAS BLACK POWER CORD EXTENDING WITH YELLOW POWER PLUG AT END; BACK HAS PAINT PEELING, IS STAINED AND RUSTED. BACK OF RED WOODEN LETTER “R” IS CRACKED; BACKS OF RED WOODEN LETTERS STAINED WITH YELLOW AND BLUE PAINT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. NEON TUBING REMNANT, LETTERS “TA”, 41 CM LONG X 54 CM WIDE. GLASS TUBING FILLED WITH WHITE, PAINTED BLACK ON BACKS AND AT ENDS. ENDS BENT AND FITTED WITH METAL CAPS WITH WIRES EXTENDING TO FIT INTO FRONT OF SIGN. LETTERS “TA” FASHION IN CURSIVE FONT AND CONNECTED; TUBE LOOPS OVER AT JUNCTION IN “A” AND GOING UP THE “T”. LOWER END OF “A” HAS BLUE PAINT STAINING; PAINT CHIPPED AROUND ENDS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. NEON TUBING REMNANT, LETTERS “AT”, 28 CM LONG X 50 CM WIDE. CLEAR GLASS TUBING, EMPTY, GLASS IS YELLOWED. TUBING PAINTED BLACK ON BACK, AT LOWER BASE, AND AT ENDS. ENDS BENT AND FITTED WITH METAL CAPS WITH WIRES EXTENDING TO FIT INTO FRONT OF SIGN. TUBES LOOP OVER AT JUNCTION IN “A” AND AT THE TOP LINE IN “T”. PAINT CHIPPED ON BACK AND FRONT; END CAPS RUSTED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
IN 2018, THE GALT MUSEUM RECEIVED A COMMERCIAL NEON SIGN FROM THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE CRIGHTON FAMILY. IN THE 1920S, GEORGE CRIGHTON OPENED CRIGHTON MEAT MARKET ON 3RD AVENUE BETWEEN 7TH AND 8TH STREET IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE, AND OPENED THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET AS A SECOND SHOP AT 510—6TH AVENUE SOUTH. THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET REMAINED OPERATED BY THE CRIGHTON FAMILY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 2012. THE ORIGINAL NEON SIGN FROM THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET WAS REMOVED AND DONATED ON NOVEMBER 22, 2018. IN APRIL 2019, THE SIGN UNDERWENT RESTORATIONS TO REPAIR THE NEON LETTERING AT L.A. NEON, LETHBRIDGE, PRIOR TO ITS INSTALLATION IN THE GALT MUSEUM PERMANENT DISPLAYS ON JULY 9, 2019. ON DECEMBER 19, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ELAINE BROWN, WHOSE FATHER-IN-LAW, DAVE BROWN, OWNED NATIONAL NEAN DISPLAYS LTD., AND WHOSE HUSBAND, ALLAN BROWN, WORKED FOR NATIONAL NEON. ON THE “ALBERTA MEAT MARKET” SIGN, BROWN RECALLED, “THAT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST SIGNS THAT THEY MADE…THE WOOD ON IT, IS WHY I KNEW THAT IT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST ONES.” “[ALLAN] USED TO GO AROUND EVERY EVENING, ONCE A WEEK, AND CHECK AND MAKE SURE [THE SIGNS] WERE ALL KEPT UP. IF ANY OF THE NEON WAS BROKEN, THEN THEY WOULD IMMEDIATELY GO AND REPAIR IT SO THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘AS IS’. HE WORKED [AT NATIONAL NEON] ALL DAY.” “[ALLAN] WAS PROUD OF THEM ALL. HE KNEW EXACTLY WHERE EVERY SIGN WAS. ANY ONE THAT HE WOULD PUT UP, HE COULD GO IN AND REPAIR QUICKLY, BECAUSE HE KNEW EXACTLY WHERE EVERYTHING WAS.” “ALLAN USED TO PAINT AND HANG SIGNS, [HIS BROTHER] JIM USED TO BLOW THE NEON AND [HIS BROTHER] BUSTER WOULD ALSO HANG SIGNS.” BROWN FURTHER ELABORATED ON THE HISTORY OF NATIONAL NEON DISPLAYS, STATING, “BEFORE [WE MARRIED IN 1957] ALLAN’S DAD, DAVE, BOUGHT THE BUSINESS WITH HIS THREE SONS…[IT WAS] NATIONAL NEON DISPLAYS LTD.” “IT WAS [AN EXISTING] BUSINESS OWNED BY ANOTHER BROWN…[DAVE] WAS INTERESTED IN IT, SO HE WENT IN AND DID ALL THE LEGWORK TO SEE IF HE COULD MAKE A GO OF IT. OBVIOUSLY, HE DECIDED HE COULD BECAUSE HE [AND THE SONS] BOUGHT IT.” “[ALLAN’S FAMILY] HADN’T BEEN [MAKING SIGNS] BEFORE BUT I PRESUME THEY KNEW THAT THEY COULD MAKE IT GO AND THEY COULD MAKE SIGNS. GRANDPA BROWN SAID THAT HE THOUGHT THEY COULD MAKE IT GO AND THEY DID.” “[ALLAN] DIDN’T THINK THE PLASTIC [SIGNS], WITH JUST THE FACE, WERE AS EYE-CATCHING AS THE NEON SIGNS NOR WERE THEY AS NICE TO LOOK AT WHEN THEY WERE ON. HE REALLY TOOK AN INTEREST IN IT; HE REALLY TRIED TO KEEP IT UP QUITE WELL. THEN HE RETIRED AND WE SOLD TO A MAN FROM CALGARY. I DON’T KNOW WHAT HAPPENED AFTER THAT BUT I THINK NEON PRODUCTS OWNS IT NOW, SO THEY SHUT [THE ORIGINAL] BUILDING DOWN. ALLAN HAD SOLD THE BUILDING AFTER HE RETIRED AND THEN THEY SHUT [THE] BUILDING DOWN AFTER THAT.” “WE HOPED THAT NATIONAL NEON WOULD BE IN PEOPLE’S MINDS AS BEING HERE AND BUILDING THOSE SIGNS…NATIONAL NEON WAS HERE AS A COMPANY AND EXPANDED FROM HERE. [ALLAN] USED TO GO INTO B.C. AND SASKATCHEWAN, TO EDMONTON…TO SELL THEM. IT WASN’T JUST A LOCAL BUSINESS. IT WAS ALL OVER, B.C., SASKATCHEWAN, ALBERTA—AND I THOUGHT IT WAS REALLY INTERESTING THAT THEY’D PICK ONE OF THE FIRST SIGNS THAT [ALLAN] BUILT TO TAKE DOWN AND PRESERVE. I’M SURE [ALLAN] WOULD HAVE BEEN HAPPY WITH THAT.” ON NOVEMBER 28, 2019, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MIRIAM SMITH AND BOB CRIGHTON REGARDING THEIR MEMORIES OF THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, OWNED AND OPERATED BY THEIR GRANDFATHER GEORGE CRIGHTON, FATHER JAMES CRIGHTON, AND THEMSELVES. ON THE HISTORY OF THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, MIRIAM SMITH RECALLED, “THE CRIGHTON FAMILY MOVED FROM SCOTLAND IN 1920…[GRANDPA CRIGHTON] OPENED THE STORE; HE RAN THE 6TH AVENUE STORE. HE RAISED HIS SONS OUT OF THERE. DAD WAS A BUTCHER IN SCOTLAND; THEY ALL BECOME BUTCHERS. BOBBY LEFT; TOMMY LEFT; DAVEY, HE WAS A BUTCHER; GEORGE WENT TO CAMPBELL RIVER.” “[DAD TOOK OVER THE SHOP ON 6TH AVENUE] ’38, OR ’39.” BOB CRIGHTON ELABORATED, “[DAD] TRIED TO ENLIST, BUT HE HAD THE STORE ON 3RD AVENUE, AND HE WENT BROKE THERE. THAT WAS CALLED CRIGHTON’S MEAT MARKET AT THAT TIME...HE HAD TO PAY ALL OF HIS BILLS OFF, SO MY GRANDPA ASKED HIM TO TAKE OVER THE 6TH AVENUE STORE. SO HE TOOK OVER THE 6TH AVENUE STORE, AND CHANGED IT TO THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET.” “[WHEN DAD GOT THE NEW NEON SIGN] I REMEMBER HIM PUTTING IT UP. DAD RENOVATED THE STORE AND WE GOT NEW MEAT COUNTERS, AND WHEN HE GOT THE NEW SIGN UP, I WATCHED THEM PUT IT UP. NATIONAL NEON PUT IT UP…I WAS 12-14 YEARS OLD.” MIRIAM SMITH RECALLED, “I WORKED THERE WHEN I WENT TO SCHOOL. I HAD TO ANSWER THE TELEPHONE ON SATURDAYS, OR HOLIDAYS…IT WAS A BUSY STORE. I REMEMBER ALONG 6TH AVENUE AND 5TH STREET, YOU COULDN’T FIND A PLACE TO PARK BECAUSE IT WAS SO BUSY. I REMEMBER, AT LUNCHTIME, I USED TO SAY, 'I’M GOING TO GO FOR MY LUNCH NOW,' AND THERE USED TO BE SILVER’S ACROSS THE STREET. MY DAD WOULD ALWAYS SAY, ‘NO, YOU CAN’T GO. I’VE GOT TO FIX THE COUNTER AND GET MY PARSLEY OUT.' HE ALWAYS HAD HIS COUNTER VERY BEAUTIFULLY DONE.” “THE PHONE WOULD RING OFF THE HOOK, ESPECIALLY [WITH] EVERYBODY WANTING TO ORDER THEIR MEAT. IT WAS PLEASANT VISITING WITH THE DIFFERENT PEOPLE. SOME OF THEM I KNEW; SOME OF THEM I DIDN’T. BUT I FOUND MOST PEOPLE VERY NICE TO CHAT WITH. I REMEMBER MY DAD, AND DORIS HUNT (H.B.HUNT), THE DOCTOR’S WIFE. SHE USED TO COME IN, AND SHE WAS QUITE A BOISTEROUS LADY, AND SHE SPOKE HER MIND. I REMEMBER ONE TIME SHE SAID TO MY DAD, 'JIMMY, THAT ROAST BEEF YOU GAVE ME LAST WEEK WAS TOUGHER THAN HELL.' WELL, MY DAD SAID TO HER, 'YOU KNOW, DORIS, I REMEMBER YOUR HUSBAND TOOK MY APPENDIX OUT, AND THEY COME BACK AGAIN.'" MIRIAM SMITH NOTED, "I REMEMBER THE TIME THAT DAD GAVE THE TURKEY TO THE KID…THE KID HAD NO MONEY, AND HE COME FOR HAMBURGER.” BOB CRIGHTON ELABORATED, “HAMBURGER, AT CHRISTMAS TIME. IT WAS 40 BELOW OUTSIDE, AND HE [CAME] DOWN…HE SAID, ‘I WANT A POUND OF HAMBURGER, MR. CRIGHTON.' [DAD] SAYS, ‘WHAT ARE YOU HAVING FOR CHRISTMAS SUPPER?' 'HAMBURGER.' 'JUST A MINUTE.' SO, [DAD] GETS A TURKEY, AND A HAM, AND SAUSAGE. GOT A BAG FOR HIM, AND HE SAYS, 'THERE – MERRY CHRISTMAS.'" “DAD WAS A PRETTY GENEROUS MAN! WHEN ANDY KERGEN DIED, JUDY [CAME] IN. SHE WAS CRYING. SHE HAD A $200.00 BILL; SHE COULDN’T PAY IT. SHE HAD $5.00 TO PUT ON THE BILL. DAD SAYS, “GIVE ME THE BILL, JUDY.” HE LOOKED AT THE BILL; HE TOOK HIS WALLET OUT AND PAID THE BILL, AND THEN GAVE HER THE RECEIPT.” MIRIAM SMITH CONTINUED, “I ALWAYS REMEMBER WHEN WE WERE KIDS GROWING UP, WE ALWAYS HAD LOTS OF MEAT. WHATEVER WAS LEFT OVER AT THE STORE [WOULD] COME HOME…WE COULD BRING ANYBODY WE WANTED, MOTHER DIDN’T MIND. THE MEAT PLATTER WOULD BE PLACED IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TABLE, AND THE WATER PITCHER. NOBODY WANTED TO SIT BESIDE THE WATER PITCHER, BECAUSE ALL YOU DID WAS POUR WATER.” MIRIAM SMITH NOTED, “[WE, THE CHILDREN, BOUGHT DAD OUT] IN 1965.” ON DECEMBER 11, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED KEN CRIGHTON, GRANDSON OF JAMES [JIM] CRIGHTON. KEN CRIGHTON WORKED WITH THE FAMILY IN ALBERTA MEAT MARKET. ON HIS MEMORIES OF WORKING IN THE ALBERTA MEAT MARKET, KEN CRIGHTON NOTED, “I WAS THERE EVERY DAY FOR 30 SOME YEARS…MY DAD AND HIS TWO BROTHERS WERE OPERATING IT WHEN I WAS A KID. [I] GOT TOLD TO GET DOWN THERE, AND HELP CLEAN UP; DO SOME CHORES; HELP WITH DELIVERIES; THEN I WORKED INTO LEARNING HOW TO CUT MEAT.” “[MY GRANDFATHER OWNED IT] JAMES ANDERSON CRIGHTON, BUT EVERYONE CALLED HIM ‘JIM’.” “[MY] FIRST MEMORIES OF GOING THERE TO WORK WAS HAVING TO RIDE ON YOUR BIKE, OR WALK FROM SCHOOL RIGHT AFTER SCHOOL, TO HELP CLEAN UP EITHER AT 4 O’CLOCK OR 4:30. IT ALWAYS SEEMED TO ME THAT I WAS DOING THE BULK OF THE WORK, AND THEY WERE DOING MOST OF THE BEER-DRINKING.” “EVERY NIGHT YOU HAD TO EMPTY ALL THE MEAT OUT OF THE COUNTER, COVER IT OVER, TAKE IT, PUT IT IN THE BIG COOLER; TAKE ALL THE PLATTERS OUT OF THE COUNTER, WASH THEM, DRY THEM…EVERYTHING FROM SWEEPING THE FLOOR, TO RAKING THE FLOOR. WE USED TO HAVE SAWDUST ON THE FLOOR TO SOAK UP ALL THE BLOOD AND FAT THAT WOULD FALL DOWN. YOU’D RUN A RAKE THROUGH IT TO PICK UP ALL THE BIG CHUNKS OF GARBAGE, AND THEN TWICE A WEEK YOU’D SWEEP UP ALL THE SAWDUST, AND REPLACE IT WITH FRESH SAWDUST. THAT ENDED WHEN THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT CHANGED…WHEN I WAS ABOUT 12-13, SO THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN 1972.” “[THE SHOP WAS OPEN] SIX DAYS A WEEK. WE WERE ONLY CLOSED, THEN, ON SUNDAYS.” “EVERY DAY, WEEKDAYS AFTER SCHOOL, AND SATURDAYS, I WOULD HELP THE GUY THAT WOULD DO DELIVERIES. WE’D RUN OUT A COUPLE, OR THREE, LOADS OF DELIVERIES TO HOUSES. IT WAS DIFFERENT BACK THEN. WE HAD SOME CUSTOMERS WHO WOULD ORDER THEIR STUFF IN THE MORNING FOR WHAT THEY WANTED FOR LUNCH. THEN THEY PHONE IN THE AFTERNOON, AND ORDER FOR WHAT THEY WANTED FOR SUPPER, WHICH, LATER ON, BECAME THE, “NO, YOU GET ONE DELIVERY A DAY.”” KEN CRIGHTON RECALLED THE LAYOUT OF THE SHOP, STATING, “THE FRONT HALF OF THE BUILDING, WHERE THE CUSTOMERS WERE, WAS PROBABLY ONLY ABOUT THE FIRST THIRD, MAYBE HALF OF THE BUILDING. A GLASS COUNTER/COOLER [WAS] ALONG THE MIDDLE, AND BEHIND IT WAS WHERE WE HAD OUR CUTTING BLOCKS AND SAW. [THERE WAS A] LITTLE COUNTER FOR A PHONE, [A] LITTLE COUNTER TO DO BOOKS ON, [AND] A 6’ WIDE AREA FOR THE CUSTOMERS TO STAND. EVERYTHING WAS SERVED. THERE WAS NO ‘THEM PICKING IT OUT’ AT THE COUNTER. IT WAS ALL DONE AND WRAPPED IN BROWN PAPER BY US.” “ON THE LEFT SIDE, [THERE WAS] A GOOD 15’ TO 20’ WALK-IN COOLER. THEN, ALONG THE WEST WALL, WE HAD A SMALL FREEZER WITH SHELVES. [IT] HAD NINE LITTLE DOORS THAT [OPENED] UP, AND SLIDE TRAYS IN. WHEN YOU’RE DOING FREEZER BEEF ORDERS, YOU’D USE THAT TO FREEZE THEM UP. [THERE WAS] A LITTLE WALK-IN FREEZER TO HOLD THE BOXES, PROBABLY ONLY 3’ BY 6’. [THERE WAS] A COUNTER [AT] THE BACK END, WITH A STOVE, THAT WE WOULD USE TO COOK UP CORNED BEEF, [AND] A FEW OTHER COLD MEATS.” “WE HAD A DOUBLE DOOR ON THE SIDE THAT WENT TO THE ALLEY, THAT WE WOULD BRING THE STUFF IN OFF THE TRUCK. USUALLY IT WAS TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS, WE WOULD GET THE BIG ORDERS OF HANGING BEEF IN. WE HAD TWO HUGE 2’ BY 6’ PIECES OF WOOD THAT WERE ON BIG HOOKS THAT WERE PROPPED UP IN THE ATTIC. THEN YOU WOULD HANG YOUR BIG MEAT HOOKS ON THEM. YOU COULD GET 8 HIND QUARTERS, AND 6-8 FRONT QUARTERS HANGING UP IN THERE. ONE DAY WAS THE DAY YOU WOULD BREAK THEM DOWN INTO PIECES, AND THEN PUT THEM INTO THE COOLER, OR SAVE THE QUARTERS IF YOU HAD A WHOLE QUARTER FOR A FREEZER ORDER.” “[I LEARNED THE TRADE] MOSTLY BY WATCHING…BY THE TIME I WAS 15-16, [I WAS] IN THERE DOING EVERY SINGLE THING THEY’RE DOING: RUNNING THE BAND SAW, THE GRINDER, MIXING UP BURGERS, MAKING PATTIES, THE WHOLE DEAL. [I] DIDN’T REALLY GET TO SERVE CUSTOMERS TILL [I WAS] OLDER. A LOT OF THE CUSTOMERS, EVEN THEN, DIDN’T WANT ME SERVING THEM, [THEY] WANTED THE OLD MAN, OR ONE OF THE OLDER GUYS. I’M SURE LOTS OF FAMILY BUSINESSES RUN INTO THAT, WHERE THE OLD-TIME CUSTOMERS ONLY WANT THE OLDER PEOPLE LOOKING AFTER THEM.” “[THE SHOP DID WELL] I THINK BECAUSE, PROBABLY A LOT OF REPUTATION, AND PERSONALIZED SERVICE. BUT, AFTER A WHILE, IT GOT TO BE THAT YOU WERE RUNNING INTO A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WOULD WANT YOUR QUALITY/YOUR SERVICE BUT AT THE SAME SALE PRICE THAT THE BIG STORES WOULD HAVE. THAT WAS THE FRUSTRATION OF IT…I WOULD SAY PROBABLY 90% OF THE CLIENTELE WERE REPEATS, AND YOU HAD YOUR STEADY CORE CUSTOMERS…THEY WOULD GET WHAT THEY LIKED.” “[IN THE 1980S] THERE WAS MYSELF, DAD, [AND] HE HAD TWO OTHER YOUNGER PEOPLE WORKING, ONE NAMED LEN, WHO WAS CUTTING MEAT, AND ANOTHER [WOMAN] NAMED IDA, WHO CUT. BUSINESS STARTED TO TAPER OFF THEN. HE LAID OFF IDA, AND THEN ME, AND LEN, AND DAD WOULD PRETTY WELL OPERATE THE WHOLE SHOW. THAT WAS ABOUT 1990.” “[DAD] WAS VERY, I THINK, ASTUTE AT THE BUSINESS…[HE] HAD TO BE, BECAUSE THAT WAS THEIR LIVING. THEY HAD NOTHING ELSE TO FALL BACK ON. [HE HAD TO] MAKE IT WORK. HE WAS REALLY GOOD WITH THE CUSTOMERS. HE ENJOYED SERVING THE CUSTOMERS MORE THAN THE GRUNT WORK IN THE BACK. HE COULD DO IT, BUT HE PREFERRED BEING UP FRONT, WORKING WITH THE PEOPLE. ME AND MY UNCLE RON COULD STAY IN THE BACK ALL DAY. I COULD STAND THERE AT THAT BLOCK, AND WE COULD CUT MEAT 8 HOURS STRAIGHT. [IT] WOULDN’T BOTHER US. I COULD HANDLE SERVING THE CUSTOMERS, BUT I PREFERRED JUST WORKING.” “[BUSINESS] REALLY STARTED DECLINING…I REALLY NOTICED IT AROUND 2008, 2009. FOR THE LAST WHILE, [I] JUST HAD MYSELF AND ONE OTHER YOUNG FELLOW, GARRY, WORKING THERE. IT WAS TO THE POINT WHERE YOU COULDN’T MAKE ENOUGH SALES TO AFFORD ANOTHER PERSON, BUT IT WAS TOO BUSY FOR ONE. GARRY WAS STARTING TO HAVE A FAMILY, AND NEEDED MORE MONEY. HE LEFT TO GO WORK SOMEWHERE ELSE. SO, I HUNG ONTO IT, AND JUST DID IT ALL BY MYSELF FOR THE LAST FOUR YEARS. BEING THE ONLY GUY THERE, EVERY HOUR OF EVERY DAY, FOR TEN HOURS A DAY, STARTED TO GET TO ME. IT GOT TO THE POINT WHERE, IN 2011, EARLY 2012, I JUST THOUGHT, “THERE’S NO POINT IN WORKING LIKE THIS, AND NOT MAKING ANYTHING. I MIGHT AS WELL DO NOTHING, AND MAKE THE SAME AMOUNT.”” KEN CRIGHTON SOLD ALBERTA MEAT MARKET IN 2012. MIRIAM SMITH SPOKE TO HER THOUGHTS ON THE SIGN BEING DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM, NOTING, “I’M VERY HAPPY. I THINK IT’S A GOOD PLACE FOR IT, AND I THINK KENNETH, AND EVERYBODY FEELS THAT WAY.” KEN CRIGHTON CONFIRMED, “I’M ECSTATIC! I WOULD RATHER IT BE HERE. OUR WHOLE FAMILY’S LOST OUR IDENTITY/ERASED [IT] BY HAVING IT JUST THROWN AWAY. ON THE OTHER HAND, I DIDN’T WANT IT STILL ON THE BUILDING, [WITH] THE BUILDING BEING USED FOR A DIFFERENT PURPOSE, AND HAVING THE NAME ASSOCIATED. [IT] FELT LIKE THE NAME BELONGED TO THE CRIGHTON’S MORE THAN THE COMMUNITY, OR WHOEVER OWNED THE BUILDING.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, FAMILY OBITUARIES, AND ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180025000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180025000
Acquisition Date
2018-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE HERALD AGENT"
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
TIN, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180004000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"LETHBRIDGE HERALD AGENT"
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
TIN, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
30.6
Width
25.8
Description
METAL SIGN WITH DOUBLE-SIDED PRINTING ON LIGHT BROWN BACKGROUND. SIGN SHOWS BLACK SQUARE BACKGROUND WITH RED TRIM AND LIGHT BROWN TEXT WITH RED TRIM READING “AGENT FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD HERE, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD SERVES THE SOUTH”; SIGN HAS SMALL BLACK TEXT PRINTED AT BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER “TMOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO. LTD. MONTREAL”. BACK OF SIGN IS PRINTED THE SAME. SIGN HAS JAGGED METAL EDGE BENT DOWN ON LEFT SIDE; SIGN IS RUSTED FRONT AND BACK AND FADED; SIGN IS SCRATCHED IN FRONT UPPER RIGHT CORNER AND CORRODED LOWER LEFT CORNER. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
PROFESSIONS
History
ON MARCH 19TH, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONTACTED DAN PLOURDE, THE "AGENT FOR...HERALD" SIGN'S SELLER. THE SIGN WAS PURCHASED BY THE GALT MUSEUM AT URBAN PRAIRIE ANTIQUE MALL ON MARCH 21, 2018. PLOURDE, A PICKER, LEASES MALL SPACE AT URBAN PRAIRIE AS A LOCATION TO SELL HIS PICKS. PLOURDE TOLD MACLEAN THAT THE HERALD SIGN CAME FROM A RURAL PROPERTY NEAR CHIN LAKE. THE RURAL LOCATION FEATURED "QUONSETS" FULL OF OTHER ITEMS, INCLUDING GAS MEMORABILIA AND FURNITURE. THE ORIGINAL OWNER OF THE SIGN, WHO LIVED AT THE PROPERTY WAS NO LONGER LIVING. THE OWNER, CONTINUED PLOURDE, CONDUCTED HIS OWN PICKING "IN BACK ALLEYS IN LETHBRIDGE 60 YEARS AGO". PLOURDE ATTEMPTED TO SELL THE SIGN IN FORT MACLEAD BEFORE RECOGNIZING THAT ITS MARKET WAS GREATER IN LETHBRIDGE. FOR COPIES OF INFORMATION REGARDING THE SIGN, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180004000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180004000
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Length
58.5
Width
22
Description
A. BANJOLELE, 53 CM LONG X 19 CM WIDE X 5.5 CM TALL. BODY IS POLISHED BROWN WOOD WITH WHITE LEATHER DRUM/HEAD; BODY HAS SILVER METAL TAIL PIECE AND TONE RING AROUND DRUM/HEAD. NECK AND HEAD-STOCK ARE COVERED IN PEARL/TORTOISE SHELL; FRET ON NECK IS STRUNG WITH ONE SILVER WIRE AND ONE CLOTH STRING; FRETBOARD IS LINED WITH SILVER METAL FRETS. HEAD-STOCK HAS FOUR SILVER METAL TUNING PEGS AND BLACK AND GOLD TEXT LABEL “VALENCIA”. BACK HAS FOUR DISCOLORED WHITE, WOODEN TUNING PEGS AND SILVER METAL SPRING AT JUNCTION OF NECK AND HEAD-STOCK. BACK OF DRUM BODY HAS CUT-OUT SWIRLS IN WOOD. WOOD BODY IS SCRATCHED AND WORN AT EDGES; BACK OF NECK HAS PEELING FINISH ON WOOD; LEATHER OF DRUM/HEAD IS WORN AND STAINED BLACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CASE, 58.5 CM LONG X 9 CM TALL X 22 CM WIDE. CASE IS BROWN CLOTH COVERING A PAPER BOARD IN SHAPE OF BANJOLELE, WITH WIDER BASE. CASE OPENS AT BASE AND HAS BROWN LEATHER HINGE AND SILVER METAL CLASP. BROWN LEATHER HANDLE ON SIDE OF CASE IS BROKEN AND DETACHED AT END. INSIDE OF CASE IS LINED WITH DARK GREEN FABRIC. TOP OF CASE HAS “L W” HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. CASE IS WORN AROUND EDGES AND CLOTH IS FRAYING; BOTTOM OF CASE HAS WATER DAMAGE AND WHITE STAINING; TOP OF CASE HAS WHITE STAINING AND SCRATCHES. LEATHER HINGE AND HANDLE ARE CRACKED AND FADED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BEVE SPENGLER AND RUTH HILL REGARDING RUTH’S DONATION OF A BANJOLELE AND GUITAR. THE INSTRUMENTS WERE KEPT AND PLAYED BY THEIR FATHER, SYDNEY JAMES WOMACK, IN THE 1930S AND 1940S. ON THE BANJOLELE, RUTH RECALLED, “I CAN’T REMEMBER [MUCH] ABOUT [IT] AT ALL, BECAUSE HE BOUGHT [THE GUITAR] BUT SOMEHOW HE MUST HAVE SEEN THIS, AND THEN HE THOUGHT FOR LORNE [OUR BROTHER] HE WOULD BUY THAT [BANJOLELE] TO MATCH THE GUITAR.” “MY DAD USED TO PLAY ME TO SLEEP FROM THE TIME…WE WENT OUT TO THE FARM IN ’30. I WAS BORN IN ’27, SO ALL THE ‘30S HE PLAYED ME TO SLEEP EVERY NIGHT…I NEVER SAW MY DAD PLAY [THE BANJOLELE] YET HE BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE KNEW THERE WAS A MATCHING PAIR. HE COULDN’T AFFORD BOTH OF THEM AT THE SAME TIME. HE BOUGHT HIS GUITAR AND THEN, LATER ON WHEN HE HAD SOME MORE MONEY, HE WENT AND GOT THAT FOR LORNE, BUT I CAN’T REMEMBER HIM PLAYING IT.” “[HE BOUGHT THE BANJOLELE] HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. HE BROUGHT [HIS] VIOLIN FROM THE STATES, BUT THOSE TWO PIECES WERE BOUGHT IN LETHBRIDGE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE AT, BUT I KNOW IT WAS IN THE EARLY ‘20S BECAUSE THEY CAME TO THE FARM WITH US IN ’30. THEY CAME HERE IN ’18…HE WORKED AT THE CPR AS AN OILER AND THEN HE ENDED UP AT THE GALT GARDENS WORKING WITH THE PLANTS. WHEN THAT FIZZLED OUT, HE WANTED A FARM SO WE WENT FARMING.” HILL ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S MUSICAL BACKGROUND, NOTING, “[MY PARENTS] MOVED FROM ENGLAND TO IOWA. THEY WERE THERE FOR SEVEN YEARS AND DADDY LEARNED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE TOILET, IN THE OUTHOUSE. THAT’S WHAT HE TOLD US.” “HE LOVED MUSIC AND ACTUALLY HIS BEST WAS HAWAIIAN GUITAR…THAT’S WHY HE GOT [THE GUITAR], BECAUSE HE LOVED HAWAIIAN MUSIC. HE LOVED TO PLAY HAWAIIAN SONGS ON [THE GUITAR] BECAUSE THEY WERE SLOWER. THE VIOLIN HE COULD REALLY GO TO TOWN AND PLAY TWO STEPS.” “[WE] USED TO GO [TO DANCES] EVERY MONTH. I CAN SEE HIM WITH THE OLD MODEL T—HE WOULD HAVE TO PUT A FIRE UNDER IT TO GET IT STARTED AT HOME, THEN WE WOULD GO FOR THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND HE WOULD START PLAYING UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING. THEN HE HAS TO PUT THE FIRE UNDER TO GET THE CAR GOING AGAIN. THEY WERE BAD YEARS BUT THEY WERE WONDERFUL YEARS…FROM [1933] UNTIL I WENT OUT IN GRADE NINE HE USED TO COME, WE USED TO HAVE DANCES, ALL THROUGH THE THIRTIES WE HAD DANCES AT LEAST TWICE A MONTH.” BEVE ADDED, “HE PLAYED WITH OTHER MEN, HE DIDN’T PLAY BY HIMSELF.” RUTH ELABORATED, “THEY HAD A LADY ON THE PIANO, THEY HAD DADDY ON THE VIOLIN, AND THEN THEY HAD ANOTHER CHAP ON THE DRUMS…[OUR FATHER] TOOK THE LEAD. THE VIOLIN WOULD ALWAYS START BEFORE, BECAUSE HE HAD THE MEMORY OF THE PIECES HE WANTED TO PLAY AND NOBODY ELSE KNEW NOTHING UNTIL HE GOT STARTED. THEN THEY’D JOIN IN.” “HE WAS STILL PLAYING THE VIOLIN, HE USED TO LIKE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN. EVEN IN THE ‘40S [HE LIKED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN], I CAN REMEMBER THAT. HE DIDN’T SO MUCH PLAY [THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS] BUT HE PLAYED THE VIOLIN. “ “HE WAS GOOD. THAT DANCE FLOOR IN THE SCHOOL THERE WOULD BE LOADED AS SOON AS HE STARTED PLAYING. AS SOON AS HE STARTED TO PLAY THEY WERE ALL UP, AND AT NIGHT NOBODY LEFT UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING…HE USED TO TAKE THE GUITAR AND PLAY THE WALTZES ON THAT, BUT THE VIOLIN HE WOULD PLAY THE OTHERS.” “THAT CLASSICAL [MUSIC], HE HAD NO USE FOR [IT]. HE USED TO SAY, “THERE’S NO BEAT THERE.” THEY WERE HIS WORDS. THERE WAS NO BEAT AND HE SAID, “IF THEY CAN’T PLAY THIS, I’M NOT LISTENING.” HE COULDN’T READ MUSIC, BUT IF HE COULD SEE THE [NOTES] AS [THEY] WENT UP OR DOWN…THAT’S WHAT HE’D LOOK AT, AND THEN HE’D LEARN TO PLAY THAT SONG. THAT WAS ON THE GUITAR, THAT WAS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PART.” “[HE HAD THE INSTRUMENTS] ON OUR FARM AT KIPP, ALBERTA AND ON THE FARMHOUSE, I’M IN THE BED. HE [WOULD BE] PLAYING THAT AND THEN I’D GO TO SLEEP TO HIM PLAYING THAT DAY IN, WEEK AFTER WEEK. YEAR AFTER YEAR. HE ALWAYS PLAYED ME TO SLEEP.” “HE [PLAYED] IN THE FRONT ROOM. [THE INSTRUMENTS] STAYED IN THE CORNER, HE BUILT A SHELF FOR THE RADIO AND THEN [THE GUITAR] STOOD UNDERNEATH THAT SHELF. THAT’S WHERE [THEY] STAYED…[THE INSTRUMENTS WERE] WITH MY DAD UNTIL ’93, THEN HE CAME TO LIVE WITH ME AND OF COURSE HE BROUGHT HIS THINGS WITH HIM. I NEVER THOUGHT THEY WERE IN MY CLOSET AND I HADN’T DONE A BIG CLEANING, SO THEY’VE JUST BEEN THERE. NOW I THOUGHT IT’S TIME TO LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT THEM...[OUR FATHER] DIED IN ’98.” “I DIDN’T WANT THE INSTRUMENTS TO BE GARBAGED. I WANTED THEM TO MEAN SOMETHING, AND I KNEW…THE MUSEUM WOULD ACCEPT THEM…IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL [FOR MY DAD TO PLAY FOR ME] BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC TOO. THAT WAS REALLY SOMETHING TO HAVE HIM PLAYING TO ME ALL THE TIME [AT BEDTIME].” “LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT [THE INSTRUMENTS] NOW. I’VE GOT ALL THE MEMORIES…I CAN SEE HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN HEAR HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN SEE IT AT THE DANCEHALL, I’VE GOT IT RIGHT THERE. SO SOMEBODY ELSE CAN LOOK AT [THEM] NOW.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, SHELL
Catalogue Number
P20180001002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, METAL, SHELL
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Length
94
Width
32.5
Description
A. GUITAR, 94 CM LONG X 32.5 CM WIDE X 9 CM TALL. WOODEN BODY WITH PEARL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID AS PICK GUARD AND ALONG FRET BOARD; GUITAR IS STRUNG WITH SIX WIRE STRINGS. GUITAR HAS SIX TUNING KNOBS AT HEAD WITH WHITE PLASTIC HANDLES ON METAL SCREWS. GUITAR BODY HAS DECORATIVE BROWN, RED AND GREEN TRIM AROUND EDGE; GUITAR HAS BLACK KNOB AT BASE. “VALENCIA” LABEL AT TOP OF HEAD; GUITAR SHOWS WEAR AND STAINING ON PICK GUARD AND FRET BOARD; GUITAR HAS SOILING INSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. GUITAR CASE, 100 CM LONG X 37 CM WIDE X 13 CM TALL. BLACK FAUX-LEATHER EXTERIOR WITH LEATHER BUCKLE AT BASE AND LEATHER HANDLE FIXED TO TOP WITH SILVER RINGS; CASE OPENS AT BASE. BASE OF CASE HAS BLACK METAL SNAP AROUND LEATHER BUCKLE STRAP. INSIDE OF CASE LINED WITH BROWN FAUX-FUR. CASE IS HEAVILY WORN ON EDGES AND PEELING; CASE IS SCRATCHED ON SIDES; LEATHER BUCKLE STRAP AT BASE IS CRACKED AND FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BEVE SPENGLER AND RUTH HILL REGARDING RUTH’S DONATION OF A BANJOLELE AND GUITAR. THE INSTRUMENTS WERE KEPT AND PLAYED BY THEIR FAMER, SYDNEY JAMES WOMACK, IN THE 1930S AND 1940S. ON THE GUITAR, RUTH HILL RECALLED, “HE BOUGHT IT AND STARTED STRUMMING ON IT…IT WAS ALWAYS ON HIS LAP…MY DAD USED TO PLAY ME TO SLEEP FROM THE TIME…WE WENT OUT TO THE FARM IN ’30. I WAS BORN IN ’27, SO ALL THE ‘30S HE PLAYED ME TO SLEEP EVERY NIGHT…I NEVER SAW MY DAD PLAY [THE BANJOLELE] YET HE BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE KNEW THERE WAS A MATCHING PAIR. HE COULDN’T AFFORD BOTH OF THEM AT THE SAME TIME. HE BOUGHT HIS GUITAR AND THEN, LATER ON WHEN HE HAD SOME MORE MONEY, HE WENT AND GOT [THE BANJOLELE] FOR LORNE.” “HE LOVED MUSIC AND ACTUALLY HIS BEST WAS HAWAIIAN GUITAR…THAT’S WHY HE GOT [THE GUITAR], BECAUSE HE LOVED HAWAIIAN MUSIC. HE LOVED TO PLAY HAWAIIAN SONGS ON [THE GUITAR] BECAUSE THEY WERE SLOWER. THE VIOLIN HE COULD REALLY GO TO TOWN AND PLAY TWO STEPS.” “[HE BOUGHT THE GUITAR] HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. HE BROUGHT [HIS] VIOLIN FROM THE STATES, BUT THOSE TWO PIECES WERE BOUGHT IN LETHBRIDGE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE AT, BUT I KNOW IT WAS IN THE EARLY ‘20S BECAUSE THEY CAME TO THE FARM WITH US IN ’30. THEY CAME HERE IN ’18…HE WORKED AT THE CPR AS AN OILER AND THEN HE ENDED UP AT THE GALT GARDENS WORKING WITH THE PLANTS. WHEN THAT FIZZLED OUT, HE WANTED A FARM SO WE WENT FARMING.” HILL ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S MUSICAL BACKGROUND, NOTING, “[MY PARENTS] MOVED FROM ENGLAND TO IOWA. THEY WERE THERE FOR SEVEN YEARS AND DADDY LEARNED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE TOILET, IN THE OUTHOUSE. THAT’S WHAT HE TOLD US.” “[WE] USED TO GO [TO DANCES] EVERY MONTH. I CAN SEE HIM WITH THE OLD MODEL T—HE WOULD HAVE TO PUT A FIRE UNDER IT TO GET IT STARTED AT HOME, THEN WE WOULD GO FOR THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND HE WOULD START PLAYING UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING. THEN HE HAS TO PUT THE FIRE UNDER TO GET THE CAR GOING AGAIN. THEY WERE BAD YEARS BUT THEY WERE WONDERFUL YEARS…FROM [1933] UNTIL I WENT OUT IN GRADE NINE HE USED TO COME, WE USED TO HAVE DANCES, ALL THROUGH THE THIRTIES WE HAD DANCES AT LEAST TWICE A MONTH.” BEVE ADDED, “HE PLAYED WITH OTHER MEN, HE DIDN’T PLAY BY HIMSELF.” RUTH ELABORATED, “THEY HAD A LADY ON THE PIANO, THEY HAD DADDY ON THE VIOLIN, AND THEN THEY HAD ANOTHER CHAP ON THE DRUMS…[OUR FATHER] TOOK THE LEAD. THE VIOLIN WOULD ALWAYS START BEFORE, BECAUSE HE HAD THE MEMORY OF THE PIECES HE WANTED TO PLAY AND NOBODY ELSE KNEW NOTHING UNTIL HE GOT STARTED. THEN THEY’D JOIN IN.” “HE WAS STILL PLAYING THE VIOLIN, HE USED TO LIKE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN. EVEN IN THE ‘40S [HE LIKED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN], I CAN REMEMBER THAT. HE DIDN’T SO MUCH PLAY [THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS] BUT HE PLAYED THE VIOLIN. “ “HE WAS GOOD. THAT DANCE FLOOR IN THE SCHOOL THERE WOULD BE LOADED AS SOON AS HE STARTED PLAYING. AS SOON AS HE STARTED TO PLAY THEY WERE ALL UP, AND AT NIGHT NOBODY LEFT UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING…HE USED TO TAKE THE GUITAR AND PLAY THE WALTZES ON THAT, BUT THE VIOLIN HE WOULD PLAY THE OTHERS.” “THAT CLASSICAL [MUSIC], HE HAD NO USE FOR [IT]. HE USED TO SAY, “THERE’S NO BEAT THERE.” THEY WERE HIS WORDS. THERE WAS NO BEAT AND HE SAID, “IF THEY CAN’T PLAY THIS, I’M NOT LISTENING.” HE COULDN’T READ MUSIC, BUT IF HE COULD SEE THE [NOTES] AS [THEY] WENT UP OR DOWN…THAT’S WHAT HE’D LOOK AT, AND THEN HE’D LEARN TO PLAY THAT SONG. THAT WAS ON THE GUITAR, THAT WAS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PART.” “[HE HAD THE INSTRUMENTS] ON OUR FARM AT KIPP, ALBERTA AND ON THE FARMHOUSE, I’M IN THE BED. HE [WOULD BE] PLAYING THAT AND THEN I’D GO TO SLEEP TO HIM PLAYING THAT DAY IN, WEEK AFTER WEEK. YEAR AFTER YEAR. HE ALWAYS PLAYED ME TO SLEEP.” “HE [PLAYED] IN THE FRONT ROOM. [THE INSTRUMENTS] STAYED IN THE CORNER, HE BUILT A SHELF FOR THE RADIO AND THEN [THE GUITAR] STOOD UNDERNEATH THAT SHELF. THAT’S WHERE [THEY] STAYED…[THE INSTRUMENTS WERE] WITH MY DAD UNTIL ’93, THEN HE CAME TO LIVE WITH ME AND OF COURSE HE BROUGHT HIS THINGS WITH HIM. I NEVER THOUGHT THEY WERE IN MY CLOSET AND I HADN’T DONE A BIG CLEANING, SO THEY’VE JUST BEEN THERE. NOW I THOUGHT IT’S TIME TO LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT THEM...[OUR FATHER] DIED IN ’98.” “I DIDN’T WANT THE INSTRUMENTS TO BE GARBAGED. I WANTED THEM TO MEAN SOMETHING, AND I KNEW…THE MUSEUM WOULD ACCEPT THEM…IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL [FOR MY DAD TO PLAY FOR ME] BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC TOO. THAT WAS REALLY SOMETHING TO HAVE HIM PLAYING TO ME ALL THE TIME [AT BEDTIME].” “LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT [THE INSTRUMENTS] NOW. I’VE GOT ALL THE MEMORIES…I CAN SEE HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN HEAR HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN SEE IT AT THE DANCEHALL, I’VE GOT IT RIGHT THERE. SO SOMEBODY ELSE CAN LOOK AT [THEM] NOW.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180001002
