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75th anniversary charter of the Chinook Club of Lethbridge

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96019
Date Range
1976
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191071
Physical Description
16"x22" paper, hand drawn, color
Scope and Content
75th anniversary charter of the Chinook Club of Lethbridge with members signitures
Date Range
1976
Description Level
Item
Creator
Chinook Club of Lethbridge
Physical Description
16"x22" paper, hand drawn, color
Scope and Content
75th anniversary charter of the Chinook Club of Lethbridge with members signitures
Accession No.
20191071
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Galt Hospital Women's Auxiliary

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions29
Date Range
1931-1944
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
19861043001
Physical Description
24 cm of textual records.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of minutes of monthly meetings of the Galt Hospital Women's Auxiliary, annual reports, financial reports, correspondence, and bills and receipts.
Date Range
1931-1944
Fonds
Galt Hospital Women's Auxiliary
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Galt Hospital Women's Auxiliary
Physical Description
24 cm of textual records.
History / Biographical
Administrative history unavailable.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of minutes of monthly meetings of the Galt Hospital Women's Auxiliary, annual reports, financial reports, correspondence, and bills and receipts.
Notes
Title based on the contents of the fonds.
Finding Aid
File list available.
Accession No.
19861043001
Category
Women
Health services
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1883-1898
Description Level
Series
Material Type
Map
Accession No.
20171080
Physical Description
55 maps 38x45 cm paper
Scope and Content
001 Township 5, Range 20 1896 Kipp Coulee, McLeod & Benton Trail 002 Township 5, Range 23 1901 St. Mary River, Cardston Trail, St. Mary's River Railway, Pinepound Creek 003 Township 4, Range 24 1899 St. Mary River, telephone line Cardston-Lethbridge 004 Township 5, Range 22 1889 Pot Hole River, spu…
Material Type
Map
Date Range
1883-1898
Description Level
Series
Creator
Department of the Interior Topographical Surveys Branch. Ottawa
Physical Description
55 maps 38x45 cm paper
Physical Condition
Fair
Scope and Content
001 Township 5, Range 20 1896 Kipp Coulee, McLeod & Benton Trail 002 Township 5, Range 23 1901 St. Mary River, Cardston Trail, St. Mary's River Railway, Pinepound Creek 003 Township 4, Range 24 1899 St. Mary River, telephone line Cardston-Lethbridge 004 Township 5, Range 22 1889 Pot Hole River, spur of Milk River Ridge 005 Township 12, Range 5 1919 South Saskatchewan River, CP railway, Medicine Hat station, Dunmore Station 006 Township 12, Range 6 1919 South Saskatchewan River, Sevenpersons River 007 Township 12, Range 7 1919 South Saskatchewan River 008 Township 12, Range 8 1920 South Saskatchewan River 009 Township 11, Range 5 1911 Bullshead Creek, Medicine Hat - Josephburg trail 010 Township 11, Range 6 1911 Sevenpersons River, CPR Crowsnest Branch 011 Township 11, Range 7 1911 Sevenpersons River, CPR Crowsnest Branch, Sevenpersons Station 012 Township 11, Range 8 1920 CPR Crowsnest & Lethbridge Section 013 Township 11, Range 9 1911 CPR Crowsnest Branch, McLead-Medicine Hat Trail, Winnifred Station 014 Township 11, Range 10 1911 CPR Crowsnest Branch 015 Township 11, Range 11 1919 South Saskatchewan River 016 Township 11, Range 12 1926 South Saskatchewan River 017 Township 11, Range 13 1930 South Saskatchewan River, Oldman River, Bow River 018 Township 11, Range 14 1930 Oldman River 019 Township 11, Range 15 1885 Belly River 020 Township 11, Range 16 1915 Oldman River 021 Township 10, Range 7 1911 Sevenpersons River, CPR Crowsnest Branch 022 Township 10, Range 8 1883 NW Coal & Navigation Company River 023 Township 