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Other Name
SMITH AND WESSON
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, WOOD, NICKEL
Catalogue Number
P20190002001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SMITH AND WESSON
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
STEEL, WOOD, NICKEL
No. Pieces
2
Length
29
Width
3
Description
A. HOLSTER, 28.5CM L X 12CM W. DARK BROWN LEATHER HOLSTER WITH FLAP COVERING TOP OPENING; FLAP SECURES TO THE FRONT OF HOLSTER WITH BRASS STUD AND HOLE PUNCHED THROUGH THE FLAP. HOLSTER HAS LIGHTER BROWN LEATHER CASING AT BARREL END STITCHED WITH LIGHT THREAD. BACK HAS LOOP FASTENED WITH SILVER STUDS FOR CARRYING ON A BELT. LEATHER IS CRACKED AND WORN; FRONT FLAP HAS GREEN CORROSION STAINS AROUND FASTENING HOLE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. REVOLVER, SMITH AND WESSON, 29CM LONG X 3CM WIDE X 0.6 BARREL DIAMETER. REVOLVER HAS DARK WOOD HANDLE AND LONG BLACK STEEL BARREL, CYLINDER AND FRAME. BARREL HAS SIGHT PIN AT END OF BARREL. HANDLE HAS CROSS-HATCHED PATTERN ENGRAVED IN WOOD WITH SILVER TRIM ALONG INSIDE AND OUTSIDE OF HANDLE; HANDLE HAS ROUND SILVER PLATE WITH EMBOSSED “S&W” LOGO AT TOP OF HANDLE WOOD. REVOLVER HAS INSCRIPTION ON RIGHT SIDE BELOW CHAMBER “MADE IN U.S.A.”; REVOLVER TRIGGER HAS INSCRIPTION ON BOTTOM “REG. U.S. PAT. OFF.” LEFT SIDE BESIDE CHAMBER HAS “S&W”; BARREL HAS INSCRIPTION ON RIGHT SIDE “22 LONG RIFLE CTG” AND INSCRIPTION ON LEFT SIDE “SMITH & WESSON”. REVOLVER HAS STEEL CYLINDER RELEASE ON LEFT SIDE TO OPEN CHAMBER; REVOLVER HAS SIX CYLINDERS FOR CARTRIDGES. BASE OF HANDLE HAS METAL TRIM RUNNING ACROSS WITH INSCRIBED TEXT “638375” ON METAL. STEEL BARREL AND CYLINDER HAVE MINOR WEAR IN THE FINISH; HANDLE HAS MINOR WEAR AROUND BASE EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-FIREARM
ARMAMENT-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JANUARY 10, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JEAN BUCHANAN REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REVOLVER AND FIREARM ACCESSORIES. THE FIREARM WAS USED BY BUCHANAN’S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, DURING HIS CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. ON THE REVOLVER, BUCHANAN RECALLED, “[MY DAD] USED [THE SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVER]…STARTING IN 1932, WITH THE RCMP, MAY BE WHEN HE GOT THAT GUN. HE HAD IT REGISTERED IN 1940, AND GETTING ANOTHER 5 YEARS REGISTRATION IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1935.” “THIS WAS HIS SIDEARM…HIS SERVICE WEAPON…HE HAD THAT ALL THE TIME…IT WOULD GO RIGHT ON HIS BELT THERE.” “[DAD KEPT THE GUN] IN [MY PARENTS’] BEDROOM. RIGHT ON THE BEDROOM CLOSET DOOR, RIGHT OPEN. I NEVER TOUCHED IT, BECAUSE HE HAD GIVEN ME MY TRAINING AND LET ME USE IT WHEN I WAS YOUNG. I HAD RESPECT FOR IT, AND I HAD NO SPECIAL CURIOSITY, WHICH IS A GOOD THING. [DAD KNEW I WAS] AN ADVENTUROUS PERSON, BUT I NEVER EVER TOUCHED IT, OUT OF COMPLETE RESPECT FOR DAD AND WHAT HE HAD THERE.” “ALL I CAN REMEMBER [IS HE HAD TWO HANDGUNS OR SIDEARMS]…HE DIDN’T GO OUT PRACTICING VERY MUCH; HE DIDN’T HAVE TO. HE COULD PASS HIS MARKSMANSHIP, AND THEN, EVERY TIME THERE WERE THINGS AT REGINA DEPOT TRAINING COURSES (UPGRADING, REFRESHER COURSES) THEY DID THEIR MARKSMANSHIP THERE, TOO. THEY WERE ALWAYS TESTED ON THEIR MARKSMANSHIP, AT REGINA DEPOT.” “I THINK [THE REVOLVER HAD] QUITE A BIT [OF MEANING TO MY DAD], BECAUSE HE HAD IT IN HIS HOUSE. IT WAS REALLY STRANGE BECAUSE I ASKED HIM WHERE IT WAS, WHEN HE SHOWED ME THE PAPERS, AND HE HAD IT IN A SHOE BOX IN HIS BEDROOM CLOSET. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE GREAT [HIDING] PLACES FOR IT IN THOSE DAYS, BUT THAT’S WHERE HE KEPT IT. HE MADE SURE IT WAS THERE, AND HE KNEW WHERE IT WAS.” “[I HAVE NO] KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HIM HAVING TO FIRE THIS WEAPON…AT ANYONE. IF HE WOULD HAVE, HE WOULD HAVE FIRED TO MISS SOMEONE, JUST AS A WARNING SHOT. HE DEFINITELY WENT FOR WARNING SHOTS, BUT HE NEVER SHOT ANYBODY WITH IT. HOWEVER, HE’S VERY, VERY CONCERNED ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF GOOD CITIZENS TO HAVE FIREARMS, BUT THE MAIN THING [WAS] TO PROTECT US FROM A FASCIST GOVERNMENT.” “[HE WOULD HAVE STOPPED CARRYING THE GUN] AT THE VERY END OF 1950, WHEN HE RETIRED FROM THE R.C.M.P.” “[I’VE HAD THE REVOLVER] SINCE 1998—THE PASSING OF MY FATHER, BECAUSE I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTRIX. IT WAS AUTOMATICALLY MY RESPONSIBILITY TO TAKE ALL OF HIS FIREARMS, IN MY POSSESSION.” “I WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR [THE CARE OF] IT, AND IT WAS A REAL KEEPSAKE. [THE GUN] WAS VERY PERSONAL, BECAUSE I’M SURE [MY DAD] OWNED THAT EVEN BACK IN 1935, [WHEN] HE WAS IN WESTLOCK, IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT THERE FOR 10 YEARS. IT WAS OF SENTIMENTAL VALUE BECAUSE HE TOOK ME OUT (I’M PRETTY SURE I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, WHEN HE HAD ME IN THE BACKYARD)—WE HAD FARMLAND AND FOREST—AND HE HAD A TARGET PRACTICE OUT THERE. HE HAD ME USE THAT FIREARM. HE SHOWED ME HOW TO USE IT, HOW TO AIM, AND HOW TO HANDLE IT SAFELY. I ALWAYS RESPECTED THAT, AND THAT WAS GOOD. THAT’S THE ORIGINAL HOLSTER FOR THAT GUN, WHICH YOU CAN SEE IS LOOPED, TO PUT ON HIS BELT. HE ALSO CARRIED A .32 COLT SEMI-AUTOMATIC.” “I’VE ALWAYS APPRECIATED REVOLVERS, AND RIFLES. IT’S NEVER BEEN ANYTHING THAT I THOUGHT ANY DANGER OF. YOU LEARN THE SAFETY, AND YOU TAKE YOUR COURSE. I HAVE MY COURSE DONE, AND I PASSED IT WITH FLYING COLORS. I HAD MY PERMIT TO HAVE IT. I HAVE TAKEN IT OUT, ON MY OWN ACREAGE, AND FIRED IT A BIT, BUT IT ISN’T SOMETHING I WANT TO DO. IT’S A SENTIMENTAL THING THAT I CAN NOW FEEL I’D LIKE TO HAVE IT IN YOUR MUSEUM. I KNOW IT’S NOW IN A SAFE PLACE, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT EVER FALLING INTO THE WRONG HANDS. AND, IF I WANT TO COME AND VISIT IT, I CAN COME AND SEE IT.” ON JUNE 8, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BUCHANAN REGARDING HER FATHER’S CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S HISTORY, “[MY DAD WAS EDWARD BUCHANAN, WHO RETIRED AT THE RANK OF] SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT…HE RETIRED IN 1950 FROM THE [R.C.M.P].” “HE JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL. IN ’21, HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON…BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL AND THEN AFTER, HE GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE. HE WAS GOING TO GO TO GRANDE PRAIRIE BUT THEN IN ’22, THEY GOT MARRIED. A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED…THAT’S WHEN THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD.” “EVEN IN THE A.P.P., TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON…BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN AND THEN MAYBE, AT THE VERY FIRST WINTER AS A ROOKIE, HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. IT WASN’T LONG AND HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE OF THE REAL POLICING.” “WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P. [IN 1932] HE WAS THE TOP CLASS OF [THE] A.P.P. THAT AUTOMATICALLY WERE ACCEPTED INTO THE R.C.M.P. HE WAS PUT IN CHARGE, WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P.—FIRST HE STARTED OUT IN CHARGE OF BRAINARD—HORSE LAKE—A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION. THEY CLOSED THAT DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY, A LITTLE VILLAGE, AND HE WAS THE ONLY ONE IN CHARGE, THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. THAT’S WHEN THAT 1932 [CHANGE] CAME ALONG AND HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P. AND WENT FROM THERE.” “IN ’32, IT WAS R.C.M.P. AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. THEN HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. [THERE] WAS NO DETACHMENT IN BARRHEAD. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO COVER.” “[A.P.P. MEMBERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY HAD THREE CATEGORIES THERE, OF THE A.P.P. MEMBERS…[THERE WERE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE, THAT THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P.; THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEY WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE. THEN THERE [WERE THE ONES THAT] COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY. THEN THERE [WERE] ONES THAT COULD GET IN FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY. THEY’D BE ACCEPTED FOR A YEAR. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE AND [THEY] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE.” “A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING. THESE WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” “ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK KNEW DAD REALLY WELL...HE CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, “BUCK, [DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’, A LOT] I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT…YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE, I THINK, THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?” “[WE CAME DOWN HERE IN] ’44…I NEVER HAD ANY PROBLEM [WITH THE MOVE]. I WAS ALWAYS ADVENTUROUS. I HAD LOTS OF FRIENDS BUT I WAS ALWAYS HAPPY TO GO.” “WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US AND THEN HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE READY, SO WE CAME DOWN AND STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN, HERE. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE, LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS.” “[DAD] HAD TO OVERSEE THE POW CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POW’S IN THIS RESPECT, THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. [THEY] WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY…THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY, THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. HE RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT AND HELPED THEM, [GAVE] THEM ADVICE, “YOU KNOW, YOU GOTTA GO BACK TO GERMANY AND THEN APPLY TO COME BACK.” THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK…‘CAUSE THERE [WAS] A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS AND THEY NEEDED THAT HELP. SOME OF THOSE FARMERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET SOME OF THESE GERMANS, AND SOME OF THE FARMERS’ DAUGHTERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET THAT, TOO. THEN THERE’S SOME LATER MARRIAGES AFTER THAT. IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO CONDEMN ALL THOSE POW’S BECAUSE A LOT OF THEM WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD, MORAL FELLOWS THAT DIDN’T WANT TO BE INVOLVED WITH ANY KILLING.” “HE WAS A PLAIN STAFF SERGEANT, NCO, SECOND IN CHARGE OF THE SUBDIVISION.” “[THEN HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON [TO RETIRE IN 1950], HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS. HE JOINED THE R.C.M. P. VETS BUT WITH HIS RECORD, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE. THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA WHICH, AT THAT TIME, THERE WERE ONLY TWO: LETHBRIDGE AND FORT SASKATCHEWAN. [THE] ONLY PLACE IN FORT SASKATCHEWAN WAS FOR WOMEN, SO [WOMEN] HAD TO GO ALL THE WAY TO FORT SASKATCHEWAN, EVEN IF [THEY] WAS FROM LETHBRIDGE. THAT WASN’T A VERY GOOD DEAL, SO DAD COULD SEE A REAL NEED [FOR WORK]. IT WAS A REAL MESS WHEN HE LOOKED AT THE PRISONS.” “HE REALIZED, BEING AN R.C.M.P., THAT MANY OF THE YOUNG CITY POLICE, TOWN SHERIFFS, SOME OF THESE MAGISTRATES, THEY MESSED THINGS UP. HE STARTED A TRAINING SCHOOL FOR THESE MUNICIPAL POLICE AND THAT JUST WENT TERRIFICALLY. THEY HAD [THE SCHOOLS] IN CALGARY AND IN EDMONTON TWICE A YEAR. THEY HAD A BIG GROUP FROM MEDICINE HAT COME UP AND [TAKE] THE SCHOOLING, LETHBRIDGE CAME UP, AND SOME OF THE PRISON GUARDS TOOK [THE TRAINING], TOO.” “[HE] WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN/SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, HE WAS SO BUSY THAT THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS BECAUSE…THE FIRST THING HE HAD TO DO WAS TO DEVELOP THE PRISONS FOR ALBERTA. TWO WAS NOT SUFFICIENT.” “[DAD’S] PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, HUMOROUS, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, AND VERY FIRMLY. THE STAFF…ALL LOVED HIM. I [HAVE] LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON…“YOU’RE THE BEST BOSS WE EVER HAD.” ALL HE HAD WAS A VISION OF WHAT NEEDED TO BE DONE…HE COULD GO AND EXPLAIN THE NEED FOR THE JAILS, WHAT IT WOULD COST AND WHAT IT NEEDED TO FIX THE PROBLEM. HE NEVER HAD PROBLEM GETTING EXACTLY WHAT HE NEEDED FROM THEM.” ON THE DONATION OF THE REVOLVER, BUCHANAN NOTED, “MY DAD KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER [HIS BELONGINGS] AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM. [DAD KNEW] THAT I WASN’T ONE TO PUT IT IN MY BASEMENT TO HAVE GOODNESS-KNOWS-WHAT-HAPPEN TO IT. HE HAD LEFT ALL OF THAT IN CHARGE OF ME. I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE.” “I AM NOW AT THE YOUNG AGE OF 88; I’M NOT WORRIED ABOUT LIVING ANOTHER 10 YEARS. I DIDN’T WANT THE CHANCE OF ANYBODY STEALING IT, OR GETTING THEIR HANDS ON IT, SO I WANTED TO MAKE SURE YOU GOT IT. AND, I DON’T NEED IT, SO WHY KEEP IT? IF I GET LONESOME, AND WANT TO SEE IT, I’LL COME TO THE MUSEUM AND LOOK AT IT.” “I’LL FEEL HAPPY, TO KNOW IT’S GOT A GOOD HOME. I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL TRANSCRIPTIONS FROM INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190002001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190002001
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"UNTITLED"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, METAL, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190006004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"UNTITLED"
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
PAPER, METAL, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
74.8
Width
67
Description
WATERCOLOUR AND PASTEL PAINTING DEPICTING A TREE IN THE FOREGROUND IN BLACK PASTEL ON GREEN, PURPLE, PINK AND BLUE BLENDED WATERCOLOUR BACKGROUND. TREE AND GROUND OUTLINES ARE DONE IN PASTEL WITH ABSTRACT WATERCOLOUR BACKGROUNDS FOR LEAVES AND LANDSCAPE. PAINTING SIGNED IN FRONT LOWER RIGHT CORNER IN BLACK INK, "MELISSA MALKAS". PAINTING BACK IS STAINED, AND HAS INSCRIPTION IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER IN BLACK LEAD "PAINTING BY MELISSA MALKAS". PAINTING WAS DONATED IN A LAVENDER MATTE AND SILVER METAL FRAME. FRAME HAD WHITE COROPLAST BACKING WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE MARKER ON LEFT SIDE "MELISSA AFTER CALGARY". MATTE CONSISTED OF A FRONT BOARD WITH THE PAINTING SECURED BY MASKING TAPE ALONG FOUR EDGES. A TREATMENT WAS CONDUCTED ON OCTOBER 24, 2019 BY CONSERVATOR JULIET GRAHAM TO REMOVE THE MASKING TAPE FROM THE BACK OF THE PAINTING, AND TO SECURE HOLLYTEX TO THE REMAINING ADHESIVE ON THE PAINTING. PAINTING HAS TWO PINHOLES AT LOWER RIGHT CORNER, AND SMALL TEARS ALONG RIGHT EDGE [REVEALED DURING TREATMENT TO REMOVE TAPE]. PAINTING HAS ADHESIVE RESIDUE ALONG FRONT EDGES FROM PREVIOUS MATTING OR FRAMING. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. FOR FURTHER CONDITION DETAILS AND THE COMPLETE TREATMENT REPORT BY CONSERVATOR JULIET GRAHAM, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIWEED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE PAINTING BY MELISSA MALKAS, FLAIG RECALLED, “MY BROTHERS AND I HAD MET [MELISSA MALKAS]. WE THOUGHT HIGHLY OF HER AS AN ARTIST, [AND] AS A PERSON. I BELIEVE SHE’S NOT AROUND IN TOWN ANY MORE, BUT SHE WAS PART OF THAT RURAL SCENE, WHERE YOU HAD A GREAT AMOUNT OF FREEDOM.” “I JUST [HAD], I BELIEVE, TWO OF MELISSA’S PIECES, THE PAINTING [WAS ONE], WHICH IS VERY BIG, BEAUTIFUL, AND PRETTY. ON THE BACK IT SAYS ‘AFTER CALGARY’. I’M NOT SURE WHAT THAT MEANS.” “[WE MET THE MALKAS’S] ONCE WE MOVED OUT TO BROXBURN. I DON’T KNOW IF THEY MOVED IN BEFOREHAND. THEY WERE [OUR] NEIGHBORS. MOM WAS RAISED ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND [MY PARENTS] KNEW HOW TO REACH OUT TO THE NEIGHBORS, AND MAKE FRIENDS, AND TAKE FOOD OVER AND VISIT…THEY WERE ALWAYS OUT VISITING.” “I KNOW [MY PARENTS] WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” “I LEARNED LATER, THAT [MY MOTHER’S LOVE OF ART] WAS BORN OUT OF HER DESIRE TO BRING ART TO HER SISTER, FERN, WHO HAD A BRAIN ANEURYSM WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. [FERN] SPENT MANY YEARS IN HOSPITAL IN LABRECQUE, IN SASKATCHEWAN, BUT [MOM] NEVER GOT THERE; NEVER GOT THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE. THE ART WORK IS, IN SOME WAYS, CRUDE. THERE ARE NO SHADOWS; THE PEOPLE ARE KIND OF LUMPY; THE COLORS ARE BRIGHT, AND ALL THESE SCENES REPRESENT SOMETHING OF HER LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL ON A FARM, IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND HOW HARD IT MUST HAVE BEEN. THERE IS A LOT OF FEELING IN EACH ONE OF HER PAINTINGS. MANY OF THEM WE’LL NEVER KNOW THE STORIES, BUT THEY’RE ALL COUCHED IN STORIES. I HAD NO IDEA EITHER, UNTIL JUST NOW, HOW PROLIFIC SHE WAS; HOW MANY PAINTINGS SHE MUST HAVE DONE. I THINK IT WAS A CATHARSIS FOR HER, BUT ALSO REPRESENTATIVE OF THEIR LIVES, GROWING UP ON A FARM IN SASKATCHEWAN—THE ISOLATION, THE COLD, THE STRIFE AMONGST THE FAMILY, THE DIFFICULTY OF HER PARENTS HOLDING A MARRIAGE TOGETHER, AND THEIR DESPERATION, WITH SEVEN KIDS, TO GET OFF THE FARM AND GET OUT OF THERE, AND MAKE SOMETHING. IT’S A HERITAGE – HER PAINTINGS, AS ARE THESE HERE. YOU JUST LOOK AT THEM AND WONDER HOW IT IS THAT AN ARTIST CAN VISUALIZE THIS, AND PUT SO MUCH FEELING INTO EACH PIECE. THE LIGHT, THE FACIAL EXPRESSION, THE SUGGESTION OF A LINE, SOMETHING SIMPLE…SOMEBODY JUST [DAUBED] THE PAINT ON THERE, GLOBS THE YELLOW OF THE TREES. THERE’S SOMETHING THERE THAT—IT’S A HERITAGE. I [HEARD IN A MOVIE] ART IS THE TRUTH THAT WE HAVE EXISTED. THESE PEOPLE EXISTED. MOM, THE LIFE THEY HAD, WILL BE FORGOTTEN, BUT IT WAS THERE. NOW, AS OUR SUCCEEDING GENERATIONS, WE HAVE THE LIFE WE HAVE BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY WENT THROUGH. THE RICHNESS OF THEIR LIFE, WE CAN NEVER REPAY IT, BUT WE CAN HOPE TO PROFIT FROM IT.