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(set) films: Canada winter games, 1975

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions91106
Date Range
1975
Material Type
Recording
Accession No.
19790145002
Physical Description
3 16mm black and white nd color film on reels.
Scope and Content
.1 - synchronized swimming event at stan siwik pool. .2 - jeux Canada games opening at sportsplex - LCI band and figure skating. 3 - winter games events at sportsplex. Color film.
Material Type
Recording
Date Range
1975
Physical Description
3 16mm black and white nd color film on reels.
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Local.
Scope and Content
.1 - synchronized swimming event at stan siwik pool.
.2 - jeux Canada games opening at sportsplex - LCI band and figure skating.
3 - winter games events at sportsplex. Color film.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19790145002
Collection
Archive
Less detail

film: postal workers strike in Lethbridge, RCMP

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions91107
Date Range
1970-1979
Material Type
Recording
Accession No.
19790199000
Scope and Content
16mm black and white film on 3 5/8 reel. Views of the Post Office building, workers on strike, 5th St & 2 Ave South, RCMP building
Material Type
Recording
Date Range
1970-1979
Physical Condition
Good
History / Biographical
Local.
Scope and Content
16mm black and white film on 3 5/8 reel. Views of the Post Office building, workers on strike, 5th St & 2 Ave South, RCMP building
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19790199000
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Other Name
"THE DISEASES OF CHILDREN"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, LINEN
Catalogue Number
P20140049001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"THE DISEASES OF CHILDREN"
Date
1908
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, LINEN
No. Pieces
1
Height
27.6
Length
20.5
Width
5.5
Description
A GREEN, HARD-COVERED BOOK WITH GOLD TEXT ON THE SPINE. THE TEXT READS “PFAUNDLER AND SCHLOSSMANN”, “THE DISEASES OF CHILDREN”, “SHAW AND LAFETRA”, “VOL. IV. GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM NERVOUS SYSTEM DERMATOLOGY”, “J.B.LIPPINCOTT CO.”. STAMPED ON THE TOP AND BOTTOM PAGES OF THE BOOK ARE THE WORDS “GALT HOSPITAL”. THE INSIDE IS INSCRIBED "J.E. LOVERING M.D." IN PENCIL. VERY GOOD CONDITION: THE COVER IS FADED AND SCRATCHED IN PLACES, WHILE LIGHTLY FRAYED AT THE EDGES AND CORNERS.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. NO INFORMATION WAS PROVIDED ABOUT THIS BOOK. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049001
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"PRINCIPALS AND PRACTICE OF OBSTETRICS"
Date Range From
1938
Date Range To
1939
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, LINEN
Catalogue Number
P20140049002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"PRINCIPALS AND PRACTICE OF OBSTETRICS"
Date Range From
1938
Date Range To
1939
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, LINEN
No. Pieces
1
Height
26
Length
19
Width
6
Description
A GREEN HARD COVERED BOOK WITH GOLD TEXT ON THE SPINE. THE TEXT READS “PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF OBSTETRICS”, “DE LEE”, “SEVENTH EDITION”, “SAUNDERS”. IN ADDITION TO THIS THERE IS A WHITE WRITTEN “440”. STAMPED ON THE TOP AND BOTTOM PAGES OF THE BOOK ARE THE WORDS “GALT HOSPITAL”, AND STAMPED ON ALL THREE SIDES OF THE PAGES ARE THE WORDS “GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING”. "REFERENCE FOR NURSES OCTOBER 5 1939" INSCRIBED ON INSIDE IN PENCIL. VERY GOOD CONDITION: THE COVER IS FADED AND WORN AT THE EDGES.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. NO INFORMATION WAS PROVIDED ABOUT THIS BOOK. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049002
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SPORTS SHIRT "GALT ROYALS"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1964
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, PAINT, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140049005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SPORTS SHIRT "GALT ROYALS"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1964
Materials
FABRIC, PAINT, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
62
Length
68
Width
48
Description
A GREEN BASKETBALL T-SHIRT WITH WHITE TRIMMING AND WHITE PAINTED NUMBERS AND TEXT. THE FRONT OF THE SHIRT READS “55” AND “GALT ROYALS”. THE BACK READS “55”. THE WHITE TRIMMING FOLLOWS THE BOTTOM EDGE, THE SLEEVE EDGES AND THE COLLAR. THE COLLAR OPENS WITH A METAL ZIPPER, ENDING IN A SMALL SILVER CHAIN. A SMALL WHITE TAG IN THE BACK OF THE COLLAR READS “12” IN RED. EXCELLENT CONDITION: THE COLLAR IS CREASED ON ONE CORNER.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
SPORTS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS SHIRT WAS A PART OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BASKETBALL UNIFORM. WHILE THE SPECIFIC DATE OF THIS ARTIFACT IS UNKNOWN, IT WOULD HAVE MOST LIKELY BEEN IN USE EARLIER THAT 1965, AS THE NURSING SCHOOL HAD GALT ROYAL UNIFORMS IN THAT YEAR THAT WERE DIFFERENT TO THIS ONE. THE UNIFORM WOULD HAVE BEEN USED BY “STUDENTS WHO WERE ON THE TEAM. BETWEEN 1965-68 ST. MICHAEL STUDENTS WERE [ON THE] TEAM ALSO.” ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY ATTACHED TO THIS ARTIFACT, SPORTS ACTIVITIES FOR THE STUDENTS WERE AN IMPORTANT PART OF THEIR LIVES DURING TRAINING. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049005
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20140049006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING"
Date
1979
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
8.5
Length
12
Diameter
8.9
Description
A CREAM-COLOURED CERAMIC MUG. ON ONE SIDE IS THE INSIGNIA OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING, WHICH IS COLOURED YELLOW, GREEN, AND RED. IN THE CENTER OF THE INSIGNIA IS A RED CROSS. THE TEXT READS “GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING, LETHBRIDGE ALTA”, “FESTINA LENTE”, AND “1910-1979”. AROUND THE LIP OF THE MUG RUNS A GOLD RING. THE BOTTOM OF THE MUG READS “DECORATED IN CANADA BY …EMORE CHINA & GLASS” AND “CREEMORE, ONT”. VERY GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT WEAR TO GOLD RIM.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
COMMEMORATIVE
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY, “THIS IS A COFFEE CUP COMMEMORATING THE CLOSING OF THE NURSING SCHOOL. THE ALUMNAE PURCHASED THEM AND SOLD THEM… [THE MUGS] WERE DESIGNED AND MADE IN 1979.” IT CONTINUES, “[THE] GALT GRADS BOUGHT THESE MUGS… [AS] A MEMENTO OF THE CLOSING OF THE SCHOOL.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049006
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TRACHEOTOME SET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1988
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CLOTH, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140049007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TRACHEOTOME SET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1988
Materials
CLOTH, METAL
No. Pieces
6
Height
16.2
Length
57.5
Width
0.5
Description
1: GREEN FABRIC CASE, EDGED WITH BEIGE FABRIC. DIVIDED INTO THREE POUCHES SEWED IN WITH BEIGE THREAD. TWO BEIGE FABRIC STRAPS ATTACHED TO ROLL AND TIE THE FABRIC CASE. A WHITE LABEL IS SEWN ON, READING IN GREEN TEXT “ SIERRA – SHELDEN”, “TRACHEOTOME CATALOG NO. 175-00”, AND “SIERRA ENGINEERING CO. SIERRA MADRE. CALIF.” 2: THE OBTURATOR THAT MATCHES THE LARGE TRACEOSTOMY TUBE. CURVED METAL WIRE WITH A METAL BOBBLE AT ONE END AND A METAL HANDLE AT THE OTHER END WITH A “7” ETCHED ON THE END. L: 11 CM, D: 1.5 CM 3: THE OBTURATOR THAT MATCHES THE SMALLER TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE. CURVED METAL WIRE WITH A METAL BOBBLE AT ONE END THAT EXPANDS INTO A SHARP CURVE BLADE WITH A BLUNTED TIP. A SMALL CIRCULAR BEAD OF METAL SITS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE WIRE AND AT THE OTHER END OF THE WIRE IS A CYLINDRICAL HANDLE WITH KNURLING TEXTURE. THE END OF THE HANDLE READS “ SIERRA ENG. CO CAT. NO. 287-00” AND “PATENT PEND”. METAL BOBBLE IS MISSING SOME OF ITS PATINA. L: 11 CM, D: 1.6 CM 4: A HOLLOW NEEDLE HEAD WITH A SMALL HANDLE WITH KNURLING TEXTURE. ETCHED INTO THE END OF THE HANDLE THE TEXT READS “287 SIERRA”. H: 6.1 CM, D: 1.7 CM 5: THE LARGE TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE MADE UP OF THREE PIECES; THE OUTER CANNULA, THE INNER CANNULA AND THE FLANGE. THE CANNULA’S SIT TOGETHER, THE INNER LOCKED IN WITH A ROTATING LATCH, BOTH CURVED AND HOLLOW TUBES. THE FLANGE SITS AT THE END OF THE CANNULAS, A METAL PLATE WITH TWO RECTANGULAR HOLES AND CURVING LIP. H: 2.5 CM, L: 10 CM, W: 4 CM 6: THE SMALL TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE MADE UP OF TWO PIECES; THE CANNULA, AND THE FLANGE. THE CANNULA IS A CURVED HOLLOW TUBE ATTACHED AT ONE END TO THE FLANGE, A METAL PLATE WITH TWO RECTANGULAR HOLES AND A CURVING LIP. H: 2.5 CM, L: 6.5 CM, W: 3.8 CM
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS IS A TRACHEOTOMY SET THAT WAS USED IN DURING SURGERY, IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, AND IN THE EMERGENCY ROOM. BOTH DOCTORS AND NURSES WOULD HAVE USED THIS ARTIFACT DURING THE PROCEDURE OF TRACHEOTOMY, WHICH CREATES A DIRECT AIRWAY IN THROUGH AN INCISION IN THE TRACHEA (WINDPIPE). WHEN ANSWERING THE QUESTION OF THE ARTIFACT’S IMPORTANCE, THE INDIVIDUAL WRITING THE HISTORY STATED, “TRACHEOTOMIES HAVE BEEN LIFE-SAVERS EVEN TO THIS DAY.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049007
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1946
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, METAL, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20140049008
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1946
Materials
GLASS, METAL, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.3
Diameter
8
Description
A CIRCULAR, BUNSEN BURNER (ALSO REFERED TO AS AN ALCOHOL BURNER) WITH A RUSTED, TARNISHED WICK HOLDER AND A WHITE, COTTON WICK HANGING DOWN INTO THE BOTTLE. EMBOSSED INTO THE BOTTOM OF THE GLASS ARE THE WORDS “MADE IN USA”. GOOD CONDITION: THE METAL CAP IS SEVERELY TARNISHED. SMALL FLAKES OF RUST SIT LOOSE IN THE BOTTLE.
Subjects
CHEMICAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS IS A GLASS BUNSEN BURNER. IT WAS USED “IN THE GSN SCIENCE LAB AND IN THE HOSPITAL LAB. THEY WERE USED ON THE WARDS IN THE EARLY DAYS TO HEAT UP SOLUTION TO DISSOLVE MEDICATION.” ACCORDING TO THE ARTIFACT’S HISTORY THIS ARTIFACT WAS USED IN “1943-1946. BY 1965, WE DID NOT USE THEM FOR DISSOLVING MEDICATION.” THE BUNSEN BURNER WAS USED BY REGISTERED NURSES AND STUDENTS. THIS ARTIFACT “WAS NECESSARY AND ROUTINELY USED EVERY DAY IN THE HOSPITAL.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049008
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SKIN THERMOMETER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1988
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, FABRIC, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20140049009
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SKIN THERMOMETER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1988
Materials
WOOD, FABRIC, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
4
Height
3.1
Diameter
8.3
Description
1: WOOD CASING LID WRAPPED IN BROWN, CHERRY FAUX LEATHER FABRIC. THE TOP HAS A STRIPE OF CREAM CLOTH TAPE, LIFTING AT ONE CORNER AND WRITTEN ON IT IN BLUE PEN IS, “CSR SKIN THERMOMETER”. THE INSIDE OF THE LID IS PADDED AT THE TOP WITH GREY FABRIC. THE FAUX LEATHER IS FRAYING AWAY AT THE EDGES AND LIFTING AT THE SEAM AT THE SIDE OF THE LID, REVEALING THE WOOD UNDERNEATH. 2: A CIRCULAR SLIP OF CREAM PAPER TITLED “CORRECTING TABLE”. THE REST IS TYPED IN BLACK INK. HANDWRITTEN BLUE INK ADDITIONS FILL IN THE INSTRUMENT NUMBER AS “3878” AS WELL AS FILLING ADDITIONS TO THE CORRECTION CHART. THE SLIGHTEST WRINKLING LEAVES TWO SMALL CREASES ON THE SURFACE. DIAMETER: 6.3 CM 3: THE SKIN THERMOMETER. IT IS CIRCULAR IN A BLACK PLASTIC CASING WITH A SINGLE HALF CIRCLE PLASTIC WINDOW TO THE DIAL ON THE TOP SIDE. THE DIAL READS “FOREGGER”, “FAHRENHEIT HEIDENWOLF AUSTRIA”, AND “PATENT 3878”. THE BOTTOM SIDE HAS A 1.1 CM HIGH, 2.3 CM DIAMETER CYLINDRICAL ARM ON WHICH A ROUND SENSOR SITS. THE SENSOR IS MISSING ALMOST ALL ITS PATINA, ONLY A LITTLE BIT SURVIVING AT THE EDGES. H: 3.8 CM, D: 7 CM 4: THE BOTTOM OF THE CASE. AN OPEN WOOD CYLINDER WRAPPED ON THE OUTSIDE WITH FAUX LEATHER FABRIC WITH GREY FELT ON THE INSIDE. THE INSIDE LIP (ON WHICH THE THERMOMETER SITS) DOES NOT WRAP AROUND COMPLETELY, LEAVING SPACE FOR THE SENSOR ARM. THE BOTTOM EDGE IS UNCOVERED. THE FAUX LEATHER IS FRAYING AT THE EDGES AND PULLING AWAY FROM THE SEAM ON THE SIDE. H: 3.1 CM, D: 8.3 CM
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS SKIN THERMOMETER WAS USED IN THE OPERATING ROOM FROM 1955 TO 1988. ACCORDING TO ITS HISTORY, “OPERATING ROOM STAFF [USED THE THERMOMETER] TO ASSESS THE TEMPERATURE OF THE PATIENTS.” THIS ARTIFACT SHOWS “HOW THINGS HAVE ADVANCED. THEY USE SKIN TAPES NOW THAT ARE THERMOMETERS.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049009
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20140049010
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
1921
Materials
GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
9.1
Diameter
4.5
Description
A GLASS CONICAL SHAPED MEASURING CUP WITH A POURING LIP. ETCHED INTO THE GLASS IS A MEASURING GAGE FOR VOLUME. “PHARMACY 1921” IS HANDWRITTEN ON THE BOTTOM OF THE GLASS IN GREEN INK. GOOD / VERY GOOD CONDITION: HARDENED ADHESIVE FROM A REMOVED STRIP OF TAPE STAINS THE GLASS. SLIGHT SCRATCHING/SCUFFING OF SURFACE.
