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Riders of the Plains Fonds. 1996-2015

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88847
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20161020
Physical Description
3 photos, 3 posters, 3 CDs, 1 Floppy Disk, and 75 cm of textual records.
Scope and Content
20161020001: Financial Statements (1997) 20161020002: Financial Statements (1998) 20161020003: Financial Statements (1999) 20161020004: Financial Statements (2000) 20161020005: FInancial Statements (2001) 20161020006: Financial Statements (2002) 20161020007: Financial Statements (2003) 20161020008:…
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Riders of the Plains Society
Physical Description
3 photos, 3 posters, 3 CDs, 1 Floppy Disk, and 75 cm of textual records.
History / Biographical
In 1996, a group of riding enthusiasts, amateur historians, and community minded volunteers formed the Riders of the Plains Commemorative Troop. The ROTP’s original purpose was to recreate the riding traditions of the North West Mounted Police, with trail rides and commemorative wagon treks, and participation in public events with period uniforms, drills, firearms, and horses and tack. The six original members of the Troop formed a non-profit society in 1996 with two purposes:
To preserve and protect the history of the North West Mounted Police
To advance the education of the public as it relates to the history of the NWMP. Members participated as a commemorative troop in various events across Western Canada and Montana, including:
NWMP Boundary Commission Wagon Trek, 1997 and 1998
RCMP 125 March West, 1999
Due North wagon trek of the Whoop-Up Trail, 2000-2001
Fort Whoop-Up annual Wild West Weekend, one of the largest re-enactments events in Western Canada. The troop participated in several films, including:
Parks Canada production of the “Battle of Batoche”
CBC production of “Canada, a People’s History”
History Channel’s “The Great March West”
A Scattering of Seeds’ “Nevitt”. In addition, the troop travelled to Batoche, Saskatchewan, Battleford, Saskatchewan, Fort Steele, British Columbia, Fort Walsh, Saskatchewan, Rawleigh, Alberta, and Fort Benton, Montana. They were trained in firearms drill, horsemanship and infantry drill. As early as 1997, the ROTP received a lease on the original site of the Macleod NWMP Barracks, which was home to the North West Mounted Police, the Royal North West Mounted Police and the present day Royal Canadian Mounted Police during the period 1884 to 1922. The ROTP immediately began to plan for restoration and preservation of the site, including recreating the historic flagpole, identifying building sites, gathering of artifacts, conducting research, and building a dedicated membership and an array of alliances. ROTP efforts resulted in the declaration and protection of the site as a Provincial Historic Resource in 2001. Subsequently, the ROTP proposal for funding under the Centennial Legacy Program was approved, providing $1.6 million dollars for reconstruction and restoration of site structures to the late 1890’s period. In addition, the ROTP raised $250,000 in various forms to assist the project. Concurrent with the design and construction of the three reconstructed buildings and the development of the site itself, the ROTP worked hard to accumulate historical and interpretive materials relating to the Barracks period. Replica uniforms and saddles were commissioned. The ROTP celebrated the Official Opening of the Barracks in August of 2005. Unfortunately, relationships with the Fort Macleod Historic Area Society and the Town of Fort Macleod began to sour soon afterwards, culminating in an unfortunate lawsuit in July of 2007 against the ROTP, Fort Whoop Up and two individuals. This, in turn, resulted in a forensic audit, completed in July, 2008 by the Government of Alberta, which found no evidence of fraud, personal gain, or illegal use on the part of the ROTP. The audit also indicated that the major inventory items (uniforms, saddles, firearms and wagons) were properly accounted for.
