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91 records – page 1 of 5.

Date Range
1911
Material Type
Map
Accession No.
19736214002
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 60 x 87 cm
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report); For numbers 398 to 417, See District No. XA, Chap. III
Material Type
Map
Date Range
1911
Creator
Commission of Conservation Canada
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 60 x 87 cm
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Canadian?
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report); For numbers 398 to 417, See District No. XA, Chap. III
Notes
Scale 1:1,100,000 Base map from plates of Map of Canada, Department of the Interior This map along with 5 other maps is contained within an envelope entitled: Commission of Conservation, 1911. Maps to Accompany Report on the Water-Powers of Canada.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19736214002
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1911
Material Type
Map
Accession No.
19736214003
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 65 x 86 cm
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, See Report; Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, See Report
Material Type
Map
Date Range
1911
Creator
Commission of Conservation Canada
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 65 x 86 cm
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Canadian?
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, See Report; Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, See Report
Notes
Scale 1:1,100,000 Base map from plates of Map of Canada, Department of the Interior This map along with 5 other maps is contained within an envelope entitled: Commission of Conservation, 1911. Maps to Accompany Report on the Water-Powers of Canada.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19736214003
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Water-powers in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and part of North West Territories

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions94124
Date Range
1911
Material Type
Map
Accession No.
19736214004
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 65 x 86 cm
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report)
Material Type
Map
Date Range
1911
Creator
Commission of Conservation Canada
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 65 x 86 cm
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Canadian?
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report)
Notes
Scale 1:1,100,000 Base map from plates of Map of Dominion of Canada, Dept. of Interior This map along with 5 other maps is contained within an envelope entitled: Commission of Conservation, 1911. Maps to Accompany Report on the Water-Powers of Canada.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19736214004
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Water-powers in British Columbia

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions94125
Date Range
1911
Material Type
Map
Accession No.
19736214005
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 74 x 71 cm
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report); The Province contains many Water-Powers that have not been measured
Material Type
Map
Date Range
1911
Creator
Commission of Conservation Canada
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 74 x 71 cm
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Canadian?
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report); The Province contains many Water-Powers that have not been measured
Notes
Scale 1:1,100,000 Base map from plates of Map of Dominion of Canada, Dept. of Interior This map along with 5 other maps is contained within an envelope entitled: Commission of Conservation, 1911. Maps to Accompany Report on the Water-Powers of Canada.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19736214005
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Woman watches small bags of sugar on a conveyor.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88952
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063023
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063023
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Woman fills bags with sugar.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88953
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063024
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063024
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Exterior of factory with a man operating machinery (crane with scoop).

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88954
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063025
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063025
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

View of Taber factory with tree in foreground (Fall/Winter?).

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88955
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063026
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063026
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063027
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063027
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Workers exiting the Taber factory.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88957
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063028
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063028
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Men stacking bags of sugar outside the factory.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88958
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063029
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063029
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063030
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063030
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Man moving stacked bags of sugar.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88960
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063031
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063031
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Exterior of Picture Butte factory with cars parked in front.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88961
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063032
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063032
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Rail cars filled with sugar beets.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88962
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063033
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063033
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Piles of beets and trucks full of beets in front of the Taber factory.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88963
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063034
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063034
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063035
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063035
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

View from above of men emptying a truck of beets.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88965
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063036
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063036
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Man standing beside some machinery.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88966
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063037
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063037
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Man standing beside rail car.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88967
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063038
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063038
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

91 records – page 1 of 5.