Subjects
CHEMICAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS IS A SMALL GLASS BEAKER THAT WAS USED TO MEASURE FLUID MEDICATIONS. IT WAS USED IN THE “PHARMACY AND MED ROOMS TO MIX MEDICATIONS.” ACCORDING TO HISTORY, THIS ARTIFACT WAS USED FROM 1945 TO THE 1960S. “NURSES USED THIS INSTRUMENT TO MEASURE MEDICATIONS IN C.C.’S [CUBIC CENTIMETERS].” OF THIS ARTIFACT, IT WAS WRITTEN, “THIS SHOWS HOW THINGS HAVE PROGRESSED FROM GLASS TO PLASTIC. IT WAS ESSENTIAL TO GIVE MEDICATIONS.” THE WRITING ON THE BASE OF THE BEAKER LINKS THIS ARTIFACT TO THE PHARMACY IN 1921. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049010
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"HIRSCHE"
Date Range From
1913
Date Range To
1935
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20140049011
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"HIRSCHE"
Date Range From
1913
Date Range To
1935
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
44.5
Width
17.2
Description
A WHITE CLOTH, STARCHED NURSING CAP. THE BACK EDGE IS STAMPED WITH BLACK INK, READING “E1040” AND BELOW THAT “HIRSCHE” . THE WHITE STRING TIES AND THE OPENING ATTACHMENT THEY PULL THROUGH IS FRAYING. VERY GOOD CONDITION: THE HEAVILY STARCHED FRONT FOLD IS CREASED WITH FOLD LINES.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. ACCORDING TO THIS NURSING CAP’S HISTORY, IT WOULD HAVE BEEN OF THE FIRST TYPES OF CAPS THAT THE STUDENT NURSES WOULD HAVE WORN. IT WAS WORN “ON THE WARDS” OF THE HOSPITAL FROM 1913 ONWARDS TO AN UNSPECIFIED DATE. THE INSIDE OF THE CAP IS LABELLED “HIRSCHE”. USING THE GSN HISTORY BOOK TITLED “WHITE CAPS AND RED ROSES” RECORDS ONE STUDENT FROM THE CLASS OF 1966 WITH THE MAIDEN NAME HIRSCHE AND THREE STUDENTS FROM CLASSES 1968 TO 1975 MARRIED MEN WITH THE HIRSCHE LAST NAME. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. ON 12 JULY 2018, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK MET WITH THREE MEMBERS OF GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNI ASSOCIATION – SHARON DEJONG, DONNA KARL, AND SUE KYLLO – TO ESTABLISH FURTHER DETAILS ABOUT VARIOUS ARTIFACTS IN THIS WAVE OF GSN ACQUISITIONS. WHEN VIEWING THE CAP, KYLLO, KARL, AND DEJONG STATED THAT ALL STUDENTS HAD TO WRITE THEIR NAMES IN THEIR UNIFORMS – LIKE “HIRSCHE” IS LABELLED IN THIS CAP – BECAUSE THE UNIFORMS, INCLUDING CAPS, WOULD BE SENT TO THE LAUNDRY AND RETURNED BACK TO THE STUDENTS. ABOUT NURSING CAPS, THE THREE ALUMNI EXPLAINED THAT THEY ALWAYS WORE WHITE CAPS AS STUDENTS. UPON GRADUATION THEY RECEIVED A VELVET BLACK BAND THEY WOULD PIN ON THE CAPS FOR WORK AS GRADUATED NURSES. THIS WAS ONE OF THE INDICATORS USED TO IDENTIFY THE STUDENT NURSES VERSUS THE GRADUATED NURSES. THEY STATED THAT IN THEIR FIRST TWO YEARS OF SCHOOL, THEY WOULD WERE BLACK SHOES AND STOCKINGS (A PRACTICE THAT ENDED IN 1968) AND AFTER THAT THEY WOULD WEAR WHITE SHOES WITH WHITE STOCKINGS TO INDICATE SENIOR NURSES. THESE VARIANCES IN THE STUDENT UNIFORMS HAD IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR EXPERIENCES ON THE FLOOR. FOR EXAMPLE, THERE WAS ONE DOCTOR WHO HAD A STRICT RULE AGAINST STUDENT NURSES SCRUBBING IN FOR HIS OPERATIONS. THEY AGREED THAT THIS WAS AN EARLY EXAMPLE OF A NURSE’S CAP, USED FROM ESTIMATE DATES OF 1913 TO 1935. REFERENCING THE GSN HISTORY BOOK, “WHITE CAPS…,” THERE IS NO RECORD OF A STUDENT WITH THIS LAST NAME IN THE SPECULATED TIME PERIOD. AS AN ANSWER TO THIS, KYLLO ADDED TO THE CAP’S WRITTEN NOTES, “THIS HAT COULD HAVE BEEN A GALT HOSPITAL STAFF MEMBER AND MAY BE NOT A GALT HAT.” IT CAN ALSO BE NOTED THAT AN ACTIVE MEMBER OF THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION INVOLVED IN THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS OF THE DONATION OF ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM WAS SHARON HIRSCHE (NEE TREIBER) OF THE CLASS OF 1968. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049011
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HAIR COMB
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CORAL
Catalogue Number
P20160042002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HAIR COMB
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Materials
CORAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
10
Width
3.4
Description
STRAIGHT-EDGED COMB. AMBER-COLOURED, TRANSLUCENT MATERIAL SPECULATED CORAL BY DONOR. THE HANDLE EDGE IS CURVED AND THE COMB'S LENGTH TAPERS INWARD FROM THE HANDLE EDGE TO TEETH EDGE. TEETH WIDTH APPROX. 0.2 - 0.5 CM. THERE IS A 1.1 CM WIDE EDGE BETWEEN TEETH AND EDGE OF COMB ON EITHER SIDE. CONDITION: SMALL CHIP ON SIDE EDGE AND SLIGHT LOSS OF FINISH ON TEETH.
Subjects
TOILET ARTICLE
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THIS COMB CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK ALONG WITH THE COMB WERE HER MOTHER’S HAIR ORNAMENTS AND A VASE (P20160042001 & 003-004). MRS. NISHIYAMA REMEMBERED, “[MY MOTHER] EXPLAINED TO ME THAT SHE’D KEPT THESE BECAUSE THEY WERE HERS – GIVEN TO HER BY HER PARENTS – AND SHE WANTED ME TO SORT OF TAKE CARE OF THEM… [THEY WERE] NOT ANYTHING TO USE AROUND HERE, ANYWAY, SO WE JUST THOUGHT THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL, AND, ONCE IN A WHILE, WE GET TO SEE IT.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE REMEMBERED HER MOTHER USING THE COMB AND HAIR ACCESSORIES, MRS. NISHIYAMA STATED, “NO. BY THE TIME SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE REALIZED THERE’S NO DRESSING UP OR NOTHING. YOU KNOW THE HAIRDOS – THE FANCY HAIRDOS THAT THEY HAD IN JAPAN - THEY WERE LONG GONE, SO THEY JUST WENT BY. I KNOW SHE BRAIDED HER HAIR AND WORE A BUN ON THE BACK OF HER HEAD, FOR YEARS AND YEARS, BEFORE SHE CUT IT SHORT. SO, I JUST REMEMBERED A LITTLE TREASURE THAT SHE HAD IN THE DRAWER… IT WAS IN A SPECIAL SPOT IN THE DRESSER, AND WE ONLY GOT TO SEE IT ONCE IN A WHILE. IT WAS SPECIAL. IT WAS HER TREASURES THAT SHE KEPT.” MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THAT HER MOTHER PROBABLY DID NOT USE THE COMB ONCE SHE WAS IN ALBERTA. SHE SAID, “I DOUBT [THEY WERE USED]. IT DOESN’T LOOK SERVICEABLE REALLY, BUT IT’S DAYS BEFORE PLASTIC – AND I KNOW SHE TOLD ME IT WAS A SPECIAL MATERIAL. I MEAN, A SPECIAL NATURAL MATERIAL. WHETHER IT’S CORAL, I’M NOT SURE. I CAN’T SAY THAT. SPEAKING OF THE ITEMS’ USE ONCE THEY WERE IN HER POSSESSION, MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID, “[THEY WERE] NOT REALLY [USED]. I THINK I’VE HAD IT OUT WHEN THEY ASKED FOR IT AT JAPANESE GARDENS. I THINK WE HAD SOMETHING ELSE SOMEWHERE, WHERE WE HAD A DISPLAY… I THINK THAT’S THE ONLY TIMES THAT THEY CAME OUT… THIS (THE COMB) WAS SOMETHING THAT WE ONLY GOT TO SEE OCCASIONALLY.” THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042002
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONE
Catalogue Number
P20160042003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONE
No. Pieces
1
Height
16.3
Length
8.5
Description
FAN-SHAPED HAIR ORNAMENT WITH TWO LARGE PRONGS. CREAM-COLOURED WITH BROWN DAPPLING. 5 WHITE TULIP-SHAPED DESIGNS ON FANNED EDGE OF ORNAMENT WITH GREEN RHINESTONES INLAID IN THE WHITE SECTIONS OF DESIGN. TWO THIN LINES ARE ETCHED ON EITHER SIDE OF EACH WHITE TULIP SECTION. CONDITION: DESIGN FADED WITH ONE GREEN RHINESTONE MISSING ON AN INNER TULIP. SLIGHT LOSS OF FINISH ESPECIALLY AT THE WHITE PORTIONS OF DESIGN. SCUFFED SURFACE OVERALL.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THIS HAIR ORNAMENT AND A MATCHING ONE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S COMB AND A VASE ALSO DONATED WITH THE TWO HAIR ORNAMENTS (P20160042001 & 003-004). MRS. NISHIYAMA REMEMBERED, “[MY MOTHER] EXPLAINED TO ME THAT SHE’D KEPT THESE BECAUSE THEY WERE HERS – GIVEN TO HER BY HER PARENTS – AND SHE WANTED ME TO SORT OF TAKE CARE OF THEM… [THEY] CAME WITH HER WHEN SHE GOT MARRIED… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… [THESE] TWO PIECES ARE HER HAIR ORNAMENTS, AND I’M GUESSING THAT THEY ARE BONE… [THEY WERE] NOT ANYTHING TO USE AROUND HERE, ANYWAY, SO WE JUST THOUGHT THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL, AND, ONCE IN A WHILE, WE GET TO SEE IT.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE REMEMBERED HER MOTHER USING THE COMB AND HAIR ACCESSORIES, MRS. NISHIYAMA STATED, “NO. BY THE TIME SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE REALIZED THERE’S NO DRESSING UP OR NOTHING. YOU KNOW THE HAIRDOS – THE FANCY HAIRDOS THAT THEY HAD IN JAPAN - THEY WERE LONG GONE, SO THEY JUST WENT BY. I KNOW SHE BRAIDED HER HAIR AND WORE A BUN ON THE BACK OF HER HEAD, FOR YEARS AND YEARS, BEFORE SHE CUT IT SHORT. SO, I JUST REMEMBERED A LITTLE TREASURE THAT SHE HAD IN THE DRAWER… IT WAS IN A SPECIAL SPOT IN THE DRESSER, AND WE ONLY GOT TO SEE IT ONCE IN A WHILE. IT WAS SPECIAL. IT WAS HER TREASURES THAT SHE KEPT.” SPEAKING OF THE ITEMS’ USE ONCE THEY WERE IN HER POSSESSION, MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID, “[THEY WERE] NOT REALLY [USED]. I THINK I’VE HAD IT OUT WHEN THEY ASKED FOR IT AT JAPANESE GARDENS. I THINK WE HAD SOMETHING ELSE SOMEWHERE, WHERE WE HAD A DISPLAY… I THINK THAT’S THE ONLY TIMES THAT THEY CAME OUT…” THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042003
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONES
Catalogue Number
P20160042004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONES
No. Pieces
1
Length
11
Width
6.5
Description
CROWN-SHAPED HAIR ORNAMENT. SHAPE IS MADE UP OF FOUR TULIP SHAPES. BONE COLOUR IS CREAM WITH BROWN DAPPLING. THE TULIPS ARE WHITE INLAID WITH GREEN RHINESTONES. LEAF-SHAPED DESIGNS ON THE BASE (TWO PER FLOWER) ARE BLACK INLAID WITH PALE BLUE RHINESTONES. FINE LINES ARE ETCHED INTO THE BLACK OF LEAVES AND AROUND THE FLOWER HEADS. CONDITION: DESIGNS ARE SLIGHTLY FADED WITH SLIGHT DIRT ACCUMULATION ON WHITE AREAS OF FLOWERS. TWO GREEN RHINESTONS AND ONE BLUE RHINESTONE MISSING. CLOSING MECHANISM AT BACK IS MISSING. SLIGHT SCUFFS ON OVERALL SURFACE.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THIS HAIR ORNAMENT AND A MATCHING ONE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S COMB AND A VASE ALSO DONATED WITH THE HAIR ORNAMENTS (P20160042001 & 003-004). MRS. NISHIYAMA REMEMBERED, “[MY MOTHER] EXPLAINED TO ME THAT SHE’D KEPT THESE BECAUSE THEY WERE HERS – GIVEN TO HER BY HER PARENTS – AND SHE WANTED ME TO SORT OF TAKE CARE OF THEM… [THEY] CAME WITH HER WHEN SHE GOT MARRIED… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… [THESE] TWO PIECES ARE HER HAIR ORNAMENTS, AND I’M GUESSING THAT THEY ARE BONE… [THEY WERE] NOT ANYTHING TO USE AROUND HERE, ANYWAY, SO WE JUST THOUGHT THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL, AND, ONCE IN A WHILE, WE GET TO SEE IT.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE REMEMBERED HER MOTHER USING THE COMB AND HAIR ACCESSORIES, MRS. NISHIYAMA STATED, “NO. BY THE TIME SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE REALIZED THERE’S NO DRESSING UP OR NOTHING. YOU KNOW THE HAIRDOS – THE FANCY HAIRDOS THAT THEY HAD IN JAPAN - THEY WERE LONG GONE, SO THEY JUST WENT BY. I KNOW SHE BRAIDED HER HAIR AND WORE A BUN ON THE BACK OF HER HEAD, FOR YEARS AND YEARS, BEFORE SHE CUT IT SHORT. SO, I JUST REMEMBERED A LITTLE TREASURE THAT SHE HAD IN THE DRAWER… IT WAS IN A SPECIAL SPOT IN THE DRESSER, AND WE ONLY GOT TO SEE IT ONCE IN A WHILE. IT WAS SPECIAL. IT WAS HER TREASURES THAT SHE KEPT.” SPEAKING OF THE ITEMS’ USE ONCE THEY WERE IN HER POSSESSION, MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID, “[THEY WERE] NOT REALLY [USED]. I THINK I’VE HAD IT OUT WHEN THEY ASKED FOR IT AT JAPANESE GARDENS. I THINK WE HAD SOMETHING ELSE SOMEWHERE, WHERE WE HAD A DISPLAY… I THINK THAT’S THE ONLY TIMES THAT THEY CAME OUT…” THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042004
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PERPETUAL MEMORY TABLET
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160042005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PERPETUAL MEMORY TABLET
Date
1949
Materials
WOOD, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
60.5
Length
12.6
Width
0.6
Description
ONLINE RESEARCH INDICATES THE NAMES FOR THIS TABLET INCLUDE SHIRAKI-IHAI TABLET, MEMORIAL TABLET, OR ANCESTRAL TABLET. THIS TABLET IS MADE UP OF A FINISHED WOODEN BOARD WITH JAPANESE CALLIGRAPHY IN BLACK INK WRITTEN VERTICALLY ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BOARD. HOLE DRILLED THROUGH TOP CENTER OF THE BOARD FOR HANGING. ONE SIDE CONTAINS FOUR VERTICAL ROWS OF CHARACTERS, WHOSE HEIGHT RANGES FROM 1-3 CM. "15" IS MARKED IN PENCIL AT THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER. THE OPPOSING SIDE CONTAINS 2 VERTICAL ROWS OF CHARACTERS WITH A SINGLE CHARACTER AT THE TOP. CHARACTERS ON THIS SIDE RANGE FROM 3 TO 7 CM IN HEIGHT. CONDITION: THE BOARD HAS SLIGHT SCRATCHING AND SOME MISSING VARNISH OVERALL.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
RELIGION
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE BROUGHT [THIS BOARD] FROM RAYMOND AS A MEMORY FOR MAC’S DAD, [KOHEI NISHIYAMA]. IN RAYMOND, AT THE BUDDHIST CHURCH, THERE WAS A YEARLY PERPETUAL MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR ALL THE MEMBERS WHO HAD DIED.” THIS BOARD WAS PART OF THAT SERVICE, MRS. NISHIYAMA CONTINUED, “… [IT] IS LIKE THE DONATION THINGS YOU SEE ON THE WALLS [IN CHURCHES]... [THERE] IS AN OLD JAPANESE CUSTOM TO PUT [THE RECORD OF A MEMORIAL DONATION] ON A BOARD, WITH THE NAME [OF THE DONOR] ON THE BACK, AND WE HONOR THEIR MEMORY EACH YEAR, REGARDLESS OF WHAT YEAR THEY PASSED AWAY. SO WHEN YOUR FAMILY MEMBER DIES, AND YOU WANT TO MAKE SURE THAT THE CHURCH CARRIES ON WITH THE PERPETUAL MEMORY SERVICE, THIS WENT UP AS A SORT OF A RECEIPT… WE HAVE A SPECIAL SERVICE IN DECEMBER ALWAYS… MOST OF THE MEMBERS MAKE A DONATION TOWARDS THAT…" MR. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED FURTHER, “THEY HAD [THE BOARDS] ON THE CHURCH WALL FOR THE PERPETUAL MEMORY.” AFTER THE INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA CLARIFIED THAT MR. NISHIYAMA’S DAD, KOHEI, MADE THE DONATION IN SOMEBODY’S MEMORY IN 1949. IT IS UNKNOWN IN WHOSE MEMORY THIS DONATION WAS MADE. THERE IS JAPANESE CALLIGRAPHY ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BOARD. “IT SAYS HIS DAD CAME FROM NEW WESTMINSTER, SO THIS IS ‘NEW’ ‘WEST’,” MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THE JAPANESE CHARACTERS, “… IT MUST SAY THAT HE CAME FROM THE NEW WESTMINSTER BUDDHIST CHURCH (ON THE SIDE WITH THE WORDS IN LARGER SCRIPT)… HE WAS AN ORIGINAL MEMBER THERE, AND THIS WOULD BE HIS NAME RIGHT THERE – KOHEI NISHIYAMA – [ON THE SIDE WITH SMALLER CHARACTERS].” SHE EXPLAINS FURTHER, “THE DATE IS RIGHT HERE – 1949. 1949, JANUARY IS THE DATE THEY RECEIVED THE DONATION…” THE GALT MUSEUM REACHED OUT TO A TRANSLATOR TO INTERPRET THE BOARD. THE INFORMATION PROVIDED STATES THAT THE SIDE OF THE BOARD WITH FOUR LINES OF CHARACTERS BEGINS WITH “MONEY 400 DOLLARS” AT THE TOP. AT THE BOTTOM THE FIRST LEFT LINE INCLUDES THE DONOR NAME. THE MIDDLE LINE INCLUDES THE NAME OF RAYMOND BUDDHIST TEMPLE AMONG OTHER INFORMATION. THE FAR RIGHT ROW SAYS, “1949 FEBRUARY.” ON THE OPPOSITE SIDE IT INCLUDES “ORGANIZE FUNERAL,” THE NAME OF THE TEMPLE, AND “SHOW RESPECT.” IN RESPONSE TO THE QUESTION OF WHO MADE THE BOARD, MR. NISHIYAMA REPLIED, “I WOULD SAY SOMEBODY… AT THE RAYMOND CHURCH [MADE THE BOARD].” MRS. NISHIYAMA ELABORATED ON THAT: “…I KNOW MAC’S DAD DID A LOT OF THE CALLIGRAPHY BECAUSE HE WAS GOOD AT IT. I’M NOT SURE WHO DID THIS.” THEY EXPLAINED THAT IN THE RAYMOND CHURCH, THESE MEMORIAL DONATION BOARDS WOULD BE DISPLAYED “ON THE WALL OF THE CHURCH, INSIDE [AND] UP HIGHER. BUT WHEN THE CHURCH GOT SOLD, I THINK MOST OF IT WENT INTO THE GARBAGE.” THIS BOARD WAS HANGING ON THE WALL OF THE RAYMOND BUDDHIST CHURCH FROM 1949 TO THE TIME THE CHURCH WAS CLOSED IN 2006. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THE ACT OF REMEMBERING AS IT EXISTS TODAY: “FOR INSTANCE, RIGHT NOW THE TEMPLE DOESN’T KEEP TRACK… THE FAMILY HAS TO REMEMBER. SO THIS COMING SUNDAY IS THE FIRST SUNDAY IN DECEMBER, WE CALL SHOTSUKI HOYO, WHICH IS A MEMORIAL DAY, WHICH IS OBSERVED FIRST OF THE MONTH, EVERY MONTH EXCEPT AUGUST, AND SO TECHNICALLY I WOULD BE AT THE TEMPLE TO ATTEND THE MEMORIAL SERVICE. MY DAD DIED IN DECEMBER…” MR. NISHIYAMA ELABORATED ON THE IMPORTANCE OF REMEMBERING, “YOU MUST REMEMBER. IT’S NOT JUST TO REMEMBER; IT’S OUT OF GRATITUDE THAT’S WHAT’S BEHIND IT. YOU ARE GRATEFUL NO MATTER HOW MANY YEARS AGO. HERE WE ARE TODAY BECAUSE OF [THE PEOPLE WHO CAME BEFORE]… IT’S TO SAY, ‘THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU’…NONE OF THE CHURCHES DO THIS ANYMORE… IF YOU MAKE A DONATION, THAT’S THAT. IT GOES TO THE TEMPLE, AND THAT’S IT, AND IT’S FORGOTTEN” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID, “BUT RAYMOND USED TO DO THE PERPETUAL MEMORY SERVICE EVERY YEAR IN DECEMBER, AND IT WAS JUST PART OF THE ROUTINE THAT WE EXPECTED…IT’S TO KEEP THE MEMORY ALIVE. IT’S JUST A PART OF OUR CULTURE.” MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THAT OUT OF ALL THE ITEMS THEY COLLECTED FROM THE RAYMOND BUDDHIST CHURCH, THIS MEMORIAL DONATION BOARD HOLDS THE MOST PERSONAL IMPORTANCE: “WHEN YOUR NAME’S ON SOMETHING, WELL, THAT’S MINE, OR OURS.” SPEAKING OF THE CHURCH’S CLOSURE, MRS. NISHIYAMA REMEMBERED, “IT WAS VERY EMOTIONAL. I TELL YOU. I HAVE… A FULL CD OF THE LAST DAY OF THE CHURCH, AND IT WAS LIKE A FUNERAL. WHEN ALL THE SHRINE… WAS DONE – EVERYTHING WAS LOADED ON THE FLAT DECK… AND GOING DOWN THE HIGHWAY, AND WE ALL HAD TEARS IN OUR EYES.: “THIS IS ALL HAPPENING,” MR. NISHIYAMA SAID ABOUT WITNESSING THE CHURCH'S CLOSURE, “IT’S BECAUSE WE LIVE SO LONG [AND WERE ABLE TO SEE IT CLOSE]. WE’RE HEALTHY. IF WE [WERE] GONE 20 YEARS AGO, IT WOULD HAVE ALL BEEN DONE [WITHOUT US SEEING]. WE WOULDN’T HAVE ALL [THESE MEMORIES]. BUT HERE WE ARE. WE HAVE TO BE GRATEFUL EVEN FOR THE ACHES AND PAINS OF OLD AGE. WE’RE HERE.” MRS. NISHIYAMA FINISHED BY SAYING, "FOR ME, IT’S A VALUABLE MEMORY – BOTH CHURCH AND DAD – AND ALL THE WORK – AND HIS DAD - BEAUTIFUL CALLIGRAPHY. SOME OF THE OTHER BOARDS, HE DID THE WRITING ON IT.” A FAMILY HISTORY WAS SUBMITTED TO THE BOOK “NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS” (PUBLISHED 2001) BY MAC AND REYKO NISHIYAMA. ACCORDING TO THAT HISTORY MAC’S FATHER, KOHEI NISHIYAMA, WAS BORN IN KUMAMOTO-KEN, JAPAN ON 10 MAY 1895. HE CAME TO CANADA IN 1915 AND SETTLED IN SAPPERTON, BRITISH COLUMBIA. HE “WORKED FOR THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY FOR 29 YEARS BEFORE BEING EVACUATED FIRST TO A ROAD CAMP AND LATER TO THE TASHME RELOCATION CAMP. IN 1946, AFTER THE WAR ENDED, HE AND HIS FAMILY MOVED TO WELLING, ALBERTA TO WORK ON THE FLOYD WILDE FARM.” THE BOOK CONTINUES: “HE MARRIED HIDE MURAKAMI IN 1918. HIDE WAS ALSO BORN IN KUMAMOTO-KEN, JAPAN ON 16 SEPTEMBER 1898. THEY RAISED A FAMILY OF TWO BOYS AND THREE GIRLS: KAORU BETTY, JACK NOBORU, FUMI ROCY, MAKIO (MAC), AND MAY MISAO…” “AFTER RAISING SUGAR BEETS FOR SEVERAL YEARS WITH HIS FAMILY, KOHEI AND HIDE RETIRED TO THE TOWN OF RAYMOND… KOHEI… AND HIDE WERE BOTH VERY ACTIVE MEMBERS OF THE RAYMOND BUDDHIST CHURCH,” IT STATES IN THE BOOK. AS STATED IN THE BOOK, HIDE PASSED AWAY IN 1968 AND KOHEI PASSED AWAY IN 1983 AT THE AGE OF 88. HIDE’S OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD STATES THAT SHE WAS 69 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME OF HER PASSING. THE OBITUARY STATES THAT SHE WAS MARRIED TO MR. NISHIYAMA ON 20 DECEMBER 1918 IN KUMAMOTO CITY. THEY WENT TO NEW WESTMINISTER, BRITISH COLUMBIA TOGETHER IN APRIL 1919. THE OBITUARY OF MAC NISHIYAMA STATES THAT HE WAS BORN IN SAPPERTON, NEW WESTMINISTER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, ON 23 AUGUST 1927 TO KOHEI AND HIDE NISHIYAMA. THE FAMILY WAS INTERNED IN TASHME, BRITISH COLUMBIA DURING THE WAR. THE FAMILY RELOCATED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA WHEN THE WAR ENDED. IT WAS AT THE RAYMOND BUDDHIST CHURCH WHERE HE MET REYKO KARAKI AND THE COUPLE WAS MARRIED IN 1953. TOGETHER THEY HAD SIX CHILDREN. HE PASSED AWAY ON 28 MAY 2017. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, COPIES OF THE NIKKEI FAMILY HISTORY, AND BOARD TRANSLATION. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PLEASE REFERENCE P20030040000, FOR AN INTERVIEW WITH MAC NISHIYAMA REGARDING A CRATE HE DONATED.