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’S. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” “MOM AND DAD RAISED US AS SORT OF ‘FREE RANGE’ KIDS, AND THAT CARRIED ON OUT ON THAT FIVE ACRE LITTLE FARM-ETTE. WE COULD PRETTY MUCH DO ANYTHING, AND EXPERIMENT. WE ALWAYS HAD WOODWORKING TOOLS, AND TOOLS OF ALL KINDS IN THE BASEMENT ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND LOTS TO MESS AROUND WITH. IF IT WASN’T ASTRONOMY, IT WAS POETRY, IT WAS WRITING, IT WAS ART, IT WAS BUILDING SOMETHING, OR FIXING SOMETHING UP THERE. IT WAS A STYLE OF LIFE THAT, IN REFLECTION, IT WAS QUITE A GIFT, QUITE A LEGACY TO US CHILDREN.” “THEY [BUILT] THE HOUSE ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, I THINK IT WAS THE SECOND OR THIRD HOUSE ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. ACROSS THE STREET WAS BALD PRAIRIE AT THE TIME, SO WE COULD JUST RUN AROUND.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD, MORE OR LESS, AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH AGE-RELATED DISEASE, AND BECOMING FORGETFUL, AND THEY HAD TO MOVE INTO TOWN. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” “IF I HAD A BIGGER HOUSE, IF I HAD MORE ROOM, IF I WAS A VISUAL ARTIST, THEN THERE’D BE NO QUESTION THEY’D BE UP SOMEWHERE, NO MATTER WHO SAID WHAT. I HAVE A FAIR NUMBER ALREADY ON THE WALLS AT HOME, AND AS THESE ARE THINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME, ARRAIGNED WITH MY YOUTH, AND WITH MY PARENTS BEING ARTISTS. HOWEVER, THEY WILL NOT SURVIVE IF DON’T BRING THEM HERE. WE JUST WON’T KEEP THEM, AND NOBODY IN MY FAMILY IS INTERESTED IN THEM. SO, NOT DOING ART, I GUESS IT’S GOOD THAT THEY’RE HERE. WHAT AM I GOING TO DO, JUST STACK THEM UP AGAINST THE WALL? THEY EVENTUALLY WILL PERISH.” ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, MELISSA MALKAS WAS A SECOND GENERATION LETHBRIDGE ARTIST, THE DAUGHTER OF IRMA MALKAS (RODOWITZ) AND EGON MALKAS. MELISSA MALKAS GRADUATED FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY IN 1986 WITH A DEGREE IN FINE ARTS, AND ALSO ATTENDED THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. DURING HER CAREER, MALKAS EXHIBITED AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE WITH THE ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL OF LETHBRIDGE. MELISSA MALKAS EXHIBITED AS A SOLO ARTIST, AND WITH HER MOTHER IN 1996 AND 2003 AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE. MALKAS WAS AN INSTRUCTOR AT THE BOWMAN ARTS CENTRE FOR THE LETHBRIDGE ARTISTS CLUB IN 2005 AND 2010, TEACHING COURSES IN MIXED MEDIA WATERCOLOUR AND OILS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190006004
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Length
58.5
Width
22
Description
A. BANJOLELE, 53 CM LONG X 19 CM WIDE X 5.5 CM TALL. BODY IS POLISHED BROWN WOOD WITH WHITE LEATHER DRUM/HEAD; BODY HAS SILVER METAL TAIL PIECE AND TONE RING AROUND DRUM/HEAD. NECK AND HEAD-STOCK ARE COVERED IN PEARL/TORTOISE SHELL; FRET ON NECK IS STRUNG WITH ONE SILVER WIRE AND ONE CLOTH STRING; FRETBOARD IS LINED WITH SILVER METAL FRETS. HEAD-STOCK HAS FOUR SILVER METAL TUNING PEGS AND BLACK AND GOLD TEXT LABEL “VALENCIA”. BACK HAS FOUR DISCOLORED WHITE, WOODEN TUNING PEGS AND SILVER METAL SPRING AT JUNCTION OF NECK AND HEAD-STOCK. BACK OF DRUM BODY HAS CUT-OUT SWIRLS IN WOOD. WOOD BODY IS SCRATCHED AND WORN AT EDGES; BACK OF NECK HAS PEELING FINISH ON WOOD; LEATHER OF DRUM/HEAD IS WORN AND STAINED BLACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CASE, 58.5 CM LONG X 9 CM TALL X 22 CM WIDE. CASE IS BROWN CLOTH COVERING A PAPER BOARD IN SHAPE OF BANJOLELE, WITH WIDER BASE. CASE OPENS AT BASE AND HAS BROWN LEATHER HINGE AND SILVER METAL CLASP. BROWN LEATHER HANDLE ON SIDE OF CASE IS BROKEN AND DETACHED AT END. INSIDE OF CASE IS LINED WITH DARK GREEN FABRIC. TOP OF CASE HAS “L W” HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. CASE IS WORN AROUND EDGES AND CLOTH IS FRAYING; BOTTOM OF CASE HAS WATER DAMAGE AND WHITE STAINING; TOP OF CASE HAS WHITE STAINING AND SCRATCHES. LEATHER HINGE AND HANDLE ARE CRACKED AND FADED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BEVE SPENGLER AND RUTH HILL REGARDING RUTH’S DONATION OF A BANJOLELE AND GUITAR. THE INSTRUMENTS WERE KEPT AND PLAYED BY THEIR FATHER, SYDNEY JAMES WOMACK, IN THE 1930S AND 1940S. ON THE BANJOLELE, RUTH RECALLED, “I CAN’T REMEMBER [MUCH] ABOUT [IT] AT ALL, BECAUSE HE BOUGHT [THE GUITAR] BUT SOMEHOW HE MUST HAVE SEEN THIS, AND THEN HE THOUGHT FOR LORNE [OUR BROTHER] HE WOULD BUY THAT [BANJOLELE] TO MATCH THE GUITAR.” “MY DAD USED TO PLAY ME TO SLEEP FROM THE TIME…WE WENT OUT TO THE FARM IN ’30. I WAS BORN IN ’27, SO ALL THE ‘30S HE PLAYED ME TO SLEEP EVERY NIGHT…I NEVER SAW MY DAD PLAY [THE BANJOLELE] YET HE BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE KNEW THERE WAS A MATCHING PAIR. HE COULDN’T AFFORD BOTH OF THEM AT THE SAME TIME. HE BOUGHT HIS GUITAR AND THEN, LATER ON WHEN HE HAD SOME MORE MONEY, HE WENT AND GOT THAT FOR LORNE, BUT I CAN’T REMEMBER HIM PLAYING IT.” “[HE BOUGHT THE BANJOLELE] HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. HE BROUGHT [HIS] VIOLIN FROM THE STATES, BUT THOSE TWO PIECES WERE BOUGHT IN LETHBRIDGE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE AT, BUT I KNOW IT WAS IN THE EARLY ‘20S BECAUSE THEY CAME TO THE FARM WITH US IN ’30. THEY CAME HERE IN ’18…HE WORKED AT THE CPR AS AN OILER AND THEN HE ENDED UP AT THE GALT GARDENS WORKING WITH THE PLANTS. WHEN THAT FIZZLED OUT, HE WANTED A FARM SO WE WENT FARMING.” HILL ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S MUSICAL BACKGROUND, NOTING, “[MY PARENTS] MOVED FROM ENGLAND TO IOWA. THEY WERE THERE FOR SEVEN YEARS AND DADDY LEARNED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE TOILET, IN THE OUTHOUSE. THAT’S WHAT HE TOLD US.” “HE LOVED MUSIC AND ACTUALLY HIS BEST WAS HAWAIIAN GUITAR…THAT’S WHY HE GOT [THE GUITAR], BECAUSE HE LOVED HAWAIIAN MUSIC. HE LOVED TO PLAY HAWAIIAN SONGS ON [THE GUITAR] BECAUSE THEY WERE SLOWER. THE VIOLIN HE COULD REALLY GO TO TOWN AND PLAY TWO STEPS.” “[WE] USED TO GO [TO DANCES] EVERY MONTH. I CAN SEE HIM WITH THE OLD MODEL T—HE WOULD HAVE TO PUT A FIRE UNDER IT TO GET IT STARTED AT HOME, THEN WE WOULD GO FOR THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND HE WOULD START PLAYING UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING. THEN HE HAS TO PUT THE FIRE UNDER TO GET THE CAR GOING AGAIN. THEY WERE BAD YEARS BUT THEY WERE WONDERFUL YEARS…FROM [1933] UNTIL I WENT OUT IN GRADE NINE HE USED TO COME, WE USED TO HAVE DANCES, ALL THROUGH THE THIRTIES WE HAD DANCES AT LEAST TWICE A MONTH.” BEVE ADDED, “HE PLAYED WITH OTHER MEN, HE DIDN’T PLAY BY HIMSELF.” RUTH ELABORATED, “THEY HAD A LADY ON THE PIANO, THEY HAD DADDY ON THE VIOLIN, AND THEN THEY HAD ANOTHER CHAP ON THE DRUMS…[OUR FATHER] TOOK THE LEAD. THE VIOLIN WOULD ALWAYS START BEFORE, BECAUSE HE HAD THE MEMORY OF THE PIECES HE WANTED TO PLAY AND NOBODY ELSE KNEW NOTHING UNTIL HE GOT STARTED. THEN THEY’D JOIN IN.” “HE WAS STILL PLAYING THE VIOLIN, HE USED TO LIKE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN. EVEN IN THE ‘40S [HE LIKED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN], I CAN REMEMBER THAT. HE DIDN’T SO MUCH PLAY [THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS] BUT HE PLAYED THE VIOLIN. “ “HE WAS GOOD. THAT DANCE FLOOR IN THE SCHOOL THERE WOULD BE LOADED AS SOON AS HE STARTED PLAYING. AS SOON AS HE STARTED TO PLAY THEY WERE ALL UP, AND AT NIGHT NOBODY LEFT UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING…HE USED TO TAKE THE GUITAR AND PLAY THE WALTZES ON THAT, BUT THE VIOLIN HE WOULD PLAY THE OTHERS.” “THAT CLASSICAL [MUSIC], HE HAD NO USE FOR [IT]. HE USED TO SAY, “THERE’S NO BEAT THERE.” THEY WERE HIS WORDS. THERE WAS NO BEAT AND HE SAID, “IF THEY CAN’T PLAY THIS, I’M NOT LISTENING.” HE COULDN’T READ MUSIC, BUT IF HE COULD SEE THE [NOTES] AS [THEY] WENT UP OR DOWN…THAT’S WHAT HE’D LOOK AT, AND THEN HE’D LEARN TO PLAY THAT SONG. THAT WAS ON THE GUITAR, THAT WAS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PART.” “[HE HAD THE INSTRUMENTS] ON OUR FARM AT KIPP, ALBERTA AND ON THE FARMHOUSE, I’M IN THE BED. HE [WOULD BE] PLAYING THAT AND THEN I’D GO TO SLEEP TO HIM PLAYING THAT DAY IN, WEEK AFTER WEEK. YEAR AFTER YEAR. HE ALWAYS PLAYED ME TO SLEEP.” “HE [PLAYED] IN THE FRONT ROOM. [THE INSTRUMENTS] STAYED IN THE CORNER, HE BUILT A SHELF FOR THE RADIO AND THEN [THE GUITAR] STOOD UNDERNEATH THAT SHELF. THAT’S WHERE [THEY] STAYED…[THE INSTRUMENTS WERE] WITH MY DAD UNTIL ’93, THEN HE CAME TO LIVE WITH ME AND OF COURSE HE BROUGHT HIS THINGS WITH HIM. I NEVER THOUGHT THEY WERE IN MY CLOSET AND I HADN’T DONE A BIG CLEANING, SO THEY’VE JUST BEEN THERE. NOW I THOUGHT IT’S TIME TO LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT THEM...[OUR FATHER] DIED IN ’98.” “I DIDN’T WANT THE INSTRUMENTS TO BE GARBAGED. I WANTED THEM TO MEAN SOMETHING, AND I KNEW…THE MUSEUM WOULD ACCEPT THEM…IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL [FOR MY DAD TO PLAY FOR ME] BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC TOO. THAT WAS REALLY SOMETHING TO HAVE HIM PLAYING TO ME ALL THE TIME [AT BEDTIME].” “LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT [THE INSTRUMENTS] NOW. I’VE GOT ALL THE MEMORIES…I CAN SEE HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN HEAR HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN SEE IT AT THE DANCEHALL, I’VE GOT IT RIGHT THERE. SO SOMEBODY ELSE CAN LOOK AT [THEM] NOW.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180001001
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, SHELL
Catalogue Number
P20180001002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1940
Materials
WOOD, METAL, SHELL
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Length
94
Width
32.5
Description
A. GUITAR, 94 CM LONG X 32.5 CM WIDE X 9 CM TALL. WOODEN BODY WITH PEARL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID AS PICK GUARD AND ALONG FRET BOARD; GUITAR IS STRUNG WITH SIX WIRE STRINGS. GUITAR HAS SIX TUNING KNOBS AT HEAD WITH WHITE PLASTIC HANDLES ON METAL SCREWS. GUITAR BODY HAS DECORATIVE BROWN, RED AND GREEN TRIM AROUND EDGE; GUITAR HAS BLACK KNOB AT BASE. “VALENCIA” LABEL AT TOP OF HEAD; GUITAR SHOWS WEAR AND STAINING ON PICK GUARD AND FRET BOARD; GUITAR HAS SOILING INSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. GUITAR CASE, 100 CM LONG X 37 CM WIDE X 13 CM TALL. BLACK FAUX-LEATHER EXTERIOR WITH LEATHER BUCKLE AT BASE AND LEATHER HANDLE FIXED TO TOP WITH SILVER RINGS; CASE OPENS AT BASE. BASE OF CASE HAS BLACK METAL SNAP AROUND LEATHER BUCKLE STRAP. INSIDE OF CASE LINED WITH BROWN FAUX-FUR. CASE IS HEAVILY WORN ON EDGES AND PEELING; CASE IS SCRATCHED ON SIDES; LEATHER BUCKLE STRAP AT BASE IS CRACKED AND FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
History
ON JANUARY 24, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BEVE SPENGLER AND RUTH HILL REGARDING RUTH’S DONATION OF A BANJOLELE AND GUITAR. THE INSTRUMENTS WERE KEPT AND PLAYED BY THEIR FAMER, SYDNEY JAMES WOMACK, IN THE 1930S AND 1940S. ON THE GUITAR, RUTH HILL RECALLED, “HE BOUGHT IT AND STARTED STRUMMING ON IT…IT WAS ALWAYS ON HIS LAP…MY DAD USED TO PLAY ME TO SLEEP FROM THE TIME…WE WENT OUT TO THE FARM IN ’30. I WAS BORN IN ’27, SO ALL THE ‘30S HE PLAYED ME TO SLEEP EVERY NIGHT…I NEVER SAW MY DAD PLAY [THE BANJOLELE] YET HE BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE KNEW THERE WAS A MATCHING PAIR. HE COULDN’T AFFORD BOTH OF THEM AT THE SAME TIME. HE BOUGHT HIS GUITAR AND THEN, LATER ON WHEN HE HAD SOME MORE MONEY, HE WENT AND GOT [THE BANJOLELE] FOR LORNE.” “HE LOVED MUSIC AND ACTUALLY HIS BEST WAS HAWAIIAN GUITAR…THAT’S WHY HE GOT [THE GUITAR], BECAUSE HE LOVED HAWAIIAN MUSIC. HE LOVED TO PLAY HAWAIIAN SONGS ON [THE GUITAR] BECAUSE THEY WERE SLOWER. THE VIOLIN HE COULD REALLY GO TO TOWN AND PLAY TWO STEPS.” “[HE BOUGHT THE GUITAR] HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. HE BROUGHT [HIS] VIOLIN FROM THE STATES, BUT THOSE TWO PIECES WERE BOUGHT IN LETHBRIDGE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE AT, BUT I KNOW IT WAS IN THE EARLY ‘20S BECAUSE THEY CAME TO THE FARM WITH US IN ’30. THEY CAME HERE IN ’18…HE WORKED AT THE CPR AS AN OILER AND THEN HE ENDED UP AT THE GALT GARDENS WORKING WITH THE PLANTS. WHEN THAT FIZZLED OUT, HE WANTED A FARM SO WE WENT FARMING.” HILL ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S MUSICAL BACKGROUND, NOTING, “[MY PARENTS] MOVED FROM ENGLAND TO IOWA. THEY WERE THERE FOR SEVEN YEARS AND DADDY LEARNED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN IN THE TOILET, IN THE OUTHOUSE. THAT’S WHAT HE TOLD US.” “[WE] USED TO GO [TO DANCES] EVERY MONTH. I CAN SEE HIM WITH THE OLD MODEL T—HE WOULD HAVE TO PUT A FIRE UNDER IT TO GET IT STARTED AT HOME, THEN WE WOULD GO FOR THE CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND HE WOULD START PLAYING UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING. THEN HE HAS TO PUT THE FIRE UNDER TO GET THE CAR GOING AGAIN. THEY WERE BAD YEARS BUT THEY WERE WONDERFUL YEARS…FROM [1933] UNTIL I WENT OUT IN GRADE NINE HE USED TO COME, WE USED TO HAVE DANCES, ALL THROUGH THE THIRTIES WE HAD DANCES AT LEAST TWICE A MONTH.” BEVE ADDED, “HE PLAYED WITH OTHER MEN, HE DIDN’T PLAY BY HIMSELF.” RUTH ELABORATED, “THEY HAD A LADY ON THE PIANO, THEY HAD DADDY ON THE VIOLIN, AND THEN THEY HAD ANOTHER CHAP ON THE DRUMS…[OUR FATHER] TOOK THE LEAD. THE VIOLIN WOULD ALWAYS START BEFORE, BECAUSE HE HAD THE MEMORY OF THE PIECES HE WANTED TO PLAY AND NOBODY ELSE KNEW NOTHING UNTIL HE GOT STARTED. THEN THEY’D JOIN IN.” “HE WAS STILL PLAYING THE VIOLIN, HE USED TO LIKE TO PLAY THE VIOLIN. EVEN IN THE ‘40S [HE LIKED TO PLAY THE VIOLIN], I CAN REMEMBER THAT. HE DIDN’T SO MUCH PLAY [THE OTHER INSTRUMENTS] BUT HE PLAYED THE VIOLIN. “ “HE WAS GOOD. THAT DANCE FLOOR IN THE SCHOOL THERE WOULD BE LOADED AS SOON AS HE STARTED PLAYING. AS SOON AS HE STARTED TO PLAY THEY WERE ALL UP, AND AT NIGHT NOBODY LEFT UNTIL TWO IN THE MORNING…HE USED TO TAKE THE GUITAR AND PLAY THE WALTZES ON THAT, BUT THE VIOLIN HE WOULD PLAY THE OTHERS.” “THAT CLASSICAL [MUSIC], HE HAD NO USE FOR [IT]. HE USED TO SAY, “THERE’S NO BEAT THERE.” THEY WERE HIS WORDS. THERE WAS NO BEAT AND HE SAID, “IF THEY CAN’T PLAY THIS, I’M NOT LISTENING.” HE COULDN’T READ MUSIC, BUT IF HE COULD SEE THE [NOTES] AS [THEY] WENT UP OR DOWN…THAT’S WHAT HE’D LOOK AT, AND THEN HE’D LEARN TO PLAY THAT SONG. THAT WAS ON THE GUITAR, THAT WAS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PART.” “[HE HAD THE INSTRUMENTS] ON OUR FARM AT KIPP, ALBERTA AND ON THE FARMHOUSE, I’M IN THE BED. HE [WOULD BE] PLAYING THAT AND THEN I’D GO TO SLEEP TO HIM PLAYING THAT DAY IN, WEEK AFTER WEEK. YEAR AFTER YEAR. HE ALWAYS PLAYED ME TO SLEEP.” “HE [PLAYED] IN THE FRONT ROOM. [THE INSTRUMENTS] STAYED IN THE CORNER, HE BUILT A SHELF FOR THE RADIO AND THEN [THE GUITAR] STOOD UNDERNEATH THAT SHELF. THAT’S WHERE [THEY] STAYED…[THE INSTRUMENTS WERE] WITH MY DAD UNTIL ’93, THEN HE CAME TO LIVE WITH ME AND OF COURSE HE BROUGHT HIS THINGS WITH HIM. I NEVER THOUGHT THEY WERE IN MY CLOSET AND I HADN’T DONE A BIG CLEANING, SO THEY’VE JUST BEEN THERE. NOW I THOUGHT IT’S TIME TO LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT THEM...[OUR FATHER] DIED IN ’98.” “I DIDN’T WANT THE INSTRUMENTS TO BE GARBAGED. I WANTED THEM TO MEAN SOMETHING, AND I KNEW…THE MUSEUM WOULD ACCEPT THEM…IT WAS ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL [FOR MY DAD TO PLAY FOR ME] BECAUSE I LOVE MUSIC TOO. THAT WAS REALLY SOMETHING TO HAVE HIM PLAYING TO ME ALL THE TIME [AT BEDTIME].” “LET SOMEBODY ELSE LOOK AT [THE INSTRUMENTS] NOW. I’VE GOT ALL THE MEMORIES…I CAN SEE HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN HEAR HIM PLAYING [THEM], I CAN SEE IT AT THE DANCEHALL, I’VE GOT IT RIGHT THERE. SO SOMEBODY ELSE CAN LOOK AT [THEM] NOW.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180001001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180001002
Acquisition Date
2018-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, STEEL, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20180005000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
PLASTIC, STEEL, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
30.5
Length
57
Width
11.3
Description
