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Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Length
17.5
Diameter
17.5
Description
BLACK AND SILVER GLAZED, CERAMIC VASE WITH RED AND GOLD DESIGNS PAINTED ON OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE VASE. ONE DESIGN SHOWCASES A CRANE FLYING TOWARDS A TREE BRANCH, WHILE THE OTHER SHOWCASES TWO CRANES PERCHED ON A LARGE TREE BRANCH BENEATH A RED DISC/MOON. “MADE IN JAPAN” IS STAMPED INTO BASE OF VASE. CONDITION: THE LIP OF THE VASE HAS A 4.3 CM CHIP AND IS MISSING 7.6 CM ALONG TOP EDGE. LOOSE OF PAINT AND OVERALL FINISH OF DESIGN. SLIGHT CHIPPING AROUND BASE.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
FURNISHINGS
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THAT THIS VASE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” THIS VASE WAS VISIBLE THROUGHOUT MRS. NISHIYAMA’S CHILDHOOD. SHE EXPLAINED, “[THE VASE] WAS MORE AN EVERYDAY THING.” IT WAS PLACED BY THE DOOR OF THE FARM HOUSE. AND “[THE] ONLY THING THAT WAS IN THERE WAS [MY MOTHER’S] UMBRELLA.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S HAIR ORNAMENTS AND COMB ALSO DONATED WITH THE VASE (P20160042002-004). THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
LIBRARY CARD CATALOGUE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAPER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140025001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
LIBRARY CARD CATALOGUE
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
2010
Materials
WOOD, PAPER, METAL
No. Pieces
31
Height
100.75
Length
103.25
Width
46
Description
.1 – WOOD CABINET CONTAINING 30 DRAWERS IN SIX ROWS (.2 - .31). CABINET’S FOUR LEGS AND EDGES ARE SQUARED, WITH THREE METAL ANGLED BRACKETS AND TWO WOODEN CORNER BRACES ATTACHING THE CABINET BODY TO THE LEGS. WOOD IS STAINED BLONDE. STAMPED TEXT IN BLUE INK ON UNDERSIDE OF CABINET READS "MADE IN CANADA". GENERAL WEAR AND SCUFFS OVERALL, ESPECIALLY ALONG TOP FRONT EDGE AND BOTTOM FRONT SKIRTING PANEL. DRIPS OF WHITE PAINT ON EDGES OF BOTH FRONT LEGS AND CABINET BACK EDGES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. 100.75 X 46 X 103.25 ALL DRAWERS (.2 - .31) ARE WOOD WITH BRASS LABELPLATES AND MEASURE 9.75 X 14.5 X 41. .2 – FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .3 – FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .4 – EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD. .5 – HALF FULL OF LOOSE CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .6 - EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL OR DRAWER ROD. .7 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .8 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. DRAWER ROD BRACKET IS MISSING ONE SCREW AND HANGS LOOSE. .9 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .10 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “LYRICS INDEX”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .11 - EMPTY EXCEPT FOR METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. NO LABEL; DRAWER ROD IN PLACE. .12 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .13 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .14 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .15 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .16 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .17 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1990”. NO DRAWER ROD; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .18 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. NEWS 1989”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .19 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 A-J”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .20 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 J-S”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .21 – HALF FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1989 S-Z”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .22 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. BIOGRAPHY 1990 A-K DONE”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .23 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. NO LABEL. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .24 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. AUTHORITY”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .25 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “L.H. AUTHORITY”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .26 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .27 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .28 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL IS FADED AND ILLEGIBLE. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .29 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “CDN… PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .30 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK. .31 - FULL OF CATALOGUE CARDS WITH TYPED AND HANDWRITTEN NOTES ON BOTH SIDES. HANDWRITTEN DRAWER LABEL READS “PLAY ANALYTICS”. DRAWER ROD IS IN PLACE; METAL FILING CLIP INSIDE DRAWER AT BACK.