10, Range 10 1913 CPR Crowsnest Branch (revised location line), Medicine Hat Trail, Lethbridge BR. 024 Township 10, Range 11 1914 CPR Crowsnest Branch, McLeod-Medicine Hat Trail, Bow Island Station 025 Township 10, Range 12 1920 CPR Lethbridge & Crowsnest Section, Burdett Station 026 Township 10, Range 13 1914 CPR Lethbridge & Crowsnest Branch, Grassy Lake Station, McLeod-Medicine Hat Trail, Grand Forks Trail 027 Township 10, Range 14 1911 CPR Lethbridge & Crowsnest Branch, Purple Spring Station, Trail to Medicine Hat 028 Township 10, Range 15 1911 CPR Lethbridge & Crowsnest Branch, MacLeod-Medicine Hat Trail 029 Township 10, Range 16 1915 CPR Lethbridge & Crowsnest Section, Belly River 030 Township 10, Range 17 1915 Belly River 031 Township 10, Range 18 1916 Belly River 032 Township 10, Range 19 1920 Oldman River 033 Township 10, Range 20 1918 Oldman River 034 Township 10, Range 21 1920 Oldman River, Piyani Coulee 035 Township 9, Range 8 1914 Branch of Sevenpersons River, Lake No. 1 036 Township 9, Range 11 1914 N/A 037 Township 9, Range 12 1916 Yellow Lake 038 Township 9, Range 13 1914 N/A 039 Township 9, Range 14 1914 N/A 040 Township 9, Range 15 1911 MacLeod-Medicine Hat Trail 041 Township 9, Range 16 1914 MacLeod-Medicine Hat Trail, CPR Lethbridge & Crowsnest Section, Former bed of Horsefly Lake 042 Township 9, Range 17 1921 CPR Lethbridge & Crowsnest Section 043 Township 9, Range 18 1915 CPR Lethbridge & Crowsnest Section, Chin Coulee, MacLeod-Medicine Hat Trail, Chin Coulee Lake, Lake No. 1, Reservoir Lake 044 Township 9, Range 19 1915 Lake No. 2, Lake No. 3, CPR Lethbridge & Crowsnest Abandoned Section, CPR Lethbridge & Crowsnest Revised Location, Reservoir Lake, Lethbridge-Medicine Hat Trail, McLeod-Medicine Hat Trail, Chin Coulee Lake, Chin Station 045 Township 9, Range 20 1916 CPR Lethbridge & Crowsnest to be abandoned Section, Coaldale Station, Revised location line of Crowsnest & Lethbridge CPR 046 Township 9, Range 21 1916 Lethbridge Station, Lethbridge-Crowsnest Section of CPR, Montana Junction, CPR Location line of Weyburn Lethbridge Branch, CPR Revised Lethbridge Location Line, Jail Lake, CPR Crowsnest Abandoned Railway, Raymond-Foremost Section C.P.RY., Oldman River, MacLeod Section of C.P.RY. 047 Township 8, Range 11 1910 Forty Mile Coulee, Burdette Trail 048 Township 8, Range 12 1920 N/A 049 Township 8, Range 13 1920 N/A 050 Township 8, Range 14 1920 N/A 051 Township 8, Range 15 1907 Walsh & MacLeod Trail 052 Township 8, Range 16 1907 N/A 053 Township 8, Range 17 1915 Lake No. 2, Chin Coulee 054 Township 8, Range 18 1915 Lake No. 1, Lake No. 2, CPR Lethbridge-Weyburn Branch Location Line, Chin Coulee 055 Township 8, Range 19 1889 Lethbridge-Medicine Hat Cart Trail, MacLeod-Walsh Cart Trail, MacLeod-Medicine Hat Trail, Walsh-McLeod Trail 056 Township 7, Range 16 1915 CPR Lethbridge-Weyburn Branch Location Line, Chin Coulee 057 Township 7, Range 17 1915 CPR Lethbridge-Weyburn Branch Location Line, Chin Coulee, Lake No. 1 058 Township 7, Range 20 1916 CPR Raymond-Foremost Section, Lethbridge-Stirling Surveyed Trail 059 Township 7, Range 21 1916 Cardston-Lethbridge Surveyed Trail, Blood Indian Reserve No. 148, St. Mary River, MacLeod-Fort Benton Trail 060 Township 6, Range 19 1917 CPR Raymond-Foremost Section, CPR Raymond-Foremost Section Location Line, Stirling Lake, Stirling Station 061 Township 6, Range 20 1917 MacLeod-Fort Benton Trail, Stirling Lake 062 Township 6, Range 21 1910 MacLeod-Benton Trail, Pothole River 063 Township 5, Range 21 1901 N/A, just prairie land 064 Township 5, Range 19 1900 Kipp Creek, Fort Benton Trail, Lake No. 1 065 Township 4, Range 22 1895 Cardston Trail, Pothole Creek 066 Township 5, Range 23 1889 N/A, prairie, unnamed trail
Notes
Scale 40 Chains to an inch Approved and confirmed by E. Deville
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
20171080
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88929
Date Range
1947-1958
Accession No.