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SONY CDP-X779ES
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20190004000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SONY CDP-X779ES
Date
1992
Materials
METAL, GLASS, WOOD
No. Pieces
12
Height
12.5
Length
46
Width
37
Description
A- CD PLAYER; PALE GOLD METAL CONTROL PANEL ON FRONT INCLUDES THIRTEEN BUTTONS OF VARIOUS SIZES, RECTANGULAR GLASS DISPLAY WINDOW, CD DRAWER AND GOLD HEADPHONE PORT. STICKER ABOVE DRAWER READS, “PULSE / D/A CONVERTER”. TOP RIGHT CORNER OF FRONT PANEL READS, “X779ES / HIGH DENSITY LINEAR CONVERTER / DIRECT DIGITAL SYNC”. TOP PANEL IS GOLD COLOUR WITH SILVER SCREWS IN EVERY CORNER AND MIDDLE EDGE. SIDES ARE REFLECTIVE DARK WOOD PANELS. BACK PANEL IS BLACK, COMPLETE WITH A HORIZONTAL ROW OF FOUR GOLD CABLE PORTS, THREE LARGE PALE GOLD PORTS, AND TWO BLACK BUTTONS. BLUE STICKER ON BACK READS “AUDIO VIDEO EQUIPMENT…NN788413”. WHITE TEXT BELOW READS, “…SERIAL NO. A700039…” MAIN BODY STANDS ON FOUR SHORT CYLINDRICAL LEGS. VERY GOOD CONDITION; MINOR WEAR AND STAINING ON FRONT PANEL BUTTONS, FINGERPRINT MARKS ON TOP PANEL. PLUG-IN CABLE ATTACHED TO THE BACK OF CD PLAYER. THICK BLACK RUBBER PROTECTIVE COVERING. GOLD TEXT ON CABLE READS, “E41381-T VW-1…” HARD PLASTIC HEAD, WITH TWO SILVER METAL PRONGS. VERY GOOD CONDITION; SLIGHT WEAR ON PRONGS. B- REMOTE CONTROL: H: 2. L: 17.4. W: 5.8. DARK BROWN AND BLACK BODY. TOP HAS PALE GOLD PERFORATED METAL PANEL WITH 36 BUTTONS, SOME OF WHICH READ, “PEAK SEARCH”, “FILE RECALL”, “CONTINUE”, “C.INDEX”, “ERASE”. BELOW FIRST PANEL, IS A SECOND SOLID GOLD METAL PANEL WITH 14 ADDITIONAL BUTTONS. WHITE TEXT BELOW READS, “CD PLAYER / RM-D995 / SONY”. BACK HAS BLACK PLASTIC PANEL TO COVER BATTERIES. VERY GOOD CONDITION; SLIGHT DUST. C- INSTRUCTION MANUAL: H: 1CM. L: 28.2CM. W: 21CM. WHITE PAPER MANUAL WITH TWO METAL STAPLES ALONG SPINE FOR BINDING. BLACK TEXT IN MIDDLE RIGHT OF THE PAGE READS “COMPACT DISC PLAYER / OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS”. BLACK TEXT ON BOTTOM OF COVER READS “…CDP-X779ES…” GREEN PAGE MARKER VISIBLE AT THE TOP IS ATTACHED TO PAGE 18, “HOOKING UP THE SYSTEM”. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION; SLIGHT YELLOWING OF PAPER, MINOR BLACK FINGERPRINT SMUDGE AND SCUFF ON THE BACK. D- CARDBOARD BOX: H: 22.8. L: 45.5. W: 56. BROWN RECTANGULAR CARDBOARD BOX WITH CLEAR STRIPS OF BROKEN TAPE OVER TOP, FRONT AND BACK. TOP OF BOX READS “SONY” IN NAVY BLUE TEXT. TO THE RIGHT IS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER THAT READS, “72-YRM”. BELOW IS AN ATTACHED STRIP OF WHITE PLASTIC WITH A SINGLE RED MARK. TEXT ON BOTTOM LEFT CORNER READS, “COMPACT DISC DIGITAL AUDIO” IN NAVY BLUE LETTERING. TEXT ON BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER READS, “CDP-X779ES / COMPACT DISC PLAYER / LECTEUR COMPACT DISC”. ON LEFT SIDE OF BOX, WHITE STICKER READS, “…ORDER: 493553 B/L: 324997…” GOOD CONDITION: CARDBOARD IS RIPPED, DENTED, PEELING AND STAINED FROM TAPE ADHESIVE. E- BAG OF EXTRA SCREWS: H: 2.5. L: 4. W. 7.6. BLACK SCREWS WITH MUSHROOM HEADS AND ‘X’ SHAPED CAVITIES. TEXT ON WHITE STICKER READS, “CAUTION…EXCHANGE LONG SCREWS FOR INCLUDED SHORT ONES…4-943-721-01”. EXCELLENT CONDITION: UNOPENED. F- THIN FOAM SHEET: L: 56.3. W: 130. WHITE STRIPES, WITH WAVED EDGES. DEEP VERTICAL CREASES INDICATE TRIFOLD FOLDING. GOOD CONDITION: HEAVY CREASING, SCUFF MARKS, “U” SHAPED HOLE ON RIGHT HAND EDGE. G- STYROFOAM PACKAGING (TOP REAR): H: 9. L: 54. W: 9.4. WHITE RECTANGULAR STYROFOAM LOG WITH CREVICE TO STORE REMOTE CONTROL. UNDERSIDE IS CUT TO FIT TOP REAR SURFACE OF CD PLAYER. TEXT EMBOSSED ON RIGHT SIDE READS, “TOP REAR”. PACKAGING WAS FOUND ON TOP FRONT. VERY GOOD CONDITION: SMALL AREAS REMOVED FROM ITS UNDERSIDE. H- STYROFOAM PACKAGING (TOP FRONT): H: 9. L: 54. W: 9.4. WHITE RECTANGULAR STYROFOAM LOG, WITH UNDERSIDE CUT TO FIT TOP FRONT SURFACE OF CD PLAYER. TEXT EMBOSSED ON RIGHT SIDE READS, “TOP FRONT”. PACKAGING WAS FOUND ON TOP REAR. EXCELLENT CONDITION. I- STYROFOAM PACKAGING (BOTTOM REAR) H: 8. L: 54. W: 9. WHITE RECTANGULAR STYROFOAM LOG, WITH TOP CUT TO FIT BOTTOM REAR SURFACE OF PLAYER. TEXT EMBOSSED ON MIDDLE TOP READS, “BOTTOM REAR”. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION: HEAVY CRACKING AND MISSING PIECES OF STYROFOAM. J- STYROFOAM PACKAGING (BOTTOM FRONT) H: 8. L: 54. W: 9. WHITE RECTANGULAR STYROFOAM LOG, WITH TOP CUT TO FIT BOTTOM FRONT SURFACE OF CD PLAYER. TEXT EMBOSSED ON THE MIDDLE TOP READS, “BOTTOM FRONT”. VERY GOOD CONDITION: MINOR CRACKS IN STYROFOAM. K- LEFT STEREO PACKAGING: H: 2. L: 36. W: 11. YELLOW CARDBOARD LINED WITH GREY FOAM. CORNERS ARE HELD TOGETHER BY YELLOW PIECES OF TAPE. BOTH LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES EXHIBIT TWO HOLES, ONE ABOVE THE OTHER, 5CM APART. VERY GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT WARPING OF CARDBOARD, TWO CIRCULAR INDENTS TO THE LEFT OF LEFT SET OF HOLES. L- RIGHT STEREO PACKAGING: H: 2. L: 36. W: 11. YELLOW CARDBOARD LINED WITH GREY FOAM. CORNERS ARE HELD TOGETHER BY YELLOW PIECES OF TAPE. BOTH LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES EXHIBIT TWO HOLES, ONE ABOVE THE OTHER, 5CM APART. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: WARPING OF CARDBOARD ON TOP, BOTTOM AND RIGHT SIDE. TWO MINOR SCRATCHES ON BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER OF FOAM.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
ON JANUARY 29, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ROD SCHULTZ REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A MODEL X779ES SONY CD PLAYER. SCHULTZ DISCUSSED HOW HE ACQUIRED THE CD PLAYER, “I PURCHASED THIS IN 1994… SONY HAD A BRAND CALLED ES AND THAT’S THE VERY TOP LINE OF THEIR STEREO SYSTEMS … I HAD HEARD THEM BEFORE – I HEARD THIS ONE PARTICULAR UNIT AND I WANTED TO BUY IT. THEN SONY DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO NOT BE INVOLVED IN MARKETING THOSE HIGH-END PRODUCTS ANYMORE BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T REALLY SEE… A CONTINUATION OF CD’S COMING BECAUSE EVERYTHING WAS GOING TO DIGITAL STREAMING - PEOPLE WEREN’T GOING TO BE BUYING THESE. I WENT OUT AND LISTENED TO THESE UNITS. I COMPARED THEM AND CAME BACK PROBABLY 10 TIMES BEFORE I HEARD THIS UNIT AND I WAS CERTAIN THIS WAS THE ONE I WANTED TO HAVE. MY WIFE WASN’T THRILLED BUT I WAS PREPARED TO MAKE SOME SACRIFICES FOR THAT. WHAT HAPPENED IS THAT I WAS GOING TO BUY IT AND THEN SONY DECIDED THAT THEY WERE GOING TO SHUT DOWN THE STORES THAT THEY HAD IN CANADA. THEY SHUT DOWN THE LETHBRIDGE ONE FIRST. THIS WAS THE ONLY ONE THAT WAS LEFT IN CANADA AND THERE WAS STILL ONE AVAILABLE IN MEDICINE HAT. I DROVE TO MEDICINE HAT AND I BOUGHT IT THERE BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T SHIP IT FROM MEDICINE HAT TO THE [LETHBRDIGE] STORE THAT WAS GOING TO BE CLOSING. I TOLD THEM, I SAID, “I TELL YOU, I’M COMING TODAY. DO NOT SELL THAT UNIT ON ME.” “PEOPLE WOULD SAY, ‘YOU SPENT $2400 ON A COMPACT DISC PLAYER. THERE IS NO WAY IT CAN BE WORTH THAT KIND OF MONEY.’ I’D SAY, ‘I’LL TELL YOU WHAT, YOU HAVE COMPACT DISCS. YOU BRING YOUR VERY FAVORITE OVER AND LISTEN TO IT SEVERAL TIMES AT YOUR HOUSE AND YOU COME OVER AND YOU LISTEN TO MINE.’ THEY SAID, ‘I CAN’T BELIEVE THE DIFFERENCE. IF SOMEONE HAD TOLD ME THAT I’D HAVE SAID, “NO, IT’S NOT POSSIBLE FOR THERE TO BE THAT KIND OF DIFFERENCE BUT I UNDERSTAND WHY YOU ARE DEVOTED TO BUYING …I FINALLY HEARD THIS WAS THE CREAM OF THE CROP.”’ AND THAT’S WHY I DECIDED THAT WAS THE ONE I WAS GOING TO OWN…AFTER I FOUND IT I DIDN”T BELIEVE IT COULD BE ANY BETTER AND I JUST…TREATED IT THE BEST I COULD.” “IT WAS A THRILL TO OWN THIS PIECE OF EQUIPMENT. I USED TO SPEND 4 HOURS A DAY LISTENING TO MUSIC. WHEN THE KIDS WENT TO BED, I HAD MY QUIET TIME AND THAT’S WHEN I KIND OF FELL OFF THE FACE OF THE EARTH...” “IT STARTED TO FAIL ABOUT NINE MONTHS AGO... YOU MIGHT HAVE TO SHUT THE ON/OFF BUTTON ON TWICE TO FINALLY GET IT TO RUN, AND THEN IT FINALLY WOULD RUN [BUT] IT WOULD NEVER QUIT PART OF THE WAY THROUGH. IT BECAME SOMETHING THAT WAS PERFECT THAT ALL OF A SUDDEN WAS NO LONGER PERFECT.” “I THOUGHT MAYBE THERE WAS SOMETHING WRONG WITH [THE] OTHER COMPONENTS THAT WERE HOOKED TO IT SO I HAD THE AMPLIFIER CHECKED OUT, THE PRE-AMPLIFIER, EVERYTHING ELSE WAS FINE. THERE’S A GUY…WHO WAS AN ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN THAT OWNED THE SAME PLAYER IN CALGARY… I USED TO GO UP TO CALGARY TO VISIT THIS GUY, AND HE HAD THE SAME ISSUE WITH THE SAME PLAYER, WITH HIS, AND HE WAS NEVER ABLE TO FIX IT…HE TOLD ME IT WAS A DONE DEAL, THERE’S NOTHING I CAN DO ABOUT IT. [I ALMOST HAD TO GO THROUGH A LEVEL OF GRIEVING AND LOTS OF DENIAL] I COULDN’T BELIEVE IT HAPPENED, SO I FINALLY BOUGHT THE REPLACEMENT THROUGH SMITH’S AUDIO.” ON THE ORIGINS OF HIS LOVE FOR MUSIC, SCHULTZ RECALLED, “…I FIRST GOT INTERESTED IN CLASSICAL MUSIC… BECAUSE OF MY FATHER-IN-LAW. HE WAS THE COOLEST GUY IN THE WORLD… WHEN I FINALLY GOT THROUGH SCHOOL AND I STARTED TO PAY ATTENTION TO LISTEN TO MUSIC SERIOUSLY. [I CAME TO LETHBRIDGE] IN 1977 AND I USED TO TAKE OUT 30 LPs AT THE BEGINNING OF THE WEEK AND 30 LPs AT THE END OF THE WEEK AND I WOULD…EXPLORE DIFFERENT COMPOSERS IN LETHBRIDGE – SO I WOULD BORROW THEM FROM THERE AND I WOULD LISTEN TO THEM ON MY PHONOGRAPH… I WAS ABLE TO DETERMINE EXACTLY WHICH COMPOSERS I LIKED AND MUSIC I LIKED, WHICH WERE THE REALLY GOOD ORCHESTRAS. I DEVELOPED THIS REPERTOIRE OF MUSIC THAT… JUST MADE MY SKIN HOT.” “I’M ALMOST POSITIVE THAT [THE FIRST CD I BOUGHT] WAS… A PIECE OF MUSIC BY BACH…IT WAS AN OBOE CONCERTO, IN AN OBOE ENVIRONMENT. IT WAS [AN] ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS PIECE OF MUSIC... I STILL HAVE IT TODAY AND IT PLAYS BEAUTIFULLY. I LISTEN TO IT ONCE A MONTH.” “I HAVE A LOT OF COMPACT DISCS, PROBABLY 450 THAT ARE PRIMARILY CLASSICAL ONES… I TRY TO PICK MUSIC BY WELL-KNOWN COMPOSERS, BEAUTIFUL THINGS, I CALL IT EAR CANDY AND THAT[‘S] WHAT IT IS TO ME. IT IS SOMETHING