Catalogue Number
P20160042005
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"A7 RANCHE 100 ANNIVERSARY"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20140032002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"A7 RANCHE 100 ANNIVERSARY"
Date
1986
Materials
WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
19.5
Diameter
5.7
Description
BROWN GLASS BEER BOTTLE WITH A LIP FOR A TWIST-OFF CAP (NO CAP). "85" IS IN RAISED LETTERS OF GLASS AT THE BASE OF THE BOTTLE. THERE IS A SEAM VISIBLE DOWN THE CENTER HALVES OF THE BOTTLE WHERE IT HAS BEEN FUSED TOGETHER. CREAM-COLOURED RECTANGULAR LABEL WITH GOLD TRIM PASTED TO ONE SIDE OF THE BOTTLE. LABEL READS "a7" WITHIN A RED DIAGONAL STRIPE RUNNING UP THE WIDTH OF THE LABEL WITH "BEER" PRINTED BELOW. THE BOTTOM OF THE LABEL READS: "BREWED AND BOTTLED IN CARLING O'KEEFE BREWERIES CALGARY, ALBERTA" IN ALTERNATING BLACK AND RED FONT. THERE IS A STAMP THAT STATES "100 YEAR ANNIVERSARY 1886-1986" IN THE UPPER LEFT SECTION OF THE LABEL. CONDITION: SLIGHT WRINKLE VERTICALLY DOWN THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE LABEL. SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE GLASS OF BOTTLE.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
INDUSTRY
History
A NOTE ABOUT THIS BOTTLE WAS WRITTEN BY THE DONOR, FRANK LIGHTBOUND, AND PROVIDED TO THE MUSEUM AT THE TIME OF DONATION STATES: “THE SPECIAL LABEL ON THIS BOTTLE IS ONE OF A FEW HUNDRED PRINTED TO HELP CELEBRATE THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY (1886-1986) OF THE A7 RANCHE (OLD SPELLING), THE SOUTHERN PORTION OF WHICH BORDERS THE OLDMAN RIVER NORTH OF LUNDBRECK IN THE MAYCROFT AREA. THE RANCH WAS ESTABLISHED BY A. E. CROSS OF BIG 4 STAMPEDE FAME AND THE FORMER CALGARY BREWING/MALTING CO. (HORSESHOE AND BUFFALO LABEL). THE RANCH IS STILL OWNED BY THE CROSS FAMILY. THE BEER WAS SERVED DURING THE CELEBRATION BAR-B-Q AND THIS BOTTLE WAS GIVEN TO ME BY VAL DENNIS, SOUTH RANCH FOREMAN AT THE TIME.” ON 22 MARCH 2017, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LIGHTBOUND ABOUT HIS DONATION OF THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATIVE BOTTLE FROM A7 RANCHE BREWERY. THIS BOTTLE COMMEMORATES THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE A7 RANCHE. OF THAT, LIGHTBOUND STATES, “WELL, I MUST HAVE ACQUIRED IT SOON AFTER THAT THEN – IN 1986. IT WASN’T GIVEN TO ME DIRECTLY. I KNEW THE FOREMAN OF THE SOUTHERN BRANCH OF THE A7 RANCHE [VAL DENNIS], AND HE HAD SEVERAL OF THEM, AND HE GAVE ME ONE...THE DENNIS FAMILY HAVE A RANCH ON THE OLD MAN RIVER JUST OUTSIDE THE FOREST RESERVE, WHICH IS ACROSS THE ROAD FROM THE A7 RANCHE.” THE BOTTLE WAS GIVEN TO LIGHTBOUND EMPTY. WHEN ASKED WHY HE WAS COMPELLED TO SAVE IT, LIGHTBOUND REPLIED, “WELL, [IT REPRESENTS] AN INTERESTING PART OF THE COUNTRY. I WAS AT THE GAP RANGER STATION FOR FIVE YEARS AND THE DENNIS FAMILY HAD THE FIRST RANCH EAST OF THE FOREST RESERVE, ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE ROAD, BETWEEN THE ROAD AND THE RIVER. I GOT TO KNOW THE FAMILY BACK AROUND 1965 AND THIS WAS [FROM] 1985. I STILL VISIT WITH THEM AND I HELPED THEM WITH THEIR RANCHING OPERATION...I SAW ALL THE FAMILY GROW UP, ALL THE KIDS GROW UP. VAL WAS ONE. WHEN I FIRST MET HIM, HE WAS A KID IN GRADE SCHOOL, AND NOW I THINK HE’S ABOUT 60 YEARS OLD, AND HE’S NEARING RETIREMENT AS AN RCMP OFFICER. SO A LOT OF YEARS HAVE PASSED. SO, OUT OF THE GOODNESS OF HIS HEART, HE THOUGHT I’D LIKE TO HAVE THAT BOTTLE AND I TOOK IT, AND I HAD IT DISPLAYED—IT WASN’T IN THE LIVING ROOM—BUT IT WAS IN THE CUPBOARD AREA IN THE DINING AREA.” ACCORDING TO THE A7 RANCHE HISTORY PROVIDED ON THEIR WEBSITE (ACCESSED ON 4 MAY 2018), THE RANCH’S FOUNDER – ALFRED ERNEST CROSS – “PICKED THE ‘A7’ BRAND TO SYMBOLIZE HIMSELF AND HIS SIX SIBLINGS. IT IS SAID TO BE THE OLDEST RANCH IN CANADA STILL IN THE HANDS OF THE ORIGINAL OWNERS, RIGHT THROUGH TO PRESENT-DAY OWNER JOHN CROSS.” THE WEBSITE CONTINUES, “A. E. CROSS IS BEST KNOWN FOR BEING ONE OF THE “BIG FOUR” CATTLEMEN WHO FOUNDED THE CALGARY STAMPEDE IN 1912. HOWEVER, HE HAD MANY OTHER BUSINESS, PUBLIC, AND CHARITABLE INTERESTS, LIKE THE CALGARY BREWING AND MALTING COMPANY, OIL AND GAS, AND THE BUDDING MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY. CROSS ALSO SERVED AS THE MLA FOR EAST CALGARY IN THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF THE NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES...” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, A7 HISTORY AND DONOR’S NOTE.
Catalogue Number
P20140032002
Acquisition Date
2014-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, VELVET, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20180002000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
METAL, VELVET, WOOD
No. Pieces
6
Height
2
Length
18.2
Width
9.5
Description
A. CASE, 18.2 CM LONG X 9.5 CM WIDE; CASE IS COMPRISED OF WOODEN PANELS BOUND WITH CLOTH SPINE; BROWN SYNTHETIC-LEATHER OUTSIDE WITH BLUE VELVET LINING. TOP HAS WORN SILVER NUMBERS IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER “12 [ILLEGIBLE] 4”. INSIDE OF CASE HAS CLOTH TAG ADHERED TO LID WITH BLACK TEXT “L.E. SALKELD”. TOP OF CASE HAS BLUE STAIN AT RIGHT SIDE; CASE EXTERIOR IS SEVERELY WORN WITH FINISH PEELED AND SCUFFED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. DRAFTING COMPASS, 14.1CM LONG X 1.4CM WIDE. SILVER COMPASS WITH A POINTED STRAIGHT LEG AND ROUNDED, ADJUSTABLE DRAWING LEG. COMPASS HAS TURN-KNOB FOR ADJUSTING LEAD IN THE DRAWING LEG. MID-SECTION OF COMPASS IS TAPERED IN ON BOTH LEGS; FRONT OF COMPASS HINGE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “O.R.P”; COMPASS HAS HANDLE AT TOP OF HINGE. COMPASS STRAIGHT LEG IS BLACKENED ON THE TIP AND DRAWING LEG IS TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. DRARFTING DIVIDER, 14.2 CM LONG X 1.4 CM WIDE. SILVER DIVIDER WITH TWO POINTED LEGS; MID-SECTION OF DIVIDER IS TAPERED IN ON BOTH LEGS; FRONT OF DIVIDER HINGE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “O.R.P”; COMPASS HAS HANDLE AT TOP OF HINGE. DIVIDER IS TARNISHED ON INSIDE OF LEGS AND HAS ADHERED SOILING ON BACK OF LEGS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. BOW COMPASS, 9.4 CM LONG X 2.9 CM WIDE. SILVER BOW COMPASS WITH ADJUSTABLE TURN KNOBS ON POINTED STRAIGHT LEG AND DRAWING LEG. COMPASS HINGE RUNS ACROSS MID-SECTION WITH RING ATTACHED TO TOP AS THE BASE FOR HANDLE. HINGE HAS ADJUSTABLE TURN-KNOB ON SIDE. LEGS ARE TARNISHED ON OUTSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. EXTENSION ROD, 10.5 CM LONG X 0.7 CM WIDE. SILVER EXTENSION ROD WITH NARROW LEG AND CUT-OUT UP CENTER OF ROD END. TOP OF ROD HAS ADJUSTABLE KNOB ND CUT-OUT DOWN CENTER OF ROD TOP. ROD HAS TARNISHING AROUND ADJUSTABLE KNOB; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. F. RULING PEN, 13 CM LONG X 1.2 CM WIDE. SILVER RULING PEN WITH DARKER ENGRAVED CROSS-HATCHED HANDLE. END TIP HAS ADJUSTABLE TURNING KNOB ACROSS POINTS. INSIDE OF RULING PEN END POINTS ARE TARNISHED; ADJUSTABLE TURNING KNOB IS TARNISHED AND RUSTED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DRAFTING T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
History
ON FEBRUARY 18, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ELAINE MCENTEE REGARDING HER DONATION OF A DRAFTING SET. THE SET WAS USED BY HER FATHER, LEONARD E.SALKELD, THROUGHOUT HIS CAREER AS AN ENGINEER. ON HER MEMORIES OF THE DRAFTING SET, MCENTEE RECALLED, “[THE SET] WOULD HAVE BEEN HIS FOR HIS LIFETIME, THROUGH UNIVERSITY, AND ALL THE TIME.” “I DIDN’T SEE THEM TILL LATER. THEY ALSO HAD, GROWING UP [IN BRITISH COLUMBIA]…THEY DID THEIR DRAFTING AND THEIR MAPS/BLUEPRINTS, BUT HE DID MAPS THAT [WERE] ON LINEN, AND THEN IT WAS WAXED. WHEN THEY WERE DONE WITH THOSE MAPS, MOM WOULD WASH THEM, WASH THE WAX OUT, AND USE THE LINEN. I STILL HAVE SOME OF THAT LINEN. THE OTHER THING THAT I REMEMBER IS - OUR SCRAP PAPER THAT WE DREW ON, WAS OLD MAPS, (THE DRAFTING MAPS THEY DREW UP ALL BY HAND), AND MOM WOULD IRON THEM. SHE’D TAKE THESE ROLLS [OF PAPER], IRON THEM FLAT, CUT THEM IN SQUARES, AND THAT’S WHAT WE DREW ON AS KIDS.” “[MY FATHER, LEONARD SALKELD] HAD A CIVIL ENGINEERING DEGREE. HE FOUGHT IN WORLD WAR TWO, CAME HOME, AND GOT HIS UNIVERSITY DEGREE. HE DIDN’T WANT LAND, [HE WANTED] HIS UNIVERSITY DEGREE. INTERESTINGLY ENOUGH, HE HAD TO FIGHT FOR THAT, BECAUSE HE CAME HOME ‘SHELL-SHOCKED’, AND THEY DIDN’T KNOW ENOUGH ABOUT THAT THEN. BECAUSE HE WASN’T PHYSICALLY IMPAIRED, THEY THOUGHT HE DIDN’T DESERVE ANY VETERAN’S BENEFITS. ONE OF HIS FAMILY MEMBERS WAS A M.P., SO THEY WENT TO THE MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT, GOT HIM HIS VETERAN’S BENEFITS, AND, AT THAT POINT, HE DIDN’T WANT TO FARM. HE’D COME FROM A FARM, AND HE DIDN’T WANT LAND, SO HE CHOSE THE UNIVERSITY AND TOOK HIS DEGREE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING” MCENTEE ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S EXPERIENCES IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, NOTING, “HE DID WORK FOR THE PFRA – A LOT OF WORK HERE, AND A LOT OF WORK ON THE ST. MARY’S IRRIGATION DISTRICT. WE LIVED IN ARROWWOOD FOR 4 OR 5 YEARS, TILL WE MOVED TO B.C. DAD WORKED ON A SIPHON OUT OF VAUXHALL. THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN IN [1951-1955]. IT WAS AFTER THE DROUGHT ON THE PRAIRIES, AND THEY WERE PUTTING IN THE IRRIGATION, AND REHABILITATING THE PRAIRIES. SO HE DID THAT, AND THEN HE WENT ON TO WORK ON THE COLUMBIA RIVER SYSTEM, IN ALL OF B.C. WE SPENT 5 YEARS HERE. [I REMEMBER] I WAS 2, AND HE TOOK ME TO WORK LOTS, BECAUSE MOM WOULD COME AND STAY IN A MOTEL NEAR THE CAMP, WHERE THE GUYS WERE ALL WORKING OR BOARDING AT HOMES.” “SHE TRAVELED WITH HIM UNTIL I STARTED SCHOOL. SO I KNEW THE NAMES OF ALL THE HEAVY EQUIPMENT THAT HE DROVE. BY THE TIME I WAS 3, I COULD SAY ALL THE NAMES OF ALL THE HEAVY EQUIPMENT THAT THEY USED TO MOVE THE LAND, AND DIG THE CANALS. I SAW DAMS BEING BUILT, AND WATERWAYS TURNED OFF, AND WATERWAYS TURNED ON, AND GREW UP KNOWING THAT, FOR 5 YEARS, UNTIL I WENT TO SCHOOL. LATER, I MET MY HUSBAND, AND HE IS FROM MONTREAL. HE TOLD ME THAT ONE YEAR THEY TURNED OFF NIAGARA FALLS TO REPAIR THEM. HE DID NOT KNOW MY DAD WAS A CIVIL ENGINEER, AND THAT I HAD SEEN DAMS BEING BUILT, AND WATER MOVING, AND TURBINES, AND TURBINES RUNNING, AND SOME NOT RUNNING. IT WAS TOTALLY WITHIN MY BRAIN POWER TO PERCEIVE THAT NIAGARA FALLS COULD BE TURNED OFF, AND HE JUST THOUGHT THAT WAS SUCH A HILARIOUS JOKE, UNTIL I TOLD HIM WHAT MY DAD DID, AND ALL THAT I HAD SEEN AS I WAS GROWING UP. JUST RECENTLY THEY HAD THE CELEBRATION OF THE ST. MARY’S IRRIGATION DISTRICT, AND I WAS GOING TO ASK MY MOM IF SHE WANTED TO COME OUT AND PARTICIPATE IN IT, IF DAD HAD WORKED ON IT OR NOT. SHE SAID, “OH, MAN, I WOULD HAVE COME…YOUR DAD DID WORK ON IT.”” “BECAUSE WE TRAVELED WITH DAD, AND MOVED AROUND WITH HIM ON HIS WORKSITES, UNTIL I WAS 5, I SAW HIS WORK, AND I KNEW WHAT HE WAS DOING, AT A YOUNG AGE. FOR THAT REASON [THE DRAFTING SET] WAS IMPORTANT TO ME.” “[NOW] I’M PACKING, AND MOVING – AND FOUND [THE DRAFTING SET] AGAIN. I HAD BROUGHT IT HOME FROM MY MOM’S PLACE, AFTER DAD’S FUNERAL. I NEVER REALLY KNEW WHAT I WAS GOING TO DO WITH IT, BUT I FOUND IT AGAIN, AND I THOUGHT, “MAN, HE WORKED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA HERE.” SO I BROUGHT IT IN [TO THE MUSEUM]…I THINK THEY WOULD BE WELL-CARED-FOR, AND APPRECIATED [HERE]. TO DO ANYTHING ELSE WITH THEM – I DON’T KNOW. NOBODY’S GOING TO BUY THEM AT A GARAGE SALE…I DON’T KNOW THAT THEY’D EVEN KNOW HOW TO USE THEM ANYMORE. I WANT THEM TO GO SOMEWHERE THEY’RE APPRECIATED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180002000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180002000
Acquisition Date
2018-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOD, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20170033001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY
Date
2011
Materials
COTTON, WOOD, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
65
Width
42
Description
BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY IN MATTE AND FRAME. EMBROIDERY COMPLETED IN BROWN ON WHITE FABRIC, AND SHOWS THE 1910 GALT HOSPITAL FRONT. EMBROIDERY INSIDE BROWN AND GREY MATTE AND BROWN WOOD FRAME WITH GLASS OVER. FRONT OF FRAME HAS BLACK ENGRAVED PLAQUE ON BOTTOM EDGE READING “GALT HOSPITAL/MUSEUM & ARCHIVES, 1910, DESIGNED AND STITCHED, 2011, BELINDA CROWSON”. BACK OF FRAME COVERED IN BROWN PAPER WITH SILVER WIRE ATTACHED FOR HANGING. BACK OF FRAME HAS WHITE LABEL WITH TEXT “LA GALLERY CUSTOM FRAMING & ART, 421-5TH ST. SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE, AB T1J 2B6, PH. 380.4556, FAX 380.4562, WEBSITE WWW.THELAGALLERY.COM, EMAIL INFO@THELAGALLERY.COM, W/O # H0761, ASSEMBLED BY CM”” WITH CHECK BOXES ON LABEL FOR “MOUNTING METHOD” AND “GLASS”, “NON-GLARE GLASS” CHECKED. FRAME HAS CHIPS ON FRONT EDGES; BACK HAS TEARS IN PAPER BACKING. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON NOVEMBER 16, 2017 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BELINDA CROWSON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A MUNICIPAL CAMPAIGN SIGN AND BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY PIECE. CROWSON WAS EMPLOYED WITH THE GALT MUSEUM AS THE MUSEUM EDUCATOR, WITH A REPUTATION AS A RENOWNED LOCAL HISTORIAN, UNTIL HER ELECTION TO CITY OF LETHBRIDGE COUNCIL IN 2017. ON THE BLACK EMBROIDERY PIECE, CROWSON RECALLED, “SHARING [THIS] WAS HARD, BECAUSE THIS WAS THE FIRST [PIECE] I DESIGNED…AND I VERY MUCH KNOW THE MEANING. IT WAS HANGING IN THE CLASSROOM [AT THE GALT MUSEUM] FOR YEARS, BUT IT WAS VERY HARD [TO GIVE UP], BECAUSE I DESIGNED IT; I STITCHED IT; AND IT’S A PIECE OF MYSELF.” “IT IS SOMETHING THAT I ACTUALLY DESIGNED, AND I HAD NEVER DESIGNED A PIECE BEFORE. I HAD TO LEARN HOW TO DESIGN IT, SO I ACTUALLY HAD A PICTURE AND GRAPH PAPER. I LEARNED HOW TO TAKE A PHOTOGRAPH, AND TURN IT INTO BLACKWORK STITCHES, EVEN THOUGH, OF COURSE, IT’S DONE IN BROWN, AND NOT BLACK. THE NAME DOESN’T ACTUALLY MEAN THE COLOR.” “BLACKWORK COMES FROM THE ELIZABETHAN TIME, AND IT WAS DONE WHEN LACE WAS REALLY EXPENSIVE. THEY WOULD TAKE BLACK THREAD ON WHITE MATERIAL. IF YOU DO BLACKWORK PROPERLY, IT’S ABSOLUTELY REVERSIBLE. IF YOU DID IT ON CUFFS OR COLLARS IT WOULD ALMOST LOOK LIKE LACE, AND BE REVERSIBLE FROM BOTH SIDES. IT’S A TYPE OF EMBROIDERY THAT USES PRIMARILY STRAIGHT LINES. I TAUGHT A CLASS TO PEOPLE AT THE GALT MUSEUM [ON] HOW TO DO BLACKWORK. I ACTUALLY TAUGHT AN EMBROIDERY CLASS IN THIS DESIGN, WHICH IS A VERY SIMPLE TYPE OF EMBROIDERY TO DO, BUT CAN CREATE INCREDIBLY ELABORATE DESIGNS.” “I COMPLETED [THIS PIECE] IN 2011 AND HAD IT FRAMED THAT SAME YEAR. IT’S SUEDE AROUND THE PICTURE MATTE.” “SOMETHING LIKE THIS SIZE OF PICTURE, IN BLACKWORK, PROBABLY ONLY TOOK ME ABOUT 2 WEEKS TO STITCH. IT’S A VERY QUICK DESIGN, BUT IT FILLS IN – AND, IF I WAS TO REDO IT AGAIN, I’D FILL IN MORE OF THE BLANK SPACES. [BLACKWORK IS] SUPPOSED TO LOOK AS COMPLETE AS POSSIBLE, BUT I WANTED TO MAKE THE COLUMNS STICK OUT, SO IT MAY HAVE WORKED IN THAT REGARD.” CROWSON ELABORATED ON HER BACKGROUND DOING EMBROIDERY, NOTING, “I HAVE BEEN DOING EMBROIDERY SINCE [I WAS] A KID. IT’S SOMETHING MY GRANDMOTHER KNEW; MY MOTHER KNEW; IT’S SOMETHING I WAS TAUGHT, AND, OF MY SIBLINGS, I’M THE ONLY ONE WHO DOES IT. THE OTHERS LIKE TO DO MORE STITCHING WITH MACHINES. I LOVE THE HAND-STITCHING, AND I HAVE LONG BEEN THINKING ABOUT DESIGNING. I ALSO HAVE A PASSION FOR HISTORIC BUILDINGS. I HAD DONE A BLACKWORK PIECE, WHICH WAS A PATTERN THAT I HAD BOUGHT AND I ABSOLUTELY LOVED IT. IT’S A REALLY NICE WAY OF DOING EMBROIDERY, SO I THOUGHT “THERE’S A WAY OF CAPTURING HISTORIC BUILDINGS IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY.” I MADE MYSELF A CHALLENGE OF FIGURING IT OUT, AND, OF COURSE, THE WAY I DO MANY THINGS, I DIDN’T ACTUALLY RESEARCH HOW TO DESIGN. I JUST TAUGHT MYSELF, AND IT TOOK ME A WEEKEND. I THREW AWAY ABOUT 3 DESIGNS, UNTIL I REALIZED YOU’VE GOT TO START IN THE CENTER AND WORK OUT. THE NICE THING ABOUT THE GALT HOSPITAL—BECAUSE I DID THE FAÇADE OF THE HOSPITAL [IN THIS PIECE]—IS THAT IT IS SO BEAUTIFULLY SYMMETRICAL, IT MADE IT EASIER. I HAD…THE VARIEGATED THREAD, AND THE MATERIAL TO STITCH ON. THEN IT WAS A MATTER OF ACTUALLY CREATING IT. THE PATTERN HAD A LOT OF ERASING DONE ON IT, AS I CHANGED THINGS. I’M VERY PROUD OF THE WINDOWS…MY GOODNESS, THAT BUILDING HAS A LOT OF WINDOWS! IT WAS FUN, AND THIS WAS THE FIRST ONE [I MADE]. SINCE THEN I HAVE DONE GALBRAITH SCHOOL, THE BOWMAN, AND THE POST OFFICE. THE GALBRAITH SCHOOL IS HANGING AT GALBRAITH SCHOOL, THE BOWMAN IS IN MY HOUSE, AND THE POST OFFICE WAS RAFFLED OFF TO HELP RAISE MONEY FOR CHINATOWN.” “I REMEMBER, AS A KID, I WAS NOT SUPPOSED TO, BUT I WENT THROUGH ONE OF MY MOM’S JEWELRY BOXES. IN THERE WAS THE WORK SHE HAD DONE AS A KID. SHE HAD BEEN PRACTICING HER STITCHES. THAT STUCK WITH ME, AND I REMEMBER HER TALKING ABOUT HOW SHE HAD BEEN TAUGHT FROM HER MOM. MY GRANDMOTHER KEPT CROSS-STITCHING EMBROIDERY UNTIL HER ARTHRITIS GOT TOO BAD. WHEN I DO IT, I REALLY DO FEEL I AM PART OF THAT CHAIN, BECAUSE I DO HAVE EMBROIDERY THAT BOTH MY MOM AND MY GRANDMOTHER HAVE DONE. IT IS INTERESTING BECAUSE, FROM THE MENNONITE TRADITION ESPECIALLY, A LOT OF THE STITCHES I HAVE COME FROM THAT TRADITION, SO IT’S VERY MUCH A PART OF THAT. I WOULD LIKE TO SIT DOWN, ONE DAY WHEN I GET TIME, WITH MY MOM’S COUSIN, WHO DOES WHAT’S CALLED 3-D EMBROIDERING. IN MY FAMILY, PEOPLE ACTUALLY HAVE THE ORDERED EVERY DAY TEA TOWELS, THEY HAVE THE BED TOWELS. IT’S SUCH A PART OF THE SOUTHERN ART, SO MY [WORKS ARE] A LITTLE MORE MODERN INTERPRETATION OF SOME OF THAT. MY GREAT-GRANDMOTHER WOULD HAVE SAT IN RUSSIA, DOING THE SAME STITCHES.” “I DON’T KNOW [HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE REGION ARE DOING BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY]. I TAUGHT THE CLASS IN … EMBROIDERY, BUT