20161063
Physical Description
86 bw 8x10 photographic prints
Scope and Content
2016.1063/001 Harvesting sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/002 Man standing on top of a pile of sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/003 Man and team of horses working in a sugar beet field. 1958 2016.1063/004 View of Taber Factory with tree in the foreground (Summer?). 1958 2016.1063/005 ?1958 2016.1063/006 Truc…
Date Range
1947-1958
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
86 bw 8x10 photographic prints
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Scope and Content
2016.1063/001 Harvesting sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/002 Man standing on top of a pile of sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/003 Man and team of horses working in a sugar beet field. 1958 2016.1063/004 View of Taber Factory with tree in the foreground (Summer?). 1958 2016.1063/005 ?1958 2016.1063/006 Trucks full of sugar beets at a factory. 1958 2016.1063/007 View of Taber Factory.1958 2016.1063/008 Two workers on a tractor harvesting beets. 1958 2016.1063/009 Beets being moved into a rail car (Child sitting in the front seat of a truck). 1958 2016.1063/010 Piles of sugar beets in foreground with factory in the background. 1985 2016.1063/011 Sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/012 Man moving bags of sugar. 1958 2016.1063/013 Bags of sugar moving up a conveyor belt to two men standing on stacked bags. 1958 2016.1063/014 Man with two watches inspecting sugar on a glass plate. 1958 2016.1063/015 Man in a hat with “C.S.F. Limited” printed on it standing over a machine full of sugar. 1958 2016.1063/016 Man in a white coat surrounded by lab equipment. 1958 2016.1063/017 Man inspecting sugar beets on a conveyor belt. 1958 2016.1063/018 Sugar beet juice? 1958 2016.1063/019 Shredded sugar beets? 1958 2016.1063/020 Man with two watches inspecting sugar. 1958 2016.1063/021 Man filling bags with sugar. 1958 2016.1063/022 Factory interior. 1958 2016.1063/023 Woman watches small bags of sugar on a conveyor. 1958 2016.1063/024 Woman fills bags with sugar. 1958 2016.1063/025 Exterior of factory with a man operating machinery (crane with scoop). 1958 2016.1063/026 View of Taber factory with tree in foreground (Fall/Winter?). 1958 2016.1063/027 View of Taber factory. 1958 2016.1063/028 Workers exiting the Taber factory. 1958 2016.1063/029 Men stacking bags of sugar outside the factory. 1958 2016.1063/030 Factory yard. 1958 2016.1063/031 Man moving stacked bags of sugar. 1958 2016.1063/032 Exterior of Picture Butte factory with cars parked in front. 1958 2016.1063/033 Rail cars filled with sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/034 Piles of beets and trucks full of beets in front of the Taber factory. 1958 2016.1063/035 Men moving beets. 1958 2016.1063/036 View from above of men emptying a truck of beets. 1958. 2016.1063/037 Man standing beside some machinery. 1958 2016.1063/038 Man standing beside rail car. 1958 2016.1063/039 Woman sewing filled bags of sugar closed. 1958 2016.1063/040 Exterior of factory with rail cars. 1958 2016.1063/041 Man sewing closed bags of dried molasses beet pulp from Taber factory. 1958 2016.1063/042 Canadian Sugar Factory machinery 1947 2016.1063/043 Railway tracks in the foreground and piles of sugar beets in the background. 1947 2016.1063/044 Construction of Taber factory. 1947 2016.1063/045 View of Picture Butte factory and surrounding land. 1947 2016.1063/046 Factory exterior. 1947. 2016.1063/047 Factory exterior with piles of beets. 1947. 2016.1063/048 Loading beets into a railway car. 1947 2016.1063/049 Loading beets into a railway car. 1947 2016.1063/050 Exterior of Picture butte factory. 1947 2016.1063/051 Large pile of sugar beets. 1947 2016.1063/052 Large pile of sugar beets. 1947 2016.1063/053 Woman sewing bags of sugar closed. (“Photograph from Office of Director of Public Information Ottawa, Photograph by Nicholas Morant” printed on back). [1947?] 2016.1063/054 View of Picture Butte factory and surrounding land. 1947 2016.1063/055 Man sewing bags of sugar closed. 1947 2016.1063/056 Four men working on machinery. 1947 2016.1063/057 Sugar inside machinery. 1947 2016.1063/058 Warehouse with bags of sugar at Raymond factory. 1947 2016.1063/059 Man working. 1947 2016.1063/060 Sugar crystals coming off a drum. 1947 2016.1063/061 Man standing at a sink. 1947 2016.1063/062 Large sugar vats. 1947 2016.1063/063 Canadian Sugar Factory machinery 1947 2016.1063/064 Three women fill and sew bags of sugar from Raymond factory. 1947 2016.1063/065 Machinery. 1947 2016.1063/066 Shredded beets on a conveyor. 1947 2016.1063/067 Canadian Sugar Factory machinery 1947 2016.1063/068 Canadian Sugar Factory machinery 1947 2016.1063/069 Canadian Sugar Factory machinery 1947 2016.1063/070 Exterior of Raymond factory. 1947 2016.1063/071 Exterior of Raymond factory. 1947 2016.1063/072 Exterior of Picture Butte factory. 1947 2016.1063/073 Exterior of Raymond(?) factory. 