CAMCORDER COMPRISED OF LENS, BETACAM DECK, AND COLOR CAMERA. BETACAM DECK AT BACK OF CAMERA IS TWO-TONE GREY WITH TWO PLUG-INS FOR “AUDIO IN, CH-1, CH-2” AND ONE PLUG-IN FOR “DC-IN, 12V”. BETACAM DECK HAS TWO BLACK SLIDE BUTTONS ON TOP LABELLED IN WHITE “EJECT” AND “REW”. BETACAM DECK HAS GREY METAL HANDLE AT TOP THAT FASTENS TO BETA CASSETTE DECK. BETACAM DECK HAS YELLOWED PLASTIC WINDOW ON SIDE TO VIEW INSIDE MECHANISMS; BELOW WINDOW IS GREEN, RED AND BLUE DECAL READING “45 NEWS, 45”. REVERSE SIDE HAS SILVER “POWER ON/OF” SWITCH ABOVE METER MEASURING BATTERY CHARGE, “SONY VU”; BETACAM DECK HAS TWO ROUND BLACK BUTTONS LABELLED “RESET” AND “LIGHT” ABOVE BLACK SWITCH LABELLED “TAPE TIMER, TIME CODE”; SIDE HAS DIGITAL DISPLAY SCREEN READING “HOUR, MIN, SEC”. SIDE HAS ROW OF SIX RED LIGHTS NEAR BOTTOM LABELLED WITH WORN WHITE PAINT WITH FIRST TWO ILLEGIBLE, “HUMID, SLACK, TAPE END, BATTERY”. SIDE HAS PANEL THAT OPENS AT BOTTOM EDGE WITH SIX DARK GREY BUTTONS LABELLED IN PAIRS “HOUR, MINUTE, SECOND” AND TWO BLACK SWITCHES LABELLED “U-BIT, TIME” AND “REC RUN, FREE RUN”. SIDE HAS SILVER PLATE FIXED READING “SONY”. BACK OF BETACAM DECK HAS SILVER LABEL WITH RED, GREEN AND BLUE LOGO “45 CFCN TELEVISION”; BACK HAS BLACK LABEL WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY BETACAM, MODEL BVV-1, VIDEOCASSETTE BETACAM DECK, DCIN, 12V, 10W, NO. 11085, SONY CORPORATION, MADE IN JAPAN, 3-676-119-01”. TOP OF BETACAM DECK HAS BLACK LABEL WITH SILVER TEXT “SAVE MODE ONLY”. COLOR CAMERA IN MID-SECTION IS LIGHT GREY WITH SMALL PIECE OF SILVER TAPE FIXED TO TOP. SIDE OF CAMERA HAS YELLOW LABEL WITH BLACK “1”; SIDE HAS DARK GREY CONTROL PANEL AT BOTTON EDGE WITH EMBOSSED TEXT AND SILVER SWITCHES AND BUTTONS, “AUTO WHITE BAL, CAMERA, PRE HEAT/ON, VTR, SAVE/STOP, GAIN, 12/6/0, OUTPUT, BASS/CAM, WHITE BAL, PRE SET/AUTO”. SIDE HAS DARK GREY BUTTON ABOVE CONTROL PANEL LABELLED “VTR START”. SIDE HAS SILVER FITTING BESIDE PANEL LABELLED “PEDESTAL”. SIDE HAS SILVER LABEL WITH WORN BLACK TEXT “SONY MODEL NO. BVP-1, COLOR VIDEO CAMERA, DC, 12V, 11W, NO. 10505”. SIDE HAS SILVER LABEL WITH BLACK TEXT “FILTER, 1 3200’K, 2 5200’K + 1/4ND, 3 5200’K, 4 6800’K”. REVERSE SIDE HAS BLACK PLATE FIXED WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY” ABOVE BLACK LABEL WITH RED, GREEN, BLUE AND WHITE LOGO “TRINICON”. SIDE HAS SILVER FITTING AT LOWER EDGE WITH EMBOSSED LABEL “MONITOR OUT”; LOWER EDGE HAS SILVER KEY HOLE WITH EMBOSSED LABEL “BATTERY”. CAMERA HAS ATTACHED BLACK ABOVE-VIEWFINDER WITH RUBBER GUARD OVER GLASS LENS. VIEWFINDER IS FIXED TO FRONT OF CAMERA; VIEWFINDER HAS WHITE TAPE ATTACHED TO TOP WITH BLUE HANDWRITTEN TEXT “PASS JULZ DAMAGE TO TUBE OR MULT.PLER”. BACK OF VIEWFINDER HAS SILVER SWITCH “TALLY, ON/OF” AND TWO BLACK METAL TURN-KNOBS “BRIGHT, CONTR”. FRONT OF VIEWFINDER HAS BLACK PLATE ATTACHED WITH SILVER TEXT “SONY”. BLACK LENS AT FRONT FIXED IN LENS STAND WITH LEATHER STRAP ON SIDE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS “VTR, RET, IRIS M”; SIDE OF LENS STAND HAS BLACK SWITCHES “W/T” AND “IRIS, A/M”. LENS HAS WHITE LABEL AROUND MID-SECTION “CANON MACRO TV ZOOMJ13X9C, 9-117MM, 1.1.6, NO.80581, CANON, JAPAN”. LENS ROTATES TO ADJUST FOCUS AND DEPTH. BETACAM HAS WEAR ON LABELS AND DISCOLORATION ON PLASTIC WINDOW; COLOR CAMERA HAS WEAR ON LABELS AND ADHESIVE RESIDUE ON SIDE; HANDLE ON TOP HAS WORN AND CHIPPED PAINT; VIEWFINDER IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
BUSINESS
History
ON MARCH 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DARREN KRONLUND REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A SONY BVV-1 BETACAM AND CAMCORDER. THE CAMCORDER WAS USED IN THE 1980S BY THE CTV LETHBRIDGE FILM CREW. ON THE FUNCTION OF THE CAMERA IN THE CTV STUDIO, KRONLUND ELABORATED, “THE TECHNOLOGY WITH CAMERAS PROGRESSED QUICKER THAN THE DECKS DID. THESE CAMERAS AND DECKS ARE USED FOR ELECTRONIC FIELD PRODUCTION [AND ARE] CALLED THE EFP CAMERAS. THE DECKS KIND [ARE] THAT TECHNOLOGY WHICH THE MAJORITY OF STATIONS USED FOR THE LONGEST TIME [IN] SONY BETA CAM FORMAT. THAT’S WHAT THE DECK IS, BUT THE CAMERAS THEMSELVES HAD AT ONE TIME THREE TUBES FOR COLOUR CAMERAS. THEN TECHNOLOGY CAME WHERE THEY COULD DO IT WITH JUST SENSORS…SO YOU DIDN’T HAVE TUBES. IT WAS MORE SENSITIVE TO LIGHT AND THAT WAS AN IMPROVEMENT. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE TO BRING A BUNCH OF LIGHTS ALONG WITH YOUR SHOOTS. AS THOSE CAMERAS CAME OUT, THEY JUST DID SUCH A BETTER JOB, THAT THESE CAMERAS WERE NO LONGER USED. ALTHOUGH THEY WORKED, THEY WOULD JUST GET STORED AND NEWER TECHNOLOGY, BETTER PICTURES AND LIGHTER [WOULD BE USED].” “[THIS CAMERA] IS A COMPOSITE. AS TECHNOLOGY EVOLVED, THEY COULD SUPPLY [THE] UPPER HALF, THE CAMERA HALF, [AND] YOU COULD CONTINUE TO USE THE OLDER DECK.” TO ME [THE DECK AND CAMERA] ARE DIFFERENT [AGES]. I THINK THE DECK IS NEWER THAN THE CAMERA. OTHERWISE THEY’D BE THE SAME COLOUR. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE OLD, ORIGINAL DECK BUT YOU COULD SWAP OUT DECKS BECAUSE THEY DID MAKE IMPROVEMENTS WITH DECKS AS WELL. THERE WAS A TIME THEY USED METAL TAPES WHICH WAS FOR AUDIO. IT HELPED, YOU COULD GET BETTER AUDIO QUALITY. THEY CALLED THEM METAL, IT’S JUST METAL PARTICLES IN THE TAPE.” “I WOULD SAY THIS CAMERA PROBABLY GOT USED, I’M GOING TO GUESS ’84…IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN SERVICE WHEN I GOT HERE…I PROBABLY SERVICED THE] CAMERA AND/OR DECK…[BY 1990 IT WAS] PROBABLY REPLACED WITH THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY. NOT THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY BUT NEWEST TO US, CALGARY WOULD HAVE HAD THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY.” “BETA WAS THE STAPLE FORMAT FOR VIDEO FOR MANY YEARS. PROBABLY LEADING RIGHT UP TO INTO THE DIGITAL WORLD IT WAS THE KING. PANASONIC HAD A FORMAT [TOO]…HITACHI HAD THEIR OWN TOO, BUT THEY EVEN MADE THEIR CAMERAS COMPATIBLE WITH BETA DECKS THAT’S HOW BIG INFLUENCE [WAS]. SOME SMALLER, INDEPENDENT STATIONS MAYBE WENT WITH SOME OF THAT STUFF, BUT I’D SAY 90% OF THE INDUSTRY WAS BETA.” “IT WAS [FOR] REPORTERS. IT WAS FOR NEWS AND VIDEO PRODUCTION.” KRONLUND ELABORATED ON THE CAMERA’S HISTORY IN PRODUCTION, NOTING, “IT’S BEEN IN THE BASEMENT FOR PROBABLY [TEN YEARS]…I FOUND IT IN AN OLD SHIPPING CONTAINER. THERE’S BEEN NUMEROUS UPGRADES TO CAMERAS SINCE THEN, SO NOTHING WAS DONE WITH IT. THE LAST TIME IT WAS USED I’M GOING TO GUESS [WAS] ROUGHLY TEN YEARS AGO, MAYBE MORE.” “I DOUBT YOU WOULD FIND ANYONE USING IT, BUT I WOULDN’T BE SURPRISED IF SOMEBODY HAD IT IN THEIR BASEMENT [FOR] THE SAME REASON OURS WAS. JUST OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND AND YOU’RE JUST GOING ABOUT YOUR DAY–TO-DAY BUSINESS, UNTIL YOU START CLEANING OUT THINGS AND YOU GO, “OH YEAH, THE OLD BBB1.”” “[WE ACQUIRED EQUIPMENT] USUALLY USED. CALGARY WOULD GET THE NEW STUFF AND THEN THE WORKING STUFF THAT THEY WERE REPLACING WOULD COME DOWN TO US, FOR THE MOST PART. THE CAMERAS WE HAVE NOW WERE BOUGHT BRAND NEW, STATE-OF THE-ART, SO THAT WAS NICE. IT IS NICE FOR THAT, BUT THIS WAS PROBABLY PRE-DATED EVEN ME AND I HAVE BEEN HERE TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS. IT WAS PROBABLY THE CAMERA THEY WERE USING, IF NOT AT THE TIME, BUT LIKELY BEFORE I STARTED.” “THIS [CAMERA] FUNCTIONS TODAY. I’M SURE YOU COULD MAKE PICTURES WITH IT, BUT THE USE OF IT WOULD PROBABLY BE, I’M GOING TO GUESS, MAYBE FIVE OR SIX YEARS. THEN [THE] BUDGETS WOULD [GROW], THEY GOT THIS NEW TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN SHOOT UNDER LESS LIGHT. IT’S A LIGHTER CAMERA AND [THEY] HAVE THESE BENEFITS, SO THEY WOULD BUDGET IN TO UPDATE THE CAMERAS AND DECKS. THROUGH THAT CYCLE, THAT IS WHEN WE WOULD PROBABLY GET A COUPLE OF NEW CAMERAS, THE OLDER STUFF WE’D PUT IN THE BASEMENT.” “I’M [NOW] CLEANING OUT OLD EQUIPMENT, BECAUSE IT BUILDS UP AND WE RUN OUT OF ROOM. IT’S SOMETHING HARD TO GET RID OF BECAUSE THEY’RE ALWAYS WORKING AND USUALLY WORKING AND FUNCTIONING FINE, BUT TECHNOLOGY PROGRESSES AND THEY BECOME BIGGER AND BETTER--OR THERE BECOMES BIGGER AND BETTER WAYS OF DOING THE SAME JOB. IT JUST GETS OUTDATED AND HITS THE SHELF. [I] HATE TO SEE IT JUST GET RECYCLED.” “I’M NOT REALLY THAT TYPE OF [NOSTALGIC] PERSON. THE CAMERAS TODAY ARE ALL DIGITAL, THEY GO RIGHT TO A SD CARD IN DIGITAL FORMAT. THERE’S NO MECHANICAL PARTS AND THAT’S PART OF THE REASON I WAS EMPLOYED BECAUSE SO MUCH OF WHAT I DID WAS BECAUSE PARTS WEAR OUT AND NEED TO BE FIXED AND REPLACED, WHERE THE NEW CAMERAS…IT’S NOT MUCH YOU CAN DO IF IT’S IN DIGITAL FORMAT AND [HAS] NO MECHANICAL MOVING PARTS. I DON’T MISS WORKING ON THEM, THAT COULD BE FRUSTRATING BECAUSE A LOT OF TINY LITTLE GEARS AND TIMING…YOU CAN SPEND HOURS AND NOT GET ANYWHERE, AND THEN FINALLY SHIP IT OUT TO THE MANUFACTURER BECAUSE YOU JUST COULDN’T GET ANYWHERE. YOU SPENT A WEEK WORKING ON IT AND NOW YOU’VE GOT TO, IN THE END, PAY SOMEONE TO DO IT. THOSE ARE FRUSTRATIONS, BUT IT IS SATISFYING WHEN YOU DO FIX A PROBLEM AND ARE ABLE TO FIX IT. BUT THOSE DAYS ARE BEHIND US AND I CAN’T SAY I MISS THEM. IT’S JUST DIFFERENT WAYS OF MAINTAINING CAMERAS NOW.” “IT’S HARD TO THROW OUT BECAUSE THE VALUE OF IT IS LIKE BUYING A CAR…AT THAT TIME. THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE DOING IS PUTTING A CAR ON YOUR SHOULDER, MAYBE NOT QUITE A CAR, BUT I’M GOING TO GUESS THIS CAMERA WAS PROBABLY FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS BACK THEN. THAT’S A LOT OF MONEY.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180005000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180005000
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, SPANDEX, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20170007005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
NYLON, SPANDEX, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Length
23
Width
8.5
Description
PAIR OF WHITE, REFLECTIVE GLOVES WITH WHITE AND OPAQUE PLASTIC BEADING ON WRISTS; BEADING FORMS FLOWER PATTERNS WITH BEADED LOOP AND TWO BEADED STRANDS FROM CENTER. TAG INSIDE LEFT HAND GLOVE READS “87.30% NYLON, 12.70% SPANDEX, MADE IN TAIWAN”. FINGERTIPS ON RIGHT HAND GLOVE STAINED RED; BEADING ON BOTH GLOVES IS STAINED RED-BROWN UNDERNEATH. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON FEBRUARY 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED WILMA WOOD, DAUGHTER OF DOROTHY TAYLOR, ABOUT HER DONATION OF TAYLOR’S ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE REGALIA. THE REGALIA REPRESENTED TAYLOR’S 50-YEAR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE FROM BRANDON, MANITOBA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. MACLEAN ADDITIONALLY INTERVIEWED ANN MARIE MCDONALD OF THE LETHBRIDGE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE ON JUNE 6, 2017. ON THE GLOVES, MCDONALD ELABORATED, “WE ALWAYS WORE WHITE GLOVES FOR FUNERALS, FOR WHEN OUR SUPREME CAME. IF OUR SUPREME CAME, WE ALWAYS HAD OUR DRILL TEAM…THEY WORE LONG SKIRTS, BUT THEY DIDN’T WEAR JACKETS. IF YOU WERE HONORABLE ROYAL LADY, AND YOU HAD SOMEBODY IMPORTANT COME TO VISIT YOU, YOU WORE WHITES, WHICH MEANT WHITE GLOVES. IF YOU GO TO A FUNERAL, AND YOU DRESS IN ROYAL PURPLE, YOU’D BETTER BRING YOUR WHITE GLOVES, OR PUT YOUR HANDS IN YOUR POCKETS.” WILMA WOOD DISCUSSED HER MOTHER’S TIME IN THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE, STATING, “SHE CONSIDERS [THESE OBJECTS IN ACTIVE USE]. SHE IS VERY MUCH A PERSON WHO VALUES THAT SOCIETY. IT HELPED HER A NUMBER OF TIMES. AS YOU GROW OLDER, ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU DISCOVER THAT YOUR BRAIN ISN’T AS ACTIVE AS IT SHOULD BE AND THE MEMORY IS GOING. SHE WOULD PUT HERSELF INTO POSITIONS WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION INCLUDING BEING PRESIDENT, THREE OR FOUR TIMES. SHE HAD TO BE AN ORGANIZER, SHE HAD TO GET HER BRAIN AND KEEP HER BRAIN FUNCTIONING, WHICH I THOUGHT WAS VERY ADMIRABLE FOR A WOMAN HER AGE BECAUSE…SHE WAS IN HER EIGHTIES. SHE RECEIVED HER 50 YEAR PIN, I THINK IT WAS TWO YEARS AGO OR THREE.” “SHE JOINED [THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE] IN BRANDON, MANITOBA WHERE [MY PARENTS] WERE LIVING AT THE TIME, AND MY DAD RETIRED THERE. THEY MOVED HERE TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE MY BROTHER LIVED HERE, AND MY UNCLE ART GOOD…HE LIVED HERE AND THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSER TO FAMILY. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND MY DAD DIED SHORTLY AFTER THAT.” “[SHE JOINED] BECAUSE OF HER FRIENDS. SHE HAD A FRIENDSHIP GROUP AND THEY BELONGED. THEY RECRUITED HER.” “WHEN SHE WAS VERY ACTIVE, SHE WAS A MAJOR RECRUITER. SHE WENT OUT AND FOUND YOUNG WOMEN BUT THEY FELL BY THE WAYSIDE BECAUSE OF LIFE. SHE WAS CERTAINLY VERY ACTIVE IN THEIR PROJECTS, ONE OF WHICH WAS FINDING FINANCES TO EDUCATE YOUNG PEOPLE. WHATEVER THEY WERE [DOING], SHE WAS INTO IT FULL TILT BECAUSE THAT’S THE KIND OF PERSON SHE IS…WHATEVER SHE DOES IS FULL BLAST, FULL BORE. SHE NEVER TOLD ME ANY DETAILS ABOUT THE SOCIETY BECAUSE IT’S ONE OF THOSE SECRET SISTERHOODS. SHE WAS ALWAYS VERY PROUD TO BE A MEMBER OF IT.” “THIS [CHAPTER] DID A LOT OF EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT…SHE TRAVELED WITH THEM BECAUSE IT WAS A CANADIAN ORGANIZATION, SO THEY HAD THEIR ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS ALL OVER CANADA. SHE CAME OUT TO VANCOUVER TO A MEETING AND I WENT OVER TO VANCOUVER TO MEET HER AND SAY “HOWDY”. SHE WENT OUT TO THE PREMIER’S, AT THAT TIME WAS VANDER ZALM, AND HE HAD THE BIG GARDENS OUT NEAR STEVESTON. SHE WENT OUT THERE AND SHE MET HIM.” “A YEAR AGO ABOUT THIS TIME, THAT’S WHEN [THE ORDER WAS] FOLDING. THE ALBERTA CLUBS WERE ALL IMPLODING, AND I THINK THERE’S ONLY ONE LEFT IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. IT WAS THE ISSUE THAT THEY WERE ALL OLD PEOPLE AND YOUNG PEOPLE DID NOT WANT TO JOIN THESE KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS ANY LONGER…[THIS HAPPENED BECAUSE] I THINK WE HAVE MORE LEGAL SUPPORT. THE GOVERNMENT HAS SET UP HEALTH CARE, COMMUNITIES HAVE SET UP ASSISTANCE FOR WOMEN WHO ARE ABUSED, THERE’S DRUG ASSISTANCE. THERE IS MUCH MORE ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. IN THE EARLY DAYS ON THE PRAIRIES, IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOUR NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOR, WHO MIGHT BE TWENTY MILES AWAY, YOU WERE IN DEEP DOO-DOO IF YOU HAD A BIG PROBLEM. THAT’S WHAT THESE SOCIETIES CAME OUT OF WAS THAT NEED. THE NEED PRETTY WELL HAS BEEN TAKEN CARE OF, I THINK. THERE ARE STILL CLUBS BUT THEY’RE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CLUBS NOW.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTIVATION FOR DONATING HER MOTHER’S REGALIA TO THE MUSEUM, WOOD NOTED, “MY MOTHER HAS TURNED 99 YEARS OLD IN JANUARY. SHE HAS DEMENTIA AND SO WE’VE HAD TO MOVE HER FROM HER SENIOR’S LODGE ROOM INTO A MORE SECURE ROOM. CONSEQUENTLY THE LAST OF THE THINGS THAT SHE TREASURED OR VALUED MUST BE DISPERSED. MY BROTHER AND I DECIDED THAT, SINCE THE ELKS AND THE ROYAL PURPLE MEANT SO MUCH TO HER, THAT [THESE WERE] THE [OBJECTS] WE WOULD LIKE TO DONATE TO THE MUSEUM. IT DEPICTS A PERIOD OF TIME WHEN THE WOMEN USED THESE ASSOCIATIONS AS A SUPPORT GROUP FOR THEMSELVES. IT WAS ANOTHER ONE OF THESE SECRET SOCIETIES, WHEN IN FACT THEY WERE SISTERHOODS. THEY WERE MEANT MAINLY FOR THEM TO HAVE PEOPLE TO SUPPORT EACH OTHER. SINCE THIS ORGANIZATION HAS BASICALLY COLLAPSED, I THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT THE MUSEUM SHOULD HAVE BECAUSE IT DOES SHOW THAT PERIOD OF TIME IN THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF CANADA.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170007005
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20170007007
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
5.5
Diameter
19
Description
A. PURPLE ROUND CAP WITH PURPLE AND WHITE TASSEL ATTACHED TO CENTER BUTTON. INSIDE OF CAP HAS BLACK VELCRO STRIP STAPLED TO BROWN LEATHER LINING, AND BLACK DOUBLE-ELASTIC STRAP ATTACHED. WHITE TAG INSIDE CAP READS “LOT. MEDIUM” WITH HANDWRITTEN INSCRIPTION IN BLUE INK “D. TAYLOR”. HAT HAS TWO PINS ON FRONT, ONE DIAMOND-SHAPED WITH RHINESTONE EDGING AND A STAG WITH PURPLE EYES IN THE CENTER, OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION; SECOND PIN COMPRISED OF FOURTEEN RHINESTONES ATTACHED WITH METAL CASINGS WITH TWO PIN ENDS AND PIN BACKINGS ATTACHED, OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. BOTH PINS HAS SILVER-COLOURED FINISHING; RHINESTONE-CHAIN PIN HAS TARNISHING ON PIN ENDS. INSIDE OF CAP HAS STAINS ALONG BACK EDGE AND ON INSIDE LINING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. HAT BAG, 33CM LONG X 22.5CM WIDE X 6.4CM DEEP, GREY EXTERIOR WITH BLACK, VINYL INTERIOR; HANDLE STITCHED TO TOP OF BAG. TOP FLAP ON BAG SECURES WITH BLACK AND SILVER SNAP BUTTON. INSIDE OF BAG HAS PAPER CARD INSERTED IN PLASTIC SLEEVE THAT READS “NAME DOROTHY TAYLOR, STREET 403 515-6 ST. S, TOWN LETHBRIDGE, PROV. ALTA, PHONE 8-9867, O.O.R.P. LODGE NO. 32”. RIGHT SIDE OF BAG INSIDE HAS GOLD “O.O.R.P.” DIAMOND SEAL WITH ELK IN CENTER. BAG HAS ROUNDED BASE; UPPER FLAP IS CURLED OUT AND BENT, AND TORN AT LOWER RIGHT AND LEFT CORNERS WHERE ATTACHED TO THE BAG; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON FEBRUARY 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED WILMA WOOD, DAUGHTER OF DOROTHY TAYLOR, ABOUT HER DONATION OF TAYLOR’S ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE REGALIA. THE REGALIA REPRESENTED TAYLOR’S 50-YEAR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE FROM BRANDON, MANITOBA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. MACLEAN ADDITIONALLY INTERVIEWED ANN MARIE MCDONALD OF THE LETHBRIDGE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE ON JUNE 6, 2017. ON THE HAT AND HAT BAG, MCDONALD ELABORATED, “WHEN YOU JOIN THE LODGE, THIS IS THE HAT YOU GET. THIS IS STANDARD. ALL THE LADIES GET THIS. WHEN YOU JOIN THE LODGE, YOUR TASSEL IS JUST PURPLE. WHEN YOU ARE HONORABLE ROYAL LADY, YOU TAKE YOUR TASSEL OFF, AND YOU PUT THIS [PURPLE AND CREAM] TASSEL ON.” “[THE BAG] MUST BE FROM BRANDON. OUR HAT BOXES ARE WHITE, AND THEY ARE HARD, AND YOU PUT YOUR HAT IN. [THEN] YOU TIP YOUR HAT UP, AND YOU PUT YOUR GLOVES AND ANYTHING THAT YOU WANT TO STORE IN THE HAT BOX. THE HAT BOXES ARE QUITE A BIT BIGGER…THEY HAVE A HANDLE ON THEM SO YOU CAN…CARRY THEM. EVERYBODY USED TO KEEP THEIR GLOVES IN THEIR HAT BOX.” WOOD DISCUSSED HER MOTHER’S TIME IN THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE, STATING, “SHE CONSIDERS [THESE OBJECTS IN ACTIVE USE]. SHE IS VERY MUCH A PERSON WHO VALUES THAT SOCIETY. IT HELPED HER A NUMBER OF TIMES. AS YOU GROW OLDER, ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU DISCOVER THAT YOUR BRAIN ISN’T AS ACTIVE AS IT SHOULD BE AND THE MEMORY IS GOING. SHE WOULD PUT HERSELF INTO POSITIONS WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION INCLUDING BEING PRESIDENT, THREE OR FOUR TIMES. SHE HAD TO BE AN ORGANIZER, SHE HAD TO GET HER BRAIN AND KEEP HER BRAIN FUNCTIONING, WHICH I THOUGHT WAS VERY ADMIRABLE FOR A WOMAN HER AGE BECAUSE…SHE WAS IN HER EIGHTIES. SHE RECEIVED HER 50 YEAR PIN, I THINK IT WAS TWO YEARS AGO OR THREE.” “SHE JOINED [THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE] IN BRANDON, MANITOBA WHERE [MY PARENTS] WERE LIVING AT THE TIME, AND MY DAD RETIRED THERE. THEY MOVED HERE TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE MY BROTHER LIVED HERE, AND MY UNCLE ART GOOD…HE LIVED HERE AND THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSER TO FAMILY. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND MY DAD DIED SHORTLY AFTER THAT.” “[SHE JOINED] BECAUSE OF HER FRIENDS. SHE HAD A FRIENDSHIP GROUP AND THEY BELONGED. THEY RECRUITED HER.” “WHEN SHE WAS VERY ACTIVE, SHE WAS A MAJOR RECRUITER. SHE WENT OUT AND FOUND YOUNG WOMEN BUT THEY FELL BY THE WAYSIDE BECAUSE OF LIFE. SHE WAS CERTAINLY VERY ACTIVE IN THEIR PROJECTS, ONE OF WHICH WAS FINDING FINANCES TO EDUCATE YOUNG PEOPLE. WHATEVER THEY WERE [DOING], SHE WAS INTO IT FULL TILT BECAUSE THAT’S THE KIND OF PERSON SHE IS…WHATEVER SHE DOES IS FULL BLAST, FULL BORE. SHE NEVER TOLD ME ANY DETAILS ABOUT THE SOCIETY BECAUSE IT’S ONE OF THOSE SECRET SISTERHOODS. SHE WAS ALWAYS VERY PROUD TO BE A MEMBER OF IT.” “THIS [CHAPTER] DID A LOT OF EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT…SHE TRAVELED WITH THEM BECAUSE IT WAS A CANADIAN ORGANIZATION, SO THEY HAD THEIR ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS ALL OVER CANADA. SHE CAME OUT TO VANCOUVER TO A MEETING AND I WENT OVER TO VANCOUVER TO MEET HER AND SAY “HOWDY”. SHE WENT OUT TO THE PREMIER’S, AT THAT TIME WAS VANDER ZALM, AND HE HAD THE BIG GARDENS OUT NEAR STEVESTON. SHE WENT OUT THERE AND SHE MET HIM.” “A YEAR AGO ABOUT THIS TIME, THAT’S WHEN [THE ORDER WAS] FOLDING. THE ALBERTA CLUBS WERE ALL IMPLODING, AND I THINK THERE’S ONLY ONE LEFT IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. IT WAS THE ISSUE THAT THEY WERE ALL OLD PEOPLE AND YOUNG PEOPLE DID NOT WANT TO JOIN THESE KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS ANY LONGER…[THIS HAPPENED BECAUSE] I THINK WE HAVE MORE LEGAL SUPPORT. THE GOVERNMENT HAS SET UP HEALTH CARE, COMMUNITIES HAVE SET UP ASSISTANCE FOR WOMEN WHO ARE ABUSED, THERE’S DRUG ASSISTANCE. THERE IS MUCH MORE ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. IN THE EARLY DAYS ON THE PRAIRIES, IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOUR NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOR, WHO MIGHT BE TWENTY MILES AWAY, YOU WERE IN DEEP DOO-DOO IF YOU HAD A BIG PROBLEM. THAT’S WHAT THESE SOCIETIES CAME OUT OF WAS THAT NEED. THE NEED PRETTY WELL HAS BEEN TAKEN CARE OF, I THINK. THERE ARE STILL CLUBS BUT THEY’RE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CLUBS NOW.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTIVATION FOR DONATING HER MOTHER’S REGALIA TO THE MUSEUM, WOOD NOTED, “MY MOTHER HAS TURNED 99 YEARS OLD IN JANUARY. SHE HAS DEMENTIA AND SO WE’VE HAD TO MOVE HER FROM HER SENIOR’S LODGE ROOM INTO A MORE SECURE ROOM. CONSEQUENTLY THE LAST OF THE THINGS THAT SHE TREASURED OR VALUED MUST BE DISPERSED. MY BROTHER AND I DECIDED THAT, SINCE THE ELKS AND THE ROYAL PURPLE MEANT SO MUCH TO HER, THAT [THESE WERE] THE [OBJECTS] WE WOULD LIKE TO DONATE TO THE MUSEUM. IT DEPICTS A PERIOD OF TIME WHEN THE WOMEN USED THESE ASSOCIATIONS AS A SUPPORT GROUP FOR THEMSELVES. IT WAS ANOTHER ONE OF THESE SECRET SOCIETIES, WHEN IN FACT THEY WERE SISTERHOODS. THEY WERE MEANT MAINLY FOR THEM TO HAVE PEOPLE TO SUPPORT EACH OTHER. SINCE THIS ORGANIZATION HAS BASICALLY COLLAPSED, I THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT THE MUSEUM SHOULD HAVE BECAUSE IT DOES SHOW THAT PERIOD OF TIME IN THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF CANADA.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170007007
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Other Name
RAGDOLL
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20120045001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RAGDOLL
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
WOOL, COTTON
No. Pieces
4
Length
42
Width
26
Description
A. RAGDOLL KNIT WITH WHITE, YELLOW, GREEN, RED, AND BLACK YARN. BODY IS WHITE WITH YELLOW UNDERWEAR, GREEN AND WHITE STOCKINGS, AND RED AND BLACK SHOES. DOLL HAS BRIGHT ORANGE HAIR MADE FROM YARN; FACE IS HAND-STITCHED WITH WHITE AND BLACK EYES, RED TRIANGULAR NOSE, AND RED FROWNING MOUTH. DOLL HAS RED YARN TIED AROUND HANDS. WHITE TAG ON BACK READS, IN BLACK, “HAND KNIT BY RESIDENTS OF FORESTER HAVEN”. DOLL SHOWS LITTLE SIGNS OF WEAR; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. B. NECK-SCARF TIED TO DOLL; (33CM WIDE X 15CM LONG); RED COTTON TRIANGULAR NECK-SCARF WITH SCALLOPED EDGES. SCARF IS HEAVILY CREASED FROM BEING TIED ON THE DOLL; EDGES ARE FRAYED; OVERALL CONDITION IS VERY GOOD. C. GREEN AND WHITE DOTTED OVERALLS, WORN BY RAGDOLL. OVERALLS HAVE WHITE SCALLOPED TRIM AROUND ANKLES AND BIB; OVERALLS ARE SECURED WITH TWO WHITE PLASTIC AND METAL BUTTON-SNAPS. FRONT OF OVERALLS HAS FELT LETTERS “IOF” SEWN ON. OVERALLS SHOW LITTLE SIGNS OF WEAR; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. D. HAT FOR RAGOLL; STYLE OF A BASEBALL CAP WITH GREEN AND WHITE DOTTED BRIM. CAP IS FORMED BY THREE TRIANGULAR GREEN AND WHITE DOTTED PATCHES AND THREE SOLID WHITE PATCHES WITH WHITE PLASTIC BUTTON SEWN ONTO TOP. CAP HAS GREEN THREAD STITCHED AROUND BASE EDGE AND SECURING BRIM. CAP SHOWS LITTLE SIGN OF WEAR; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE PURPOSE OF THE RAGDOLL, CAREFOOT NOTED, “THESE DOLLS…WERE PART OF WHAT WE USED FOR…THE PREVENTION OF CHILD ABUSE…THAT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WE USED IN ADVERTISING…OCCASIONALLY, WHEN THERE WAS SOMETHING GOING ON IN THE CITY, WE’D RENT A SPACE AND HAVE A BOOTH AND THIS WAS ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WE’D PROJECT.” “WE DIDN’T MAKE AND SELL THEM. IT WAS JUST A DEMONSTRATION OF CHILDREN, CAUGHT PEOPLE’S EYE.” “THIS TOOK PLACE [IN] CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES BECAUSE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS WAS BIG IN THE UNITED STATES AS WELL AND IT GREW OVER TO ENGLAND…WE WOULD HAVE ACTIVITIES WHERE WE COULD MAKE SOME MONEY AND WE’D DONATE IT TO THE GROUPS THAT WERE [PREVENTING] CHILD ABUSE…WE WOULD HAVE A PRINCESS IN THE VARIOUS COMMUNITIES CLOSE AROUND AND THEY WOULD SELL TICKETS FOR VARIOUS THINGS SO THAT WE WOULD ACCUMULATE THE MONEY…WE WOULD THEN DONATE [THE MONEY] ON BEHALF OF [THE BUYERS] TO [THE] PREVENTION OF CHILD ABUSE.” “TODAY, IT HAS SORT OF FLOATED DOWN TO WHERE IT’S HARDLY NEGLIGIBLE ANYMORE BECAUSE OTHER THINGS HAVE HAPPENED IN THE COMMUNITY THAT WERE PROBABLY DOING BETTER THAN WE WERE.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045001
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RAGDOLL
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20120045002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RAGDOLL
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
1980
Materials
WOOL, COTTON
No. Pieces
2
Length
40
Width
26
Description
A.RAGDOLL WEARING GREEN AND WHITE DOTTED DRESS; DOLL IS KNIT FROM WOOL AND HAS BRIGHT ORANGE YARN HAIR. DOLL FACE IS HAND-STITCHED WITH WHITE AND BLACK EYES, RED NOSE AND RED FROWNING MOUTH SEWN INTO WOOL. DOLL HAS KNIT YELLOW PANTIES, GREEN AND WHITE STOCKINGS, AND RED AND BLACK SHOES ALL PART OF MAIN BODY. WHITE TAG ON BACK READS, IN BLACK, “HAND KNIT BY RESIDENTS OF FORESTER HAVEN”. DOLL SHOWS LITTLE SIGNS OF WEAR; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. B. DOLL DRESS; GREEN AND WHITE WITH WHITE SCALLOPED HEM AND SLEEVES, AND WHITE COLLAR. DRESS HAS ELASTIC SLEEVES. DRESS ATTACHED AT BACK OF THE NECK WITH SILVER HOOK-CLASP. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE PURPOSE OF THE RAGDOLL, CAREFOOT NOTED, “THESE DOLLS…WERE PART OF WHAT WE USED FOR…THE PREVENTION OF CHILD ABUSE…THAT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WE USED IN ADVERTISING…OCCASIONALLY, WHEN THERE WAS SOMETHING GOING ON IN THE CITY, WE’D RENT A SPACE AND HAVE A BOOTH AND THIS WAS ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WE’D PROJECT.” “WE DIDN’T MAKE AND SELL THEM. IT WAS JUST A DEMONSTRATION OF CHILDREN, CAUGHT PEOPLE’S EYE.” “THIS TOOK PLACE [IN] CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES BECAUSE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS WAS BIG IN THE UNITED STATES AS WELL AND IT GREW OVER TO ENGLAND…WE WOULD HAVE ACTIVITIES WHERE WE COULD MAKE SOME MONEY AND WE’D DONATE IT TO THE GROUPS THAT WERE [PREVENTING] CHILD ABUSE…WE WOULD HAVE A PRINCESS IN THE VARIOUS COMMUNITIES CLOSE AROUND AND THEY WOULD SELL TICKETS FOR VARIOUS THINGS SO THAT WE WOULD ACCUMULATE THE MONEY…WE WOULD THEN DONATE [THE MONEY] ON BEHALF OF [THE BUYERS] TO [THE] PREVENTION OF CHILD ABUSE.” “TODAY, IT HAS SORT OF FLOATED DOWN TO WHERE IT’S HARDLY NEGLIGIBLE ANYMORE BECAUSE OTHER THINGS HAVE HAPPENED IN THE COMMUNITY THAT WERE PROBABLY DOING BETTER THAN WE WERE.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045002
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range
1940-1963
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191021
Physical Description
2 items textual material
Scope and Content
Photocopy of black and white photograph of the Joseph and Mary Chervinski (Cherwinski) family. Photocopy of a Lethbridge Herald article dated August 10, 1963 which interviewed Joe and Mary Chervinsky about their lives in Lethbridge.
Date Range
1940-1963
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
2 items textual material
History / Biographical
From the donor: "My grandmothers 13 children were all born and raised in Lethbridge. Leon Synik (Syniuk) was father to the oldest three. Joseph Chervinski, father of the other 10. Mary Haliburda (Halaburda) was their mother."
Scope and Content
Photocopy of black and white photograph of the Joseph and Mary Chervinski (Cherwinski) family. Photocopy of a Lethbridge Herald article dated August 10, 1963 which interviewed Joe and Mary Chervinsky about their lives in Lethbridge.
Accession No.
20191021
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Chervinski and Metcalfe Families.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95551
Date Range
1930-1950
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191037
Physical Description
7 black and white photographic prints. 3 items textual material.
Scope and Content
Records from the Chervinski (Czerwinski) and Metcalfe families. 5 photographic prints, RCAF discharge certificate, copy of baptism and newborn baby booklet from the Crystal Dairy.
Date Range
1930-1950
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
7 black and white photographic prints. 3 items textual material.
Scope and Content
Records from the Chervinski (Czerwinski) and Metcalfe families. 5 photographic prints, RCAF discharge certificate, copy of baptism and newborn baby booklet from the Crystal Dairy.
Accession No.
20191037
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Lloyd George Carefoot fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions93710
Date Range
1973 – 2018
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20181067
Physical Description
30cm of textual records, 1 hardcover book, 1 data DVD
Scope and Content
1: 1973-1993; 57 photos, news-clippings; ice rodeo; scout circus (1978); ADRI camp; Chief Scout awards; Canadian Jamboree (P.E.I.) 1977; badges 2: 1983-1993; 31 photos, badges; World Jamboree 1983; subcamp 3: 1994 – 1999; 97 photos; badges; Thinking day, skillorama 1996; Scout camp 1998; Investitur…
Date Range
1973 – 2018
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Lloyd George Carefoot
Physical Description
30cm of textual records, 1 hardcover book, 1 data DVD
History / Biographical
Lloyd Carefoot was born in Radway, Alberta on March 1, 1932, spending his childhood on a farm in the Weskatenau area. Mr. Carefoot attended agricultural school in Vermillion, Alberta (1950-1952), and at the age of twenty moved to Edgerton, Alberta to work as elevator agent for the Alberta Wheat Pool. In the mid-1950s Mr. Carefoot joined the Life Stock Feed Division of the Swift Canadian Co. and in 1973 he moved to the Poultry Department as a sales representative. In 1979, after the Swift Canadian Co. closed the plant, Mr. Carefoot managed the Co-op Hatchery in Edmonton. In the mid-1980s Mr. Carefoot began a career in real estate (Royal LePage) and he retired in the 1990s. Lloyd Carefoot was a member of the Independent Order of Foresters (IOF) – (Lethbridge Chapter) since the 1960s, serving as president twice. Mr. Carefoot was an active volunteer at the Lethbridge Food Bank, where he served on the executive for 23 years. He was involved in fundraising for multiple organizations, including the Canadian Red Cross, the Victorian Order of Nurses, the Canadian Kidney Foundation, the CNIB Canada, the Nord-Bridge Seniors Centre, and the Stirling Railroad Museum Association. On July 4, 2014, Lloyd Carefoot was awarded the Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers (Governor General’s Award) for his contributions to the Scouting Movement in Lethbridge. His involvement spanned over 47 years. Lloyd Carefoot is married (Ruth; 1959-) and has two daughters and one son. He resides in Lethbridge, Alberta. (history includes information provided through unrecorded donation interview with Lloyd Carefoot, (as per Accession No. 20111084)
Scope and Content
1: 1973-1993; 57 photos, news-clippings; ice rodeo; scout circus (1978); ADRI camp; Chief Scout awards; Canadian Jamboree (P.E.I.) 1977; badges 2: 1983-1993; 31 photos, badges; World Jamboree 1983; subcamp 3: 1994 – 1999; 97 photos; badges; Thinking day, skillorama 1996; Scout camp 1998; Investiture ceremony, Yellowknife 1998; Scout camp 1999; 4: 1999-2000; 75 photos; Map (Waterton Park) Scout camp (14th Lethbridge); Winter camp 2000 5: 2001; 111 photos; Scout camp 2001; Kedon Joint camp 2001; Family camp 2000; 35 year pin/award; 6: 1999; 22 photos; Alberta Jamboree 1999 (Camp Impeesa) 7: 2004-2006; 113 photos; Scout camp 2004; Bevcub Rally 2005; Alberta Jamboree 2005; Scout brotherhood jamboree 2005; Year of the Veteran 2005; Cubcar racing; 8: 2018; 68th Lethbridge Windystone Baden-Powell Guild and Scout awards 2018 9: Digital copy (original album returned to donor) 1973-2005; World jamboree, Alberta Jamboree (199 photos) 10: DVD disc: Alberta Jamboree 2003 (Skeleton Lake Sub-Camp): 12 video files, 1550 photos; 1 recipe book;
Accession No.
20181067
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Plans, Instructions & Specifications for Farm Structures & Systems.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96493
Date Range
1930-1945
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191105
Physical Description
3 cm. textual material.
Scope and Content
Assorted plans, instructions, & specifications for various farm projects, including a wind-driven battery charger, building a septic tank, prevention & treatment of chimney problems, oil-burning kitchen stove, tilting saw table, pipe furnace, hot/cold water systems, sand filter for farm water suppl…
Date Range
1930-1945
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
3 cm. textual material.
History / Biographical
Plans, instructions, etc. supplied by the Department of Agricultural Engineering, MacDonald College, Quebec.
Custodial History
Papers were stored in the donor's barn.
Scope and Content
Assorted plans, instructions, & specifications for various farm projects, including a wind-driven battery charger, building a septic tank, prevention & treatment of chimney problems, oil-burning kitchen stove, tilting saw table, pipe furnace, hot/cold water systems, sand filter for farm water supply, braced rafter hay barn, swing saw, cold storage room, farm cottage, work bench, swing gate, farm shop, jigs & gauges, door hinges. Redhead Petroleum Products road map of Alberta, n.d.
Accession No.