I DON’T THINK A LOT OF PEOPLE ARE PICKING UP BLACKWORK. IT’S INTERESTING, WHEN I MENTION THIS, TALKING TO SOME PEOPLE ONLINE, ONE OF MY FRIENDS WHO HAS A HISTORIC HOUSE IS LIKE, “COULD I PAY YOU TO DESIGN MY HOUSE?” [BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY] IS A FUN WAY FOR ME TO TAKE THOSE TWO IDEAS I LOVE-–OF STITCHING, AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS-–BECAUSE PHOTOGRAPHY, WITH WHAT PEOPLE HAVE TODAY, IS RELATIVELY EASY. YOU CAN TAKE POINT-AND-SHOOT. SOME PEOPLE ARE MUCH BETTER AT IT--THEY’RE ARTISTIC-–BUT THIS IS A WAY OF CAPTURING A BUILDING. YOU HAVE TO, VERY PERSONALLY, SIT THERE, AND BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO MEASURE EVERYTHING OUT, EVEN TO DESIGN IT, YOUR APPRECIATION OF THE ARCHITECTURE IS VERY DIFFERENT THAN A POINT-AND-SHOOT CAMERA.” “I’VE DONE FIVE BUILDINGS NOW, AND I HAVE SEEN EACH ONE IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY. I REMEMBER THINKING, WITH THE POST OFFICE, WHEN YOU ACTUALLY LOOK AT THE HEIGHT OF THE CLOCK TOWER COMPARED TO THE BASE OF THE BUILDING, [YOU SEE THE] PHENOMENAL ARCHITECTURE, [BUT] IT’S ONLY WHEN YOU ARE STITCHING IT THAT YOU REALIZE THAT THE BASE OF THAT BUILDING ISN’T STRAIGHT. THE BUILDING GOES WITH THE SLANT OF THE SIDEWALK, AND I HAD TO TAKE AN ARTISTIC EYE, AND MAKE THE BOTTOM OF THE BUILDING STRAIGHT FROM THE FRONT. THE OTHER THING, WITH THE POST OFFICE, THERE’S ALMOST NO HISTORIC [PHOTOGRAPHS] OF IT STRAIGHT-ON; IT’S ALWAYS ON THE CORNER, BECAUSE THAT’S EASIER. I CAN’T CROSS-STITCH MY BUILDING ON THE CORNER, SO I HAD TO ACTUALLY TAKE MY OWN PHOTOGRAPHS, INSTEAD OF HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS. THIS HAS REALLY GIVEN ME A NEW APPRECIATION OF THE BUILDINGS, BECAUSE I HAD TO LOOK AT THEM SO CAREFULLY. WITH THE BOWMAN—WITH ALL THESE BUILDINGS--YOU HAD TO THINK WHAT TIME PERIOD YOU WANTED TO DISPLAY. SO THE ONE OF THE BOWMAN, I HAVE THE UNION JACK FLYING [IN] THE PICTURE, BECAUSE I WANTED [TO CAPTURE] IT BACK WHEN IT WAS ORIGINALLY CREATED.” “IT’S AN ADDICTION. YOU SIT IN FRONT OF THE TELEVISION, AND SOMETIMES A WEEKEND PASSES AND YOU HAVEN’T DONE MUCH. WHEN YOU’RE WORKING ON A PROJECT, FOR MYSELF, IT’S LIKE, “I’M GOING TO GET IT DONE.” THEN YOU TAKE A BREAK BEFORE YOU PICK UP THE NEXT PROJECT, SO YOU CAN DO ALL THE OTHER STUFF. TRYING TO PUT [AN ESTIMATE OF TIME SPENT CREATING] IT, I WOULDN’T HAVE A CLUE.” “I THINK EVERYBODY [HAS] MULTI-FACETS IN THEIR BRAINS, AND I USE DIFFERENT PARTS OF IT. IT’S ALWAYS FUN TO CHALLENGE, TO TRY NEW THINGS. ONE OF THE THINGS I’D LIKE TO DO…I’VE SEEN PEOPLE WHO ARE CROSS-STITCHING ON METAL [PUTTING HOLES IN]. IN THE SPRING, I WILL BE DOING A CROSS-STITCH PATTERN ON ‘PAGE WIRE’, THAT [ATTACHES] TO A FENCE, SO IT WILL BE OUTDOOR CROSS-STITCH. I LOVE WORKING WITH MY SILKS, AND MY REALLY DELICATE STUFF, BUT THE BEAUTIFUL THING ABOUT EMBROIDERY IS YOU CAN TAKE IT DIFFERENT WAYS. WHY SHOULD KNITTERS HAVE ALL THE FUN WHEN THEY GO ‘YARN-BOMBING’? WE CAN DO ‘CROSS-STITCH BOMBING’, TOO. IT’S ONE OF THOSE THINGS WHERE YOU CAN TAKE A VERY OLD FORM, AND MAKE IT VERY MODERN.” “IT WAS A HARD DECISION [TO DONATE IT]. I HAVE THE PATTERN. I CAN ALWAYS RECREATE IT. IT WOULD NEVER BE THE SAME. I DON’T CARE IF YOU RECREATE SOMETHING, IT’S NEVER THE SAME THING. BUT I HAD TO LET THE LOGICAL PART OF MY BRAIN HANDLE THIS DECISION, BECAUSE IT DID HANG IN THE CLASSROOM AND YOU POINTED TO THIS THING A LOT WHEN WE DISCUSSED THE BUILDING. FOR A LOT OF STUDENTS THIS WAS THE PICTURE OF THE BUILDING THAT THEY REMEMBER SEEING, SO THE CONNECTION TO MY JOB JUST MADE IT SUCH A STRONG [POINT]. THE OTHER THING IS, AS AN ARTIST…I GET TO SAY I’M AN ART-PIECE IN A MUSEUM. THAT’S QUITE THE HONOR. IT WASN’T CHOSEN AS AN ART-PIECE, BUT STILL I CAN MAKE THAT WORK. [I SPENT] PROBABLY A WEEK TALKING TO FAMILY MEMBERS AS WELL, BECAUSE I HAVE A LOT OF CROSS-STITCH IN MY HOUSE, FROM PATTERNS AND DIFFERENT THINGS. I REMIND THEM I’M NOT GOING TO DIE SOON, BUT SOME OF MY NIECES HAVE TOLD ME WHICH ONES THEY WANT WHEN I’M DEAD. SO I ALSO NEEDED TO TALK TO FAMILY, AND MAKE SURE THAT NOBODY WAS GOING TO BE CRINGING TO FIND IT WAS GONE. IT IS INTERESTING HOW THINGS THAT YOU CREATE [HAVE] A SENSE OF OWNERSHIP FOR OTHER PEOPLE TOO, SO I HAD TO DOUBLE CHECK WITH OTHER PEOPLE TOO.” “IT WAS JULY OR AUGUST OF 2000, WHEN I WAS INTERVIEWED BY WILMA WOODS, AND I WAS BETWEEN TEACHING [JOBS]…AND GETTING CLOSE TO THE START OF SCHOOL. I DIDN’T REALLY WANT TO SUB, AND IT WAS A TEMPORARY SIX MONTH POSITION. I APPLIED, AND WILMA INTERVIEWED ME ON THE MAIN FLOOR, IN THE HALF OF WHAT’S NOW THE FRIEND’S BOARDROOM. THAT IS WHERE HER OFFICE WAS, AND WHERE SHE DID THE INTERVIEW. I PREPPED. I WENT TO B. MACCABEE’S BOOKSTORE AND BOUGHT THE CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE, AND READ THE ENTIRE BOOK…BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. I WASN’T REALLY THINK ABOUT WHETHER I’D GET THE JOB, SO I GAVE REFERENCES TO HER AND REALIZED I HADN’T ACTUALLY LET THE REFERENCES KNOW. I CALLED THEM AFTER I GOT HOME, WHICH WAS GOOD, BECAUSE I GUESS SHE CALLED FIVE MINUTES AFTERWARDS BECAUSE SHE WAS PRETTY QUICK. I STARTED [AT THE GALT MUSEUM] SEPTEMBER 1, 2000, WITH THE EXHIBIT ON THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT AND ITS CENTENNIAL. IT WAS A SIX MONTH GRANT POSITION. I WAS SUPPOSED TO BE A TEMPORARY POSITION, BECAUSE AT THAT POINT THE E. TEAM HAD GEARED DOWN ON STAFF AT THE MUSEUM. SO I STARTED THERE, AND…JANUARY AND FEBRUARY OF THE YEAR, THEY WENT TO CITY COUNCIL AND ASKED FOR IT TO BE MADE A FULL-TIME PERMANENT POSITION. IT HAD TO BE POSTED, BUT I APPLIED AND GOT THE FULL-TIME PERMANENT POSITION IN MARCH 2001. I MADE THE DECISION, BUT WITHOUT REALLY THINKING ABOUT IT, THAT TEMPORARY POSITION TURNED INTO A SEVENTEEN YEAR JOB.” “[OF THE WORKS I’VE DONE] IT’S DEFINITELY ONE OF THE BIG ONES. THERE [WERE] A FEW OTHER THINGS I TOOK OUT OF MY OFFICE THAT HAVE BEEN WITH ME FROM THE BEGINNING…THE REASON I STITCHED THIS BUILDING WAS MY CONNECTION TO THE BUILDING. IT’S NOT ONLY A PHENOMENAL BUILDING, BUT THIS WAS ‘HOME’ FOR 17 YEARS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170033001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170033001
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CROWSON CAMPAIGN SIGN
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, INK
Catalogue Number
P20170033002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CROWSON CAMPAIGN SIGN
Date
2017
Materials
PLASTIC, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
61
Width
40.5
Description
PURPLE DOUBLE-SIDED SIGN PRINTED ON COROPLAST BOARD. SIGN HAS PURPLE PHOTOGRAPH OF BELINDA CROWSON BESIDE LARGE METAL WHEEL WITH THE LETHBRIDGE HIGH LEVEL BRIDGE AND WEST CITYSCAPE IN BACKGROUND; WHITE TEXT ON SIDE READS “BELINDA CROWSON FOR COUNCIL...BELINDA4COUNCIL@GMAIL.COM”. FRONT OF SIGN HAS TWO ROUND DENT ALONG LOWER EDGE FROM SIGN STAKES; BACK OF SIGN IS SCRATCHED ON UPPER AND LOWER LEFT EDGES. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
POLITICS
History
ON NOVEMBER 16, 2017 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BELINDA CROWSON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A MUNICIPAL CAMPAIGN SIGN AND BLACKWORK EMBROIDERY PIECE. CROWSON WAS EMPLOYED WITH THE GALT MUSEUM AS THE MUSEUM EDUCATOR, WITH A REPUTATION AS A RENOWNED LOCAL HISTORIAN, UNTIL HER ELECTION TO CITY OF LETHBRIDGE COUNCIL IN 2017. THE CAMPAIGN SIGN WAS USED BY CROWSON DURING HER 2017 CAMPAIGN FOR CITY OF LETHBRIDGE COUNCIL. ON THE SIGN, CROWSON RECALLED, “I SAT DOWN WITH LISA LAMBERT, JENN SCHMIDT-REMPEL, AND BARB LACEY, A WHOLE BUNCH OF PEOPLE. I GOT ALL KINDS OF INFORMATION. I KNEW ANINE [VONKEMAN] WAS GOING TO BE MY DESIGNER, BECAUSE I COULDN’T THINK OF ANYBODY BETTER TO DO IT. THE DESIGN FOR THIS CAME ABOUT FROM A CONVERSATION WITH LISA AND ANINE, BECAUSE LISA SAID, “THERE’S TWO THINGS EVERYBODY KNOWS ABOUT YOU – YOUR FACE, AND YOUR FIRST NAME.” SHE SAID, “ASK ME TO COMMENT ON ANYTHING YOU DO.” I TYPED THAT TO ANINE, AND SHE SAID THAT’S WHAT SHE HAD IN MIND, TOO. I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY DOUBT IN ANYBODY’S MIND THAT IT WOULD BE PURPLE-–NOT NENSHI PURPLE—BELINDA WAS PURPLE BEFORE HE EVER WAS. I ASKED FRIENDS, AND TONYA PLONKA WAS SUGGESTED AS THE PHOTOGRAPHER, AND THEY SAID, “YOU HAVE TO BE BELINDA AT ‘THE GALT’, WITHOUT SAYING ‘THE GALT’.” WE DID THE PICTURES OUT WITH THE WHEELS [AT THE GALT MUSEUM], AND THE TRAIN BRIDGE IN THE BACKGROUND. I GOT MY HAIR DONE…THAT DAY, AND SENT IT OFF TO ANINE. THE DESIGN IS VERY MUCH ANINE’S. SHE HAD AN IMAGE IN HER HEAD, AND YOU HAVE TO HAVE A CELLPHONE NUMBER, AND YOUR E-MAIL ON. THEY DON’T HAVE TO BE THAT LARGE BUT, BY BYLAW, YOU HAVE TO HAVE THEM ON. THE REST IS DEPENDING ON WHAT YOU WANT. WHAT I LOVE ABOUT ANINE’S DESIGN IS [IT’S] EASY TO READ. THEY STOOD OUT AMONGST ALL THE OTHER SIGNS; THEY WERE A VERY DIFFERENT DESIGN THAN ALL [THE OTHERS]. I HAD 100 OF THESE MADE, AND 5 BIG SIGNS. BECAUSE OF THE FULL BLEED, MINE WERE MORE EXPENSIVE [ABOUT TWICE AS MUCH AS THE OTHER SIGNS], SO THEY ARE $10.00 A SIGN TO BUY. BASED ON THE BUDGET, WE ONLY GOT 100 OF THEM. WE HAD WAY LESS THAN OTHER PEOPLE BY NUMBER, BUT BECAUSE OF THE STAND-OUT I HAD PEOPLE TELLING ME THAT THEY THOUGHT WE HAD MORE THAN EVERYBODY ELSE. THE SIGN FOOLED YOU.” “IT TAKES A COMMUNITY TO RUN AN ELECTION. I COULD NEVER SAY ENOUGH ABOUT MY FAMILY AND FRIENDS IN THIS. I HAD THREE SIGN CREWS; TWO MORE WHO WANTED TO BE SIGN CREWS, BUT THEY ALL GOT THEM DONE SO FAST. PEOPLE SUBMITTED NAMES-–PEOPLE E-MAILED ME, AND GAVE ME ADDRESSES WHO WANTED THE SIGNS, AND THEN [THE SIGN CREWS] ALSO TOOK DIFFERENT PARTS. THEY JUST WENT OUT AND PUT THEM UP. THERE ARE LAWS ABOUT WHERE YOU CAN PUT THEM, AND THEN THEY ALL BABYSAT THEIR SIGNS. THEY WATCHED THEM THROUGHOUT, AND, UNKNOWN TO ME, EVEN MY MOTHER WAS DRIVING AROUND. IF A SIGN WAS DOWN, SHE’D CLEAN IT AND PUT IT BACK UP, BECAUSE SHE JUST COULDN’T STAND SEEING THEM [DOWN]. I KNEW FROM TALKING TO SHANNON PHILLIPS, AND A FEW OTHERS, THAT ‘SIGN MANAGEMENT’ IS MUCH BIGGER PART OF IT, AND I MUST ADMIT, EXCEPT FOR PICKING A FEW SIGNS UP AT THE END OF IT, I DID NOTHING WITH MY SIGNS, PERSONALLY. THE VOLUNTEERS DID IT ALL. THEY TOOK THAT TO HEART, AND THEY DID THE SIGN TEAMS.” “THE OTHER THING I HAPPENED TO LEARN FROM PEOPLE LIKE RYAN PARKER AND JEFF CARLSON IS GETTING PEOPLE WITH THE RIGHT ADDRESSES FOR YOUR BIG SIGNS. THEY HAVE THE ‘CORNERS’. I HAD SOME GOOD ONES-–I HAD ONE ON CROWSNEST TRAIL. THE MAYES GAVE ME ONE RIGHT AT 28TH AND CROWSNEST, AND I HAD ONE ON WHOOP-UP DRIVE, AND A FEW FRIENDS WHO OFFERED ONES UP. I HAVE LEARNED A LOT, IN THAT YOU REALLY HAVE TO MAKE FRIENDS WITH PEOPLE WITH THE BEST ‘CORNERS’. THEN SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE, “ARE SIGNS EVEN WORTH IT? LIKE, ARE THEY ENVIRONMENTAL?” BUT, I WAS TOLD, YOU DO EVERY ONE OF THE THINGS. THE OTHER THING ABOUT SIGNS IS YOU USE THEM WHEN WE DID OUR WAVING CAMPAIGN. SO, MYSELF, I DID 9 HOURS OF WAVING, AND PEOPLE JOINED ME AT DIFFERENT ONES…EVERY DAY OF THE CAMPAIGN, JUST STANDING WITH A SIGN, SOMETIMES THE HUGE ONES, EIGHT OF US, SOMETIMES THE LITTLE ONES, AND WAVING FOR AN HOUR, AT DIFFERENT SPOTS AROUND TOWN. THE SIGNS WERE WONDERFUL FOR THAT, IN THAT, BEFORE THEY EVEN SAW US, THEY RECOGNIZED THE SIGN. I HAVE HAD SO MANY PEOPLE TALK ABOUT THE DESIGN OF THE SIGN, AND THAT’S ANINE. MY GIANT PURPLE FACE ALL OVER TOWN!” CROWSON ELABORATED ON HER DECISION TO RUN FOR CITY OF LETHBRIDGE COUNCIL IN 2017, NOTING, “I’VE BEEN THINKING ABOUT RUNNING FOR COUNCIL FOR THE LAST 2 YEARS. I NEED TO BE GOING TOWARDS SOMETHING, AS MUCH AS I’M LEAVING SOMETHING. I SAT AND TALKED WITH SEVERAL FRIENDS WELL OVER A YEAR AGO ABOUT, “DO YOU THINK I COULD DO IT? WHAT WOULD I HAVE TO DO?” I WENT…THROUGH CAMPAIGN STUFF…IT WAS A YEAR AND A HALF BEFORE, THAT I STARTED MAKING PLANS, THINKING, “HOW MUCH MONEY DO YOU NEED? WHAT DO YOU NEED TO DO?” MY ROAD TRIP LAST SEPTEMBER—WYOMING—PART OF THAT TRIP WAS PREPARING…IT WAS A LOT OF PLANNING IN ADVANCE. WHEN DO YOU START TELLING PEOPLE? HOW DO I START WINDING THINGS DOWN, WITHOUT INDICATING THAT I’M WINDING THINGS DOWN?” “TO ME, THE MAIN PURPOSE OF HISTORY IS A BETTER FUTURE. WE LOOK AT THE CONTEXT; WE LOOK AT THAT, SO WE CAN MAKE BETTER PLANS. AS I LOOK BACK, IT BECAME A NO-BRAINER. YOU CAN’T JUST SAY, “MAN, I WISH I HAD DONE THIS.” AT SOME POINT, YOU’VE GOT TO STEP UP AND GO, “THIS IS WHAT WE HAVE TO DO, AND I NEED BE AROUND THAT TABLE”. I’M ABSOLUTELY LOVING THE BIG DISCUSSION. LIKE ANY JOB, YOU CAN GET STUCK IN THE MINUTIA OF, “WHY ARE YOU SENDING ME AN E-MAIL ABOUT THIS?” THE HUGE DISCUSSIONS THAT WE CAN HAVE ABOUT, “ARE WE GOING TO DENSIFY, OR ARE WE GOING TO DO THIS?”…WHAT I ALSO LOVE IS, SOME OF THE CONVERSATIONS, I CAN GO BACK AND GET A 1910 NEWSPAPER, AND THEY ARE THE SAME THINGS. “HOW DO WE MAKE THIS BETTER? WHAT DO WE DO?” I’M ABSOLUTELY LOVING THE FACT THAT, AS ONE OF MY GRADE FIVE STUDENTS SAID, “NOW, YOU NO LONGER TELL HISTORY; YOU MAKE HISTORY.” IN SOME RESPECTS, THAT’S THE CHANGE, BUT IT’S ALL STILL PART OF IT. I HAD SOME WORRIES, BECAUSE I KNEW SOME PEOPLE I THOUGHT WERE GOING TO RUN, “I DON’T KNOW IF I COULD BEAT THOSE PEOPLE.” BUT, AT SOME POINT IN YOUR LIFE [YOU JUST SAY], “CRAP. I’M JUST GOING TO DO IT-–I’M JUST GOING TO THROW MY NAME IN.”” “[I WAS ELECTED] THE 16TH [FRIDAY]…MY LAST DAY AT WORK…[WAS] THE 20TH OF OCTOBER.” “IT WAS FUNNY, BECAUSE I COULD NOT MAKE ANY DECISIONS AFTER OCTOBER 16TH. I DID NOT KNOW WHICH WAY MY LIFE WOULD GO. TO BE HONEST THOUGH, “WOULD I HAVE COME BACK?” I PROBABLY WOULD NOT HAVE. I WAS SO PREPARED TO MOVE ON, IF I HADN’T GOTTEN ELECTED. I PROBABLY WOULD HAVE PUT MY RESIGNATION IN, ANYWAYS. I HAD A BACK-UP PLAN TO GETTING ON COUNCIL, BECAUSE WHAT I SAID I LOVED ABOUT COUNCIL IS I WANTED TO MOVE FORWARD. THIS IS WHAT I REALLY WANTED TO DO, BUT I ALSO REALIZED I REALLY WAS DONE HERE, AS WELL. IT WASN’T ABOUT QUITTING A JOB, ONLY. IT WAS ABOUT QUITTING A JOB, AND MOVING INTO SOMETHING ELSE. IF YOU’RE NOT SCARED A LITTLE BIT EVERY DAY, IT’S NOT FUN ANYMORE. I’M A SEAT-OF-THE-PANTS-–HAVE TO HAVE FUN—DOING THINGS [PERSON]. I WILL ALWAYS, SOMEHOW, BE TEACHING AND DOING STUFF WITH KIDS. THAT’S JUST PART OF WHO I AM, BUT I NEEDED TO HAVE OTHER THINGS JUST AS LARGE AS THAT IN MY LIFE.” “IT’S VERY WEIRD. I HAVE ALWAYS SEEN MYSELF AS A TEACHER, WORKING IN A MUSEUM. EVEN THOUGH I HAVE DONE HISTORIAN [WORK], I’M A TEACHER. TO GO INTO A POLITICAL WORLD IS QUITE A DIFFERENT THING, BUT SOMEBODY SAID TO ME THAT I’VE ACTUALLY SPENT 20 YEARS GETTING READY FOR IT. I’VE SAT ON A LOT OF COMMITTEES. I DID ALL THAT, AND ACTUALLY SOME OF THE GRADE FIVE KIDS WERE ASKING, “WE DIDN’T KNOW YOU WERE INTO POLITICS.” I SAID, “THAT WAS BECOMING A MUCH BIGGER PART OF MY LIFE THAT YOU GUYS DIDN’T SEE.” WHEN I LOOK BACK [I THINK], “OBVIOUSLY YOU WERE PLANNING FOR THAT, AND PREPPING FOR THAT.” “LEARNING [THIS PART OF MY LIFE] IS LIKE ANYTHING. ALWAYS DO YOUR HOMEWORK, AND BE PREPARED, AND THEN BE FLEXIBLE, BECAUSE IT’S NEVER GOING TO WORK OUT THE WAY YOU THINK, BUT THAT’S MY ENTIRE LIFE. IF I READ EVERYTHING IN ADVANCE, AND TRY TO BE AS MUCH OF AN EXPERT BEFORE I WALK INTO A ROOM, I’M HAPPY KNOWING THAT YOU ALSO CAN’T ALWAYS BE THE EXPERT. THAT’S THE THING WITH THE ELECTION AS WELL. THANK HEAVENS I HAD PEOPLE WHO KNEW A LOT MORE THAN I DID, ABOUT WHAT TO DO. THE OTHER THING THAT’S ‘TAKE AWAY’ IS PEOPLE WERE SO VERY GRACIOUS WITH THEIR TIME, AND THEIR EFFORT, AND THEIR ENERGY. IF YOU ASK FOR HELP, YOU’D BE AMAZED HOW MANY PEOPLE WILL DO IT, WHO WILL GIVE YOU AN HOUR, AN HOUR AND A HALF, AND SIT AND TALK TO YOU, AND SAY, “THIS IS WHAT I LEARNED. THIS IS WHAT I WOULD DO.” THOSE ARE THE PEOPLE I TRY TO EMULATE. TO PASS ALONG TO THE NEXT GENERATION, THE NEXT ONE, AND TO BE LIKE THAT BECAUSE I THINK PEOPLE THOUGHT WE WERE HILARIOUS. WE WERE THE FIRST ELECTION CAMPAIGN WHERE ALL THE CANDIDATES WHO WERE THERE GOT TOGETHER FOR A GROUP PHOTOGRAPH AT THE END. YOU CAN DEBATE IDEAS BUT STILL BE CIVIL. THE CAMPAIGN WAS FUN.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170033001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170033002
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
37
Length
36.4
Width
20
Description
A. BUTTON ACCORDION, 37 CM TALL X 36.4 CM LONG X 20 CM WIDE. ACCORDION IS BROWN POLISHED WOOD WITH BLACK AND LIGHT BROWN TRIM; ACCORDION HAS BLACK PLASTIC BELLOWS AND SILVER PLATE OVER THREE ROWS OF WHITE BUTTONS AT SIDE; OPOPSITE END OF ACCORDION HAS FOUR ROWS OF WHITE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS SET IN SILVER PLATE ABOVE BLACK LEATHER STRAP. TOP OF ACCORDION HAS TWO SILVER BASS/TREBLE SWITCHES. BORDERS AROUND BELLOWS HAVE PEAL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID. ACCORDION IS MISSING BUTTON FROM FOURTH ROW OF BUTTONS, AND HAS TWO WOODEN SUBSTITUTE BUTTONS IN SECOND AND FOURTH ROWS. FRONT OF ACCORDION HAS WINDOW ABOVE BELLOWS WITH GLASS PLATE OVER WHITE PAPER AND BLACK TEXT “C. DALLAPE, TRENTO (ITALIA)”. ACCORDION HAS FOUR BRASS FEET ON SIDE WITH FOUR ROWS OF BUTTONS. WOOD IS WORN AT HANDLES AND EDGES; METAL PLATES AND ACCENTS HAVE CORROSION. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BLUE COTTON BAG, 72 CM LONG X 53 CM WIDE. BAG HAS HANDLE ATTACHED TO COVER FLAP; COVER FLAP HAS THREE BUTTON HOLES. BAG HAS TWO BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS ON FRONT ALONG TOP EDGE. BAG HAS PATCHES STITCHED WITH BLACK THREAD ON FRONT UPPER LEFT CORNER, ON BACK IN THE CENTER OF BAG, AND ON THE BACK BESIDE LEFT CORNER OF HANDLE. BAG IS TORN IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER AND FRAYED; BAG IS TORN ALONG LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES AND ON FRONT AT UPPER RIGHT EDGE; BACK HAS TORN HOLES AT BOTTOM. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LESLIE MORTON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A BUTTON ACCORDION. THE ACCORDION WAS OWNED AND PLAYED BY MORTON’S GRANDFATHER, GIUSEPPE (JOSEPH) "FABRO" BRIDAROLLI, AND WAS LATER OWNED BY HER UNCLE, SYLVIO "SYL" BRIDAROLLI, BEFORE BECOMING IN HER POSSESSION. MORTON DISCUSSED HER MEMORIES OF THE ACCORDION IN HER HOME, STATING, “IT’S A BUTTON ACCORDION…THERE’S BUTTON ACCORDIONS AND PIANO ACCORDIONS, AND I PLAY THE PIANO. IF I HAD A PIANO ACCORDION, I COULD AT LEAST PICK OUT THE NOTES BECAUSE I COULD READ THE MUSIC. THIS IS SOMETHING DIFFERENT. YOU HAVE TO BE A REAL MUSICIAN TO PLAY A BUTTON ACCORDION BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY BY EAR. THERE’S THE MELODY SIDE AND THE CHORD SIDE AND YOU JUST DO IT BY EAR. IF YOU LISTEN TO HIS TAPE [IN ARCHIVES]…HE WAS JUST TURNING 81 WHEN HE MADE THIS TAPE AND HE WAS TRYING TO REMEMBER SOME OF THE SONGS HE KNEW. ONE CAME OUT REALLY GOOD AND THEN HE GOT THE MELODY OF SOMETHING. HE WAS PICKING IT OUT AND HE WAS INTO THINGS HE WAS MORE FAMILIAR WITH. HE WAS VERY MUSICAL AND HAD A REAL EAR. IT’S SORT OF LIKE AN IRISH BUTTON ACCORDION BUT NOT QUITE. IT’S BIGGER.” “WHAT I REMEMBER [MY GRANDPARENTS] TELLING ME IS WHEN HE WAS HERE, HE HAD IT MADE FOR HIM IN ITALY AND IT WAS SENT OVER TO CANADA WHEN HE LIVED HERE. I ALSO UNDERSTOOD HE PLAYED IN ITALY BUT THIS ACCORDION WAS MADE FOR HIM THERE AND SENT OVER [IN THE 1920S].” “IT’S A TREASURE. I WOULD SAY OF ALL THE THINGS I FOUND IN MY PARENTS’ HOME AND ALL THE THINGS I’VE HAD TO FIND HOMES FOR, ALL THE THINGS THAT WOULD REMIND ME OF MY CHILDHOOD, THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING. EVER. IT EVOKES REALLY STRONG MEMORIES. THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT MUSIC IN A FAMILY. IF YOU CAN MEET TOGETHER AND YOU CAN SHARE MUSIC, WHICH OUR FAMILY DID, IT LEAVES AN IMPRESSION THAT YOU DON’T EVER FORGET.” “[THE ACCORDION] REALLY WAS FOR MY GRANDFATHER [GIUESEPPE “JOSEPH” BRIDAROLLI]. IT WAS FROM HIM. THAT’S WHERE THE [LOVE OF] MUSIC CAME FROM FOR ALL [MY FAMILY].” “WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL, WE WOULD GO OVER TO [MY GRANDPARENTS’] HOUSE AT 909 - 8TH STREET NORTH, [MY GRANDFATHER] ALWAYS PLAYED. HE’D JUST SIT IN HIS KITCHEN AND HE’D PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. HE WOULD SIT ON A BENCH BY THE BACK DOOR OUTSIDE AND HE WOULD PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. AT CHRISTMAS, MY GRANDPARENTS WOULD COME OVER [TO OUR HOME] AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. MY MOTHER WOULD PLAY THE VIOLIN, MY SISTER THE PIANO. SHE WAS BETTER THAN ME AND WE WOULD ALL SING CAROLS. FOR MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE THE SAME. HE ALWAYS WAS THERE PLAYING HIS ACCORDION. WHEN MY UNCLE AND AUNT CAME TO VISIT, IT WAS THE SAME THING. HE’D PLAY.” ON HER FAMILY’S HISTORY AND CONNECTION TO THE ACCORDION, MORTON ELABORTED, “[MY GRANDFATHER] STOPPED WORKING IN THE MINES IN THE FIFTIES. HE WAS STILL DOING IT IN THE FIFTIES. WHEN THEY CAME OVER FOR SUNDAY DINNER OR WE WENT OVER THERE [MY GRANDFATHER WOULD PLAY]. [WHEN] MY GRANDMOTHER WAS WELL ENOUGH, WE WOULD ALTERNATE [HOMES FOR DINNERS]. THEN WHEN IT GOT HARDER FOR HER [SUNDAY DINNER] WAS ALWAYS IN OUR HOME. I MADE A TAPE WHEN MY PARENTS WENT TO INDIA IN 1971, AND THAT’S WHEN MY UNCLE GOT MARRIED AS WELL. WE CORRESPONDED BY CASSETTE TAPE. THAT SOUNDS VERY ANTIQUATED NOWADAYS. THERE WAS NO EMAIL. PHONES WERE DIFFICULT WHEN YOU TRIED TO PHONE INDIA AND [WE] HAD TO YELL INTO THE PHONE. SO WE DECIDED TO MAKE CASSETTE TAPES…I WENT DOWN SEPTEMBER THE 5TH, 1971…AND I HAD HIM PLAY THE ACCORDION SO THAT I COULD SEND THIS TAPE TO MY PARENTS. [THIS TAPE HAS] HIS VOICE A LITTLE BIT IN THE BACKGROUND AND MINE A TINY BIT BUT IT’S HIS MUSIC THAT’S IMPORTANT. IT WAS SENT OVER TO INDIA FOR THEM AND WE’VE KEPT IT EVER SINCE. HE DIED IN ’72 AND WE PLAYED THAT ACCORDION TAPE A HUNDRED MILLION TIMES. MY UNCLE ALSO HAD ONE OF COURSE. HE WAS ALWAYS PLAYING. MY MOTHER TELLS A STORY, ALTHOUGH IT’S NOT A FAMILY ONE BUT SHE SAID THAT FRIENDS OF HIS, WHEN IT WAS THEIR BIRTHDAY, HE WOULD GO OVER SIT UNDER THEIR WINDOW AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. HE WOULD PLAY AT GATHERINGS OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY. HE PLAYED AT DANCES.” “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN SEPTEMBER 7TH 1890 AND MY GRANDMOTHER [MARIA BERTE] WAS JANUARY 9TH, 1893. THEY WERE FROM CAVENDINE, ITALY, WHICH IS IN THE PROVINCE OF TRENTO AND THAT’S WHERE THIS ACCORDION WAS MANUFACTURED…THEY WERE VERY POOR OVER THERE…I FOUND A PAPER IN THE MIDDLE OF THE FAMILY DOCUMENTS THAT, I DON’T SPEAK ITALIAN, BUT IT LOOKED LIKE A POVERTY DOCUMENT THAT HAS MY GRANDFATHER—HIS FATHER’S NAME ON IT. THEY WERE VERY POOR AND THEY WOULD HAVE COME HERE TO MAKE A BETTER LIFE FOR HIS FAMILY.” “I UNDERSTAND THAT MY GRANDFATHER CAME OVER BY HIMSELF PRIOR TO 1920. HE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE AND SIZED THINGS UP. HE WENT BACK TO ITALY AND GOT MARRIED TO MY GRANDMOTHER IN 1920. MY MOTHER WAS BORN OVER THERE. IT WAS 1924, IN OCTOBER WHEN HE BROUGHT HIS WIFE AND HIS YOUNG DAUGHTER, ANN, OVER. THEY CAME ON A BOAT AND LANDED IN THE MARITIMES, AND THEY MADE THEIR WAY TO LETHBRIDGE. THEY STARTED IN COALHURST FOR A SHORT WHILE…AND THEN THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. MY UNCLE WAS BORN HERE IN 1926.” “I CAN GUESS [MY GRANDPARENTS MOVED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA] BECAUSE [OF] MILLIE LUCIANI—THERE WERE BERTE FAMILIES HERE AND MY GRANDMOTHER WAS A BERTE. MILLIE LUCICANI’S FATHER[WAS A BERTE AND HE WAS A COUSIN OF MY [GRAND]MOTHER] … THERE WAS COMMUNICATION THERE THAT THIS WAS THE PLACE TO COME BECAUSE THEY WERE ALREADY HERE.” “WHEN MY GRANDFATHER DIED IN 1972, I HAD THIS ACCORDION AND THEN, AT A CERTAIN POINT I GAVE IT TO MY UNCLE, HIS SON, SYL. HE HAD IT IN FERNIE THEN IN MERRITT. HE DIED IN 2011 AND MY AUNT SENT IT TO ME. WE TALKED ABOUT LEAVING IT TO THE MUSEUM BUT I DIDN’T WANT TO LET GO OF IT YET. WHAT HAS SPURRED IT ON IS THAT THERE IS NOBODY ELSE TO PASS IT ON TO.” “I WAS GIVEN THIS BECAUSE, WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL I JUST LOVED IT. HE PLAYED AND I LOVED IT. MY UNCLE LOVED IT TOO, HE DIDN’T LIVE HERE AND BECAUSE IT WAS EASY AND MY PARENTS HAD TO LEAVE FOR INDIA, I GOT IT TEMPORARILY. IT DID BELONG MORE TO MY MOM AND MY UNCLE THAN TO ME, BUT I HAD IT FIRST FOR QUITE A WHILE.” “MY SISTER AND I WERE TALKING AND WE THOUGHT, WELL REALLY IT WAS MORE [OUR UNCLE’S] THAN OURS. THAT’S WHY [I GAVE IT TO HIM]. BY GOING TO ME IT WENT TO MY MOM AND SHE WAS THE ELDEST. BUT WHEN MY MOTHER WAS GETTING REALLY SICK AND HE WAS COMING TO VISIT HER AND SHE WASN’T GOING TO LIVE, THEN IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IT GO TO THE NEXT PERSON WHICH REALLY WOULD BE MY UNCLE. WE THOUGHT IT WAS THE RIGHT THING AND HE WAS ENCHANTED. IT WAS REALLY HIS AT THAT POINT.” “I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY IT SO I TRIED, BUT I HAD ARTHRITIS IN MY SHOULDERS SO I COULDN’T. I WOULD TAKE [IT] OUT EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE AND TRY TO PLAY “SILENT NIGHT”. I JUST TOOK IT WHEREVER I WENT AND TRIED TO LOOK AFTER IT.” “IT WOULD BE [ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN MY HOME] AND I’M SURE FOR MY UNCLE TOO. PICTURES ARE REALLY IMPORTANT TO OUR FAMILY AND TO ME. I KNOW TO MY UNCLE SYL AS WELL THIS WOULD BE [IMPORTANT] BECAUSE WE ALL REMEMBERED [MY GRANDFATHER] PLAYING ALL THE TIME. HE NEVER SAT DOWN WITHOUT IT ON HIS LAP. TO MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE EVEN STRONGER BECAUSE, OF COURSE, HE GREW UP WITH HIS FATHER PLAYING THE ACCORDION.” “MY GRANDPARENTS HAD TWO CHILDREN, MY MOTHER ANN, AND HER BROTHER SYL. SYL NEVER HAD ANY CHILDREN, THEY ADOPTED A GIRL ONCE BUT THAT WAS LONG AGO [AND] SHE’S OUT OF THE PICTURE. THERE’S MY AUNT, HIS WIFE, AND THERE’S ME. MY PARENTS HAVE PASSED AWAY AND MY SISTER, LAUREL, PASSED AWAY IN 2009 IN GENEVA. IF SOMETHING HAPPENS TO ME, THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO WAY THIS BRIDAROLLI FAMILY WILL CARRY ON. THE ANDERSON FAMILY [MY FATHER’S FAMILY] THERE WERE EIGHT OF THEM. THERE’S NOBODY ELSE. THERE’S ME AND I FEEL A LITTLE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE IT’S POSSIBLE THAT THE JOSEPH BRIDAROLLI FAMILY IS IN SOME WAY REMEMBERED. MY GRANDFATHER WAS A COAL MINER IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE ALSO WAS A PART OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY AND THEY WEREN’T RICH; THEY WEREN’T POWERFUL. THEY DIDN’T HOLD POSITIONS BUT I THINK THEIR STORY IS VERY IMPORTANT AS IMMIGRANTS FROM ITALY AND I’D LIKE TO TELL THEIR STORY. THAT’S THE REASON I BROUGHT IT. I THINK IT WOULD BE REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IN SOME WAY IT IS PERPETUATED BOTH FOR MY UNCLE AND MY MOTHER AS WELL AS HER PARENTS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180011000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

391 records – page 1 of 20.