Custodial History
These records were donated to the Galt Museum and Archives by Barbara Cavers of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Scope and Content
20161020001: Financial Statements (1997) 20161020002: Financial Statements (1998) 20161020003: Financial Statements (1999) 20161020004: Financial Statements (2000) 20161020005: FInancial Statements (2001) 20161020006: Financial Statements (2002) 20161020007: Financial Statements (2003) 20161020008: Financial Statements (2004) 20161020009: Financial Statements (2005) 20161020010: Financial Statements (2006) 20161020011: Financial Statements (2008) 20161020012: Audit (2007-2008) 20161020013: Donations 20161020014: Investments 20161020015: Request for Business Number 20161020016: Legacy Agreement 20161020017: Legacy Requistitions (2001-2002) 20161020018: Legacy Requistions (2003) 20161020019: Legacy Requisitions (2004) 20161020020: Legacy Requisitions (2005-2006) 20161020021: C.I.P. Grant (2004) 20161020022: Canada Revenue 20161020023: "With the Mounties in the Boot and Saddle Days" Research and Correspondence 20161020024: "With the Mounties in the Boot and Saddle Days" Manuscript 20161020025: Lease 20161020026: Membership (2 Photos) 20161020027: Bylaws 20161020028: Alberta Museum Association 20161020029: Museum Affirmation Program 20161020030: Final Report Historical Resource Impact Mitigation (2004) 20161020031: R.O.T.P. Membership Application Forms 20161020032: Articles of Incorporation/Continuance, Annual Returns 20161020033: Directors Minutes, Contracts,Unanimous Shareholder Agreements 20161020034: Business Plan (January 1, 2008 - December 31, 2012) 20161020035: R.O.T.P. Minutes (1995-1996) 20161020036: R.O.T.P. Minutes (1997-1998) 20161020037: R.O.T.P. Minutes (1999-2000) 20161020038: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2001) 20161020039: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2002) 20161020040: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2003) 20161020041: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2004) 20161020042: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2005) 20161020043: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2006) 20161020044: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2007) 20161020045: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2008) Part 1 20161020046: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2008) Part 2 20161020047: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2009) 20161020048: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2010) 20161020049: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2012) 20161020050: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2013) 20161020051: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2014) 20161020052: R.O.T.P. Minutes (2015) 20161020053: Outgoing Loans 20161020054: R.O.T.P. Master Copies 20161020055: Alberta Historic Resources 20161020056: Alberta Registries 20161020057: Collections Policy 20161020058: Dora Degenstein 20161020059: Firearms 20161020060: Harness Shop 20161020061: Hirano & Heaton (Quote on Relocation of Harness Shop) 20161020062: History of Barracks 20161020063: Lawsuit Part 1 20161020064: Lawsuit Part 2 20161020065: Mural 20161020066: Site Interpretation and Information Sheet 20161020067: Town of Fort MacLeod Part 1 20161020068: Town of Fort MacLeod Part 2 20161020069: Transfer of Assets 20161020070: Jail Barn 20161020071: Architecture 20161020072: Accession and Loan Records (Haultain Collection) 20161020073: Guest Book 20161020074: Letters with Mayor of Fort MacLeod 20161020075: Site Details 20161020076: Transfer of Custody from Glenbow 20161020077: Sale of Presbyterian Church 20161020078: Management Plan 20161020079: Alberta 2005 Centennial Initiative 20161020080: Annual Reports (2003, 2004, 2005) 20161020081: Kit (1 Photo) 20161020082: Finance Report (2002-2003) 20161020083: Request for $5000.00 20161020084: Operations Overview (2005-2007) 20161020085: Misc. Finances 20161020086: Accession Records (Legacy) 20161020087: Accession Records (R.O.T.P.) 20161020088: Accession Records (D.D. on Loan) 20161020089: Accession Records (Roxanne Linderman) 20161020090: Accession Records (Fort Whoop-Up) 20161020091: Records of Glenbow Inventory 20161020092: Contents List (Drawers) 20161020093: Inventory (Fort Whoop-Up Items at Fort Whoop-Up) 20161020094: Barracks Inventory (Fort Whoop-Up Items) 20161020095: Salvage Chinook Ltd. Agreement and Societies Act 20161020096: Volunteer Logs 20161020097: Barb Cavers 20161020098: Glenbow Archives 20161020099: Legacy Grant Applications 20161020100: Supporting Research Material 20161020101: Reenactment March West Posters (R.C.M.P.) (3 Posters) 20161020102: R.O.T.P. Backup Disc (September 20, 2004) (1 CD) 20161020103: Commercial Data Part 1 (1 CD) 20161020104: Commercial Data Part 2 (1 CD) 20161020105: Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (January 1, 2003) (1 floppy disk)
Accession No.
20161020
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88929
Date Range
1947-1958
Accession No.
20161063
Physical Description
86 bw 8x10 photographic prints
Scope and Content
2016.1063/001 Harvesting sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/002 Man standing on top of a pile of sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/003 Man and team of horses working in a sugar beet field. 1958 2016.1063/004 View of Taber Factory with tree in the foreground (Summer?). 1958 2016.1063/005 ?1958 2016.1063/006 Truc…
Date Range
1947-1958
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
86 bw 8x10 photographic prints
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Scope and Content
2016.1063/001 Harvesting sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/002 Man standing on top of a pile of sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/003 Man and team of horses working in a sugar beet field. 1958 2016.1063/004 View of Taber Factory with tree in the foreground (Summer?). 1958 2016.1063/005 ?1958 2016.1063/006 Trucks full of sugar beets at a factory. 1958 2016.1063/007 View of Taber Factory.1958 2016.1063/008 Two workers on a tractor harvesting beets. 1958 2016.1063/009 Beets being moved into a rail car (Child sitting in the front seat of a truck). 1958 2016.1063/010 Piles of sugar beets in foreground with factory in the background. 1985 2016.1063/011 Sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/012 Man moving bags of sugar. 1958 2016.1063/013 Bags of sugar moving up a conveyor belt to two men standing on stacked bags. 1958 2016.1063/014 Man with two watches inspecting sugar on a glass plate. 1958 2016.1063/015 Man in a hat with “C.S.F. Limited” printed on it standing over a machine full of sugar. 1958 2016.1063/016 Man in a white coat surrounded by lab equipment. 1958 2016.1063/017 Man inspecting sugar beets on a conveyor belt. 1958 2016.1063/018 Sugar beet juice? 1958 2016.1063/019 Shredded sugar beets? 1958 2016.1063/020 Man with two watches inspecting sugar. 1958 2016.1063/021 Man filling bags with sugar. 1958 2016.1063/022 Factory interior. 1958 2016.1063/023 Woman watches small bags of sugar on a conveyor. 1958 2016.1063/024 Woman fills bags with sugar. 1958 2016.1063/025 Exterior of factory with a man operating machinery (crane with scoop). 1958 2016.1063/026 View of Taber factory with tree in foreground (Fall/Winter?). 1958 2016.1063/027 View of Taber factory. 1958 2016.1063/028 Workers exiting the Taber factory. 1958 2016.1063/029 Men stacking bags of sugar outside the factory. 1958 2016.1063/030 Factory yard. 1958 2016.1063/031 Man moving stacked bags of sugar. 1958 2016.1063/032 Exterior of Picture Butte factory with cars parked in front. 1958 2016.1063/033 Rail cars filled with sugar beets. 1958 2016.1063/034 Piles of beets and trucks full of beets in front of the Taber factory. 1958 2016.1063/035 Men moving beets. 1958 2016.1063/036 View from above of men emptying a truck of beets. 1958. 2016.1063/037 Man standing beside some machinery. 1958 2016.1063/038 Man standing beside rail car. 1958 2016.1063/039 Woman sewing filled bags of sugar closed. 1958 2016.1063/040 Exterior of factory with rail cars. 1958 2016.1063/041 Man sewing closed bags of dried molasses beet pulp from Taber factory. 1958 2016.1063/042 Canadian Sugar Factory machinery 1947 2016.1063/043 Railway tracks in the foreground and piles of sugar beets in the background. 1947 2016.1063/044 Construction of Taber factory. 1947 2016.1063/045 View of Picture Butte factory and surrounding land. 1947 2016.1063/046 Factory exterior. 1947. 2016.1063/047 Factory exterior with piles of beets. 1947. 2016.1063/048 Loading beets into a railway car. 1947 2016.1063/049 Loading beets into a railway car. 1947 2016.1063/050 Exterior of Picture butte factory. 1947 2016.1063/051 Large pile of sugar beets. 1947 2016.1063/052 Large pile of sugar beets. 1947 2016.1063/053 Woman sewing bags of sugar closed. (“Photograph from Office of Director of Public Information Ottawa, Photograph by Nicholas Morant” printed on back). [1947?] 2016.1063/054 View of Picture Butte factory and surrounding land. 1947 2016.1063/055 Man sewing bags of sugar closed. 1947 2016.1063/056 Four men working on machinery. 1947 2016.1063/057 Sugar inside machinery. 1947 2016.1063/058 Warehouse with bags of sugar at Raymond factory. 1947 2016.1063/059 Man working. 1947 2016.1063/060 Sugar crystals coming off a drum. 1947 2016.1063/061 Man standing at a sink. 1947 2016.1063/062 Large sugar vats. 1947 2016.1063/063 Canadian Sugar Factory machinery 1947 2016.1063/064 Three women fill and sew bags of sugar from Raymond factory. 1947 2016.1063/065 Machinery. 1947 2016.1063/066 Shredded beets on a conveyor. 1947 2016.1063/067 Canadian Sugar Factory machinery 1947 2016.1063/068 Canadian Sugar Factory machinery 1947 2016.1063/069 Canadian Sugar Factory machinery 1947 2016.1063/070 Exterior of Raymond factory. 1947 2016.1063/071 Exterior of Raymond factory. 1947 2016.1063/072 Exterior of Picture Butte factory. 1947 2016.1063/073 Exterior of Raymond(?) factory. 1947 2016.1063/074 Sugar beets in front of factory. 1947 2016.1063/075 Sugar beets in front of factory. 1947 2016.1063/076 Sugar beets in front of Raymond factory. 1947 2016.1063/077 Sugar beets and Hoover bulldozer. 1947 2016.1063/078 Four men on tractor in a beet field, side view. 1947 2016.1063/079 Four men on tractor in a beet field, rear view. 1947 2016.1063/080 Four men on tractor in a beet field, side view. 1947 2016.1063/081 Woman sewing bags of sugar closed. (“Photograph from Office of Director of Public Information Ottawa, Photograph by Nicholas Morant” printed on reverse). [1947?] 2016.1063/082 Four men on a tractor and truck working in a beet field, side view. 1947 2016.1063/083 Man driving a tractor. 1947 2016.1063/084 Man driving a Caterpiller, house in the background. 1947 2016.1063/085 Man making a field ditch. 1947 2016.1063/086 Canadian Sugar Factories Limited Advertising, brochure entitled “Energy! For Breakfast” ca.1950
Accession No.
20161063
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Canadian Sugar Factory machinery.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88971