THAT CAN BRING ME TO TEARS, THAT I CAN BE EMOTIONALLY ATTACHED TO IT…TO ME IT’S LIKE A SOOTHER FOR AN ADULT. THIS IS MAYBE A STRANGE THING TO SAY, BUT IT GIVES ME GREAT JOY. I WOULD RATHER BE BLIND THAN TO LOSE MY HEARING BECAUSE IF I LISTEN TO MUSIC, I’D BE CRYING RIGHT IN FRONT OF YOU… I REALLY BELIEVE IN MY HEART THAT COMPOSERS ARE A GIFT FROM GOD.” “IT DOES SOMETHING TO ME…I MEAN, I’VE GOT A BEAUTIFUL WIFE, BEST FAMILY, NICE HOME BUT THIS IS STILL A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE AND MY MENTAL HEALTH.” “SOMETIMES I THINK FOR PEOPLE [MUSIC IS] JUST NOISE IN THE BACKGROUND, BUT…IF I SIT ON THE SOFA AND I LISTEN TO MUSIC, IT’S ALMOST LIKE I ELEVATE FROM THE GROUND. I’M NOT A CRAZY PERSON BUT IT JUST TAKES ME TO A DIFFERENT REALM. IT TAKES ME TO A DIFFERENT PLACE THAT HAS JUST ME ENJOYING SOMETHING I LOVE. IT’S SPECIAL TO ME.” ON DONATING THE CD PLAYER TO THE MUSEUM, SCHULTZ EXPLAINED, “IF I COULD HAVE FIXED THIS, IT WOULD STILL BE IN MY SYSTEM…I JUST COULDN’T DO IT. YOU ASKED ME WHY IT’S IMPORTANT FOR ME TO DO SOMETHING WITH IT. I COULD LEAVE THIS [TO] SIT IN A BOX. IT’S IN A BOX AND IT HAS MEMORIES TO ME, BUT THIS IS AN ELECTRONIC PIECE OF ART AND IT’S A VERY, VERY WELL DESIGNED AND BEAUTIFUL SOUNDING PIECE OF EQUIPMENT… IT IS SUCH A UNIQUE THING AND SOMETHING I’VE PRIZED [TOO] MUCH THAT, TO ME, IT WOULD BE A TRAVESTY TO JUST SIT IN A BOX AND DO NOTHING, WHERE IT COULD POSSIBLY ONE DAY BE APPRECIATED BY OTHER PEOPLE FOR THE BEAUTY OF IT AND FOR THE DESIGN OF IT AND THE FACT THAT IT WAS REALLY AT THE TOP OF ITS CLASS AND THE REVIEWS THAT THEY HAVE STATED THAT THIS WAS ONE OF THE BEST CD PLAYERS THAT HAS EVER BEEN MADE IN THE WORLD.” “THERE’S A PLACE I COULD GO DOWN AND RECYCLE [THE CD PLAYER, BUT IT’S THE] MOST DISRESPECTFUL THING I COULD DO…BECAUSE IT DESERVES BETTER THAN THAT FROM WHAT IT GAVE ME. SO I SAVE THEM. I FEEL EMBARRASSED THAT I’M EMOTIONAL ABOUT IT BUT TO ME – I DON’T KNOW IF IT’S A LOVE AFFAIR WITH SOMETHING, BUT IT’S NOT THAT FAR FROM IT. IT JUST GAVE ME SO MUCH INCREDIBLE JOY. [DESTROYING IT] WOULD BE THE MOST DISRESPECTFUL THING I COULD DO TO SOME INANIMATE OBJECT. I COULDN’T DO IT. THAT’S WHY IT SAT IN MY BASEMENT. I THOUGHT TO MYSELF, ‘THERE’S A BETTER HOME FOR IT THAN A CARDBOARD BOX’.” “I HAVE A CONNECTION HERE [TO THE GALT] AND I BELIEVE IN WHAT YOU’RE DOING AND WHAT YOU’RE TRYING TO ACHIEVE. IT MAKES ME FEEL PEACEFUL. I CAN SAY “GOODBYE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PHOTOGRAPHS AND ADDITIONAL RECEIPTS DATED 1987, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190004000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190004000
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"ATROPHY MANUSCRIPT" CD, TITLED "THIS PRESENT DAY CONFUSION"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20170004002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"ATROPHY MANUSCRIPT" CD, TITLED "THIS PRESENT DAY CONFUSION"
Date
2006
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.8
Length
14.2
Width
12.1
Description
COMPACT DISC FOR MUSIC. THE COVER DEPICTS A BLUE-TINTED IMAGE OF A GROCERY STORE AISLE. THE CD IS UNOPENED/WRAPPED IN CELLOPHANE. THERE IS A WHITE LABEL STICKING TO THE FRONT TOP CORNER OF THE CASE THAT SAYS “ATROPHY MANUSCRIPT… BURNABY B.C. 2006”. THE BACK READS, “THIS PRESENT DAY CONFUSION” AND LISTS 11 TRACK TITLES IN BLACK INK AGAINST A BLUE BACKGROUND. THE BACK IMAGE IS ABSTRACTED. EXCELLENT CONDITION. SCRATCHES ON CELLOPHANE.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
IN THE EARLY MONTHS OF 2017 THE MUSIC FRANCHISE, HMV CANADA, BEGAN TO THE PROCESS OF CLOSING DOWN ALL 120 OF THEIR STORES ACROSS CANADA. AFTER 30 YEARS OF BUSINESS, THE COMPANY WENT INTO RECEIVERSHIP. PARK PLACE MALL IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE HAD AN HMV LOCATION OF ITS OWN, WHICH OPENED IN 1994. THIS COMPACT DISC (CD) WAS ON SALE AT HMV AT THE TIME OF CLOSING. THE BAND, ATROPHY MANUSCRIPT, WAS A LETHBRIDGE-BASED ALTERNATIVE/EMO ROCK BAND. THE CD IS TITLED, "THIS PRESENT DAY CONFUSION," AND WAS THE BAND’S SECOND RECORDED ALBUM. ACCORDING TO THE LABEL ATTACHED TO THE FRONT OF THE CD COVER, THE ALBUM WAS RECORDED AT A STUDIO CALLED THE HIVE IN BURNABY, B.C. THE ALBUM WAS EITHER RECORDED IN 2006 (LABEL ON ALBUM COVER) OR 2008 (LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES). ACCORDING TO THE BAND’S MYSPACE PAGE (WWW.MYSPACE.COM/ATROPHYMANUSCRIPT, ACCESSED 15 AUGUST 2017), THE BAND WAS ACTIVE FROM 2003 UNTIL 2009. ON 27 FEBRUARY 2017, IN AN INTERVIEW WITH COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, THE MANAGER OF THE HMV LETHBRIDGE, BRENDAN FRIZZLEY, REFLECTED ON HIS PAST EXPERIENCE AT THE MUSIC STORE, THE SIGNIFICANCE OF MUSIC STORES, AND ON THE RECEIVERSHIP PERIOD. FOR MORE INFORMATION OF THAT PERIOD, AS WELL AS FRIZZLEY’S RELATIONSHIP WITH THE STORE, PLEASE SEE P20170004001. DURING THE INTERVIEW, FRIZZLEY REFLECTED ON THE NATURE OF PEOPLES’ RELATIONSHIPS WITH MUSIC STORES. HE EXPLAINED, “… IT’S THE STRANGEST SORT OF STORE BECAUSE IF YOU WENT INTO A GROCERY STORE AND THEY HAD EXPANDED THEIR ORGANIC SECTION YOU WOULDN’T BE OFFENDED… [BUT] WITH MUSIC STORES, IT DOESN’T MATTER IF YOU’RE A 16-YEAR-OLD LISTENING TO PUNK MUSIC, OR A EARLY-20’S METAL GUY, OR AN OLD PERSON LISTENING TO THE GENRE CLASSICAL... THERE’S THIS FEELING THAT WHENEVER ANYTHING IS ASSAULTED, IN TERMS OF MUSIC, LIKE, 'HEY, THE METAL SECTION WENT FROM LIKE 8 FEET OF SPACE TO 12 FEET OF SPACE." WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY ADD ANY PRODUCT, BUT THE METAL GUYS WILL BE ECSTATIC, BECAUSE CLEARLY WE HAD DONE THIS THING THAT HAD MADE IT BETTER. WE CARED ABOUT THEM… AND SIMILARLY, WHEN THE PUNK GUYS LOST THAT SPACE AND WENT FROM 8 FEET OF SPACE TO 4 FEET OF SPACE, THEY WERE LIKE 'YOU KNOW, YOU GUYS JUST DON’T HAVE THE SAME SORT OF SELECTION YOU USED TO.' BUT IT’S THE PERCEPTION OF [HOW MUCH PEOPLE CARE ABOUT THEIR MUSIC] AND THAT’S ALWAYS SORT OF BEEN IT... YOU KNOW, PEOPLE ARE OFFENDED BY MUSIC THAT THAT THEY DON’T LIKE BEING IN A STORE. THE AMOUNT OF TIMES I CAN REMEMBER A NEW JUSTIN BIEBER COMING OUT, AND GOING UP TO THE FRONT OF THE STORE, AND BEING LIKE 'WELL WHAT’S GOING ON HERE?' AND SOMEONE HAD TAKEN MY ENTIRE IRON MAIDEN SECTION AND PUT IT IN FRONT OF EACH JUSTIN BIEBER CD. I CAN’T FATHOM ANYBODY BEING INVESTED IN ANY SORT OF OTHER PURCHASE WHERE THEY WOULD BE LIKE 'THIS SORT OF THING OFFENDS ME...' I CAN’T IMAGINE FEELING THAT WAY ABOUT A PARTICULAR BRAND OF KETCHUP OR A PARTICULAR CAR, OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT…" SPEAKING ABOUT THE TYPICAL HMV SHOPPER FRIZZLEY SAID, "THERE’S THIS NARRATIVE THAT PEOPLE WANT TO [BE] THE OLD, DYING CD BUYER... THERE’S ALWAYS PEOPLE WHO COME IN, AND SAY THINGS LIKE, 'OH, I JUST DON’T DO THE DIGITAL,' - [BUT ALSO] 'OH, I HAVE A CD PLAYER IN MY TRUCK, SO THAT’S THE ONLY REASON I’M BUYING CD’S TODAY,' AND THAT’S ALWAYS BEEN A SUBSECTION OF WHAT WE SELL TO - BUT, I THINK THE MAJORITY OF PEOPLE JUST WANT TO HAVE THAT PHYSICAL CONNECTION WITH THE THING THAT THEY LIKE. AND THAT [TYPE OF] PERSON DIDN’T DIE, BUT THEY ALSO WEREN’T MARKETED TO BY ALL THE MARKETING... SO THAT’S SORT OF WHY THE FOOTPRINT OF CDS SHRUNK. IT WASN’T TO ASSAULT WHAT THEY WANTED, BECAUSE THEY WERE COMING IN [AND] BUYING SPECIFIC THINGS, OR COMING UP AND ORDERING SPECIFIC TITLES THAT THEY’VE ALREADY PUT THEIR RESEARCH INTO. THEY WANT THIS TOKEN OF WHAT THEY LIKE (WHICH IS THE PHYSICAL CD). AND ANYTIME THAT ANY AFFRONT HAPPENED TO CDS, THEY TOOK IT SO PERSONALLY…" AS THE SALE OF CDS DECREASED WITH THE ADVENT OF DIGITAL CONTENT AND STREAMING SERVICES, FRIZZLEY NOTED THAT SOME POSITIVES EMERGED. HE SAID, “THE POSITIVES ARE THAT BARRIERS ARE BROKEN DOWN. YOU KNOW THE FACT THAT BANDCAMP IS HUGE; THAT LITERALLY ANYBODY CAN MAKE MUSIC, AND CAN MAKE IT AVAILABLE IS SO COOL. YOU’VE GOT SHAWN MENDES RIGHT NOW, WHO IS VINE FAMOUS... [MEANING], ‘I MAKE SHORT VIDEO CLIPS OF ME SINGING SONGS AND THAT’S GOING TO LEAD INTO THIS MASSIVE CAREER.' THAT’S SURREAL… [AND] I THINK IT LETS PEOPLE FEEL MORE CONNECTED TO THEIR MUSIC... IT CHANGES THE WAY THAT PEOPLE SORT OF PERCEIVE THEIR CONNECTION TO IT. PEOPLE LOVE THE IDEA OF BEING A PART OF SOMETHING...” FRIZZLEY WENT ON TO DISCUSS THE SHIFT IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY, “I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT THERE’S MORE POSITIVES THAN THAT, BUT I REALLY THINK THE MUSIC INDUSTRY MADE A SYSTEM THAT IS NOT GOING TO BE FINANCIALLY VIABLE FOR A LOT OF MUSICIANS. IF YOU LOOK AT STREAMING, - WHICH IS GREAT - [BUT] I DON'T THINK PEOPLE REALIZE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SPOTIFY AND NETFLIX. WHEN YOU DO NETFLIX, IT’S MOVIES THAT HAVE ALREADY HAD THEIR THEATRE RUN; ALREADY MADE THEIR BILLIONS OF DOLLARS; ALREADY HAD A CHANCE TO BE SOLD, WHETHER DIGITALLY OR PHYSICALLY, AND THEN FINALLY END UP ON NETFLIX. SPOTIFY [IS LIKE], ‘HEY, IT’S $10.00 A MONTH AND HERE’S ALL THE MUSIC FOREVER.’ SPOTIFY ROYALTIES AREN’T ENOUGH. EVERYONE KNOWS THEY’RE NOT ENOUGH, BUT I THINK PEOPLE HAVE IN THEIR HEADS THAT ALL THE MUSIC FOREVER IS WORTH $10.00 A MONTH… MUSIC HAS NO VALUE ANYMORE. LIVE MUSIC DOES AND THE PHYSICAL TOKENS DO, AND THAT’S WHY VINYL IS SEEING THIS RESURGENCE, BUT MUSIC HAS NO VALUE. AND I THINK PART OF THAT [IS] BECAUSE OF THE RADIO, [WHICH IS] SORT OF HOW MUSIC HAPPENED; HOW WE’VE LISTENED TO MUSIC. SO RADIO HAPPENS, AND YOU CAN LISTEN TO RADIO FOR FREE, BUT YOU STILL HAVE TO BUY THE RECORDS. AND IT WORKED. BUT NOW WE STILL HAVE THIS IDEA THAT ‘WELL, THE TECHNOLOGY EXISTS FOR ME TO BE ABLE TO LISTEN TO THE RADIO, AND CHOOSE WHAT I LISTEN TO ON THE RADIO... SO I SHOULD BE ABLE TO CHOOSE WHAT I LISTEN TO, BUT I STILL WANT THAT PREMISE OF FREE MUSIC’… I DON’T KNOW HOW THE WORLD IS ABLE TO FINANCIALLY COMPENSATE YOU FOR MAKING YOUR MUSIC, AND I DON’T KNOW IF IT NECESSARILY NEEDS TO. ART WILL ALWAYS EXIST REGARDLESS WHETHER OR NOT THERE’S PEOPLE PAYING FOR IT. BUT IT DOESN’T CHANGE THE FACT THAT WHEN YOU ARE ABLE TO COMPENSATE PEOPLE, THEY CAN FOCUS ON THEIR ART FULL TIME, [AND] YOU END UP WITH JUST BETTER QUALITY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ARTICLES REGARDING THE RECEIVERSHIP AND LIQUIDATION OF HMV CANADA.