1947 2016.1063/074 Sugar beets in front of factory. 1947 2016.1063/075 Sugar beets in front of factory. 1947 2016.1063/076 Sugar beets in front of Raymond factory. 1947 2016.1063/077 Sugar beets and Hoover bulldozer. 1947 2016.1063/078 Four men on tractor in a beet field, side view. 1947 2016.1063/079 Four men on tractor in a beet field, rear view. 1947 2016.1063/080 Four men on tractor in a beet field, side view. 1947 2016.1063/081 Woman sewing bags of sugar closed. (“Photograph from Office of Director of Public Information Ottawa, Photograph by Nicholas Morant” printed on reverse). [1947?] 2016.1063/082 Four men on a tractor and truck working in a beet field, side view. 1947 2016.1063/083 Man driving a tractor. 1947 2016.1063/084 Man driving a Caterpiller, house in the background. 1947 2016.1063/085 Man making a field ditch. 1947 2016.1063/086 Canadian Sugar Factories Limited Advertising, brochure entitled “Energy! For Breakfast” ca.1950
Accession No.
20161063
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063001
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063001
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Man standing on top of a pile of sugar beets.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88931
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063002
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063002
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Man and team of horses working in a sugar beet field.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88932
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063003
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063003
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

View of Taber Factory with tree in the foreground (Summer?).

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88933
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063004
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063004
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063005
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063005
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Trucks full of sugar beets at a factory.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88935
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063006
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063006
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063007
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063007
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Two workers on a tractor harvesting beets.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88937
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063008
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063008
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Beets being moved into a rail car (Child sitting in the front seat of a truck).

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88938
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063009
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063009
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Piles of sugar beets in foreground with factory in the background.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88939
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063010
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063010
Collection
Archive
Images
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Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063011
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063011
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Man moving bags of sugar.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88941
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063012
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063012
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Bags of sugar moving up a conveyor belt to two men standing on stacked bags.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88942
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063013
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063013
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Man with two watches inspecting sugar on a glass plate.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88943
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063014
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063014
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Man in a hat with “C.S.F. Limited” printed on it standing over a machine full of sugar.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88944
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063015
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063015
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Man in a white coat surrounded by lab equipment.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88945
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063016
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063016
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

90 records – page 1 of 5.