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063042
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063042
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Railway tracks in the foreground and piles of sugar beets in the background.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88972
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063043
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063043
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Construction of Taber factory.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88973
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063044
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063044
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

View of Picture Butte factory and surrounding land.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88974
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063045
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063045
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063046
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063046
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Factory exterior with piles of beets.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88976
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063047
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063047
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Loading beets into a railway car.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88977
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063048
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063048
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Loading beets into a railway car.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88978
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063049
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063049
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Exterior of Picture butte factory.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88979
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063050
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063050
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Large pile of sugar beets.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88980
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063051
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063051
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Large pile of sugar beets.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88981
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063052
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063052
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Woman sewing bags of sugar closed. (“Photograph from Office of Director of Public Information Ottawa, Photograph by Nicholas Morant” printed on back).

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88982
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063053
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063053
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

View of Picture Butte factory and surrounding land.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88983
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063054
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063054
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Man sewing bags of sugar closed.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88984
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063055
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063055
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Four men working on machinery.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88985
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063056
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063056
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063057
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063057
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Warehouse with bags of sugar at Raymond factory.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions88987
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063058
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063058
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161063059
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Canadian Sugar Factory Ltd
Physical Description
8x10 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Sugar beet farming has an extensive history in southern Alberta. Sugar beets had been farmed in Ontario and Quebec but with the help of irrigation techniques southern Alberta was found to be an ideal place to grow the crop. The first sugar beet factory in Alberta was built under the Roger’s sugar name at Raymond, Alberta in 1925; near the site of the old Knight Sugar factory. A second factory was built at Picture Butte in 1936, and the largest was opened in 1950 at Taber. Collectively the factories employed hundreds of workers and helped to support the economy of western Canada and reportedly processed 5000 tons of beets daily into sugar during the busy fall harvest season. These factories also produced beet pulp, and dried molasses beet pulp, which are by-products of the sugar production process used for animal feed. The Taber factory is the only one that is still operational and the only sugar factory in Canada that processes sugar beets. XXX The photographs are of the beet growing and harvesting process as well as the sugar production process and machinery. The photos were taken by J.D. Bodington (1958), Harry Pollard (1947) and a couple apparently taken by Nicholas Morant. The series also includes an educational advertising brochure (connection to the Lethbridge Herald? See page 12), possibly printed around 1950 which talks about what sugar beets are, how they are grown and processed and the value of the industry to the Albertan and Canadian economies.
Accession No.
20161063059
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

46 records – page 1 of 3.