Catalogue Number
P20170004002
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"AC/DC", "HIGHWAY TO HELL"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20170004003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"AC/DC", "HIGHWAY TO HELL"
Date
2003
Materials
PLASTIC, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
1
Length
14
Width
12.6
Description
COMPACT MUSIC DISC. THE CD CASE IS MADE FROM CARDBOARD AND PLASTIC THAT IS UNOPENED, COVERED IN CELLOPHANE WRAPPER. THE COVER INCLUDES A PHOTO OF THE BAND AND SAYS “AC/DC” , “HIGHWAY TO HELL”. ON TOP OF THE CELLOPHANE IN A HMV SALE STICKER THAT READS “HMV 2/20…”. THERE IS A SECOND STICKER ON THE FRONT THAT IS BLACK AND SAYS, “DIGITALLY REMASTERED”. THE BACK COVER HAS A BLACK AND WHITE PICTURE OF THE BAND AND LISTS TEN TRACK TITLES. THE LABEL INCLUDES “1979, 2003…” “9699-80206”. EXCELLENT CONDITION. HOLES IN CELLOPHANE ON THE BACKSIDE AND THE BLACK STICKER IS LIFTING.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
IN THE EARLY MONTHS OF 2017 THE MUSIC FRANCHISE, HMV CANADA, BEGAN TO THE PROCESS OF CLOSING DOWN ALL 120 OF THEIR STORES ACROSS CANADA. AFTER 30 YEARS OF BUSINESS, THE COMPANY WENT INTO RECEIVERSHIP. PARK PLACE MALL IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE HAD AN HMV LOCATION OF ITS OWN, WHICH OPENED IN 1994. THIS AC/DC CD IS INDICATIVE OF A TYPE OF CD SOLD BY HMV. AC/DC IS A POPULAR ROCK BAND THAT FORMED IN THE 1970S IN AUSTRALIA. THE ALBUM, HIGHWAY TO HELL, WAS RELEASED IN 1979 AND WAS THE FIFTH AC/DC ALBUM TO BE RELEASED INTERNATIONALLY. ON 27 FEBRUARY 2017, IN AN INTERVIEW WITH COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, THE MANAGER OF THE HMV LETHBRIDGE, BRENDAN FRIZZLEY, REFLECTED ON HIS PAST EXPERIENCE AT THE MUSIC STORE, THE SIGNIFICANCE OF MUSIC STORES, AND ON THE RECEIVERSHIP PERIOD. FOR MORE INFORMATION OF THAT PERIOD, AS WELL AS FRIZZLEY’S RELATIONSHIP WITH THE STORE, PLEASE SEE P20170004001. DURING THE INTERVIEW, FRIZZLEY REFLECTED ON THE NATURE OF PEOPLES’ RELATIONSHIPS WITH MUSIC STORES. HE EXPLAINED, “… IT’S THE STRANGEST SORT OF STORE BECAUSE IF YOU WENT INTO A GROCERY STORE AND THEY HAD EXPANDED THEIR ORGANIC SECTION YOU WOULDN’T BE OFFENDED… [BUT] WITH MUSIC STORES, IT DOESN’T MATTER IF YOU’RE A 16-YEAR-OLD LISTENING TO PUNK MUSIC, OR A EARLY-20’S METAL GUY, OR AN OLD PERSON LISTENING TO THE GENRE CLASSICAL... THERE’S THIS FEELING THAT WHENEVER ANYTHING IS ASSAULTED, IN TERMS OF MUSIC, LIKE, 'HEY, THE METAL SECTION WENT FROM LIKE 8 FEET OF SPACE TO 12 FEET OF SPACE." WE DIDN’T ACTUALLY ADD ANY PRODUCT, BUT THE METAL GUYS WILL BE ECSTATIC, BECAUSE CLEARLY WE HAD DONE THIS THING THAT HAD MADE IT BETTER. WE CARED ABOUT THEM… AND SIMILARLY, WHEN THE PUNK GUYS LOST THAT SPACE AND WENT FROM 8 FEET OF SPACE TO 4 FEET OF SPACE, THEY WERE LIKE 'YOU KNOW, YOU GUYS JUST DON’T HAVE THE SAME SORT OF SELECTION YOU USED TO.' BUT IT’S THE PERCEPTION OF [HOW MUCH PEOPLE CARE ABOUT THEIR MUSIC] AND THAT’S ALWAYS SORT OF BEEN IT... YOU KNOW, PEOPLE ARE OFFENDED BY MUSIC THAT THAT THEY DON’T LIKE BEING IN A STORE. THE AMOUNT OF TIMES I CAN REMEMBER A NEW JUSTIN BIEBER COMING OUT, AND GOING UP TO THE FRONT OF THE STORE, AND BEING LIKE 'WELL WHAT’S GOING ON HERE?' AND SOMEONE HAD TAKEN MY ENTIRE IRON MAIDEN SECTION AND PUT IT IN FRONT OF EACH JUSTIN BIEBER CD. I CAN’T FATHOM ANYBODY BEING INVESTED IN ANY SORT OF OTHER PURCHASE WHERE THEY WOULD BE LIKE 'THIS SORT OF THING OFFENDS ME...' I CAN’T IMAGINE FEELING THAT WAY ABOUT A PARTICULAR BRAND OF KETCHUP OR A PARTICULAR CAR, OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT…" SPEAKING ABOUT THE TYPICAL HMV SHOPPER FRIZZLEY SAID, "THERE’S THIS NARRATIVE THAT PEOPLE WANT TO [BE] THE OLD, DYING CD BUYER... THERE’S ALWAYS PEOPLE WHO COME IN, AND SAY THINGS LIKE, 'OH, I JUST DON’T DO THE DIGITAL,' - [BUT ALSO] 'OH, I HAVE A CD PLAYER IN MY TRUCK, SO THAT’S THE ONLY REASON I’M BUYING CD’S TODAY,' AND THAT’S ALWAYS BEEN A SUBSECTION OF WHAT WE SELL TO - BUT, I THINK THE MAJORITY OF PEOPLE JUST WANT TO HAVE THAT PHYSICAL CONNECTION WITH THE THING THAT THEY LIKE. AND THAT [TYPE OF] PERSON DIDN’T DIE, BUT THEY ALSO WEREN’T MARKETED TO BY ALL THE MARKETING... SO THAT’S SORT OF WHY THE FOOTPRINT OF CDS SHRUNK. IT WASN’T TO ASSAULT WHAT THEY WANTED, BECAUSE THEY WERE COMING IN [AND] BUYING SPECIFIC THINGS, OR COMING UP AND ORDERING SPECIFIC TITLES THAT THEY’VE ALREADY PUT THEIR RESEARCH INTO. THEY WANT THIS TOKEN OF WHAT THEY LIKE (WHICH IS THE PHYSICAL CD). AND ANYTIME THAT ANY AFFRONT HAPPENED TO CDS, THEY TOOK IT SO PERSONALLY…" AS THE SALE OF CDS DECREASED WITH THE ADVENT OF DIGITAL CONTENT AND STREAMING SERVICES, FRIZZLEY NOTED THAT SOME POSITIVES EMERGED. HE SAID, “THE POSITIVES ARE THAT BARRIERS ARE BROKEN DOWN. YOU KNOW THE FACT THAT BANDCAMP IS HUGE; THAT LITERALLY ANYBODY CAN MAKE MUSIC, AND CAN MAKE IT AVAILABLE IS SO COOL. YOU’VE GOT SHAWN MENDES RIGHT NOW, WHO IS VINE FAMOUS... [MEANING], ‘I MAKE SHORT VIDEO CLIPS OF ME SINGING SONGS AND THAT’S GOING TO LEAD INTO THIS MASSIVE CAREER.' THAT’S SURREAL… [AND] I THINK IT LETS PEOPLE FEEL MORE CONNECTED TO THEIR MUSIC... IT CHANGES THE WAY THAT PEOPLE SORT OF PERCEIVE THEIR CONNECTION TO IT. PEOPLE LOVE THE IDEA OF BEING A PART OF SOMETHING...” FRIZZLEY WENT ON TO DISCUSS THE SHIFT IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY, “I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT THERE’S MORE POSITIVES THAN THAT, BUT I REALLY THINK THE MUSIC INDUSTRY MADE A SYSTEM THAT IS NOT GOING TO BE FINANCIALLY VIABLE FOR A LOT OF MUSICIANS. IF YOU LOOK AT STREAMING, - WHICH IS GREAT - [BUT] I DON'T THINK PEOPLE REALIZE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SPOTIFY AND NETFLIX. WHEN YOU DO NETFLIX, IT’S MOVIES THAT HAVE ALREADY HAD THEIR THEATRE RUN; ALREADY MADE THEIR BILLIONS OF DOLLARS; ALREADY HAD A CHANCE TO BE SOLD, WHETHER DIGITALLY OR PHYSICALLY, AND THEN FINALLY END UP ON NETFLIX. SPOTIFY [IS LIKE], ‘HEY, IT’S $10.00 A MONTH AND HERE’S ALL THE MUSIC FOREVER.’ SPOTIFY ROYALTIES AREN’T ENOUGH. EVERYONE KNOWS THEY’RE NOT ENOUGH, BUT I THINK PEOPLE HAVE IN THEIR HEADS THAT ALL THE MUSIC FOREVER IS WORTH $10.00 A MONTH… MUSIC HAS NO VALUE ANYMORE. LIVE MUSIC DOES AND THE PHYSICAL TOKENS DO, AND THAT’S WHY VINYL IS SEEING THIS RESURGENCE, BUT MUSIC HAS NO VALUE. AND I THINK PART OF THAT [IS] BECAUSE OF THE RADIO, [WHICH IS] SORT OF HOW MUSIC HAPPENED; HOW WE’VE LISTENED TO MUSIC. SO RADIO HAPPENS, AND YOU CAN LISTEN TO RADIO FOR FREE, BUT YOU STILL HAVE TO BUY THE RECORDS. AND IT WORKED. BUT NOW WE STILL HAVE THIS IDEA THAT ‘WELL, THE TECHNOLOGY EXISTS FOR ME TO BE ABLE TO LISTEN TO THE RADIO, AND CHOOSE WHAT I LISTEN TO ON THE RADIO... SO I SHOULD BE ABLE TO CHOOSE WHAT I LISTEN TO, BUT I STILL WANT THAT PREMISE OF FREE MUSIC’… I DON’T KNOW HOW THE WORLD IS ABLE TO FINANCIALLY COMPENSATE YOU FOR MAKING YOUR MUSIC, AND I DON’T KNOW IF IT NECESSARILY NEEDS TO. ART WILL ALWAYS EXIST REGARDLESS WHETHER OR NOT THERE’S PEOPLE PAYING FOR IT. BUT IT DOESN’T CHANGE THE FACT THAT WHEN YOU ARE ABLE TO COMPENSATE PEOPLE, THEY CAN FOCUS ON THEIR ART FULL TIME, [AND] YOU END UP WITH JUST BETTER QUALITY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ARTICLES REGARDING THE RECEIVERSHIP AND LIQUIDATION OF HMV CANADA.
Catalogue Number
P20170004003
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1961
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, STONE, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20150016002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1961
Materials
METAL, STONE, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Diameter
12.5
Description
AWARD TROPHY, “ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING CJLH-TV LETHBRIDGE, ALTA. 1960-61”. CAST METAL PEBBLED, LAUREL LEAF BASE, FINISHED IN GOLD. PEDESTAL CONSTRUCTED OF WOOD AND POLISHED STONE. GREEN FELT BOTTOM. VERY GOOD CONDITION. GOLD FINISH SCUFFED IN SOME AREAS WITH SOME SCRATCHES ON THE BASE AND DUST BUILD UP. MINOR LOSS TO THE BLACK PAINT AROUND THE BASE AND SLIGHT WEAR TO THE FELT BOTTOM.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
PROFESSIONS
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY AND THE COUNTRY CAPERS - TO WHOM THE TROPHY WAS AWARDED IN 1961. EVERAL MET JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE CAME TO SUPINA’S TO WORK. SHE REMEMBERS: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.” THIS TROPHY IS REPRESENTATIVE OF JOE HORHOZER’S TIME AS PART OF THE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE COUNTRY CAPERS. PRIOR TO THAT, HE WAS A PART OF THE MUSICAL GROUP, THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN 1937 AND HAD SEEN SUCCESS ON BOTH THE LOCAL AND NATIONAL LEVELS. AROUND 1955, THE GROUP HAD SLOWED DOWN FROM THEIR TOURING SCHEDULE, AS A RESULT HORHOZER AND A FELLOW BAND MEMBER, REMO BACEDA, WERE ABLE TO JOIN A GROUP FORMING IN LETHBRIDGE THAT CAME TO BE THE 'COUNTRY CAPERS.' THIS GROUP CONSISTED OF THE POTTS FAMILY ON VOCALS, EDDIE, BETTY (WAGGONTAIL), AND TWINS SHIRLEY ANN (PETRAK) AND SHARON (SCOVILLE), AS WELL AS DONN PETRAL ON VOCALS AND GUITAR, HERB URANO ON BASS, REMO BACEDA ON FIDDLE, AND HORHOZER WITH HIS ACCORDION. HORHOZER SAYS OF THAT TIME, “WELL, THE POTTS ALWAYS SIGNED TOGETHER. THERE WERE THREE SISTERS AND THEN EDDIE, THE BROTHER, AND THEY WERE VERY GOOD SINGERS, BUT THEY WANTED SOMEBODY THAT WAS PROFESSIONAL TO KIND OF TEACH THEM HOW TO SING IN HARMONY. REMO WAS GOOD AT THAT ‘CAUSE HE WAS THE HEAD OF A CHOIR AND [KNEW] HOW TO DO GROUP MUSIC, ‘CAUSE [THE POTTS] WERE GREEN. THEY DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING. THEN THEY WOULD PRACTICE AND PRACTICE TOGETHER, AND THEN DONN PETRAK, I GUESS, GOT THE RADIO STATION TO HIRE THEM. THEY’VE GOT TO -THEY’VE GOT TO HEAR YOU PLAY FIRST, SO THEY HAD THIS BAND CALLED THE COUNTRY CAPERS AND THEY ALL PLAYED TOGETHER FOR QUITE A LONG TIME ON THE RADIO. I THINK THEY WERE ON THE RADIO FOR MAYBE TWO YEARS OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT – CJOC.” HORHOZER’S DAUGHTER, MELODEE “MEL” MUTCH, WHO WAS ALSO IN THE ROOM FOR THE INTERVIEWS WITH MACLEAN, ADDED, “… IT WAS A TELEVISION SHOW. THAT’S WHAT THEY WERE KNOWN FOR.” ON MARCH 1, 1998, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD’S “THE WAY WE WERE” COLUMN FEATURED A HISTORY OF THE COUNTRY CAPERS WRITTEN BY GARRY ALLISON. THIS ARTICLE STATES, “THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE FEATURED ON CJOC RADIO WITH THEIR OWN SHOW AND ON CJLH-TV FOR FIVE YEARS. THEY ALSO TRAVELED TO CALGARY EACH WEEK FOR A CROSS-CANADA RADIO SHOW ON CBC IN 1958. THEIR LOCALLY-PRODUCED TV SHOW WAS SHOWN EACH TUESDAY NIGHT AT FIRST, THEN LATER ON THURSDAY NIGHT.” CJLH-TV WON SEVEN LIBERTY MAGAZINE AWARDS IN TOTAL DURING THE 1950S AND 1960S. THESE AWARDS INCLUDED THE 1960 – 1961 AWARD FOR BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING, WHICH THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE A PART OF, AND IN 1962 THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE PRESENTED WITH THE AWARD FOR BEST STATION MUSIC SHOW. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT [THE TROPHY], EXCEPT THIS IS WHEN THEY PLAYED ON TV, THEY ALWAYS GIVE AN AWARD FOR THE BEST MUSICAL BAND ON TV OR SOMETHING. THAT’S WHEN THEY GOT THAT." FOR AN ARTICLE WRITTEN ABOUT JOE HORHOZER IN 2002 FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, JOE STATED, “[MUSIC’S] MY LIFE – OUTSIDE OF MY FAMILY. [WITHOUT IT], I’D BE LOST.” MUTCH REAFFIRMS HER FATHER’S STATEMENT BY SAYING, “… HIS HANDS WERE ALWAYS TAPPING. HE WAS ALWAYS TAPPING. YOU COULD SEE THAT IN HIS HEAD. PLUS HE HELD DOWN A FULL TIME JOB. AND WHEN THEY NEEDED ENTERTAINMENT – LIKE GARY KIRK. GOSH, IT’S GOT TO BE 50 YEARS AGO, SAID TO MY DAD AND BUCK, 'WOULD YOU COME DOWN TO PLAY AT THIS CABIN?' – LONG LOST RANCH, OR WHEREVER THEY WERE HAVING A FAMILY REUNION – SO THEY WERE THE ENTERTAINMENT. HE WAS … SOUGHT-AFTER, LET’S PUT IT THAT WAY. AND WHEN HE WOULD PLAY MUSIC UNTIL YOU’D WANT TO THROW UP. HE’D COME HOME FROM A DANCE; POUR HIMSELF ANOTHER ONE; AND THEN THE RECORDS WOULD START TO COME OUT. THAT IS HOW THE NIGHT WENT. I’D EVEN COME HOME SOME NIGHTS AND MY MOM AND DAD WOULD BE DANCING. WHEN YOU ARE A TEENAGER, THAT’S HORRIFIC. SO, THERE IS THE HENDERSON LAKE HOTEL, WHATEVER – THE DANCE HALL. THAT WAS VERY MUCH A PART OF THEIR LIVES AS WELL.” JOE HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON OCTOBER 21, 2010 AT THE AGE OF 89 YEARS. HORHOZER WAS THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE COUNTRY CAPERS, THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS, AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016002
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"RED DAWN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180029001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"RED DAWN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
104
Width
68.8
Description
POSTER WITH IMAGE ON FRONT OF PURPLE AND BLUE SKY WITH SUNRISE AND PARATROOPERS DESCENDING OVER TOWN SURROUNDED BY MOUNTAINS AT BOTTOM EDGE. POSTER HAS WHITE BORDERS; POSTER HAS WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON IMAGE “IN OUR TIME NO FOREIGN ARMY HAS EVER OCCUPIED AMERICAN SOIL. UNTIL NOW” AND RED PRINTED TEXT BELOW WITH RUSSIAN SYLLABICS OVER “RED DAWN”; POSTER HAS WHITE CREDITS ALONG BOTTOM EDGE, “A VALKYRIE FILM A SIDNEY BECKERMAN PRODUCTION RED DAWN…” WITH LISTING OF CAST AND CREW MEMBERS. LOWER LEFT CORNER OF IMAGE HAS TEXT WARNING “PG-13, PARENTS ARE STRONGLY CAUTIONED TO GIVE SPECIAL GUIDANCE FOR ATTENDANCE OF CHILDREN UNDER 13, SOME MATERIAL MAY BE INAPPROPRIATE FOR YOUNG CHILDREN”, AND TEXT BESIDE “[COPYRIgHT SYMBOL” 1984 UNITED ARTISTS CORPORATION”; LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF IMAGE HAS LOGO “METRO GOLDWYN MAYER UNITED ARTISTS, DIAMOND JUBILEE, SIXTY YEARS OF GREAT ENTERTAINMENT”; POSTER HAS TEXT ALONG LOWER BORDER “PROPERTY OF NATIONAL SCREEN CORPORATION LICENSED FOR USE ONLY IN CONNECTION WITH THE EXHIBITION OF THIS PICTURE AT THE THEATRE LICENSING THIS MATERIAL. LICENSEE AGREES NOT TO TRADE, SELL OR GIVE IT AWAY, OR PERMIT OTHERS TO USE IT, NOR SHALL LICENSEE BE ENTITLED TO ANY CREDIT UPON RETURN OF THIS MATERIAL. THIS MATERIAL EITHER MUST BE RETURNED OR DESTROYED IMMEDIATELY AFTER USE. LITHO. IN U.S.A., RED DAWN 840077”. BACK OF POSTER HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN RED INK IN LOWER LEFT CORNER “KEVIN MCLEAN $2.00” AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE INK “RED DAWN”. POSTER HAS TEARS AT RIGHT AND LEFT EDGES, AND LOWER EDGE; FRONT IS CREASED; BACK OF CORNERS HAS LOSS FROM REMOVAL OF ADHESIVES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
LEISURE
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIeWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS DONATED BY MACLEAN REFLECTED HIS LIFE AND IDENTITY THROUGH HIS TIME IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE “RED DAWN” FILM POSTER, MACLEAN ELABORATED, “THE POSTER [WAS] UP [IN MY ROOM].” “[IN] THE 1980S, AS A KID, AND I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS JUST ME ‘CAUSE I WAS A NEWS JUNKIE, THE COLD WAR WAS A BIG DEAL IN THE EARLY ‘80S. THERE WERE SHOWS ON TV THAT WERE SCARING THE CRAP OUT OF ME. THERE WAS ONE CALLED "THE DAY AFTER" AND THAT WAS IN ’83. THEN IN 1984 THIS MOVIE COMES OUT WHICH IS CALLED RED DAWN WHICH IS, AGAIN, ABOUT RUSSIAN COMMUNIST INVASIONS OF NORTH AMERICA. IT’S A SMALL TOWN THAT ALL THESE TROOPS DROP INTO. TO SAY THE LEAST, I WAS SEMI-OBSESSED WITH THE SUBJECT MATTER.” “IF YOU WATCHED "THE DAY AFTER"…ON ONE HAND, THAT KIND OF SUBJECT MATTER CAN FEEL FOREIGN AND ABSTRACT AND NOT RELEVANT. BUT, IF AT THE SAME TIME YOU’RE A KID, AND YOUR PARENTS ARE WATCHING THE NEWS EVERY NIGHT, AND YOU HAVE AN INTEREST IN WHAT’S GOING ON—A LOT OF KIDS DON’T CARE BUT FOR SOME REASON, I WAS VERY INTERESTED. THEN YOU THOUGHT, “NO, THIS IS A VERY REAL PROSPECT. THIS COULD ACTUALLY HAPPEN.” I WAS TERRIFIED ABOUT IT. BUT, AT THE SAME TIME, I WAS ALSO ATTRACTED TO IT, LIKE A FLAME. IT WAS…ROCKETS…I DON’T KNOW WHAT IT WAS BUT I WAS ACTIVELY INTERESTED IN [THEM]. THEN AT SOME POINT, THAT PIVOTED, WHICH IS WHEN I KNOW I WAS LOOKING AT THE SOLDIER OF FORTUNE MAGAZINES AND THEN I STARTED BUYING COMIC BOOKS…WORLD WAR TWO COMIC BOOKS.” “WE DIDN’T HAVE MUCH TV OUT IN PICTURE BUTTE. [OTHER PEOPLE] PROBABLY HAD LOTS OF CHANNELS IN LETHBRIDGE. ONE CHANNEL WE DID HAVE—I THINK WE ONLY HAD THREE—WAS CBC. I REMEMBER [MY PARENTS] WATCHING THE NATIONAL. I THINK [THERE] WAS [A SHOW] CALLED THE JOURNAL WITH BARBARA FRUM [THAT MY PARENTS] WOULD WATCH AT TEN O’CLOCK EVERY SINGLE NIGHT. I WOULD SNEAK OUT OF MY ROOM AND HIDE BEHIND THE COUCH, AND [THE COLD WAR IS] ON THE NEWS EVERY SINGLE NIGHT.” “IN TERMS OF [THE COLD WAR] MANIFESTING ITSELF LOCALLY…I THINK TRUDEAU’S IN POWER, AND THERE’S A WHOLE DEBATE ABOUT CANADA HAVING NUKES IN THIS COUNTRY. ULTIMATELY, IT DIDN’T HAPPEN. BUT, THE U.S. WAS TESTING CRUISE MISSILES IN ALBERTA, AND NOT FAR FROM MY FRIEND’S HOUSE OUT NEAR PICTURE BUTTE, WHEN THE TALK OF A CRUISE MISSILE BEING TESTED IN ALBERTA WAS IN THE NEWS, ACTIVELY, PEOPLE WERE UNHAPPY AND PROTESTING. A BUNCH OF TRACTOR TRAILERS PULLED UP ON THE TOP OF A HILL, TWO MILES AWAY FROM [MY FRIEND’S] HOUSE, WITH U.S. LICENSE PLATES. OTHERWISE, THEY WERE TOTALLY UNMARKED. THEY BUILT THIS RADAR INSTALLATION UP ON THE TOP OF THE HILL, WHERE IT REMAINED…FOR THREE DAYS OR [SO]…AND THEN IT ALL DISAPPEARED.” “I CAN’T SAY THAT I KNOW FOR A FACT THAT IT WAS RELATED TO CRUISE MISSILE TESTING.” “GENERALLY TO SAY…WITH THESE [OBJECTS] I CAN DRAW A BIT OF A LINE FROM MY HAVING POSSESSED THEM ALL THE WAY, IN SOME FORM…THEY WOULD HAVE HAD AN IMPACT ON [MY] IDENTITY AND WHO I THINK I AM TODAY. I DON’T VALUE THEM BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE UTILITY AND THEY DON’T HAVE PRACTICAL VALUE. I DON’T LOOK AT THEM ALL THE TIME, BUT I KNOW THAT THEY HAVE SOME IMPORTANCE LIFE-WISE.” “IN SCHOOL, THERE WAS A GAME THAT WE WERE PLAYING. THIS IS AT A TIME WHEN THERE’S ONE COMPUTER FOR THE ENTIRE SCHOOL. IT WAS AN APPLE…AND IT WAS A WW2-BASED GAME. MY INTEREST, INITIALLY, WAS IN CONTEMPORARY-TYPE STUFF. THEN WE’RE PLAYING THIS GAME WHICH I’M NOT REALLY–IT’S ABSTRACT TO ME. WE’RE JUST PLAYING THIS GAME AND THEN, BECAUSE I’M INTO THIS, I’M BUYING MAGAZINES CALLED SOLDIER OF FORTUNE, AND I CAN REMEMBER FLIPPING THROUGH THE PAGES OF [THE] PROXY WAR IN AFGHANISTAN. [THE RUSSIANS] HAD GONE INTO AFGHANISTAN, AND I SAW A WW2 PICTURE AND I CONNECTED IT TO THIS GAME AND I [THOUGHT], “OH, THIS IS A REAL THING.” THEN, ALL OF A SUDDEN, THIS CONTEMPORARY STUFF IS OF LESSER INTEREST AND THEN IT BECOMES MORE SECOND WORLD WAR INTEREST AFTER THAT.” “MAYBE I STILL AM [THAT PERSON] TODAY A BIT…IN DIFFERENT RESPECTS. [THE OBJECTS] TAKE UP SOME SPACE BUT I COULDN’T LET THEM GO BECAUSE THEY’RE SYMBOLS, IN A WAY. THEY’RE ONLY THAT BECAUSE OF WHAT IS IN MY HEAD, SO I THOUGHT AT SOME POINT IT WAS GOOD TO [DONATE THEM]…IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MAYBE EASIER TO LET SOME OF THIS STUFF GO.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029001
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CASSETTE TAPE
Date Range From
1985
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20180029005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CASSETTE TAPE
Date Range From
1985
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PLASTIC, PAPER
No. Pieces
3
Height
1.7
Length
11
Width
7
Description
A. CASSETTE TAPE CASE, 11 CM LONG X 7 CM WIDE X 1.7 CM TALL. CLEAR PLASTIC RECTANGULAR CASE WITH TWO PLASTIC PRONGS INSIDE. CASE FRONT HAS EMBOSSED STAMP IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER “TDK, MADE IN JAPAN”. RIGHT SIDE HAS INDENT FOR OPENING; CASE IS HINGED ON LEFT SIDE. CASE IS SCRATCHED AND SCUFFED, WITH BLACK STAINING ON FRONT, BACK, AND LEFT SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CASSETTE TAPE, 10 CM LONG X 6.4 CM WIDE X 0.7 CM TALL. TAPE IS BLACK PLASTIC WITH TWO HOLES THROUGH CASSETTE; TAPE HAS CLEAR PLASTIC WINDOW BETWEEN HOLES SHOWING TAPE INSIDE; BOTTOM EDGE OF TAPE HAS FIVE SQUARE OPENINGS SHOWING BROWN TAPE. TAPE HAS WHITE TEXT ON FRONT AND BACK; FRONT TEXT “AC DC * BACK IN BLACK, HELLS BELLS/SHOOT TO THRILL/, WHAT DO YOU DO FOR MONEY HONEY, GIVE THE DOG A BONE/LET ME PUT MY LOVE IN YOU, CP 1, DOLBY SYSTEM, XCS 16018, ATLANTIC”, LOWER LABEL HAS WHITE TEXT BILUNGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] “MANUFACTURED & DISTRIBUTED BY WEA MUSIC OF CANADA LTD., 810 BIRCHMOUNT RD SCARBOROUGH ONTARIO, A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY”. TOP EDGE OF TAPE HAS EMBOSSED TEXT “MADE IN CANADA”. BACK OF TAPE HAS WHITE TEXT “AC DC * BACK IN BLACK, BACK IN BLACK/YOU SHOOK ME ALL NIGHT LONG, HAVE A DRINK ON ME, SHAKE A LEG/ROCK AND ROLL AIN’T NOISE POLLUTION, CP 2, DOLBY SYSTEM, XCS 16018, ATLANTIC”, LOWER LABEL HAS WHITE TEXT BILINGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] “MANUFACTURED & DISTRIBUTED BY WEA MUSIC OF CANADA LTD., 810 BIRCHMOUNT RD SCARBOROUGH ONTARIO, A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY”. TEXT ON TAPE IS WORN AND FADED; LOWER EDGE OF TAPE IS SCUFFED AND STAINED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. PAPER INSERT FOR CASSETTE TAPE, 10.3 CM LONG X 6.6 CM WIDE X 1.4 CM TALL. PAPER BOOKLET WITH BLACK COVER AND WHITE TEXT; FRONT OF COVER HAS TEXT “AC DC, BACK IN BLACK, ATLANTIC, SUPER CASSETTE”; SIDE OF COVER HAS TEXT “AC/DC, BACK IN BLACK, DOLBY SYSTEM, XCS-16018, SUPER CASSETTE”; BACK OF COVER HAS TEXT INCLUDING TRACK LIST FOR “SIDE ONE/SIDE TWO” AND PHOTOGRAPH OF MAN PLAYING GUITAR, TEXT BELOW PHOTOGRAPH “1980 LEIDSPELEIN PRESSE B.V., UNAUTHORIZED REPRODUCTION OF THIS RECORDING IS PROHIBITED BY LAW AND SUBJECT TO CRIMINAL PROSECUTION”, TEXT BELOW IS BILINGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] “MANUFACTURED & DISTRIBUTED BY, WEA MUSIC OF CANADA LTD., 1810 BIRCHMOUNT RD. SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO, A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY”. INSIDE OF COVER WHITE WITH BLACK TEXT “ALL SONGS WRITTEN BY YOUNG, YOUNG AND JOHNSON, PRODUCED BY ROBERT JOHN “MUTT” LANGE, ENGINEERED BY TONY PLATT, ASSISTANT ENGINEERS: JACK NEWBER, BENJI ARMBRISTER, RECORDED AT COMPASS POINT STUDIOS, APRIL-MAY 1980, MIXING ENGINEER: BRAD SAMUELSON, ART DIRECTION: BOB DEFRIN, PHOTOS: ROBERT ELLIS”, WITH “THANKS” BELOW, TEXT BELOW “FOR MORE INFORMATION ON AC/DC’S FAN CLUB AND MERCHANDISING, PLEASE SEND A SELF-ADDRESSED ENVELOPE TO: AC/DC FAN CLUB, 18 WATSON CLOSE, BURY ST. EDMUNDS, SUFFOLK ENGLAND, ALBERT PRODUCTIONS”. BACK INSIDE INCLUDES TEXT ON “NEW LEVELS OF EXCELLENCE” IN ENGLISH AND FRENCH. BACK OF BOOKLET HAS TWO HOLES PUNCHED THROUGH; COVER IS WORN AND FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIEWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. ON THE CASSETTE TAPE, MACLEAN ELABORATED, “I WOULD THINK IT’S…IN THE WINTER OF GRADE 10 THAT I FOUND AC/DC AND THE SONG WAS, “FOR THOSE ABOUT TO ROCK”. I REMEMBER LISTENING TO IT WITH A BUDDY IN KALISPELL AND PLAYING ARCADE GAMES IN THE HOTEL AND THINKING, “OH, MY GOD, THIS IS THE COOLEST.”” “[BECAUSE] I’M A CATHOLIC KID…WE WERE PRETTY INNOCENT KIDS, AND [LISTENING TO BANDS LIKE AC/DC AND IRON MAIDEN] WOULD BE LIKE, “OH, I’M NOT GONNA GO THERE.” IT’S JUST TOO GRAPHIC…I THOUGHT IT DIDN’T REPRESENT ANYTHING GOOD. AC/DC CAME FIRST [FOR ME].” “THE OTHER THING THAT ATTRACTED ME TO AC/DC…THIS IS 1985, SO PART OF [MY INTEREST] IS THAT THEY’RE QUITE BLUE COLLAR…THE GLAM-ROCK THING…NEVER DID AS MUCH FOR ME. BUT THESE GUYS LOOK LIKE ORDINARY, WORKING-CLASS GUYS WHICH…IN TERMS OF WANTING TO FIT IN AND NOT HAVE A LOOK THAT STANDS OUT THEN, THERE WAS SOME APPEAL TO THESE GUYS, TOO.” “THIS, “BACK IN BLACK”, I’M CARRYING IN MY JEAN JACKET IN THE LEFT BREAST POCKET. WHEN I GO TO PARTIES, EVERY SINGLE WEEKEND, I HAD THIS TAPE BECAUSE IF PEOPLE DIDN’T HAVE “BACK IN BLACK” IN THEIR HOUSE, THEN I HAD IT. THEY COULD PLAY IT WHILE WE WERE PARTYING.” MACLEAN RECALLED HIS INTEREST IN MUSIC IN THE 1980S, NOTING, “[MY] DAD LISTENED TO COUNTRY MUSIC, CHARLEY PRIDE AND WILLIE NELSON, WHICH I WASN’T REALLY GETTING ANYTHING OUT OF. MY MOM, THOUGH, HAS ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN CONTEMPORARY STUFF, WHATEVER THAT WORLD MIGHT BE. SHE IS THE ONE IN THE FAMILY WHO’S PROBABLY BUYING MOST OF THE RECORDS AND WHO IS LISTENING TO MUSIC LOTS, IN THE HOUSEHOLD. SHE DID JAZZERCISE STUFF SO SHE TAUGHT CLASSES. THERE’S LOTS OF VINYL IN THE HOUSE WHEN I’M GROWING UP. AT SOME POINT IN TIME, I DON’T KNOW HOW IT HAPPENED, BUT THERE WAS A RECORD PLAYER THAT WENT INTO MY BEDROOM AND INITIALLY, [BECAUSE] IT’S PROBABLY THE ONLY TIME I LISTENED TO VINYL, IT WAS MOM AND DAD’S KENNY ROGERS RECORD. I THINK I LIKED IT [BECAUSE] I COULD SING TO IT.” “IN ABOUT 1983, I WOULD HAVE AN ALLOWANCE. I START BUYING MUSIC AND THAT’S ALL I WANTED MONEY FOR; TO BUY MUSIC AND TO BUY A TAPE BACK THEN BECAUSE TAPES [WERE] COMPETING WITH VINYL RECORDS. WHERE I HAVE FRIENDS WHO ARE YOUNGER THAN ME OR WHO ARE THE SAME AGE AS ME WHO ARE BUYING VINYL, IT’S GENERALLY, I WOULD SAY, BECAUSE THEY HAVE SIBLINGS WHO ARE ALSO BUYING VINYL. THEY’RE DOING THE RECORD PLAYER THING BUT I WENT RIGHT TO CASSETTE.” “WHEN I FIRST STARTED BUYING MUSIC, THE FIRST [CASSETTE] I BOUGHT WAS MICHAEL JACKSON “THRILLER”; THAT WAS THE FIRST ONE. ALMOST AT THE EXACT SAME TIME, I BOUGHT DURAN DURAN “RIO” AND I THINK MY THIRD TAPE WAS EDDY GRANT; IT WAS A SONG CALLED “ELECTRIC AVENUE”. WHEN I’M BUYING MUSIC, I’M COMING INTO LETHBRIDGE. I REMEMBER THERE WAS A MUSIC STORE—THERE [WAS] NO PARK PLACE MALL—IN THE LETHBRIDGE CENTRE MALL.” “MY COUSIN, WHO’S LIVING WITH US—REG—IS SIX YEARS OLDER THAN ME. HE [HAS] A TAPE CASE BEFORE I BUY MY FIRST TAPE CASE. HIS MUSIC IS PREDOMINANTLY CANADIAN ROCK FROM THE EARLY ‘80S. SO, BANDS THAT WERE ALL COMING OUT AT THE SAME TIME LIKE STREETHEART, TORONTO, CHILLIWACK, HEADPINS, PRISM, THE STUFF THAT RON SAKAMOTO, THE PROMOTER, WAS BRINGING INTO THE SPORTSPLEX. BUT I WAS NOT INTERESTED IN ROCK. I WANTED POP MUSIC AND I REMEMBER SHARING MY LOVE OF MY POP MUSIC WITH MY FRIENDS. I REMEMBER WHEN I GOT DURAN DURAN “RIO”, I WOULD CALL UP MY FRIEND ON THE ROTARY DIAL PHONE AND WITH MY VIKING CASSETTE RECORDER/TAPE PLAYER PUSH ‘PLAY’ AND HOLD THE RECEIVER OVER SO THAT HE COULD HEAR THIS MUSIC THAT I WAS SO EXCITED TO SHARE.” “WHEN I BUY, WHEN I TELL MY NEIGHBOUR FRIEND, [I ASK], “IS THIS OKAY? IS THIS A GOOD ONE?” AND THE ONE TIME, I REMEMBER HIM GOING, “YEAH, THAT’S A GOOD CHOICE.” IT WAS A BAND CALLED, THE TUBES. THAT WOULD BE GRADE 8 AND PROBABLY INTO GRADE 9 AND MY TAPE CASE WOULD BE FULL OF STUFF THAT WOULD BE POP, DURAN DURAN AND MICHAEL JACKSON.” “[IN] GRADE 9, RIGHT BEFORE HIGH SCHOOL, I FIND TWISTED SISTER…THIS WOULD BE BY THE SUMMER OF ’84. [THEIR] VIDEO WAS GETTING TO BE A BIG DEAL…THERE WAS, “WE’RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT” WHICH IS REBELLION FROM YOUR PARENTS AND THE DAD IS LIKE A DRILL SERGEANT. THEN [THE KIDS] ALL TURN INTO TWISTED SISTER. I LOVED THIS TAPE. I PLAYED IT OVER AND OVER AGAIN. [IT WAS] MY FIRST ROCK TAPE AND IT WAS LIFE-CHANGING BECAUSE THEN, ALL THIS POP THAT HAD BEEN IN MY TAPE CASE…I SOLD TO JACK PEACOCK BY GRADE 10. I GOT RID OF ALL MY POP, SO WHERE THAT POP HAD BEEN DEFINING…ALL OF A SUDDEN IT’S LIKE, “I’M NOT THAT, ANYMORE.” IT WAS LIKE A LIGHT SWITCH WENT ON…IN GRADE 10.” “I WAS WEARING A JEAN JACKET IN GRADE 11…WHICH IS ABOUT AS MUCH AS, IN TERMS OF ME AND MY DRESS, HOW I’M REFLECTING [MY IDENTITY]. THIS IS A BIG DEAL BECAUSE WHERE MAYBE YOU DON’T WANT, IN YOUR OWN PARTICULAR DRESS, TO BE WEARING CAMOUFLAGE, YOU COULD THEN OPEN UP A TAPE CASE AND, BY PEOPLE SEEING WHAT’S IN YOUR TAPE CASE, THAT IS SPEAKING TO WHO YOU ARE.” “LISTENING TO MUSIC HASN’T NECESSARILY BEEN CONSISTENT BECAUSE THERE WERE YEARS WHEN WE WERE [AT HOME] THAT WE DIDN’T HAVE A STEREO SYSTEM BECAUSE IT JUST DIDN’T FEEL LIKE IT WAS THE RIGHT THING TO DO AT THE TIME. I WOULD HAVE BEEN LISTENING TO [TAPES] MORE IN MY VEHICLE. WHEN WE GOT OUR…SYSTEM BACK, THEN ALL OF A SUDDEN I’M LISTENING TO IT A LOT, AGAIN. BUT, THERE’S NO QUESTION, IT’S BEEN A MAINSTAY.” “MAYBE IT’S BECAUSE MY EYES ARE SO CRAPPY, [I ASK] IF YOU HAD TO CHOOSE BETWEEN YOUR EYESIGHT AND YOUR HEARING, WHAT WOULD YOU CHOOSE? DO I REALLY WANT TO LOSE MY HEARING? I WANT MONEY TO BUY MUSIC. THAT’S ALL I WANT MONEY FOR. NOTHING ELSE…THE FUNNY PART WITH THAT, TOO, THAT I LEARNED WAS THAT YOU NEVER WANTED TO BUY TOO MUCH MUSIC AT THE SAME TIME. IF YOU DID, YOU DIDN’T LISTEN TO A TAPE AS INTENSELY BECAUSE YOU HAD TWO OR THREE TAPES, SO YOU WOULDN’T APPRECIATE THEM EQUALLY. I LEARNED EARLY, YOU SHOULD ONLY BUY ONE RECORD OR ONE TAPE AT A TIME AND LISTEN TO IT OVER AND OVER AND OVER AGAIN.” “I SWITCHED OVER TO CD’S IN THE SUMMER OF ’89. MY TAPE LISTENING WOULD BE A VERY SHORT TIME. TAPES DON’T LAST VERY LONG. CASSETTE TAPES DON’T LAST. WHEN YOU THINK OF CD’S, WHICH YOU CAN STILL GO AND BUY AND THEY WERE BEING SOLD BY, AT LEAST LOCALLY, FOR SURE, BY 1987, AND THEY’RE STILL BEING SOLD, CASSETTE TAPES [DIDN’T LAST LONG]. FOR ME, [I’M BUYING CASSETTE TAPES FROM] ’83 TO ’88. SIX YEARS.” “IT’S FUNNY, BECAUSE [MY TAPE CASE] WOULD HAVE BEEN FULL AND, FOR SOME REASON, I CHOSE TO GET RID OF THE OTHER TAPES. PROBABLY BECAUSE I WASN’T LISTENING TO THEM AND I THOUGHT, ‘OH, I CAN TAKE THEM TO A USED PLACE,’ BUT I SHOULDN’T HAVE DONE THAT. I SHOULD HAVE ACTUALLY KEPT IT FULL. I WISH I HAD [BECAUSE] I HAD ALL THE AC/DC’S. BUT YOU CAN TELL BY WHAT I KEPT, I OBVIOUSLY KNEW THAT THIS WAS A REALLY IMPORTANT TAPE; TWISTED SISTER [AND] “BACK IN BLACK”. THOSE ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT…” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029005
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 1.