20191105
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Other Name
"SPEED GUN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, FOAM
Catalogue Number
P20120014000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SPEED GUN"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1985
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, FOAM
No. Pieces
5
Height
13
Length
45
Width
32
Description
A. CASE, SPEED GUN, 45CM LONG X 32CM WIDE X 13CM TALL. BLACK SYNTHETIC LEATHER EXTERIOR WITH SILVER TRIM ALONG LID, TWO SILVER METAL CLASPS WITH LOCKS ON FRONT, FOUR ROUND, SILVER METAL FEET ON BACK, AND SILVER METAL HINGES ON BACK. FRONT OF CASE HAS BLACK PLASTIC HANDLE ATTACHED TO SILVER METAL MOUNT. CASE INTERIOR HAS GREEN FOAM INSERTS INSIDE LID AND BASE; BASE FOAM INSERT HAS CUT-OUTS FOR SPEED GUN TO REST. CASE EXTERIOR IS SCUFFED AND WORN; TOP AND FRONT OF CASE STAINED WHITE AND BROWN; HANDLE HAS LABEL RESIDE ON TOP AND INSIDE; FOAM INSIDE CASE IS HAS INDENTS FROM SPEED GUN. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. SPEED GUN, 75.4CM LONG WITH CORD, GUN 30.8CM LONG X 9.2CM WIDE. BLACK METAL GUN BODY WITH CONICAL FRONT END; SPEED GUN HAS BLACK HANDLE WITH ENGRAVED CROSS-HATCHED GRIP, AND BLACK TAPE WRAPPED AROUND THE BASE; BASE OF HANDLE HAS BLACK CORD ATTACHED. CORD HAS WHITE TAPE WOUND AROUND TOP, WHITE RUBBER CABLE GUARD; CORD IS SPIRALED WITH BLACK VEHICLE ADAPTER FITTED AT END; ADAPTER IS BLACK PLASTIC WITH ROUND SILVER METAL FITTING. SPEED GUN HAS BLACK PLASTIC TRIGGER AT FRONT OF HANDLE BELOW BODY; FRONT OF SPEED GUN HAS BLACK FOAM FITTED INSIDE CONICAL END. SPEED GUN BODY HAS WHITE TEXT ON SIDE “SPEEDGUN EIGHT” WITH ARROW RUNNING THROUGH WORDS; BODY HAS SILVER SWITCH, TWO WHITE DIALS LABELLED “ALARM”, SILVER DIAL, AND BLACK PLASTIC SWITCH LABELLED “MAN.” “AUTO” “(REL).” BESIDE TEXT. SPEED GUN HAS WHITE TEXT ON REVERSE SIDE “SPEEDGUN EIGHT” WITH ARROW RUNNING THROUGH TEXT. UNDERNEATH OF SPEED GUN BODY HAS SILVER AND BLACK METAL PLATE FIXED WITH SILVER TEXT “CMI INC, MINTURN, CO. USA, TRANSMITTER TYPE JF100, PAT. NO. 3,689,921 & RE 29, 401, S/N 38-001367”. BACK OF SPEED GUN HAS DARKENED GLASS DISPLAY WINDOW, WITH TWO GREEN AND TWO RED BULBS VISIBLE INSIDE. BACK OF SPEED GUN HAS SILVER SWITCH LABELLED “(CAL), MOV, STA.” BELOW DISPLAY WINDOW, AND BELOW A SECOND SILVER SWITCH LABELLED “OFF, ON”. BACK OF SPEED GUN HAS WHITE TEXT “CMI INCORPORATED” BELOW DISPLAY WINDOW. BODY OF SPEED GUN IS SCUFFED AND WORN, WITH CHIPS IN BLACK PAINT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. LEATHER CASE, 14.4CM LONG X 6.7CM WIDE. BLACK LEATHER EXTERIOR WITH BLACK COTTON AND FOAM-LINED INTERIOR; FRONT OF CASE HAS GOLD TEXT STAMPED NEAR TOP EDGE “DECATUR ELECTRONICS, INC, 715 BRIGHT STREET, DECATUR, ILLINOIS 82522”. CASE MACHINE-STITCHED ALONG RIGHT AND BOTTOM EDGES; TOP EDGE HAS RIM ENGRAVED IN LEATHER. CASE INTERIOR IS FLAKING; TEXT ON FRONT OF CASE IS WORN AND FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. TUNING FORK, 12.5CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. SILVER WITH TWO SQUARE PRONGS AND HANDLE; FRONT HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “65 KPH, X BAND”. BACK HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “11443”. TOP OF HANDLE HAS CUT-OUT CIRCLE IN MIDDLE. TUNING FORK HAS BLACK FOAM RESIDUE ON PRONGS FROM LEATHER CASE INTERIOR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. TUNING FORK, 12.5CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. SILVER WITH TWO SQUARE PRONGS AND HANDLE; FRONT HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “88 KPH”. BACK HAS TEXT ENGRAVED BELOW HANDLE “C22333”. TOP OF HANDLE HAS CUT-OUT CIRCLE IN MIDDLE. TUNING FORK HAS BLACK FOAM RESIDUE ON PRONGS FROM LEATHER CASE INTERIOR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MECHANICAL T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON DECEMBER 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED TIM STOBBS, FORMER LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICES OFFICER, ON THE DONATION OF THE SPEED GUN. ON THE SPEED GUN, STOBBS ELABORATED, “[THE SPEED GUN 8] REALLY CHANGED THE WAY THE WORLD WORKED. [IT] ALLOWED US TO SET AN ALARM, IT COULD BE MOUNTED ON THE DASH OF THE CAR TO BE MOBILE, OR IT COULD BE HELD IN A STATIONARY POSITION.” “THIS IS THE LAST ITERATION OF THE SPEED GUN SERIES OF RADAR THAT THE POLICE SERVICES USED IN THE LATE ‘60S…PROBABLY A LOT OF PLACES USED THEM INTO THE EIGHTIES, AND LATER BECAUSE THEY WERE SUCH A GOOD UNIT. THE SPEED GUN 6 WAS A PRECURSOR TO THIS AND IT WOULD [BE] A PLAIN SPEED GUN WHICH LOOKED IDENTICAL TO [THIS] MODEL. BUT IT HAD NONE OF THE FANCY ITERATIONS LIKE ALARMS AND MANUAL AND AUTO SETTINGS ON IT. IT WAS THE FIRST ITERATION THAT ALLOWED THE POLICE, OR AN ENFORCEMENT AGENCY, TO ACTUALLY HAVE A PORTABLE UNIT THAT THEY COULD HOLD IN THEIR HAND [TO] GIVE THEM A READING ON A CAR…VERSUS EVERYTHING THAT THEY HAD WHICH WAS BUILT INTO THE CAR BEFORE AND ACTUALLY FIXED IN THE CAR. PRIOR TO THAT YOU WOULD BE OUTSIDE AND YOU WOULD HAVE A MOUNTED PIECE THAT WOULD BE A TIMING DEVICE, AND YOU WOULD HAVE PIECES OF TUBING ON THE GROUND AND IT WOULD GIVE YOU SPEED FROM TUBES. THIS WAS A STEP FORWARD INTO THE MODERN 2000 FUTURE. EVERYBODY THOUGHT THIS WAS FROM THE PLANET MARS, IT WAS AWESOME." “THE INITIAL ONES THAT STARTED OUT WERE 6’S…[BY 1979 WHEN I ARRIVED] WE WERE MOVING TO 8’S. 8’S HAD ALL THESE WONDERFUL FEATURES IN THEM, THEY HAD COME SO FAR [WITH] THE ALARM, THE AUTO AND MANUAL SETTINGS, THE STATIONARY MOVEMENT, VERY QUICKLY YOU COULD MOVE FROM STATIONARY TO MOVING. THE INTERNAL CALIBRATION WAS A BIG [FEATURE] BECAUSE YOU COULD VALIDATE YOUR SPEEDS WITH YOUR TUNING FORKS, BUT IT WAS ALWAYS NICE TO JUST PERIODICALLY RUN AN INTERNAL CALIBRATION TO MAKE SURE EVERYTHING WAS RUNNING GOOD.” “THEY ONLY LASTED PROBABLY ANOTHER 5 YEARS AFTER I GOT THERE, IF THAT, BECAUSE WE STARTED MOVING TO…A DOUBLE SYSTEM WHERE WE HAD HARD MOUNTED, MOVING RADAR. IT ALSO DID STATIONARY FRONT AND BACK. WE ALSO STARTED MOVING TO A HANDHELD STATIONARY RADAR, WHICH GAVE US MORE VERSATILITY AS WELL. NOW YOU HAD YOUR RADAR LIKE THIS [SPEED GUN] AND YOU COULD RUN TO THE SIDE, YOU COULD DO MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS AT ONCE.” “[WE RAN] 6’S AND 8’S AT THE SAME TIME.” “THIS PARTICULAR MODEL IS QUITE A HIGH END ONE, IT HAS A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT SETTINGS ON IT AND, YOU CAN LOOK ON THE SIDE AND IT SAYS “ALARM”. THIS WAS A UNIQUE THING BACK IN THE DAY—YOU COULD SET, WHEN YOU WERE TRAVELING DOWN THE HIGHWAY OR ON THE ROAD, A PRE-SET SPEED. LET’S SAY FOR AN EXAMPLE YOU GAVE A 15 KM/H DIFFERENTIAL. YOU WOULD SET THIS AT 65 KM/H AND YOU WOULD PUT THE TOP SWITCH TO THE “ON” POSITION, AND YOU LEAVE THIS BACK ROCKER SWITCH IN THE CENTER POSITION, AND WHEN YOU’RE TRAVELING DOWN THE ROAD, ANY VEHICLE THAT WAS IN VIOLATION OF THAT 65 IT WOULD AUTOMATICALLY BEEP AND IT WOULD LOCK THEIR SPEED ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE. YOUR PATROL SPEED WOULD BE DEMONSTRATED IN THE GREEN ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE OF THE BACK DISPLAY AND ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE WOULD BE THE RED DISPLAY WHICH WOULD BE YOUR TARGET SPEED. IT WOULD LOCK IT. WITH RADAR, THIS IS A DEVICE THAT CAN BE USED TO TEST A SPEED OF A MOTOR VEHICLE, BUT THE INITIAL OBSERVATION HAS TO BE MADE BY THE OFFICER TO SAY THAT, “I LOOKED AT A VEHICLE, I SAW THE VEHICLE WAS TRAVELLING AT WHAT I BELIEVE TO BE A SPEED OF FASTER THAN 65KM/H, I CHECKED AND VALIDATED IT WITH MY RADAR.” THIS [SPEED GUN], YOU COULD TOTALLY DEPEND UPON THE RADAR TO LOCK IT UP, EVEN IF YOU DIDN’T SEE THE VEHICLE. THIS ONE WAS A MILE STEP AHEAD OF ANYTHING AT THAT TIME THAT WE HAD.” “[THE SPEED GUNS] WORKED WELL IN COLD, THEY WORKED WELL IN HOT, THEY WERE VERY PORTABLE. WE COULD PUT A BATTERY PACK ON THESE, A 12 VOLT BATTERY PACK AND WE COULD STAND OUTSIDE THE VEHICLE WITH THE BATTERY PACK. THEY WERE A PRETTY GOOD UNIT FOR THE DAY. THE ONLY THING THAT YOU REQUIRED THE OFFICER FOR WAS TO ENSURE THAT YOU DIDN’T GET THE WRONG READING, BECAUSE IF YOU HAVE TWO CARS COMING AT YOU AND YOU HAVE TWO OF THEM IN THE BEAM, THE OFFICER HAS TO MAKE A DIFFERENTIAL WHETHER OR NOT IT WOULD WORK.” “WE HAD A NUMBER OF DASH MOUNTED UNITS WHICH HAD THE SAME CAPABILITIES, BUT NOTHING HAD THE ALLOWANCE FOR YOU TO BE ABLE TO PULL IT OUT IN A SECOND AND POINT IT OUT THE SIDE WINDOW TO CATCH SOMEBODY COMING AT YOU FROM THE SIDE OR THE REAR. IT WAS A VERY UNIQUE AND WELL THOUGHT OF BEAST. THE ONLY PROBLEMS WE HAD WITH THESE IS IF YOU CAN NOTICE THERE IS AT THE END [THERE’S A PIECE THAT LOOKS] LIKE A HORN. ONE OF THE BIGGEST ISSUES IS MOST POLICEMEN ARE RELATIVELY HARD ON EQUIPMENT IN THE CARS. THEY’VE GOT THE [SPEED GUN] AND THEY DROP IT ON THE GROUND AFTER THEY GET A SPEED. WE [USED] TO KNOCK THE HORNS OFF [SPEED GUNS] QUITE A BIT AND HAVE TO SEND THEM BACK, OR THE HORNS [BECAME] DEFORMED, AND THE REASON IT’S DEFORMED IS ITS BEEN DROPPED OR BANGED AGAINST SOMETHING. WHILE THAT WOULD BE A NORMAL FOR THIS TYPE OF INSTRUMENT, THAT WAS THE ONLY WEAK POINT IN THIS. IF YOU LOOK AT THE MORE MODERN HANDHELD UNITS THEY WENT AWAY FROM A HORN AND PUT A CONE ON THE OUTSIDE TO PROTECT THE INTAKE OF THE RADAR UNIT. THIS ONE HERE…HAS A STYROFOAM INSERT [IN] IT [TO PROTECT IT]. THOSE ALSO WERE VERY SUSCEPTIBLE TO BEING BANGED AND SMASHED OUT. WE WERE ALWAYS MAKING SOMETHING NEW TO PUT BACK IN THERE AND GLUE THEM BACK IN TO PROTECT THE INNARDS OF THE UNIT; THAT WAS PRETTY MUCH THE ONLY DOWNFALL OF THE UNIT.” “ANOTHER THING IT HAD, WHICH THE OLD ONES DIDN’T HAVE, IS IT HAS A STATIONARY MODE ON THE TOP SWITCH AND A MOVING MODE. THEN IT ALSO HAD A CALIBRATE MODE. IT HAD AN INTERNAL TESTING SYSTEM THAT WHEN YOU HIT CALIBRATE IT WOULD RUN AN INTERNAL CALIBRATION ON IT TO HELP YOU, WITH YOUR TUNING FORKS, TO ENSURE THAT THIS WAS WORKING RIGHT. YOU WOULD GENERALLY TEST THIS AT THE BEGINNING OF YOUR SHIFT AND IF YOU STOPPED FOR LUNCH YOU WOULD TEST IT AGAIN DURING THE MIDDLE OF YOUR SHIFT. THEN YOU’D TEST AT THE END OF YOUR SHIFT TO VALIDATE THAT THIS INSTRUMENT HAD BEEN OPERATING CORRECTLY DURING THE DURATION OF YOUR SHIFT.” “THIS CALIBRATION INTERNALLY WOULD RUN AN INTERNAL TEST TO MAKE SURE THAT THE CALCULATIONS INSIDE WERE WORKING CORRECTLY, THE ELECTRONICS. BECAUSE THIS IS A PIECE OF ELECTRONICS AND IT IS SUSCEPTIBLE TO HOT AND COLD. THE WHOLE IDEA OF THIS IS TO ENSURE THAT WHEN YOU WENT TO COURT, WITH THE TUNING FORK TEST AND WITH THE INTERNAL CALIBRATION TEST, YOU COULD STAND UP BEFORE THE COURT AND [SAY], “I TESTED THE UNIT, AND IN MY OPINION, AND MY TRAINING, THIS UNIT WORKED CORRECTLY AND AS IT SHOULD TO DETERMINE ACCURATELY THE SPEED OF A MOTOR VEHICLE, EITHER WITH ME MOVING IT OR ME STATIONARY”. YOU HAVE TO GIVE THAT EVIDENCE…AND THAT [CALIBRATION] ALLOWED THAT. [THE] TUNING FORK TEST AND THE INTERNAL [MODE] VALIDATED YOUR ABILITY TO SAY THAT.” “EVERY TIME YOU TOOK OVER A CAR, OR SAY YOU CHANGE CARS MID-SHIFT, [AND] YOU HAD ONE OF THESE UNITS OR ANY RADAR UNIT IN IT, THE FIRST THING YOU’D DO IS YOU WOULD TEST AND ENSURE THE ACCURACY OF THIS UNIT. [THAT WOULD] ENSURE THAT WHEN YOU LEFT, IF YOU GOT SOMEBODY ON RADAR, IT WOULD BE GIVING YOU AN ACCURATE READING. THEY’RE USUALLY ACCURATE, PLUS OR MINUS LESS THAN 1%. AT A 100KM/H IT WOULD BE LESS THAN 1KM/H OFF. THERE ARE VARIOUS THINGS WITH RADAR THAT ARE [BENEFICIAL]. IF YOU’RE SITTING AT THE SIDE OF THE ROAD AND YOU’RE SHOOTING AT AN ANGLE, THE HIGHER THE ANGLE THE LOWER THE SPEED BECAUSE IT’S LIKE A TONE. IF YOU THINK OF RADAR AS HEARING A TRAIN COMING TOWARDS YOU, YOU HEAR IT COMING, IT GETS LOUD, AND THEN IT GOES AWAY AND IT CHANGES TONE. [THE SPEED GUN] GIVES US THE SAME THING AND THAT’S WHAT THIS READS. SO THAT’S GOOD. THIS [SPEED GUN] WAS THE ULTIMATE IN THE SPEED GUNS, THIS WAS EXCELLENT.” “THE COOL THING ABOUT IT WAS FOR THE COURT SYSTEM, IT CAME WITH TWO SETS OF TUNING FORKS. THE TUNING FORKS WERE USUALLY CALIBRATED TO A SPEED. THESE ONES ARE X-BAND TYPE TUNING FORKS, AND THEY WERE SENT AWAY ANNUALLY TO BE CALIBRATED TO ENSURE THAT THEY MAINTAINED THEIR FREQUENCIES. WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IS THAT YOU WOULD TAKE AND PUT [THE SPEED GUN] IN STATIONARY MODE, AND YOU WOULD TEST THE DEVICE TO ENSURE THAT IT WAS ACTUALLY READING CORRECTLY, ON BOTH OF [TUNING FORKS]. YOU TESTED THE COMPUTATIONAL SPEED OF THE UNIT. YOU’D STRIKE TWO OF THE TUNING FORKS AND PUT THEM TOGETHER IN FRONT OF THE UNIT, AND IT WOULD MAKE A COMPUTATION ON THE TWO TONES TO GIVE YOU THE BASIC SPEED DIFFERENTIAL BETWEEN THE TWO TUNING FORKS. THIS WAS ANOTHER MEANS TO ENSURE THAT WHAT YOU’RE DOING IS GETTING THE PROPER SPEED OUT OF YOUR UNIT. IT WAS REALLY A STEP FORWARD IN INSURING THAT THE CREDIBILITY AND CAPABILITY OF THE UNIT WAS VALIDATED, AND THE COURTS ACTUALLY LOVE THAT.” “ANNUALLY YOU RECERTIFY YOUR TUNING FORKS, YOUR TUNING FORK CERTIFICATION FOR TWO TUNING FORKS IS PROBABLY ABOUT $120 A YEAR. IF ANYTHING STARTS HAPPENING TO THESE, BECAUSE THEY GET BOUNCED IN THE CAR, VIBRATION, HOT, COLD, THEY’RE IN THE CAR ALL THE TIME. THEY START TO WEAR OUT. IT STARTS BECOMING COST PROHIBITIVE TO SEND THEM BACK TO THE FACTORY FOR REFURBISHING. THERE’S A THING IN [THE SPEED GUNS] CALLED THE OSCILLATOR. UNDER THE NEWER UNITS THE OSCILLATOR IS IN THE HEAD, AWAY FROM THE MAIN UNIT. THE OSCILLATOR FOR THIS [MODEL] IS BUILT INSIDE, SO YOU HAVE TO TAKE [THE] WHOLE UNIT AND SHIP IT OFF. THEY HAVE TO PEAL IT ALL APART, PUT AN OSCILLATOR INTO IT. WHEREAS WITH THE NEW UNITS, WITH THE SEPARATE HEADS WITH THE OSCILLATOR, YOU CAN JUST GET ANOTHER HEAD, PUT ANOTHER HEAD ON, SEND THAT HEAD AWAY TO THE, AND FOR A $160 YOU GET THE OSCILLATOR FIXED. WHEN THESE START TO BREAK DOWN, IT’S USUALLY CATASTROPHIC. THIS IS USUALLY ALMOST COST PROHIBITIVE—LIKE MOST ELECTRONICS, THEY HAVE A VERY LIMITED SHELF LIFE. THEY DON’T GET TREATED EXACTLY THE NICEST. MOST POLICE CARS WILL HAVE POWER SEATS BECAUSE OF THE AMOUNT OF PEOPLE THAT [HAVE] TO BE IN THEM AND THE DIFFERENT POSITIONS THEY HAVE TO BE IN, AND A REGULAR SLIDING SEAT GENERALLY DOESN’T GIVE ENOUGH TO FIT ENOUGH PEOPLE. IF SOMEBODY HAD USED THIS, AND PUT IT DOWN, AND IT FELL BEHIND THE SEAT, AND THEY PUSHED THE SEAT BACK, THOSE POWER SEATS ARE FAIRLY STRONG, THEY CAN DO A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF DAMAGE TO ONE OF THESE UNITS INADVERTENTLY. YOU HAVE TO ASSESS HOW THEY’VE BEEN TREATED, WHAT THE COST IS GOING TO BE TO MAINTAIN THEM, LONG-TERM INVESTMENT. AS SOON AS A SPEED GUN 8 OSCILLATOR’S DONE, IT’S DONE. BECAUSE IT’S NOT WORTH SENDING IT BACK TO HAVE RE-DONE.” “[THE] TRAFFIC SERGEANT WOULD HAVE BEEN IN CHARGE OF THE PROCUREMENT OF [RADAR EQUIPMENT]. AT THAT TIME I’M NOT SURE WHO WOULD HAVE BEEN SERGEANT, BUT IT WAS ONE OF MY SERGEANTS THERE. HE HAD BEEN ON TRAFFIC FOR QUITE A WHILE AT THE TIME…SHORTLY THEREAFTER, WHILE I WAS TENURED THERE, SERGEANT NORRIS VANHORN WAS ALSO ON TRAFFIC WHEN I WAS ON THERE. THESE [SPEED GUNS] WERE FANTASTIC…WHEN WE GOT THESE, THESE WERE EYE OPENERS…YOU THOUGHT YOU’D DIED AND GONE TO HEAVEN BECAUSE OF THE VERSATILITY IT GAVE YOU TO DO YOUR JOB.” “YOU CHANGE THE TECHNOLOGY TO TRY TO KEEP UP WITH THE NEEDS OF THE GUYS THAT ARE WORKING. IT MAKES YOU MORE EFFICIENT…I MANAGED THE PEACE OFFICERS IN OKOTOKS, AND I CAN TELL YOU, I CAN BUY EQUIPMENT EVERY DAY…THAT STUFF’S CHEAP. PEOPLE ARE EXPENSIVE…YOU WOULD TRY TO KEEP THEM IN EQUIPMENT THAT KEEPS THEM VERY EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE, AND YOU’D GET THE MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK OUT OF THE PEOPLE WORKING…THIS TYPE OF EQUIPMENT HAS USUALLY A SHORT SHELF LIFE. WE DID OTHER THINGS WITH THEM. WE USED TO LEND OUT THESE RADAR GUNS TO THE SOFT BALL KIDS…OR THE HARD BALL KIDS…AND THEY COULD SEE HOW FAST THEY COULD PITCH. OR WHEN THEY HAD SOAPBOX DERBIES…YOU’D GIVE THESE [SPEED GUNS] AND THEY COULD POST IT ON THE NEWS “AH LITTLE JOHNNY CAME DOWN THE HILL AND HE WAS DOING 37 KM/H IN HIS HOME MADE THING”. THERE [WERE] LOTS OF OTHER APPLICATIONS THAT THIS WAS SORT OF RE-CIRCULATED TO, FOR THE COMMUNITY. IT’S NOT LIKE YOU’D JUST DISCARD THE [EQUIPMENT], YOU’D TRY TO MAKE ANOTHER USE FOR IT. A LOT OF THIS [EQUIPMENT] FOR MANY YEARS, MADE ITS WAY AROUND THE COMMUNITY IN OTHER SOCIAL EVENTS TO ASSIST THE COMMUNITY IN WHAT THEY WANTED TO DO AND SEE.” STOBBS RECALLED HIS TIME WITH THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICE, NOTING, “I WAS VERY FORTUNATE. I WORKED FOR LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICE [STARTING IN 1979]. I ALSO WORKED FOR THE RED CLIFF POLICE SERVICE PRIOR TO THAT, AND WE RAN THESE UNITS WHEN I WAS A YOUNG CONSTABLE. I WORKED IN TRAFFIC FOR OVER 3 AND A HALF OR 4 YEARS.” “THESE [SPEED GUNS] WERE VERY COMMON IN OUR CARS WHEN I CAME HERE. I WAS VERY FORTUNATE—I DROVE A BLACK WIDOW…ONE OF OUR WIDOWS HAD THIS IN IT…WE HAD TWO CARS IN TOWN THAT WERE RENOWNED WITH THE KIDS. THEY WERE TWO BLACK FORDS WITH BIG 429’S IN THEM. THEY HAD SPEED GUNS IN THEM AND THEY ALSO HAD OTHER RADARS IN THEM. THAT [SPEED GUN] WAS ONE OF THE ITERATIONS WE HAD IN THEM, AND WE USED THESE A LOT FOR OUR ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM. THEY COULD GIVE US SUCH VERSATILITY FOR THE OFFICER TO SIT STATIONARY OR TO BE MOVING. WHEN YOU’RE IN A SCHOOL ZONE, SOMETIMES YOU WANT TO STAND OUTSIDE YOUR CAR, YOU WANT TO RUN BACKWARDS, OR YOU WANT TO RUN TO THE SIDE. IF YOU’RE IN A PLAYGROUND ZONE, IT’S MORE ADVANTAGEOUS TO BE SITTING ON A SIDE STREET THAN SITTING WITH THE CARS PASSING YOU. IT GAVE US SUCH VERSATILITY WHICH WE NEVER HAD BEFORE.” “BACK IN THE DAY, OUR FLEET WAS…WE CALLED IT THE ‘SMARTIE’ FLEET. IT WAS MULTIPLE COLOURS AND I DON’T KNOW THE PURPOSE BEHIND IT. WHEN I WAS IN [LETHBRIDGE], IF YOU WOUND UP WITH THE TRAFFIC FLEET WHEN I STARTED IN ‘79, THERE WERE TWO CARS. THERE WERE ALWAYS TWO BLACK CARS, AND THEY WERE CALLED THE BLACK WIDOWS. THERE WERE DIFFERENT ITERATIONS. THE FIRST TWO WERE FORD INTERCEPTORS WITH 429’S ALL DECKED OUT, AND THEY WERE PURSUIT TYPE CARS, THEY ALL WERE IN THOSE DAYS. THEN WE HAD A NUMBER OF OTHER VEHICLES. ONE OF THE CARS THAT, WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, I DROVE [WAS] A SECONDARY MARKED ENFORCEMENT CAR AND IT WAS A PINKIE SALMON COLOUR. I DON’T EVEN KNOW, AND IT WAS GREAT, BUT IT WAS A GREAT BIG LTD AS WELL. THEN WE HAD A COUPLE OTHER CARS THAT WERE A COLLISION CAR AND A HIT-AND-RUN CAR. THEY WERE DIFFERENT COLOURS AGAIN. I DON’T KNOW WHY THEY BOUGHT THEM THAT WAY, I DON’T KNOW WHETHER THAT WAS THE THOUGHT OF THE CHIEF AT THE TIME, BUT THAT WAS THE WAY THINGS WENT UNTIL FINALLY WE DECIDED LATER ON THAT OUR FLEET WAS GOING TO GO BLACK AND WHITE LIKE IN THE OLD DAYS. BEFORE THE “SMARTIE” FLEET IT WAS BLACK AND WHITE, WE WERE GOING BACK TO BLACK AND WHITE. WE WERE THE FIRST POLICE SERVICE IN ALBERTA THAT WENT BACK TO BLACK AND WHITE AND EVERYBODY’S FOLLOWING LETHBRIDGE SUIT, ACTUALLY. THAT’S A CULTURAL THING THOUGH AND LETHBRIDGE IS VERY PROUD OF THEIR BLACK AND WHITE CARS.” “RADAR WAS A DAY-TO-DAY THING; IT WAS INVOLVED HEAVILY IN A DIRECTED TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM. WE USED TO HAVE A PIN-MAP, AND WE DIRECTED OUR ENFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES AROUND A NUMBER OF THINGS. FIRST AND FOREMOST WOULD BE OUR PIN-MAP AND OUR PIN-MAP WAS OUR COLLISION MAP. EVERY COLLISION WAS PINNED AND THEY WERE PINNED IN DIFFERENT COLOURS—THIS [IS] OLD TECHNOLOGY. A FATAL WOULD BE BLACK, AN INJURY WOULD BE RED, A NON-INJURY WOULD BE BLUE. WE COULD VISUALLY SEE FROM THE ENFORCEMENT ASPECT WHERE WE SHOULD BE INVESTING OUR TIME TO SLOW PEOPLE DOWN AT THESE COLLISION POINTS. SECONDLY IS, LETHBRIDGE HAD ALWAYS HAD OUR SCHOOLS CLOSE TOGETHER, SO WE INVESTED A LOT OF OUR TIME AND ENERGY AROUND THE SCHOOL SYSTEM. ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I WAS PROUD OF IS, FOR THE SIZE OF THE CITY AND THE TRAFFIC FLOWS THAT WE HAD, OUR FATALITY WITH YOUTH WAS VERY LOW. WE HAD A FEW KIDS HIT IN MY TIME AND A FEW OBVIOUSLY PASSED AWAY, IN A CITY OF THIS SIZE, BUT OVER THE YEARS MOST OF US TOOK GREAT PRIDE IN THE FACT THAT WE HAD AN OPPORTUNITY TO REALLY MAKE A VISUAL AND A NOTED IMPACT ON BEHAVIORS IN SCHOOLS, WHETHER IT BE U-TURNS, SPEEDING, IN THIS. PEOPLE WERE WELL AWARE WE WERE THERE.” “WE HAD AN EXCELLENT RELATIONSHIP WITH THE KIDS…[IN THE 1970S-1980S WHEN] MUSCLE CARS WERE BIG. WE USED TO HAVE A COOL THING GOING WITH SOME OF THESE KIDS WHEN YOU’RE IN THE ENFORCEMENT GAME. WE USED TO HAVE A [SYSTEM OF] EVERY THIRD ONE’S FREE TYPE THING. THEY’D WORK ALL WINTER, A LOT OF THESE KIDS DIDN’T SMOKE, THEY DIDN’T DRINK, THEY DIDN’T DO ANYTHING. ALL THEY WORKED [ON] WAS THEIR CARS, BUT ONCE SPRING ROLLED OUT, OUT CAME THE MUSCLE CARS. OVER THE COURSE OF THE SUMMER THEY DROVE THEM. THEY WOULD END UP AFOUL OF US, WHETHER IT BE FOR STUNTING OR SPEEDING. WITH SOME OF THESE KIDS, WE WOULD HAVE THIS FREQUENT FLYER MILE PROGRAM BECAUSE THEY WOULD GET THEMSELVES INTO A BIND, BUT THEY WERE SUCH GOOD KIDS THEY WERE JUST STUPID WITH THEIR CARS. WE USED TO CATCH THEM FOR SPEEDING WITH THESE [SPEED GUNS], OR STUNTING. THE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE YOUTH, SOME OF THE YOUNGER PEOPLE, THAT ARE LATE-TEENS OR EARLY-TWENTIES WAS PRETTY GOOD, THESE GUYS THAT BUILT THESE CARS UP. WE HAD A PRETTY GOOD KNOWLEDGE OF THEM AND WE WORKED WELL WITH THEM.” “WE RAN WHAT THEY CALLED A “DIRECTED TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM”. THERE [WERE] A LOT OF OPTIONS FOR THE GUYS TO GO WHERE THEY WANTED, BUT FIRST AND FOREMOST WE CONCENTRATED ON HIGH COLLISION AREAS AND SCHOOLS. OBVIOUSLY WE KNEW WE HAD THE STRIP…WE HAD 3RD AVENUE AND MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE AND KIDS DROVE THE STRIP IN THE SUMMER, THAT’S WHERE THEY DID THEIR DRAG RACING…BACK IN THE DAY, WHEN I FIRST STARTED, MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE WENT STRAIGHT THROUGH TO NORTH MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE. THAT INTERSECTION [OF] 3RD AVENUE, MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE USED TO GO STRAIGHT THROUGH ON THE HIGHWAY. IT WAS A BUSY PLACE [WITH] LOTS OF COLLISIONS. WE SPENT A LOT OF TIME DOWN IN THERE ON MAYOR MAGRATH, AND THERE WERE OTHER PLACES IN TOWN WHICH WERE CONCERNS. YOU’D GET CITIZENS COMPLAINING ABOUT LOTS OF TRAFFIC AND SPEED, WE WOULD GO DOWN AND MONITOR IT, AND WE WOULD TRY TO RESPOND TO THE NEEDS OF THE COMMUNITY BY ATTENDING THAT AREA. USUALLY IT WAS ONE OR TWO PEOPLE IN THE AREA THAT WERE DOING IT AND YOU CAUGHT AND DEALT WITH THEM, AND THE PROBLEM PRETTY MUCH WENT AWAY. ONE OF THE THINGS I WAS TAUGHT AS A YOUNG CONSTABLE [WAS WHEN YOU] COME TO WORK AFTER YOUR DAYS OFF, THE FIRST THING YOU DO IS YOU GO LOOK AT YOUR PIN BOARD AND YOU SEE IF ANYTHING CHANGED, IF HAVE WE HAD A FATALITY. HAS THERE BEEN SOME SERIOUS COLLISIONS, HAS SOMETHING CHANGED? YOU ALWAYS KNEW IN YOUR MIND WHERE YOU HAD TO BE.” “WE SPENT LOTS OF TIME ON SCENIC DRIVE ANYWHERE. AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION IS WORTH A POUND OF CURE. IF YOU’RE RUNNING A MARKED VEHICLE, SOMETIMES WE WOULD JUST PARK ON A BOULEVARD SOMEWHERE IT WAS BUSY AND JUST SIT THERE. YOU’D MONITOR TRAFFIC AND OF COURSE SOMEBODY WOULD EVENTUALLY DO SOMETHING SILLY AND YOU’D HAVE STOP THEM, BUT THE WHOLE IDEA WOULD BE FOR THE VISIBILITY ASPECT.” “I REMEMBER WHEN WE GOT THE 8’S [SPEED GUNS] AND WE COULD PROGRAM THEM, WE THOUGHT WE’D DIED AND WENT TO HEAVEN. WE ARE ALL ABOUT EFFICIENCY. EVERY SHIFT YOU WOULD DEAL WITH TWENTY, THIRTY PEOPLE OR MORE. NOT INCLUDING COMPLAINTS, WE’RE TALKING ABOUT INTERACTIONS WITH PEOPLE THAT WERE VIOLATIONS SOMEHOW. [THE SPEED GUNS] GAVE YOU A TOOL TO INTERACT WITH SOMEBODY…AND A LOT OF OTHER THINGS COME FROM THIS. A LARGE AMOUNT OF CRIME IS SOLVED BY SOMEBODY STOPPING A CAR AND TALKING TO SOMEBODY, AND THE CAR’S STOLEN, THERE’S STOLEN PROPERTY IN THE CAR, THE GUY’S WANTED ON WARRANTS. THIS TOOL WAS A LEVERAGE AND AN ABILITY TO ENTER A WHOLE NEW REALM IN ASSISTING OUR COMMUNITY AND KEEPING OUR COMMUNITY SAFE. IT JUST WASN’T FROM THE TRAFFIC END OF IT, IT GAVE YOU AN OPPORTUNITY TO INTERACT WITH PEOPLE THAT NORMALLY YOU WOULD NOT HAVE THE CAPACITY TO INTERACT WITH. AND DO IT IN A LAWFUL MANNER.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120014000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120014000
Acquisition Date
2012-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
POLYESTER, WOOL, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170007001
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
POLYESTER, WOOL, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
74
Width
50
Description
PURPLE BLAZER JACKET WITH PURPLE LINING; FRONT LAPELS OF JACKET ARE DECORATED WITH PINS. FRONT LEFT AND RIGHT POCKETS LINED WITH GREY PATTERNED FABRIC; FRONT POCKETS HAVE WHITE AND PURPLE “LETHBRIDGE, NO. 32, OORP” AND “BRANDON, NO. 138, OORP” DIAMOND BADGES SEWN ON, WITH WHITE STAG IN CENTER OF TEXT. INSIDE OF BLAZER HAS BLACK TAG WITH WHITE STITCHED TEXT AT BACK OF COLLAR, “MADE IN / FABRIQUE EN CANADA”. TWO POCKETS SEWN INTO BLAZER LINING WITH WHITE CLOTH LINING; INSIDE RIGHT-WEARING INNER POCKET IS WHITE TAG WITH BILINGUAL (FRENCH AND ENGLISH) TEXT “MADE IN CANADA, CA – 00023, 55% POLYESTER, 45% WOOL DRY CLEAN ONLY”. OUTSIDE OF RIGHT-WEARING INNER POCKET HAS TAG SEWN ON; BLACK WITH WHITE TEXT “VETEMENTS, CLOTHES” AND GOLD-STITCHED TEXT BETWEEN WHITE READING “BILTMORE” AND GOLD AND WHITE LOGO IN UPPER LEFT CORNER “LP”. TWO GOLD CHECKERED BUTTONS DOWN FRONT OF BLAZER AND TWO AT EACH CUFF. BLAZER HAS FADING ON INSIDE OF CUFFS, AND STAINING ON FRONT LEFT-WEARING SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. ON FRONT RIGHT-WEARING LAPEL, PINS INCLUDE: GOLD-FINISHED PIN WITH RED AND WHITE CANADA FLAG AND BLUE AND WHITE CROSS FLAG; GOLD-FINISHED FLYING DOVE PIN; RED AND WHITE CANADA FLAG PIN; WHITE PLASTIC NAME TAG WITH SILVER ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE SEAL AND BLACK TEXT “LETHBRIDGE LODGE NO. 32, DOROTHY TAYLOR”; GOLD-FINISHED PIN GREY, WHITE AND PEACH IMAGE OF WOMAN AND BLACK TEXT ABOVE IMAGE “DEAF DETECTION” AND BLACK TEXT BELOW IMAGE “PHOEBE MCCULLOUGH, 1896-1971”; GOLD-FINISHED PIN OF MAPLE LEAF WITH GOLD ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE STAG ON A PURPLE BACKGROUND SURROUNDED BY GOLD LETTERS “OORP”; GOLD-FINISHED PIN WITH BAR SHAPED LIKE BOW AND HANGING SEAL OF THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE; GOLD-FINISHED PIN WITH GOLD BORDER AROUND PURPLE AND YELLOW FLOWERS ON GREEN BACKGROUND, WITH ENGRAVED TEXT ON BORDER “MANITOBA ROYAL PURPLE ASSOCIATION”. ON LEFT-WEARING LAPEL IS PURPLE RIBBON WITH GOLD-FINISHED ATTACHMENT TO JACKET AND WHITE FRINGE, ON RIBBON GOLD-FINISHED PINS INCLUDE: TWO GOLD BARS ATTACHED WITH CHAIN AND HANGING ORNATE SEAL OF THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE, TEXT ON TOP BAR READS “BRANDON LODGE NO. 138”, LOWER BAR TEXT READS “1998-1999”; BAR PIN WITH PURPLE TEXT “15 YRS” AND ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE SEAL IN CENTER; BAR PIN WITH TWO TEXT BANNERS TO THE UPPER LEFT AND LOWER RIGHT OF ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE SEAL, UPPER BANNER READS “20” AND LOWER BANNER READS “YRS”; OVAL PIN WITH ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE SEAL IN CENTER AND BOTTOM BANNER READING “LIFE MEMBER”; FLOWER PIN WITH ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE SEAL IN CENTER AND SIX HANGING BARS THAT READ “25 YEARS”, “30 YEARS”, “35 YEARS”, “40 YEARS”, “45 YEARS”, “50 YEARS”.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON FEBRUARY 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED WILMA WOOD, DAUGHTER OF DOROTHY TAYLOR, ABOUT HER DONATION OF TAYLOR’S ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE REGALIA. THE REGALIA REPRESENTED TAYLOR’S 50-YEAR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE FROM BRANDON, MANITOBA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTHER’S BLAZER, WOOD RECALLED, “[MY MOTHER WAS WEARING THIS] WITHIN THE [PAST] TWO OR THREE YEARS, AS YOU CAN SEE, SHE HAD IT ON WHEN SHE RECEIVED HER 50 YEAR PIN. I THINK SHE WENT TO ONE MORE ACTIVITY BEFORE SHE COULDN’T ANYMORE BECAUSE SHE’S BEEN WHEELCHAIR BOUND FOR 15 YEARS. IT GOT MORE AND MORE DIFFICULT FOR HER TO GET OUT.” MACLEAN ADDITIONALLY INTERVIEWED ANN MARIE MCDONALD OF THE LETHBRIDGE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE ON JUNE 6, 2017. ON THE BLAZER, MCDONALD ELABORATED, “WHEN I JOINED IN ’89, THEY WERE MOVING INTO THE NEW JACKETS…WE USED TO PASS DOWN JACKETS. WE USED TO HAVE A CUPBOARD. IF A LADY PASSED AWAY, YOU’D DRY-CLEAN HER JACKET, AND PUT IT INTO THE CUPBOARD…PROBABLY ABOUT 1985 THEY STARTED REPLACING THE JACKETS. I KNOW [THIS WAS DOROTHY’S JACKET] ORIGINALLY, IT HAD PIPING ON IT, AND…IT HAD BRANDON. SHE WORE THE BRANDON [BADGE] ON IT – THEN, SHE OBVIOUSLY GOT THE NEW JACKET MADE, AND THEN PUT THE [PATCH] ON HER POCKETS. IN THOSE DAYS, BEFORE I JOINED ROYAL PURPLE, YOU HAD A PATCH. YOU ALWAYS WORE THE PATCH OF YOUR LODGE ON YOUR JACKET.” “YOU WEAR WHAT ARE CALLED YOUR JEWELS ON YOUR LEFT SIDE. THIS [RIBBON WITH HER YEARS] WOULD BE A JEWEL.” “SHE WAS HONORABLE ROYAL LADY IN BRANDON, IN, POSSIBLY, 1975-76, THAT’S WHEN SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN IN.” MCDONALD ELABORATED ON THE PINS ON TAYLOR’S BLAZER, NOTING, “EACH YEAR THAT YOU STAY IN LODGE, THEY GIVE YOU A BAR. I’M THINKING MAYBE SHE DIDN’T [A BAR PIN] FROM OUR LODGE, BECAUSE SHE WAS ALREADY AN HONORED ROYAL LADY IN BRANDON. SHE JUST TOOK THE BAR, AND HAD THE BAR PUT ON HER OLD PIN – HER BRANDON PIN.” “BARS WERE [GIVEN] IF, FOR EXAMPLE, YOU WERE ON THE DRILL TEAM. YOU WOULD GET A BAR EVERY YEAR THAT YOU’RE ON THE DRILL TEAM. IF YOU WERE OUR PIANIST, YOU GOT A BAR EVERY YEAR THAT YOU STAYED AS PIANIST. SHE WAS OBVIOUSLY ON THE DRILL TEAM FOR 3 YEARS HERE. EVERY YEAR THEY GIVE YOU 1, UP TO 10. EVERY 5 YEARS YOU GOT A BAR.” “[THE CLASP PIN] IS HER 15TH YEAR BAR, SO WHEN SHE WAS IN OUR LODGE 15 YEARS…ALTHOUGH I’M NOT SURE WITH DOROTHY, IF THEY COMBINED HERS OR NOT. I KNOW THEY COMBINED HERS FOR HER 50TH. YOU WOULD WEAR IT ON [THE] RIBBON. ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE. THE LEFT SIDE IS WHAT WE CONSIDER IS OVER YOUR HEART. YOU WEAR ALL YOUR JEWELS OVER YOUR HEART.” “[THE MAPLE LEAF] IS AN INSTALLATION PIN. WHEN YOU JOIN THE LODGE, THEY GIVE YOU AN INSTALLATION PIN. THEY WANT ACKNOWLEDGE [YOUR INSTALLATION], IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU EARN. IT’S KIND OF “WELCOME TO THE LODGE”. SHE WOULD WEAR THIS…ON HER REGALIA [LEFT] SIDE.” “NOW [THE PINS ON THE RIGHT SIDE] I DON’T KNOW WHAT [THEY ALL] ARE. DEAF DETECTION…ARE PINS, IN OUR ORGANIZATION THEY PUT OUT TONS OF PINS AND THEN SELL THEM. THERE WAS SOME FUND-RAISER FOR DEAF DETECTION, AND SHE BOUGHT A PIN.” “[THE PURPLE FLORAL PIN] IS A MANITOBA ROYAL PURPLE ASSOCIATION. SHE WOULDN’T HAVE [WORN THIS ON HER REGALIA] BECAUSE…THEY SELL THE PINS AND THEY MAKE MONEY. HER PERFECT ATTENDANCE [PIN], 5 YEARS SHE COULD WEAR ON HER REGALIA PIN. THERE IS A KEEPSAKE [PIN] THAT THEY HAD WHEN THEY HAD THEIR YEAR 2000…[YOU] BOUGHT THE PIN TO SUPPORT THE LODGE. THERE IS A BRANDON PIN. SHE WOULDN’T WEAR IT WITH HER REGALIA THOUGH…IT’S PURCHASED FOR BRANDON. [THERE IS] THE 12TH COLLECTION EDITION OF ROYAL PURPLE. THE BIRD [HAS NO SIGNIFICANCE] WITH OUR LODGE. ON DOROTHY TAYLOR’S INVOLVEMENT IN THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE, MCDONALD RECALLED, “SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN IN OUR LODGE BY [1989]. SHE WAS A DUAL MEMBER OF OUR LODGE. SHE PAID HER DUES TO BRANDON, AND SHE PAID TO US FOR MANY YEARS, BECAUSE SHE LOVED BRANDON, AND HER HEART WAS IN BRANDON. SHE HAD FRIENDS, TOO, LADIES IN BRANDON THAT SHE STAYED REALLY GOOD FRIENDS WITH…WHEN SHE WAS HONORABLE ROYAL LADY, [THE BAR PIN] WASN’T THERE. [THE REST] ARE ALL FUND-RAISERS…[THERE IS ONE FOR] FUND FOR CHILDREN, WHICH WAS OUR NATIONAL CHARITY.” WOOD DISCUSSED HER MOTHER’S TIME IN THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE, STATING, “SHE CONSIDERS [THESE OBJECTS IN ACTIVE USE]. SHE IS VERY MUCH A PERSON WHO VALUES THAT SOCIETY. IT HELPED HER A NUMBER OF TIMES. AS YOU GROW OLDER, ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU DISCOVER THAT YOUR BRAIN ISN’T AS ACTIVE AS IT SHOULD BE AND THE MEMORY IS GOING. SHE WOULD PUT HERSELF INTO POSITIONS WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION INCLUDING BEING PRESIDENT, THREE OR FOUR TIMES. SHE HAD TO BE AN ORGANIZER, SHE HAD TO GET HER BRAIN AND KEEP HER BRAIN FUNCTIONING, WHICH I THOUGHT WAS VERY ADMIRABLE FOR A WOMAN HER AGE BECAUSE…SHE WAS IN HER EIGHTIES. SHE RECEIVED HER 50 YEAR PIN, I THINK IT WAS TWO YEARS AGO OR THREE.” “SHE JOINED [THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE] IN BRANDON, MANITOBA WHERE [MY PARENTS] WERE LIVING AT THE TIME, AND MY DAD RETIRED THERE. THEY MOVED HERE TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE MY BROTHER LIVED HERE, AND MY UNCLE ART GOOD…HE LIVED HERE AND THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSER TO FAMILY. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND MY DAD DIED SHORTLY AFTER THAT.” “[SHE JOINED] BECAUSE OF HER FRIENDS. SHE HAD A FRIENDSHIP GROUP AND THEY BELONGED. THEY RECRUITED HER.” “WHEN SHE WAS VERY ACTIVE, SHE WAS A MAJOR RECRUITER. SHE WENT OUT AND FOUND YOUNG WOMEN BUT THEY FELL BY THE WAYSIDE BECAUSE OF LIFE. SHE WAS CERTAINLY VERY ACTIVE IN THEIR PROJECTS, ONE OF WHICH WAS FINDING FINANCES TO EDUCATE YOUNG PEOPLE. WHATEVER THEY WERE [DOING], SHE WAS INTO IT FULL TILT BECAUSE THAT’S THE KIND OF PERSON SHE IS…WHATEVER SHE DOES IS FULL BLAST, FULL BORE. SHE NEVER TOLD ME ANY DETAILS ABOUT THE SOCIETY BECAUSE IT’S ONE OF THOSE SECRET SISTERHOODS. SHE WAS ALWAYS VERY PROUD TO BE A MEMBER OF IT.” “THIS [CHAPTER] DID A LOT OF EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT…SHE TRAVELED WITH THEM BECAUSE IT WAS A CANADIAN ORGANIZATION, SO THEY HAD THEIR ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS ALL OVER CANADA. SHE CAME OUT TO VANCOUVER TO A MEETING AND I WENT OVER TO VANCOUVER TO MEET HER AND SAY “HOWDY”. SHE WENT OUT TO THE PREMIER’S, AT THAT TIME WAS VANDER ZALM, AND HE HAD THE BIG GARDENS OUT NEAR STEVESTON. SHE WENT OUT THERE AND SHE MET HIM.” “A YEAR AGO ABOUT THIS TIME, THAT’S WHEN [THE ORDER WAS] FOLDING. THE ALBERTA CLUBS WERE ALL IMPLODING, AND I THINK THERE’S ONLY ONE LEFT IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. IT WAS THE ISSUE THAT THEY WERE ALL OLD PEOPLE AND YOUNG PEOPLE DID NOT WANT TO JOIN THESE KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS ANY LONGER…[THIS HAPPENED BECAUSE] I THINK WE HAVE MORE LEGAL SUPPORT. THE GOVERNMENT HAS SET UP HEALTH CARE, COMMUNITIES HAVE SET UP ASSISTANCE FOR WOMEN WHO ARE ABUSED, THERE’S DRUG ASSISTANCE. THERE IS MUCH MORE ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. IN THE EARLY DAYS ON THE PRAIRIES, IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOUR NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOR, WHO MIGHT BE TWENTY MILES AWAY, YOU WERE IN DEEP DOO-DOO IF YOU HAD A BIG PROBLEM. THAT’S WHAT THESE SOCIETIES CAME OUT OF WAS THAT NEED. THE NEED PRETTY WELL HAS BEEN TAKEN CARE OF, I THINK. THERE ARE STILL CLUBS BUT THEY’RE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CLUBS NOW.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTIVATION FOR DONATING HER MOTHER’S REGALIA TO THE MUSEUM, WOOD NOTED, “MY MOTHER HAS TURNED 99 YEARS OLD IN JANUARY. SHE HAS DEMENTIA AND SO WE’VE HAD TO MOVE HER FROM HER SENIOR’S LODGE ROOM INTO A MORE SECURE ROOM. CONSEQUENTLY THE LAST OF THE THINGS THAT SHE TREASURED OR VALUED MUST BE DISPERSED. MY BROTHER AND I DECIDED THAT, SINCE THE ELKS AND THE ROYAL PURPLE MEANT SO MUCH TO HER, THAT [THESE WERE] THE [OBJECTS] WE WOULD LIKE TO DONATE TO THE MUSEUM. IT DEPICTS A PERIOD OF TIME WHEN THE WOMEN USED THESE ASSOCIATIONS AS A SUPPORT GROUP FOR THEMSELVES. IT WAS ANOTHER ONE OF THESE SECRET SOCIETIES, WHEN IN FACT THEY WERE SISTERHOODS. THEY WERE MEANT MAINLY FOR THEM TO HAVE PEOPLE TO SUPPORT EACH OTHER. SINCE THIS ORGANIZATION HAS BASICALLY COLLAPSED, I THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT THE MUSEUM SHOULD HAVE BECAUSE IT DOES SHOW THAT PERIOD OF TIME IN THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF CANADA.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170007001
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20170007002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
COTTON, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
67
Width
44
Description
WHITE LINEN BLOUSE WITH SIX WHITE PLASTIC BUTTONS RUNNING DOWN FRONT, AND ONE AT EACH CUFF. BLOUSE HAS FLORAL-PATTERNED EMBROIDERED LINING OVER BUTTON HOLES DOWN FRONT, AND FLORAL-PATTERNED EMBROIDERY AT COLLAR. INSIDE COLLAR OF BLOUSE HAS WHITE TAG WITH YELLOW AND BLACK TEXT “ELITE, INTERNATIONAL, CA – 00034. INSIDE LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF BLOUSE IS WHITE TAG WITH BLACK TEXT “18” AND TWO WHITE PLASTIC BUTTONS. BLOUSE SHOWS LITTLE SIGNS OF WEAR; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON FEBRUARY 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED WILMA WOOD, DAUGHTER OF DOROTHY TAYLOR, ABOUT HER DONATION OF TAYLOR’S ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE REGALIA. THE REGALIA REPRESENTED TAYLOR’S 50-YEAR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE FROM BRANDON, MANITOBA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. ON THE PURSE, WOOD NOTED, “THIS WAS THE OFFICIAL OUTFIT. I KNOW THAT SOME OF THEM, DEPENDING ON WHAT POSITION THEY HELD WITHIN THE CLUB, THEY WOULD WEAR ALL WHITE.” WOOD DISCUSSED HER MOTHER’S TIME IN THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE, STATING, “SHE CONSIDERS [THESE OBJECTS IN ACTIVE USE]. SHE IS VERY MUCH A PERSON WHO VALUES THAT SOCIETY. IT HELPED HER A NUMBER OF TIMES. AS YOU GROW OLDER, ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU DISCOVER THAT YOUR BRAIN ISN’T AS ACTIVE AS IT SHOULD BE AND THE MEMORY IS GOING. SHE WOULD PUT HERSELF INTO POSITIONS WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION INCLUDING BEING PRESIDENT, THREE OR FOUR TIMES. SHE HAD TO BE AN ORGANIZER, SHE HAD TO GET HER BRAIN AND KEEP HER BRAIN FUNCTIONING, WHICH I THOUGHT WAS VERY ADMIRABLE FOR A WOMAN HER AGE BECAUSE…SHE WAS IN HER EIGHTIES. SHE RECEIVED HER 50 YEAR PIN, I THINK IT WAS TWO YEARS AGO OR THREE.” “SHE JOINED [THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE] IN BRANDON, MANITOBA WHERE [MY PARENTS] WERE LIVING AT THE TIME, AND MY DAD RETIRED THERE. THEY MOVED HERE TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE MY BROTHER LIVED HERE, AND MY UNCLE ART GOOD…HE LIVED HERE AND THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSER TO FAMILY. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND MY DAD DIED SHORTLY AFTER THAT.” “[SHE JOINED] BECAUSE OF HER FRIENDS. SHE HAD A FRIENDSHIP GROUP AND THEY BELONGED. THEY RECRUITED HER.” “WHEN SHE WAS VERY ACTIVE, SHE WAS A MAJOR RECRUITER. SHE WENT OUT AND FOUND YOUNG WOMEN BUT THEY FELL BY THE WAYSIDE BECAUSE OF LIFE. SHE WAS CERTAINLY VERY ACTIVE IN THEIR PROJECTS, ONE OF WHICH WAS FINDING FINANCES TO EDUCATE YOUNG PEOPLE. WHATEVER THEY WERE [DOING], SHE WAS INTO IT FULL TILT BECAUSE THAT’S THE KIND OF PERSON SHE IS…WHATEVER SHE DOES IS FULL BLAST, FULL BORE. SHE NEVER TOLD ME ANY DETAILS ABOUT THE SOCIETY BECAUSE IT’S ONE OF THOSE SECRET SISTERHOODS. SHE WAS ALWAYS VERY PROUD TO BE A MEMBER OF IT.” “THIS [CHAPTER] DID A LOT OF EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT…SHE TRAVELED WITH THEM BECAUSE IT WAS A CANADIAN ORGANIZATION, SO THEY HAD THEIR ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS ALL OVER CANADA. SHE CAME OUT TO VANCOUVER TO A MEETING AND I WENT OVER TO VANCOUVER TO MEET HER AND SAY “HOWDY”. SHE WENT OUT TO THE PREMIER’S, AT THAT TIME WAS VANDER ZALM, AND HE HAD THE BIG GARDENS OUT NEAR STEVESTON. SHE WENT OUT THERE AND SHE MET HIM.” “A YEAR AGO ABOUT THIS TIME, THAT’S WHEN [THE ORDER WAS] FOLDING. THE ALBERTA CLUBS WERE ALL IMPLODING, AND I THINK THERE’S ONLY ONE LEFT IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. IT WAS THE ISSUE THAT THEY WERE ALL OLD PEOPLE AND YOUNG PEOPLE DID NOT WANT TO JOIN THESE KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS ANY LONGER…[THIS HAPPENED BECAUSE] I THINK WE HAVE MORE LEGAL SUPPORT. THE GOVERNMENT HAS SET UP HEALTH CARE, COMMUNITIES HAVE SET UP ASSISTANCE FOR WOMEN WHO ARE ABUSED, THERE’S DRUG ASSISTANCE. THERE IS MUCH MORE ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. IN THE EARLY DAYS ON THE PRAIRIES, IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOUR NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOR, WHO MIGHT BE TWENTY MILES AWAY, YOU WERE IN DEEP DOO-DOO IF YOU HAD A BIG PROBLEM. THAT’S WHAT THESE SOCIETIES CAME OUT OF WAS THAT NEED. THE NEED PRETTY WELL HAS BEEN TAKEN CARE OF, I THINK. THERE ARE STILL CLUBS BUT THEY’RE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CLUBS NOW.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTIVATION FOR DONATING HER MOTHER’S REGALIA TO THE MUSEUM, WOOD NOTED, “MY MOTHER HAS TURNED 99 YEARS OLD IN JANUARY. SHE HAS DEMENTIA AND SO WE’VE HAD TO MOVE HER FROM HER SENIOR’S LODGE ROOM INTO A MORE SECURE ROOM. CONSEQUENTLY THE LAST OF THE THINGS THAT SHE TREASURED OR VALUED MUST BE DISPERSED. MY BROTHER AND I DECIDED THAT, SINCE THE ELKS AND THE ROYAL PURPLE MEANT SO MUCH TO HER, THAT [THESE WERE] THE [OBJECTS] WE WOULD LIKE TO DONATE TO THE MUSEUM. IT DEPICTS A PERIOD OF TIME WHEN THE WOMEN USED THESE ASSOCIATIONS AS A SUPPORT GROUP FOR THEMSELVES. IT WAS ANOTHER ONE OF THESE SECRET SOCIETIES, WHEN IN FACT THEY WERE SISTERHOODS. THEY WERE MEANT MAINLY FOR THEM TO HAVE PEOPLE TO SUPPORT EACH OTHER. SINCE THIS ORGANIZATION HAS BASICALLY COLLAPSED, I THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT THE MUSEUM SHOULD HAVE BECAUSE IT DOES SHOW THAT PERIOD OF TIME IN THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF CANADA.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170007002
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
POLYESTER, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20170007003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
POLYESTER, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
71.5
Width
40
Description
WHITE PLEATED SKIRT WITH ELASTIC WAIST; INSIDE BACK OF SKIRT HAS GREY TAG WITH BLACK TEXT “TRADITION, SEARS”. WHITE TAG UNDERNEATH HAS BLACK AND RED TEXT “100% POLYESTER, CA – 02945, MODELE/STYLE 207902, LOT, 2 ½, TAILLE/SIZE, 16, FABRIQUE AU/MADE IN CANADA, EXCLUSIVE OF TRIM”. FRONT OF SKIRT IS STAINED ON RIGHT-WEARING AND LEFT-WEARING SIDES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON FEBRUARY 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED WILMA WOOD, DAUGHTER OF DOROTHY TAYLOR, ABOUT HER DONATION OF TAYLOR’S ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE REGALIA. THE REGALIA REPRESENTED TAYLOR’S 50-YEAR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE FROM BRANDON, MANITOBA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. ON THE PURSE, WOOD NOTED, “THIS WAS THE OFFICIAL OUTFIT. I KNOW THAT SOME OF THEM, DEPENDING ON WHAT POSITION THEY HELD WITHIN THE CLUB, THEY WOULD WEAR ALL WHITE.” WOOD DISCUSSED HER MOTHER’S TIME IN THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE, STATING, “SHE CONSIDERS [THESE OBJECTS IN ACTIVE USE]. SHE IS VERY MUCH A PERSON WHO VALUES THAT SOCIETY. IT HELPED HER A NUMBER OF TIMES. AS YOU GROW OLDER, ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU DISCOVER THAT YOUR BRAIN ISN’T AS ACTIVE AS IT SHOULD BE AND THE MEMORY IS GOING. SHE WOULD PUT HERSELF INTO POSITIONS WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION INCLUDING BEING PRESIDENT, THREE OR FOUR TIMES. SHE HAD TO BE AN ORGANIZER, SHE HAD TO GET HER BRAIN AND KEEP HER BRAIN FUNCTIONING, WHICH I THOUGHT WAS VERY ADMIRABLE FOR A WOMAN HER AGE BECAUSE…SHE WAS IN HER EIGHTIES. SHE RECEIVED HER 50 YEAR PIN, I THINK IT WAS TWO YEARS AGO OR THREE.” “SHE JOINED [THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE] IN BRANDON, MANITOBA WHERE [MY PARENTS] WERE LIVING AT THE TIME, AND MY DAD RETIRED THERE. THEY MOVED HERE TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE MY BROTHER LIVED HERE, AND MY UNCLE ART GOOD…HE LIVED HERE AND THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSER TO FAMILY. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND MY DAD DIED SHORTLY AFTER THAT.” “[SHE JOINED] BECAUSE OF HER FRIENDS. SHE HAD A FRIENDSHIP GROUP AND THEY BELONGED. THEY RECRUITED HER.” “WHEN SHE WAS VERY ACTIVE, SHE WAS A MAJOR RECRUITER. SHE WENT OUT AND FOUND YOUNG WOMEN BUT THEY FELL BY THE WAYSIDE BECAUSE OF LIFE. SHE WAS CERTAINLY VERY ACTIVE IN THEIR PROJECTS, ONE OF WHICH WAS FINDING FINANCES TO EDUCATE YOUNG PEOPLE. WHATEVER THEY WERE [DOING], SHE WAS INTO IT FULL TILT BECAUSE THAT’S THE KIND OF PERSON SHE IS…WHATEVER SHE DOES IS FULL BLAST, FULL BORE. SHE NEVER TOLD ME ANY DETAILS ABOUT THE SOCIETY BECAUSE IT’S ONE OF THOSE SECRET SISTERHOODS. SHE WAS ALWAYS VERY PROUD TO BE A MEMBER OF IT.” “THIS [CHAPTER] DID A LOT OF EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT…SHE TRAVELED WITH THEM BECAUSE IT WAS A CANADIAN ORGANIZATION, SO THEY HAD THEIR ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS ALL OVER CANADA. SHE CAME OUT TO VANCOUVER TO A MEETING AND I WENT OVER TO VANCOUVER TO MEET HER AND SAY “HOWDY”. SHE WENT OUT TO THE PREMIER’S, AT THAT TIME WAS VANDER ZALM, AND HE HAD THE BIG GARDENS OUT NEAR STEVESTON. SHE WENT OUT THERE AND SHE MET HIM.” “A YEAR AGO ABOUT THIS TIME, THAT’S WHEN [THE ORDER WAS] FOLDING. THE ALBERTA CLUBS WERE ALL IMPLODING, AND I THINK THERE’S ONLY ONE LEFT IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. IT WAS THE ISSUE THAT THEY WERE ALL OLD PEOPLE AND YOUNG PEOPLE DID NOT WANT TO JOIN THESE KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS ANY LONGER…[THIS HAPPENED BECAUSE] I THINK WE HAVE MORE LEGAL SUPPORT. THE GOVERNMENT HAS SET UP HEALTH CARE, COMMUNITIES HAVE SET UP ASSISTANCE FOR WOMEN WHO ARE ABUSED, THERE’S DRUG ASSISTANCE. THERE IS MUCH MORE ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. IN THE EARLY DAYS ON THE PRAIRIES, IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOUR NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOR, WHO MIGHT BE TWENTY MILES AWAY, YOU WERE IN DEEP DOO-DOO IF YOU HAD A BIG PROBLEM. THAT’S WHAT THESE SOCIETIES CAME OUT OF WAS THAT NEED. THE NEED PRETTY WELL HAS BEEN TAKEN CARE OF, I THINK. THERE ARE STILL CLUBS BUT THEY’RE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CLUBS NOW.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTIVATION FOR DONATING HER MOTHER’S REGALIA TO THE MUSEUM, WOOD NOTED, “MY MOTHER HAS TURNED 99 YEARS OLD IN JANUARY. SHE HAS DEMENTIA AND SO WE’VE HAD TO MOVE HER FROM HER SENIOR’S LODGE ROOM INTO A MORE SECURE ROOM. CONSEQUENTLY THE LAST OF THE THINGS THAT SHE TREASURED OR VALUED MUST BE DISPERSED. MY BROTHER AND I DECIDED THAT, SINCE THE ELKS AND THE ROYAL PURPLE MEANT SO MUCH TO HER, THAT [THESE WERE] THE [OBJECTS] WE WOULD LIKE TO DONATE TO THE MUSEUM. IT DEPICTS A PERIOD OF TIME WHEN THE WOMEN USED THESE ASSOCIATIONS AS A SUPPORT GROUP FOR THEMSELVES. IT WAS ANOTHER ONE OF THESE SECRET SOCIETIES, WHEN IN FACT THEY WERE SISTERHOODS. THEY WERE MEANT MAINLY FOR THEM TO HAVE PEOPLE TO SUPPORT EACH OTHER. SINCE THIS ORGANIZATION HAS BASICALLY COLLAPSED, I THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT THE MUSEUM SHOULD HAVE BECAUSE IT DOES SHOW THAT PERIOD OF TIME IN THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF CANADA.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170007003
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, PLASTIC, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170007004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1990
Materials
COTTON, PLASTIC, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
71
Width
23
Description
WHITE PURSE WITH GOLD-COLOURED METAL FINISHING AND WHITE SHOULDER STRAP; PURSE CLOSES WITH GOLD-COLOURED BUTTON ON FRONT. FRONT OF PURSE HAS WHITE AND GOLD METAL TRIM ALONG EDGE OF CLOSING FLAP. INSIDE OF PURSE HAS SMALL ZIPPER COMPARTMENT WITH WHITE AND GOLD ZIPPER, AND A WHITE TAG READING “MADE IN CHINA”. FRONT OF INSIDE HAS RED STAIN; INSIDE ON FRONT OF ZIPPER COMPARTMENT IS A SMALL BROWN STAIN. OUTSIDE OF PURSE IS WORN WITH STAINING ON FRONT AND BACK NEAR TOP. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON FEBRUARY 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED WILMA WOOD, DAUGHTER OF DOROTHY TAYLOR, ABOUT HER DONATION OF TAYLOR’S ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE REGALIA. THE REGALIA REPRESENTED TAYLOR’S 50-YEAR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE FROM BRANDON, MANITOBA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. ON THE PURSE, WOOD NOTED, “THIS WAS THE OFFICIAL OUTFIT. I KNOW THAT SOME OF THEM, DEPENDING ON WHAT POSITION THEY HELD WITHIN THE CLUB, THEY WOULD WEAR ALL WHITE.” WOOD DISCUSSED HER MOTHER’S TIME IN THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE, STATING, “SHE CONSIDERS [THESE OBJECTS IN ACTIVE USE]. SHE IS VERY MUCH A PERSON WHO VALUES THAT SOCIETY. IT HELPED HER A NUMBER OF TIMES. AS YOU GROW OLDER, ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU DISCOVER THAT YOUR BRAIN ISN’T AS ACTIVE AS IT SHOULD BE AND THE MEMORY IS GOING. SHE WOULD PUT HERSELF INTO POSITIONS WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION INCLUDING BEING PRESIDENT, THREE OR FOUR TIMES. SHE HAD TO BE AN ORGANIZER, SHE HAD TO GET HER BRAIN AND KEEP HER BRAIN FUNCTIONING, WHICH I THOUGHT WAS VERY ADMIRABLE FOR A WOMAN HER AGE BECAUSE…SHE WAS IN HER EIGHTIES. SHE RECEIVED HER 50 YEAR PIN, I THINK IT WAS TWO YEARS AGO OR THREE.” “SHE JOINED [THE ORDER OF ROYAL PURPLE] IN BRANDON, MANITOBA WHERE [MY PARENTS] WERE LIVING AT THE TIME, AND MY DAD RETIRED THERE. THEY MOVED HERE TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE MY BROTHER LIVED HERE, AND MY UNCLE ART GOOD…HE LIVED HERE AND THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSER TO FAMILY. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE AND MY DAD DIED SHORTLY AFTER THAT.” “[SHE JOINED] BECAUSE OF HER FRIENDS. SHE HAD A FRIENDSHIP GROUP AND THEY BELONGED. THEY RECRUITED HER.” “WHEN SHE WAS VERY ACTIVE, SHE WAS A MAJOR RECRUITER. SHE WENT OUT AND FOUND YOUNG WOMEN BUT THEY FELL BY THE WAYSIDE BECAUSE OF LIFE. SHE WAS CERTAINLY VERY ACTIVE IN THEIR PROJECTS, ONE OF WHICH WAS FINDING FINANCES TO EDUCATE YOUNG PEOPLE. WHATEVER THEY WERE [DOING], SHE WAS INTO IT FULL TILT BECAUSE THAT’S THE KIND OF PERSON SHE IS…WHATEVER SHE DOES IS FULL BLAST, FULL BORE. SHE NEVER TOLD ME ANY DETAILS ABOUT THE SOCIETY BECAUSE IT’S ONE OF THOSE SECRET SISTERHOODS. SHE WAS ALWAYS VERY PROUD TO BE A MEMBER OF IT.” “THIS [CHAPTER] DID A LOT OF EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT…SHE TRAVELED WITH THEM BECAUSE IT WAS A CANADIAN ORGANIZATION, SO THEY HAD THEIR ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS ALL OVER CANADA. SHE CAME OUT TO VANCOUVER TO A MEETING AND I WENT OVER TO VANCOUVER TO MEET HER AND SAY “HOWDY”. SHE WENT OUT TO THE PREMIER’S, AT THAT TIME WAS VANDER ZALM, AND HE HAD THE BIG GARDENS OUT NEAR STEVESTON. SHE WENT OUT THERE AND SHE MET HIM.” “A YEAR AGO ABOUT THIS TIME, THAT’S WHEN [THE ORDER WAS] FOLDING. THE ALBERTA CLUBS WERE ALL IMPLODING, AND I THINK THERE’S ONLY ONE LEFT IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. IT WAS THE ISSUE THAT THEY WERE ALL OLD PEOPLE AND YOUNG PEOPLE DID NOT WANT TO JOIN THESE KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS ANY LONGER…[THIS HAPPENED BECAUSE] I THINK WE HAVE MORE LEGAL SUPPORT. THE GOVERNMENT HAS SET UP HEALTH CARE, COMMUNITIES HAVE SET UP ASSISTANCE FOR WOMEN WHO ARE ABUSED, THERE’S DRUG ASSISTANCE. THERE IS MUCH MORE ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE. IN THE EARLY DAYS ON THE PRAIRIES, IF YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOUR NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOR, WHO MIGHT BE TWENTY MILES AWAY, YOU WERE IN DEEP DOO-DOO IF YOU HAD A BIG PROBLEM. THAT’S WHAT THESE SOCIETIES CAME OUT OF WAS THAT NEED. THE NEED PRETTY WELL HAS BEEN TAKEN CARE OF, I THINK. THERE ARE STILL CLUBS BUT THEY’RE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CLUBS NOW.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTIVATION FOR DONATING HER MOTHER’S REGALIA TO THE MUSEUM, WOOD NOTED, “MY MOTHER HAS TURNED 99 YEARS OLD IN JANUARY. SHE HAS DEMENTIA AND SO WE’VE HAD TO MOVE HER FROM HER SENIOR’S LODGE ROOM INTO A MORE SECURE ROOM. CONSEQUENTLY THE LAST OF THE THINGS THAT SHE TREASURED OR VALUED MUST BE DISPERSED. MY BROTHER AND I DECIDED THAT, SINCE THE ELKS AND THE ROYAL PURPLE MEANT SO MUCH TO HER, THAT [THESE WERE] THE [OBJECTS] WE WOULD LIKE TO DONATE TO THE MUSEUM. IT DEPICTS A PERIOD OF TIME WHEN THE WOMEN USED THESE ASSOCIATIONS AS A SUPPORT GROUP FOR THEMSELVES. IT WAS ANOTHER ONE OF THESE SECRET SOCIETIES, WHEN IN FACT THEY WERE SISTERHOODS. THEY WERE MEANT MAINLY FOR THEM TO HAVE PEOPLE TO SUPPORT EACH OTHER. SINCE THIS ORGANIZATION HAS BASICALLY COLLAPSED, I THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING THAT THE MUSEUM SHOULD HAVE BECAUSE IT DOES SHOW THAT PERIOD OF TIME IN THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF CANADA.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170007001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170007004
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
IRON, LEATHER, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20160020000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Materials
IRON, LEATHER, STEEL
No. Pieces
2
Length
15.5
Width
9.1
Diameter
12.2
Description
METAL COW BELL WITH LEATHER STRAP. BELL IS MADE UP OF 2 PIECES OF METAL FUSED TOGETHER AT SIDES WITH TWO NAILS IN EACH SEAM. TOP IS FOLDED TOGETHER WITH THE ENDS FUSED DOWN THE SIDE IN A TRIANGULAR FOLD. FRONT AND BACK OF BELL ARE RELATIVELY FLAT, COMING OUT SLIGHTLY AT EDGE. WELDING OF BELL IS CRUDE. INSIDE OF THE BELL IS THE CLAPPER WITH A BALL END THAT IS 10.5 CM IN CIRCUMFERENCE. BALL IS ATTACHED TO A ROD THAT IS HOOKED TO THE LOOP INSIDE THE TOP OF BELL. FLAT METAL LOOP AT TOP OF BELL ATTACHES THE BELL TO LEATHER STRAP THAT IS 109.4 CM IN LENGTH AND 2.4 CM IN WIDTH. 9 HOLES PUNCHED IN LEATHER FOR STRAP ADJUSTMENT WITH THE BUCKLE GOING THROUGH THE 10TH HOLE PUNCH. STANDARD METAL BUCKLE WITH LEATHER BELT LOOP FOR THE EXCESS LENGTH OF STRAP. FAIR CONDITION: METAL SEVERELY RUSTED IN COLOUR. AT ONE SEAM NEAR THE BASE, THE METAL HAS OXIDIZED TO A GREEN COLOUR. METAL SURFACE INSIDE OF BELL HAS LOST SHINE AND IS RUSTY. STRAP IS SEVERELY WORN AND HAS SCRATCHES AND LOSS OF FINISH OVERALL. END OF THE STRAP OPPOSITE OF BUCKLE IS TORN OFF.
Subjects
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
History
ON 14 JULY, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONOR, ELLENNOR PORTER, AND HER DAUGHTER, KAREN PORTER AT THE GALT MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THAT INTERVIEW. ELLENNOR’S HUSBAND WAS ROBERT MICHAEL “MICK” PORTER. HE FOUND THE BELL AS ELLENNOR REMEMBERS, “[I REMEMBER] HIM BRINGING IT IN THE HOUSE… I DON’T KNOW JUST HOW LONG AGO… [AND HIM SAYING], ‘LOOK WHAT I GOT.’ THEN IT WAS JUST EVERYONE WAS SAYING, ‘WOW,’ AND PLAYING AROUND WITH IT… [AFTER THAT] IT WAS PUT IN THE BASEMENT WITH THE REST OF THE THINGS.” KAREN AND ELLENNOR BELIEVE THE BELL WOULD HAVE BEEN FOUND BY MICK IN THE 1950S OR THE 1960S. ELLENNOR CONTINUED, “[HE FOUND IT ON] THE RANCH. HE WAS OUT VISITING HIS RELATIVES OUT THERE. HE HAD AUNTS AND UNCLES ON THE BURN RANCH. HE’S PROBABLY JUST RE-VISITING THEIR PLACE THAT HAD BEEN SOLD, SO MAYBE IT CAME FROM PINCHER CREEK. IN THAT AREA ANYWAY, LUNDBRECK OR PINCHER CREEK.” “DAD WOULD GO UP SOMETIMES BY HIMSELF,” KAREN ADDED, “I DON’T THINK ANY OF US WERE WITH HIM WHEN HE CAME HOME WITH THAT. I THINK WE WERE AT HOME WHEN HE BROUGHT IT TO THE HOUSE… IT IS ALSO POSSIBLE THAT HIS FATHER AND MOTHER HAD [THE BELL] AT THEIR HOUSE AND GAVE IT TO HIM. THEY WERE FARMERS AT THE WALDRON RANCH – NOW THE WALDRON RANCH – [BUT IT] WAS THE PORTER RANCH. THEY HAD A HOUSE IN PINCHER CREEK, SO THERE IS A POSSIBILITY THAT’S ALSO WHERE HE WOULD HAVE GOTTEN IT.” THINKING BACK TO HER LATE HUSBAND’S DAYS IN THE AREA, ELLENNOR EXPLAINED, “[MICK’S] DAD WAS AT THE PORTER/WALDRON RANCH. IT WAS JUST THE PORTER RANCH AND AFTER HE MOVED TO PINCHER, HE SOLD LIKE HIS INTEREST PART OF IT TO WALDRON, SO IT [BECAME] A PARTNERSHIP… THE WALDRON RANCH IS NEAR BLACK MOUNTAIN ON THAT ROAD, TOWARDS THE BAR-U RANCH.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE BELL, ELLENNOR SAID, “[THIS BELL] BRINGS BACK MEMORIES FROM WAY BACK WHEN WE USED TO LOOK FOR CATTLE BACK IN THE BUSH, AND I IMAGINE THAT’S WHAT MY HUSBAND MUST HAVE THOUGHT TOO… [IT WOULD BE] A REMEMBRANCE FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. THEY PROBABLY HAD TO BRING IN THE OLD MILK COW AND SHE WOULD BE WEARING THE BELL. THAT’S WHAT THEY DID. THEY PUT IT ON THE BIG MILK COW, SO THAT WHEN THEY WANTED THEM TO COME IN TO MILK THEY COULD FIND THEM. SOMETIMES THEY’D GO HIDE IN THE BUSH, SO THEY KEPT THE BELL ON THEM SO THEY COULD KEEP TRACK OF WHERE THEY WERE AT.” ELLENNOR FURTHER EXPLAINED, “I HAD NO CONNECTION WITH THAT BELL. WE HAD NO CATTLE. WE WERE GRAIN FARMERS.” KAREN ADDED, “MUM AND DAD WERE WHEAT FARMING ON [THE K-LAZY-A-RANCH]. THERE WERE CATTLE THERE, BUT MUM DOESN’T REMEMBER THERE BEING CATTLE WITH BELLS ON. THEY WERE IN THE FARM YARD… THERE WERE HARDLY ANY TREES. THAT WAS THE RANCH ORIGINALLY AND LATER BECAME A WHEAT FARM. IF THEY KEPT IT AS A RANCH WITH CATTLE AND HORSES, THAT MEANT THEY COULD NEVER EVER LEAVE AND IT WAS PRETTY ISOLATED, SO OVER THE YEARS DAD TALKED THE OWNER INTO LETTING HIM COVERT IT TO WHEAT.” “THERE WAS NO BUSH [THERE FOR THE COWS] TO HIDE IN. SO NO NEED FOR A BELL!” ELLENNOR REMEMBERED. THE DONOR AND HER DAUGHTER REMEMBERED HOW MICK VALUED OBJECTS AND MEMORIES. “HIS EYES WOULD LIGHT UP [AND HE WOULD SAY], ‘LOOK WHAT WE HAVE HERE,’ [WHEN HE SAW SOMETHING ATTACHED TO A MEMORY]. HE HAD ALL KINDS OF MEMORIES OF HIS GROWING UP. SOME WERE NOT TOO HAPPY, SOME WERE VERY HAPPY, BUT HE ALWAYS REALLY LOVED COWS. IT DIDN’T MATTER WHERE WE WENT TRAVELLING IN THE WORLD…[HE ALWAYS] STOPPED AND TOOK SOME PICTURES. ‘OH LOOK AT THE COWS!’ HE’D SAY,” ELLENNOR JUMPED IN, COMPLETING HER DAUGHTER’S SENTENCE. “DAD TOOK THOUSANDS OF PICTURES OF COWS. FOR HIM THERE WAS A REAL CORRELATION,” KAREN FINISHED. “[THE BELL IS A TREASURE] BECAUSE IT HAS BEEN IN OUR HOME FOR SUCH A LONG TIME. WHEN DAD BROUGHT IT HOME, IN HIS PERSPECTIVE, HE WOULD HAVE THE SAME KIND OF MEMORIES MY MUM DOES OF HEARING THE COWS…I CAN REMEMBER THEM WHEN I WAS LITTLE ON THE FARM OUT BY SKIFF HEARING COW BELLS OR BEING OUT AT MY GRANDMOTHER’S FARM BY OLDS HEARING COW BELLS… [THIS BRINGS] THE MEMORY OF DAD BEING EXCITED ABOUT [THE BELL] AND TRYING TO WAKE US UP IN THE MORNING RINGING IT, IF WE WERE SLEEPING IN TOO LONG. THAT’S MORE THE MEMORY FOR US… [BUT] I WAS NEVER ON THE RANCH WHEN MY DAD WOULD HAVE FOUND [THIS SPECIFIC] BELL, SO THOSE MEMORIES AREN’T MY MEMORIES, THEY’RE MORE HIS MEMORIES. HE ALWAYS TREASURED IT, HE ALWAYS WANTED IT KEPT AND WE’D LIKE TO HONOUR THAT,” KAREN ADDED. NOTES FROM AN 2008 INTERVIEW WITH MICKEY AND ELEANOR PORTER STATE THE DONOR’S FATHER-IN-LAW, GEORGE ENGLISH PORTER, WAS BORN 1878 IN ORILLIA, ONTARIO AND DIED ON MARCH 16, 1959. HE CAME WEST FROM ONTARIO IN 1896 AT THE AGE OF SEVENTEEN. GEORGE PORTER’S FAMILY SETTLED 30 MILES NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ON THE EASTERN SLOPES OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. THE FAMILY SETTLED ON THE BLACK MOUNTAIN RANCH. GEORGE WAS ONE OF FOURTEEN CHILDREN IN THE FAMILY. HER MOTHER-IN-LAW WAS BORN IN EASTERN CANADA BEFORE MOVING TO OREGON. SHE IMMIGRATED TO CANADA WHEN SHE WAS8 YEARS OLD AND WAS RAISED ON THE BURN RANCH NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ALBERTA. THE NOTES FURTHER STATE THE DONOR, ELLENNOR PORTER, WAS BORN IN 1922. THE OBITUARY FOR ROBERT MICHAEL “MICK” PORTER READS MICK WAS BORN ON MAY 23, 1921 IN COWLEY, ALBERTA. HE ATTENDED SCHOOL IN COWLEY AND GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL FROM ST. MICHAEL’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL IN PINCHER CREEK. HE JOINED THE RCAF DURING WWII AND UPON AN HONOURABLE DISCHARGE AFTER A HIP INJURY, HE WORKED AS A GRAIN BUYER. HE MARRIED ELLENNOR CHRISTOFFERSEN IN OLDS, ALBERTA. LATER, HE WORKED FOR THE MCINTYRE RANCH FOR 5 YEARS. IN 1953, HE BEGAN FARMING IN THE SKIFF AREA AND RETIRED IN 1984. MICK AND ELLENNOR HAD FIVE CHILDREN: LAWNA ROBART, MICHAEL, RONALD, KAREN PORTER, AND CHRISTOPHER, WHO PASSED AWAY AS AN INFANT. MICK PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 AT THE AGE OF 91 YEARS. HISTORY OF THE WALDRON CATTLE RANCH LTD. WAS PUBLISHED IN THE “CANADIAN CATTLEMEN” PUBLICATION IN MARCH OF 1946. IT STATES THE RANCH “COMPRISED ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND ACRES OF LAND SITUATED IN SOUTH-WESTERN ALBERTA. IT WAS SITUATED IN A VALLEY EXTENDING BETWEEN THE PORCUPINE HILLS AND OLD MAN RIVER FOR ABOUT 30 MILES NORTH AND SOUTH AND VARYING FROM THREE TO FIVE MILES IN WIDTH.” THE HISTORY STATES THE WALDRON CATTLE RANCH WAS FORMED IN 1883 BY SIR JOHN WALROND WALROND OF BARONET AND LORD CLINTON OF LONDON – BOTH MEN OF ENGLAND. ON JUNE 26TH, 1884, QUEEN VICTORIA GRANTED THE RANCH AN INDENTURE OF LEASE TO SIR WALROND, BARONET. (THE TEXT OF THAT LEASE AGREEMENT WAS PRODUCED AS PART OF THE CATTLEMEN PUBLICATION AND IS ATTACHED TO THE ARTIFACT’S PERMANENT RECORD.) ACCORDING TO THE ARTICLE, THE FIRST PURCHASE OF CATTLE WAS IN 1883 – 3,125 HEAD FOR $100,000. IN 1897, THE COMPANY WAS INCORPORATED UNDER THE CANADIAN JOINT STOCK COMPANIES ACT, MOVING ITS HEAD OFFICE FROM LONDON, ENGLAND. DUNCAN MCEACHRAN WAS APPOINTED PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER OF THE RANCH AND DAVID WARNOCK FROM GLASGOW BECAME THE LOCAL MANAGER. AT THE TIME OF THIS TRANSITION, IT IS BELIEVED THE RANCH HAD GROWN TO 12,311, THOUGH THIS WAS A MERE ESTIMATE. MCEACHRAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THE COMPANY FROM ITS BEGINNING IN 1883, WHEN HE STARTED AS THE GENERAL MANAGER. HIS LEADERSHIP GOT THE COMPANY THROUGH “PERIODS OF DEPRESSED CONDITION.” AFTER A HARSH WINTER IN 1906-1907, THE RANCH LOST APPROXIMATELY 5,000 HEAD OF CATTLE DUE TO SEVERE TEMPERATURE CHANGES. AFTER THIS, IN THE SUMMER OF 1908, THE RANCH “DISPOSED OF ALL ITS CATTLE TO PAT BURNS. FOLLOWING THE SALE, THE LAND OF THE WALDRON RANCH, EXCLUDING 1,000 ACRES WAS LEASED FIRST TO W. R. HULL, THEN TO PAT BURNS. C. W. BUCHANAN WAS APPOINTED THE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER OF THE RANCH THAT IN 1923. MCEACHRAN PASSED AWAY IN OCTOBER 1924. ANOTHER HISTORY ON THE RANCH WAS FOUND BY MUSEUM RESEARCHERS IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. PUBLISHED ON 1 MAY 1954, THE ARTICLE READS, “AT ONE TIME THE WALDRON LEASE CONSISTED OF BETWEEN 300,000 TO 400,000 ACRES OF LAND, EXTENDING FROM WHAT IS KNOWN AS STOWE TO THE NORTH FORK OF THE OLDMAN RIVER. IN THE NORTH FORK DISTRICT THE LAND WAS DIVIDED INTO FIVE BRANCHES… AT ITS PEAK IN THE SUMMER OF 1906 THE RANCH HAD 20,000 HEAD OF STOCK.” GEORGE PORTER IS LISTED IN THE HISTORY AS ONE OF THE CATTLE MEN EMPLOYED BY THE WALDRON RANCH FROM 1883 TO 1908. ABOUT HIM, THE ARTICLE STATES, “GEORGE PORTER [WAS] A GOOD STOCKMAN, [WHO] LATER BOUGHT 12 SECTIONS OF THE COMPANY’S FREEHOLD AT ITS NORTHERN END AND ADJOINING LAND ALREADY OWNED BY HIM.” “GEORGE PORTER AND SONS HAVE SOLD THEIR RANCH AND CATTLE TO JOHN FRANCIS MILLER… THE PORTER RANCH IS ABOUT THIRTY MILES NORTH OF LUNDBRECK AND ADJOINS THE 19,000 ACRE WALDRON RANCH WHICH MR. MILLER ALSO OWNS HAVING PURCHASED IT FROM P. BURNS RANCHES LAST FEBRUARY,” THE HISTORY STATES. AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE 21 AUGUST 1953 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ANNOUNCED, “TWO OF THE LARGEST AND MOST FAMOUS RANCHES IN THE SOUTH-WESTERN ALBERTA FOOTHILLS ARE BEING OFFERED FOR SALE. THEY ARE THE WALDRON AND PORTER RANCHERS, NORTH OF LUNDBRECK. THESE PROPERTIES ARE OWNED NOW BY JOHN F. MILLER OF LAS VEGAS, NEVADA… [THEY] HAVE BEEN OPERATED BY MR. MILLER’S SON, WHO TOOK OVER THE JOB SEVERAL YEARS AGO WHEN THE MILLERS BOUGHT THE WALDRON FROM THE WALDRON RANCHING COMPANY AND THE PORTER RANCH PROPERTY FROM GEORGE PORTER…” THE HISTORY OF GEORGE AND NORA PORTER (NEE BURN)’S MARRIAGE WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON JUNE 26, 1954 FOR THEIR 50TH ANNIVERSARY. THE COUPLE WERE MARRIED AT THE BURN RANCH IN JUNE 21 1904. THE COUPLE’S FOURTEEN CHILDREN WERE: MARJORIE ANDERSON, NORMAN PORTER, PHYLLIS ROBBINS, KATHLEEN HAMILTON, WINNIFRED BONERTZ, SANDY PORTER, EILEEN IRONMONGER, JEAN ALCOCK, JOSEPHINE ROBINSON, LILLIAN CHRISTIANSON, ISOBEL SINNOT, MICHAEL PORTER, LAWRENCE PORTER, AND CONNIE PORTER. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT RECORD P20080020001 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE PORTER AND BURN FAMILIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160020000
Acquisition Date
2016-07
Collection
Museum
Images
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Ladies of the Pioneers Pemmican Club

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96021
Date Range
1977-2007
Accession No.
20191030
Scope and Content
2019.1030/001: “Secretary Book” – Administrative Records, including meeting minutes, attendance records, newspaper articles, etc., 1989-2007. 2019.1030/002: Miscellaneous Letters, 2000-2001 2019.1030/003: Audited Financial Statements, Part 1/2, 1995-1999. 2019.1030/004: Audited Financial Stateme…
Date Range
1977-2007
Creator
Ladies of the Pioneers Pemmican Club
History / Biographical
The Ladies of the Pioneers Pemmican Club are a group of women that meet together to socialize and participate in community outreach programs. The Club was established in 1953. To be a member of the Club, women must be from families that lived in Southern Alberta prior to December 31, 1910. The Club meets together on the first Wednesday of the month to socialize. The Ladies of the Pioneers Pemmican Club is a branch off the men’s Pemmican Club. On 12 December 1894 the Old Timers Association was created (the name has changed multiple times over the years). The purpose of the men’s club was to arrange a New Years’ Eve Club and the planning/work of the association was to be done by people who had arrived in southern Alberta prior to 1886. Throughout the years the Pemmican Club has had the purpose: “to encourage fellowship, entertainment and social enjoyment for the members; to collect and preserve the early history of Lethbridge and southern Alberta; and provide assistance to members and their families through difficult times in their lives”. In the same way, the Ladies of the Pioneers Pemmican Club follow a similar guideline for membership, traditions and charity work. The Ladies have worked many volunteer hours at the Chinook Regional Hospital making dolls for sick children and other programs, and have participated in charities throughout Lethbridge. They also donate generously to various organizations in Southern Alberta, such as animal shelters and Meals on Wheels.
Scope and Content
2019.1030/001: “Secretary Book” – Administrative Records, including meeting minutes, attendance records, newspaper articles, etc., 1989-2007. 2019.1030/002: Miscellaneous Letters, 2000-2001 2019.1030/003: Audited Financial Statements, Part 1/2, 1995-1999. 2019.1030/004: Audited Financial Statements and Account Book, Part 2/2, 1977-2001. 2019.1030/005: Event Invitations, 2000. 2019.1030/006: Massed High School Choir Concert and Coalhurst background, 1948.
Accession No.
20191030
Collection
Archive
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596 records – page 1 of 30.