Subjects
FURNITURE
DATA PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
FURNISHINGS
History
THIS CARD CATALOGUE WAS PRODUCED AND USED BY STAFF AT THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY. ON MAY 1, 2015 COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LINDA MCELRAVY, WHO WORKED AT THE LIBRARY’S MAIN BRANCH STARTING IN 1978, RETIRING FROM HER POSITION AS ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SERVICES IN 2008. MCELRAVY EXPLAINED THE CATALOGUING PROCESS AND SUGGESTED THAT IT MAY HAVE BEEN HOUSED IN THE LIBRARY’S SENATOR BUCHANAN ROOM (A REFERENCE RESOURCE OF LOCAL HISTORIES AND GENEALOGIES) AT ONE TIME. MCELRAVY SAID: “WE USED [CARD CATALOGUES] PRIOR TO AUTOMATING OUR CATALOGUE WHICH WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE EARLY ‘80S… THERE ARE AT LEAST THREE INDEXES [INSIDE THIS SPECIFIC CATALOGUE]… WE USED TO CREATE CARD INDEXES FOR COLLECTIONS AND THINGS THAT YOU COULDN’T FIND… THROUGH NORMAL CATALOGUING PROCESSES. SO, THE FIRST ONE IS… THE SONG INDEX AND THAT WAS MADE UP OF ANALYTICS OF SHEET MUSIC MAGAZINE AND COLLECTIONS AND SONGS – ALL MUSIC AS OPPOSED TO JUST THE LYRICS. SO WE WOULD TAKE COLLECTIONS OF SONGS IN OUR LIBRARY COLLECTION, WE DIDN’T USE ANYTHING THAT WAS NOT AVAILABLE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY – SO IT WASN’T A GENERAL THING IT WAS SPECIFIC, A SPECIFIC TOOL TO OUR COLLECTION… IF SOMEONE WANTED A PARTICULAR PIECE OF MUSIC… WE WOULD BE ABLE TO FIND THAT HERE RATHER THAN PEOPLE STANDING AT THE SHELF, LEAFING THROUGH ALL OF THAT… [AT] THE OTHER END OF THE BANK OF CARDS IS THE PLAY INDEX AND THAT’S THE SAME IDEA – THERE WOULD BE ‘AUTHOR’, ‘PLAYWRIGHT’ AND ‘TITLE’ CARDS PUT IN FOR EACH OF THE PLAYS IN COLLECTIONS THAT WE HAD AT LPL. AND THE MIDDLE ONE WAS THE INDEX TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD – I THINK SOME OF IT GOES BACK TO ’99 AND BEFORE AND FOR THAT ONE THE STAFF WOULD CUT OUT ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD AND THEN THEY WOULD PUT SUBJECT HEADINGS ON THEM AND MAKE A CORRESPONDING CARD FOR THE CATALOGUE SO THAT THAT WOULD GIVE PEOPLE ACCESS TO THAT [FILE]...” MCELRAVY CONTINUED: “I THINK [THE AUTOMATION OF THE LIBRARY CATALOGUE] WAS IN THE MID ‘80S… [AFTER THAT PROCESS] I’M NOT SURE HOW OFTEN THEY USED [THE CARD CATALOGUES] ANYMORE… PERHAPS IT WAS JUST A QUESTION OF HANGING ON TO IT FOR THE SAKE OF HANGING ON TO IT.. I DON’T SUPPOSE REALLY FOR TOO LONG AFTER THAT IT WOULD [HAVE BEEN] USEFUL… [THE CARD CATALOGUE] REPRESENTS A LOT OF WORK… IT WAS EXPENSIVE TIME-WISE, IT WAS EXPENSIVE MATERIALS-WISE AND IT WAS EXPENSIVE SPACE-WISE… EVEN WITH THE DIGITIZED, AUTOMATED CATALOGUE, THOSE GENERIC ENTRIES DIDN’T NECESSARILY HAVE ANALYTICS… SO THAT’S WHY WE CONTINUED WITH THIS FOR A WHILE AND THEN EVENTUALLY IT JUST SEEMED TO BE NOT WORTH THE EFFORT TO DO IT… IT JUST SEEMED SAD TO ME THAT IT WAS ALMOST LIKE IT WASN’T RECOGNIZED BECAUSE IT WAS TOO OLD – IT HAD HAD ITS DAY BUT THERE’S NO PURPOSE FOR IT ANYMORE… I THINK THAT THIS CERTAINLY SERVED ITS PURPOSE FOR ITS TIME AND IT’S PART OF THE CONTEXT OF THE PERIOD… I OFTEN THINK TODAY WITH INTERNET AND WITH ALL THE ONLINE ACCESS THAT PEOPLE HAVE TO INFORMATION… WHEN YOU HAVE A QUESTION WHAT DO PEOPLE DO NOW? THEY PULL OUT THEIR PHONE, AND THEY GOOGLE, AND THEY GET THE ANSWER. WHEREAS, BEFORE ANY OF THIS HAPPENED THAT WAS WHAT THE LIBRARY DID, THAT WAS THE ROLE OF THE REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. THE LIBRARY IS THERE NOT JUST TO PROVIDE RECREATIONAL READING BUT TO PROVIDE INFORMATION. I’M NOT SAYING THEY’RE NOT DOING THAT ANYMORE, THEY ARE, IN A VERY MUCH MORE SOPHISTICATED WAY BUT THIS WAS ONE OF THE WAYS THAT WE HANDLED THE NEED TO PROVIDE INFORMATION TO PEOPLE.” THE FOLLOWING BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY WAS DEVELOPED WITH INFORMATION FROM THE LIBRARY’S WEBSITE. IN 1911 A CITY BYLAW WAS PASSED FOR THE PROVISION OF A LOCAL LIBRARY TO BE ESTABLISHED, AND EIGHT YEARS LATER LETHBRIDGE’S FIRST LIBRARY SERVICE WAS OPERATED OUT OF TWO ROOMS IN THE YMCA BUILDING. IN 1922, THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY BUILDING IN GALT GARDENS OPENED, WITH AN EXTENSION ADDED IN 1951. IN 1956 A NORTH BRANCH WAS OPENED, AND A SOUTH BRANCH FOLLOWED IN 1974. THE LETHBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY MAIN BRANCH ON STAFFORD DRIVE SOUTH WAS COMPLETED IN 1974, WITH AN EXTENSION AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CHINOOK ARCH REGIONAL LIBRARY SYSTEM IN 1992. IN 1989 THE LIBRARY ADOPTED THE DYNIX AUTOMATED CATALOGUE SYSTEM, AND IN 1997 INTRODUCED PUBLIC INTERNET ACCESS COMPUTERS. IN 2010, THE CROSSINGS BRANCH OPENED IN WEST LETHBRIDGE. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR HARDCOPIES OF FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND ONLINE SOURCE MATERIAL.
Catalogue Number
P20140025001
Acquisition Date
2014-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail