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Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BAKELITE, LEATHER, VELVET
Catalogue Number
P20160044003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1980
Materials
BAKELITE, LEATHER, VELVET
No. Pieces
11
Height
27
Length
38
Width
11.5
Description
A: CASE: GREEN AND OFF-WHITE LEATHER CASE. BLACK PLASTIC/SILVER METAL LABEL THAT READS “CONN” ON FRONT OF CASE. GREEN HANDLE AT TOP WITH TWO METAL LATCHES ON EITHER SIDE. HINGES ON THE BOTTOM OF CASE TO OPEN. FOUR METAL FEET ON BOTTOM. CORK EDGES AROUND THE SIDES, STITCHED ON AND PAINTED OFF-WHITE COLOUR. INSIDE IS LINED WITH A GREEN VELVET. TOP FOLDS DOWN AND IS FASTENED WITH LEATHER STRAP AND METAL SNAP BUTTON. “CONN” LABEL IN TOP LEFT CORNER OF CASE THAT IS GOLD WITH BLACK AND RED PAINT INSIDE. THREE PEOPLE OF A MARCHING BAND IN IMAGE ON LABEL. THE BOTTOM HALF OF THE INSIDE OF CASE HAS EIGHT SECTIONS FOR INSTRUMENT PIECES AND ACCESSORIES. FAIR CONDITION: MODERATE TO SEVERE SURFACE DIRT OVERALL. VARIOUS GREEN STAINS AT TOP OF CASE. METAL COMPONENTS SCUFFED. SOME STITCHING AS SIDES COMING LOOSE. LOSS OF PAINT IN SEVERAL PLACES ALONG CORK EDGE. INSIDE FABRIC WORN. B: BLACK BAKELITE CLARINET BELL WITH SILVER AROUND BOTH EDGES. “CONN DIRECTOR U.S.A.” ETCHED ON OUTER SURFACE. 11 CM LENGTH. 8 CM BELL DIAMETER. C: BLACK BAKELITE LOWER JOINT WITH SILVER KEYS. CORK EDGE ON BOTTOM AND SILVER RIM AROUND TOP. “721800” ETCHED ON BACK NEAR CORK. PADDED THUMB REST ON BACK OF THIS JOINT. 25.5 CM X 2.5 CM. D: BLACK BAKELITE UPPER JOINT WITH SILVER KEYS. BOTH ENDS COVERED IN CORK. LOGO WITH THREE MARCHING BAND FIGURES ETCHED ON FRONT NEAR THE TOP. 22.5 CM X 2.3 CM (TOP DIAMETER SLIGHTLY WIDER). E: BLACK BAKELITE BARREL JOINT WITH SILVER EDGES. 6 CM X 3 CM (BOTTOM DIAMETER) 2.8 CM (TOP DIAMETER). F: BLACK BAKELITE MOUTHPIECE WITH CORK AT BOTTOM. METAL LIGATURE WITH ITS TWO SCREWS ATTACHED SECURING A REED TO THE MOUTHPIECE. 9 CM LONG WITH 2.1 CM DIAMETER AT BOTTOM. VERY GOOD CONDITION FOR B-F: SLIGHT SCUFFS OF SURFACE G: SILVER METAL MARCHING LYRE. CIRCULAR BAND WITH ADJUSTABLE SCREW FOR ATTACHMENT TO INSTRUMENT. THIS SCREWS ONTO A STEM, WHICH EXTENDS TO CONNECT TO A LYRIFORM SPRING CLAMP THAT IS MEANT TO HOLD MUSIC. FAIR CONDITION: SEVERE GREEN STAINING IN MANY AREAS OF SURFACE. METAL SLIGHTLY SCRATCHED OVERALL. H: BLACK PLASTIC REED HOLDER WITH SLOTS FOR TWO REEDS (ONE ON FRONT AND ONE ON). “LAVOZ” ETCHED IN PLASTIC ON FRONT AND BACK AND “USA” ABOVE THAT.7.7 CM X 2 CM. I: CLARINET REED ENCASED IN REED HOLDER (H).”RICO” IN MUSIC STAFF STAMPED ON BACKSIDE AND SIZE “V-2 ½” STAMPED BELOW THE LOGO. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION FOR H-I: SOME WEAR TO SIDE OF REED HOLDER WITH REED. REED SHOWS SIGNS OF USE. J: WHITE ENVELOPE THAT READS, “CONN EXCLUSIVE TUNING RING” WITH TEXT BELOW AND DIAGRAM OF THE TUNING RING PRINTED ALL IN BLACK INK ON THE FRONT OF THE ENVELOPE. THE BACK HAS SCOTCH TAPE SECURING THE RIGHT SIDE ENVELOPE FLAP. CAN FEEL ONE TUNING RING INSIDE ENVELOPE. 14 CM X 7.9 CM. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION: PAPER OF ENVELOPE HAS SEVERELY YELLOWED. K-N: TWO IDENTICAL TUBES OF CORK GREASE WITH CAPS. WHITE PLASTIC TUBE THAT READS, “PARAMOUNT MUSIC “PREMIUM” CORK GREASE” AND AN ADDRESS BELOW ALL IN RED FONT. TWISTABLE END TO EXTEND THE GREASE IN TUBE. GREASE STILL PRESENT IN TUBES. RED PLASTIC CAPS. ONE READS “B 7 ETHYL” (K) ON INSIDE OF CAP AND THE OTHER READS “B 87 ETHYL” (N). 6.8 CM X 1,7 CM. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT SURFACE DIRT ON LABEL. DISCOLOURING OF PLASTIC AROUND BOTTOM EDGES. GREASE IS CRYSTALIZING. O-P: SMALL, BLACK PLASTIC GREASE CONTAINER IN CUBE WITH GOLD METALLIC LETTERS ON LID “YAMAHA CORK GREASE”. HINGE ATTACHING LID TO CONTAINER, SO LID COMPLETE DETACHES. GREASE INSIDE OF THE CONTAINER. 2.7 CM X 2.7 CM X 2 CM. GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT SCRATCHING ON SURFACE. BROKEN HINGE. Q: CLARINET CLEANING SWAB WAND WITH TWISTED WIRE WAND/HANDLE AND MULTICOLOURED (BLUES AND PINKS), FABRIC SWAB. THE SWAB IS SHAGGED. 29 CM X 2.5 CM. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: WIRE IS SLIGHTLY BENT. R: CLOTH CLEANING SWAB WITH NATURAL-COLOURED TAN SUEDE CLOTH (APPROX. 12.5 CM X 6.3 CM) THAT HAS ROUGH EDGES. ONE CORNER OF SUEDE IS PINCHED TOGETHER WITH A SILVER METAL CLASP (TOOTHED), WHICH SECURES IT AROUND A BLACK STRING (57 CM IN LENGTH) WITH A SILVER-COLOURED WEIGHT AT THE END. FAIR CONDITION: STRING IS FRAYING MODERATELY IN ONE PLACE AND SLIGHTLY IN OTHERS. SUEDE FABRIC SHOWS DIRT. WEIGHT’S METAL IS SCUFFED.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
MILITARY
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS CLARINET WAS PLAYED BY THREE GENERATIONS OF THE DONORS’ FAMILY. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. RUTH EXPLAINED, “IT WAS PURCHASED BRAND NEW [IN THE] EARLY ‘50S WITH THE INTENT THAT HER FIRST SON, BERNIE (BORN IN 1950) WOULD PLAY THE CLARINET, WHICH HE DID. MOM DID USE IT FOR SOME LATER PERFORMANCES WITH THE ANDERSON SISTERS, BUT IT WAS PURCHASED [FOR HIM]. AND HIS DAUGHTER, CONNIE, ALSO PLAYED THE CLARINET.” SPEAKING OF WHY THEY SELECTED THIS OBJECT TO BE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, RUTH SAID, “WHEN WE WERE GATHERING THINGS TOGETHER, WE THOUGHT [OF] WHAT INSTRUMENTS WE HAD THAT HAVE A CONNECTION. SO IT WAS DECIDED [ON THE CLARINET]. CONNIE WAS QUITE HAPPY TO KNOW THAT IT WAS COMING IN THIS DIRECTION, SINCE IT WAS GRANDMA’S CLARINET, IT SHOULD GO WITH GRANDMA’S THINGS.” OF ALL THE INSTRUMENTS ALICE KNEW HOW TO PLAY, THE CLARINET “WAS THE MAIN ONE,” RUTH CONTINUED, “BUT SHE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AS WELL. AND ALSO TAUGHT PIANO FOR YEARS AND YEARS AND YEARS. [ALL THE SISTERS] PLAYED PIANO REALLY WELL. SHE PLAYED OTHER INSTRUMENTS LIKE THE ORGAN, AND THERE WERE ACTUALLY INSTANCES TOO WHERE SOMEONE WOULD CALL ON HER TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY AN INSTRUMENT, AND SHE WOULD TEACH THEM HOW TO PLAY IT WITHOUT KNOWING HOW TO PLAY IT HERSELF, BECAUSE SHE KNEW THE TECHNIQUE [OR] WOULD LEARN THE TECHNIQUE. BUT THE CLARINET WAS HER MAIN THING WITH, AS I SAID, SAXOPHONE AND PIANO PROBABLY THE NEXT CLOSEST IN LINE.” THE SISTERS STATE THAT THEY REMEMBER THEIR MOTHER PLAYING THIS SPECIFIC CLARINET. ELEANOR SAID, “SHE DIDN’T PASS IT [ON] UNTIL CONNIE WANTED TO USE IT, BECAUSE BERNIE DIDN’T TAKE IT WITH HIM [FROM HOME].” RUTH ADDED, “YEAH, THAT’S RIGHT. I THINK IT’S REALLY ALWAYS BEEN HERS.” THE LAST TIME THEY REMEMBER HER PLAYING IT WOULD HAVE BEEN THE LAST TIME THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA PERFORMED, WHICH WAS A PERFORMANCE FOR THE ELKS IN GRANUM IN THE 1970S. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044003
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1982
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, NYLON
Catalogue Number
P20180029002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1982
Date Range To
1985
Materials
COTTON, NYLON
No. Pieces
1
Height
16
Length
24
Diameter
17.3
Description
GREEN AND BROWN CAMOFLAGUE PATTERN CAP WITH BRIM ON FRONT. CAP HAS STITCHED BAND ALONG FRONT EDGE AND ABOVE BRIM; BRIM HAS STITCHING IN SEMI-CIRCLE PATTERN WITH GREEN THREAD. INSIDE OF CAP HAS GREEN LINING; CAP HAS FLAPS ALONG EDGE THAT FOLD UP INTO CAP OR FOLD DOWN TO EXTEND CAP. CAP HAS FADED GREEN TAG ON INSIDE WITH BLACK PRINTED TEXT “CAP, COMBAT, WOODLAND CAMOUFLAGE PATTERN, DLA100-32-C-2002, 8415-01-084-1686, 65% COTTON, 35% NYLON, PROPPER INTERNATIONAL INC., SIZE: 7 ¼”. CAP HAS FADED GREEN TAG BELOW WITH PRINTED BLACK TEXT “CAP, COMBAT, WOODLAND CAMOUFLAGE PATTERN, 1.DO NOT WEAR CAP IN COLD WEATHER ENVIRONMENTS. USE CAP IN COLD WEATHER, INSULATING HELMET LINER. 2.IF CAP IS WORN UNDER HELMET, HELMET HEAD BAND MAY REQUIRE READJUSTMENT FOR PROPER FIT AND COMFORT. 3.MACHINE WASH. USE PERMANENT PRESS CYCLE. WAS IN WARM WATER WITH MILD DETERGENT. 4.HAND WASH. HAND WASH IN WARM WATER USING MILD DETERGENT. DO NOT WRING OR TWIST. RINSE IN CLEAN WARM WATER. 5.DO NOT USE CHLORINE BLEACH OR STARCH. 6.DRY AT LOW HEAT (DO NOT EXCEED 130 [DEGREE SYMBOL]F). DO NOT REMOVE THIS LABEL”. TAGS ARE STITCHED ONTO CAP LINING. CAP IS CREASED AT FRONT; BRIM IS FADED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIeWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS DONATED BY MACLEAN REFLECTED HIS LIFE AND IDENTITY THROUGH HIS TIME IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE CAMOFLAGUE CAP, MACLEAN ELABORATED, “THE HAT…WOULD FIT ME. [IT] WOULD BE AN ADULT’S HAT.” “FOR REASONS I DON’T KNOW OR UNDERSTAND, I’VE HAD, TO VARYING DEGREES OVER MY LIFE, AN INTEREST IN MILITARY STUFF. MY EARLIEST MEMORIES OF THAT INTEREST WOULD BE HANGING OUT WITH MY COUSIN BRYAN IN LETHBRIDGE, AND HIS DAD [HE DIDN’T SERVE IN KOREA]…[WHO WAS] ENLISTING RIGHT ABOUT THE TIME IN KOREA. MY COUSIN HAD HIS DAD’S DOG TAGS AND I REMEMBER RUNNING AROUND THE PARK, AND WE WOULD TELL EVERYONE WE WERE IN THE ARMY AND I THOUGHT THAT WAS PRETTY COOL. THAT WOULD BE PROBABLY BE IN THE LATE 1970S—’78, ’79, ’80—THERE’S A BUNCH OF OTHER STUFF THAT’S GOING ON AT THE SAME TIME, WITH ROCKETS. FOR SOME REASON, I HAD A THING ABOUT ROCKETS. THE SPACE SHUTTLE IS STARTING TO LAUNCH IN 1981…EVEN MY BEDROOM WAS ROCKET-BASED STUFF. IN THE EARLY ‘80S—’81, ’82—I WAS TWELVE. MY COUSIN, WHOSE NAME IS REG, MY MOM’S NEPHEW...BY 1982 HE COMES TO LIVE WITH US AND HE’S ABOUT SIX YEARS OLDER THAN I AM. HE WOULD BE THE CLOSEST THING THAT I WOULD HAVE TO A BROTHER, DEFINITELY, AT THE TIME. TO HAVE A BROTHER WHO’S [A HANDSOME GUY] AND [WHO HAS] THIS BACKGROUND OF HAVING LIVED IN HAWAII AND ARIZONA…YOU CAN IMAGINE IN YOUR HOUSE, WHEN YOU’RE TWELVE YEARS OLD, HAVING THIS FAMILY MEMBER.” “[IT] WAS REALLY COOL AND HE’S AN INTERESTING GUY AND SUPER FUNNY. AT SOME POINT, HE DECIDES TO LEAVE LETHBRIDGE AFTER HE’S BEEN LIVING HERE, IN THE CITY AND IN OUR HOME, FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. HE JOINS THE U.S. ARMY BECAUSE HE’S GOT AMERICAN PERMANENT RESIDENCY. I THINK HE HAD PERMANENT RESIDENCY ANYWAYS ‘CAUSE HE GREW UP THERE. HE GOES BACK AND HE JOINS.” “HE JUST MADE A LIFE CHOICE TO JOIN THE MILITARY…AND THIS [CAMOUFLAGE] PATTERN WAS DEVELOPED IN 1981 SO IT’S RELATIVELY NEW. BEFORE THAT, THEY WERE IN GREEN STUFF WHICH—WHEN YOU THINK OF M.A.S.H.—[WAS] THAT LOOK, THROUGH VIETNAM.” “[IT WAS DEVELOPED] BY THE U.S. MILITARY. SOMETIMES…I LIKE CERTAIN, SPECIFIC THINGS AND I’M NOT HAPPY WITH ANYTHING ELSE. I IDENTIFY THIS AS BEING SPECIAL BECAUSE IT’S JUST THE SOLDIERS THAT ARE WEARING IT. SO, I WANT IT. I DON’T KNOW IF HE IS IN [THE ARMY], BY THEN. POTENTIALLY, HE IS. I REMEMBER TELLING MY PARENTS I WANTED CAMOUFLAGE AND I LITERALLY REMEMBER GOING INTO A DEPARTMENT STORE AT THE TIME AND THERE WAS [NOTHING] THERE...THROUGH THE ‘70S AND EARLY ‘80S YOU COULDN’T FIND IT. AT THE SAME TIME, [DEPARTMENT STORES] WERE STARTING TO DEVELOP HUNTING CAMOUFLAGE, WHICH I’VE NEVER CONNECTED WITH.” “SO, I SAID, “NO, I DON’T WANT HUNTING CAMO—THIS [ARMY CAMO] IS WHAT I WANT.” NEEDLESS TO SAY, REG IS IN THE MILITARY AND, IN 1983, HE’S SENDING ME LETTERS BACK, HE COMES BACK FOR A VISIT. IT COULD BE WITHIN SIX MONTHS OF HIS JOINING…HE BRINGS THIS [CAP] BACK FOR ME WHICH HE BOUGHT DOWN THERE. HE COULD HAVE BEEN IN THE CAROLINAS AND HE GAVE ME THIS CAP, WHICH HAPPENS TO BE HIS OWN, PERSONAL [MILITARY ISSUE] CAP. AS PRESENTS GO, IT WOULDN’T HAVE COST HIM A TREMENDOUS AMOUNT OF MONEY. BUT, IT WOULD HAVE BEEN ABSOLUTELY IMPOSSIBLE TO FIND IN CANADA, LET ALONE IN LETHBRIDGE AND THIS IS AT A TIME THAT THERE IS NO INTERNET. ANYTIME YOU WANT SOMETHING, YOU HAVE TO DO IT BY MAIL AND THIS IS RECENTLY DEVELOPED TECHNOLOGY. IT WOULD BE TWO YEARS OLD.” ON HIS TIME WEARING THE CAP, MACLEAN RECALLED, “I WOULD GUESS I’M THIRTEEN [WHEN I’M GIVEN THE UNIFORM]. I WOULD HAVE BEEN IN APPROXIMATELY GRADE 8.” “IN TERMS OF THE WEAR OF THIS…IF YOU LOOK AT THE LABEL IT’S BEEN WORN. I DID WEAR IT. I WOULD BE SO PROUD TO WEAR A HAT THAT MY COUSIN, WHO IS IN THE U.S. ARMY, WAS WEARING…SO TREMENDOUSLY PROUD. I PROBABLY WORE THE HAT MORE BECAUSE I WAS VERY SELF-CONSCIOUS OF STICKING OUT. IF YOU ARE IN THE EARLY ‘80S, WEARING CAMOUFLAGE, THEN IT’S JUST…NUMBER ONE, IT WASN’T A TIME THAT YOU WANTED TO STICK OUT. THIS WOULD [HAVE SEEN] SOME WEAR BECAUSE HE HAD WORN IT HIMSELF [IN THE ARMY] DOWN IN THE STATES BEFORE HE GAVE IT TO ME.” “[AT THE TIME] I STILL HAVE SOME SMALL INTEREST IN THIS SUBJECT MATTER. TO THE POINT WHERE [I WAS INTERESTED IN] WHAT THE CANADIANS WERE WEARING OVERSEAS IN AFGHANISTAN.” MACLEAN ELABORATED ON HIS INTEREST IN THE JACKET AND MILITARY HISTORY, NOTING, “WHILE ALL THIS IS GOING ON—THE 1980S—AS A KID, AND I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS JUST ME ‘CAUSE I WAS A NEWS JUNKIE, THE COLD WAR WAS A BIG DEAL IN THE EARLY ‘80S. THERE WERE SHOWS ON TV THAT WERE SCARING THE CRAP OUT OF ME…TO SAY THE LEAST, I WAS KIND OF SEMI-OBSESSED WITH THE SUBJECT MATTER. “ “I WOULD BE CONFIDENT THAT BY GRADE 10, I WAS NOT WEARING IT…MY INTEREST MOVED INTO THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “AGAIN, [REG IS] LIKE AN OLDER BROTHER TO ME. I GOT SOME PRETTY NICE GIFTS WHEN I WAS A KID. BUT, SOMEBODY BRINGING THIS BACK, ALL THE WAY FROM THE CAROLINAS, OR WHERE HE WAS POSTED—AND THE FACT THAT PROBABLY, EVEN BY ’85, IT WOULD BE NEAR IMPOSSIBLE TO FIND, ALTHOUGH YOU MIGHT BE ABLE TO GET IT AT A SURPLUS STORE BY THEN—IT HAD A LOT OF MEANING TO ME. SO I’VE HUNG ONTO IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029002
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1982
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, NYLON
Catalogue Number
P20180029003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1982
Date Range To
1985
Materials
COTTON, NYLON
No. Pieces
1
Length
74.6
Width
41
Description
GREEN AND BROWN CAMOFLAGUE PATTERN JACKET. JACKET FRONT HAS FOUR POCKETS ON CHEST; POCKETS HAVE BROWN PLASTIC BUTTONS UNDER OUTER FLAPS. JACKET FRONT HAS FIVE BROWN PLASTIC BUTTONS ON RIGHT WEARING SIDE AND BUTTON LOOPS ON LEFT WEARING SIDE; BUTTONS AND BUTTON LOOPS ARE TUCKED UNDER FLAP RUNNING DOWN FRONT. JACKET SLEEVES HAVE LARGE SQUARE PATCHES OF CAMOFLAGUE PATTERN SEWN ONTO TOP OF SLEEVE; SLEEVE CUFFS HAVE THREE BROWN PLASTIC BUTTONS SEWN ON. INSIDE OF JACKET LINED WITH OPAQUE GREEN LINING; JACKET HAS GREEN TAG INSIDE COLLAR. TAG IS FADED AND TEXT INDECIPHERABLE. JACKET HAS GREEN TAG INSIDE RIGHT WEARING SIDE; TAG IS FADED AND TEXT INDECIPHERABLE. BACK OF JACKET HAS SMALL RIP ON RIGHT SIDE; LOWER EDGE OF JACKET HAS FRAYED THREADS; RIGHT SLEEVE HAS SMALL WHITE STAIN; FRONT LOWER LEFT POCKET HAS WHITE RUB MARKS AT LOWER LEFT CORNER; LEFT CUFF HAS FRAYING THREADS INSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON DECEMBER 21, 2018, GALT MUSEUM CURATOR AIMEE BENOIT INTERVIEWED KEVIN MACLEAN REAGARDING HIS DONATION OF PERSONAL OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS DONATED BY MACLEAN REFLECTED HIS LIFE AND IDENTITY THROUGH HIS TIME IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE CAMOFLAGUE JACKET, MACLEAN ELABORATED, “THE JACKET…IS NOT FOR AN ADULT; IT WOULD BE FOR A CHILD.” “FOR REASONS I DON’T KNOW OR UNDERSTAND, I’VE HAD, TO VARYING DEGREES, OVER MY LIFE, AN INTEREST IN MILITARY STUFF. MY EARLIEST MEMORIES OF THAT INTEREST WOULD BE HANGING OUT WITH MY COUSIN BRYAN IN LETHBRIDGE, AND HIS DAD [HE DIDN’T SERVE IN KOREA]…[WHO WAS] ENLISTING RIGHT ABOUT THE TIME IN KOREA. MY COUSIN HAD HIS DAD’S DOG TAGS AND I REMEMBER RUNNING AROUND THE PARK, AND WE WOULD TELL EVERYONE WE WERE IN THE ARMY AND I THOUGHT THAT WAS PRETTY COOL. THAT WOULD BE PROBABLY BE IN THE LATE 1970S—’78, ’79, ’80—THERE’S A BUNCH OF OTHER STUFF THAT’S GOING ON AT THE SAME TIME, WITH ROCKETS. FOR SOME REASON, I HAD A THING ABOUT ROCKETS. THE SPACE SHUTTLE IS STARTING TO LAUNCH IN 1981…EVEN MY BEDROOM WAS ROCKET-BASED STUFF. IN THE EARLY ‘80S—’81, ’82—I WAS TWELVE. MY COUSIN, WHOSE NAME IS REG, MY MOM’S NEPHEW...BY 1982 HE COMES TO LIVE WITH US AND HE’S ABOUT SIX YEARS OLDER THAN I AM. HE WOULD BE THE CLOSEST THING THAT I WOULD HAVE TO A BROTHER, DEFINITELY, AT THE TIME. TO HAVE A BROTHER WHO’S [A HANDSOME GUY] AND [WHO HAS] THIS BACKGROUND OF HAVING LIVED IN HAWAII AND ARIZONA…YOU CAN IMAGINE IN YOUR HOUSE, WHEN YOU’RE TWELVE YEARS OLD, HAVING THIS FAMILY MEMBER.” “[IT] WAS REALLY COOL AND HE’S AN INTERESTING GUY AND SUPER FUNNY. AT SOME POINT, HE DECIDES TO LEAVE LETHBRIDGE AFTER HE’S BEEN LIVING HERE, IN THE CITY AND IN OUR HOME, FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. HE JOINS THE U.S. ARMY BECAUSE HE’S GOT AMERICAN PERMANENT RESIDENCY. I THINK HE HAD PERMANENT RESIDENCY ANYWAYS ‘CAUSE HE GREW UP THERE. HE GOES BACK AND HE JOINS.” “HE JUST MADE A LIFE CHOICE TO JOIN THE MILITARY…AND THIS [CAMOUFLAGE] PATTERN WAS DEVELOPED IN 1981 SO IT’S RELATIVELY NEW. BEFORE THAT, THEY WERE IN GREEN STUFF WHICH—WHEN YOU THINK OF M.A.S.H.—[WAS] THAT LOOK, THROUGH VIETNAM.” “[IT WAS DEVELOPED] BY THE U.S. MILITARY. SOMETIMES…I LIKE CERTAIN, SPECIFIC THINGS AND I’M NOT HAPPY WITH ANYTHING ELSE. I IDENTIFY THIS AS BEING SPECIAL BECAUSE IT’S JUST THE SOLDIERS THAT ARE WEARING IT. SO, I WANT IT. I DON’T KNOW IF HE IS IN [THE ARMY], BY THEN. POTENTIALLY, HE IS. I REMEMBER TELLING MY PARENTS I WANTED CAMOUFLAGE AND I LITERALLY REMEMBER GOING INTO A DEPARTMENT STORE AT THE TIME AND THERE WAS [NOTHING] THERE...THROUGH THE ‘70S AND EARLY ‘80S YOU COULDN’T FIND IT. AT THE SAME TIME, [DEPARTMENT STORES] WERE STARTING TO [SELL] HUNTING CAMOUFLAGE, WHICH I’VE NEVER CONNECTED WITH.” “SO, I SAID, “NO, I DON’T WANT HUNTING CAMO—THIS [ARMY CAMO] IS WHAT I WANT.” NEEDLESS TO SAY, REG IS IN THE MILITARY AND, IN 1983, HE’S SENDING ME LETTERS BACK, HE COMES BACK FOR A VISIT. IT COULD BE WITHIN SIX MONTHS OF HIS JOINING…HE BRINGS THIS [JACKET] BACK FOR ME WHICH HE BOUGHT DOWN THERE. HE COULD HAVE BEEN IN THE CAROLINAS AND HE ALSO GAVE ME [A] CAP, WHICH HAPPENS TO BE HIS OWN, PERSONAL [MILITARY ISSUE] CAP. AS PRESENTS GO, IT WOULDN’T HAVE COST HIM A TREMENDOUS AMOUNT OF MONEY. BUT, IT WOULD HAVE BEEN ABSOLUTELY IMPOSSIBLE TO FIND IN CANADA, LET ALONE IN LETHBRIDGE AND THIS IS AT A TIME THAT THERE IS NO INTERNET. ANYTIME YOU WANT SOMETHING, YOU HAVE TO DO IT BY MAIL AND THIS IS RECENTLY DEVELOPED TECHNOLOGY. IT WOULD BE TWO YEARS OLD.” “MY BELIEF IS THAT THEY WOULD HAVE HAD STORES ON THE BASES WHERE [SERVICE MEMBERS] COULD BUY THEIR OWN THINGS THAT SERVE THEIR OWN PERSONAL NEEDS. I’M PRETTY SURE THAT THIS IS WHERE HE GOT [THE JACKET]—IS FROM A STORE ON THE BASE.” ON HIS TIME WEARING THE JACKET, MACLEAN RECALLED, “I WOULD GUESS I’M THIRTEEN [WHEN I’M GIVEN THE UNIFORM]. I WOULD HAVE BEEN IN APPROXIMATELY GRADE 8.” “I PROBABLY WORE THE HAT MORE [THAN THE JACKET] BECAUSE I WAS VERY SELF-CONSCIOUS OF STICKING OUT. IF YOU ARE IN THE EARLY ‘80S, WEARING CAMOUFLAGE, THEN IT’S JUST…NUMBER ONE, IT WASN’T A TIME THAT YOU WANTED TO STICK OUT. I DO HAVE VAGUE [MEMORIES OF] MAYBE WEARING IT TO SCHOOL ONCE OR TWICE. THAT WAS PROBABLY IT. IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MORE AROUND HOME THAT I WOULD HAVE BEEN WEARING IT. [THE JACKET] WOULD SEE SOME WEAR BECAUSE HE HAD WORN IT HIMSELF DOWN IN THE STATES BEFORE HE GAVE IT TO ME.” “I DO REMEMBER WEARING I[THE JACKET] SKIING IN WHITEFISH. ABOUT THE SAME TIME WE STARTED SKIING AS A FAMILY IN 1982. WE WOULD BE TRAVELING DOWN THERE AND THEN YOU WOULD FIND SURPLUS STORES IN THE U.S. SO, FOR ME, THE EXCITEMENT TO GO TO WHITEFISH WASN’T TO GO SKIING, IT WAS ACTUALLY TO GO TO THE SURPLUS STORES.” “[AT THAT TIME] I STILL HAVE SOME SMALL INTEREST IN THIS SUBJECT MATTER. TO THE POINT WHERE [I WAS INTERESTED IN] WHAT THE CANADIANS WERE WEARING OVERSEAS IN AFGHANISTAN.” MACLEAN ELABORATED ON HIS INTEREST IN THE JACKET AND MILITARY HISTORY, NOTING, “WHILE ALL THIS IS GOING ON—THE 1980S—AS A KID, AND I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS JUST ME ‘CAUSE I WAS A NEWS JUNKIE, THE COLD WAR WAS A BIG DEAL IN THE EARLY ‘80S. THERE WERE SHOWS ON TV THAT WERE SCARING THE CRAP OUT OF ME…TO SAY THE LEAST, I WAS KIND OF SEMI-OBSESSED WITH THE SUBJECT MATTER. “ “I WOULD BE CONFIDENT THAT BY GRADE 10, I WAS NOT WEARING IT…MY INTEREST MOVED INTO THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “AGAIN, [REG IS] LIKE AN OLDER BROTHER TO ME. I GOT SOME PRETTY NICE GIFTS WHEN I WAS A KID. BUT, SOMEBODY BRINGING THIS BACK, ALL THE WAY FROM THE CAROLINAS, OR WHERE HE WAS POSTED—AND THE FACT THAT PROBABLY, EVEN BY ’85, IT WOULD BE NEAR IMPOSSIBLE TO FIND, ALTHOUGH YOU MIGHT BE ABLE TO GET IT AT A SURPLUS STORE BY THEN—IT HAD A LOT OF MEANING TO ME. SO I’VE HUNG ONTO IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, BRANDON SUN, MEDICINE HAT NEWS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180029001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180029003
Acquisition Date
2018-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CASSEROLE DISH SET
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2006
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20160001000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CASSEROLE DISH SET
Date Range From
1970
Date Range To
2006
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
22
Height
22
Length
44
Width
32
Description
BOX OF SUNBURST CASSEROLE DISHES WITH 11 PIECES (5 FULL SETS OF SMALL AND LARGE DISHES AND 1 PARTIAL SET WITH ONE SMALL DISH). THERE ARE 22 PIECES INCLUDING THE STORAGE MATERIALS. A – F: CERAMIC CASSEROLE DISHES. UNGLAZED. “SUNBURST… OVENPROOF” WITH A SUN LOGO STAMPED ON THE BOTTOM. THE DISHES HAVE A RIM AT THE TOP AND A BASE AROUND THE BOTTOM. THERE ARE 2 HANDLES ON OPPOSITE ENDS OF THE TOP OF THE DISHES. A-E HAVE “1.95” WRITTEN ON THE BOTTOMS IN PENCIL. F HAS AN ERASER MARK IN THAT PLACE, AND A WHITE STICKER WITH THE PRICE “$5.00” HANDWRITTEN AND STICKING TO A TOP HANDLE. THE DIAMETERS ARE 19.4 CM, THE LENGTHS INCLUDING THE HANDLES ARE 23.3 CM AND THE DISHES ARE EACH 7.1 CM DEEP. THE CONDITIONS OF DISH A THROUGH D ARE VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT. THERE IS DUST COATING EACH DISH. B HAS 5 SMALL CHIPS ON THE BASE AND A SLIGHT CRACK (LESS THAN 1 CM LONG) ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE RIM. THE CERAMIC ON C IS ROUGH ON THE INNER RIM. IT ALSO HAS A DARK MARK ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE RIM AND SOME SMALL CHIPS ON THE BASE. D HAS A SCRATCH ON THE BASE. THE CONDITION OF E IS VERY GOOD WITH A SMALL CRACK ON THE SIDE OF THE DISH, A DARK STAIN ON THE EDGE OF THE RIM, AND A SLIGHT SCUFF ON THE BOTTOM. CASSEROLE DISH F IS IN GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION WITH SOME MARKS ALONG THE RIM AND BASE. THERE IS A CHIP IN THE HANDLE. G – K: CERAMIC CASSEROLE DISHES. UNGLAZED. “SUNBURST… OVENPROOF” WITH A SUN LOGO STAMPED ON THE BOTTOM. THE DISHES HAVE A RIM AT THE TOP AND A BASE AROUND THE BOTTOM. THERE ARE 2 HANDLES ON OPPOSITE ENDS OF THE TOP OF THE DISHES. H-J HAVE “2.95” WRITTEN ON THE BOTTOMS IN PENCIL. G HAS AN ERASER MARK IN THAT PLACE, AND A WHITE STICKER WITH THE PRICE “$7.00” HANDWRITTEN AND STICKING TO A TOP HANDLE. THE DIAMETERS ARE 22.6 CM, THE LENGTHS INCLUDING THE HANDLES ARE 27.1 CM AND THE DISHES ARE EACH 8.4 CM DEEP. THE CONDITION OF DISH G IS VERY GOOD WITH DARK IMPURITIES IN THE CLAY, A SCUFF ALONG THE BASE AND A SCRATCH IN THE CLAY ON THE SIDE OF THE DISH. THE CONDITION OF H IS FAIR TO GOOD. THIS DISH HAS A LARGE CHIP IN THE RIM WITH A LENGTH OF APPROXIMATELY 6.1 CM. THERE IS A SCUFF IN THE BOTTOM. DISH I IS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION WITH SOME IMPURITIES IN THE CLAY, AN AIR BUBBLE ON THE SIDE OF THE DISH, A DARK BROWN STAINING ON THE SIDE, AND CHIPS ON THE BOTTOM RIM. DISHES J AND K ARE IN VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION WITH SMALL CHIPS IN THE RIM. L – M: SQUARE PIECES OF CARDBOARD FOR PACKING. THEY ARE BENT TO FOLD AROUND A DISHES WITH A CIRCULAR CREASE IN THE CENTER WITH TWO PARALLEL SLITS (APPROX. 3.5 CM APART) FROM ONE END TO THE CENTER. THE DIMENSIONS OF EACH ARE 21 CM X 21 CM. GOOD CONDITION WITH TEARING IN SOME AREAS (L IS TORN ON ONE SIDE) AND CLAY DUST OVERALL. N – U: RECTANGULAR CARDBOARD SEPARATORS FOR PACKING (THEY ARE PLACED IN BETWEEN THE SMALL AND LARGE DISH IN A SET. THERE ARE 3 SLITS IN EACH SEPARATOR THAT ARE 4.5 CM LONG FROM ONE SHORT END STOPPING AT THE CENTER AND EACH SLIT IS 7.5 CM APART. EACH PIECE IS BENT TO FIT THE SHAPE OF DISHES. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION WITH REGULAR WEAR (TEARS AND STAINING) OVERALL. V: CARDBOARD BOX WITH ORANGE LETTERING, “SUNBURST CERAMICS” WITH AN ORANGE LOGO ON THE LONG SIDE OF THE BOX. HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK ON THE TOP OF THE BOX CAN BE READ “OPICAL EDMONTON ALTA.” ON ONE SHORT SIDE IT SAYS, “6 CASSEROLES 48 OZ…” IN ORANGE PRINT AND THEN IN BLACK HANDWRITING IT READS “6 + 32 OZ 6 – 48 OZ CASS.” THERE ARE 4 LARGE STAPLES HOLDING THE BOTTOM OF THE BOX TOGETHER. THE INSIDE HAS 4 CARDBOARD DIVIDERS (3 LENGTHWISE AND 1 HORIZONTALLY DOWN THE CENTER) THAT FIT TOGETHER THROUGH SLITS IN THE DIVIDERS. THESE MAKE UP 6 SECTIONS IN THE BOX FOR STORING THE SETS OF DISHES. THE OVERALL DIMENSIONS OF THE BOX ARE 32 X 44 X 22 CM. POOR TO FAIR CONDITION. THERE ARE HOLES, BENDS, AND TEARS OVERALL THE WHOLE SURFACE OF THE BOX. ONE CORNER EDGE IS TAPED TOGETHER WITH A BROWN PAPER TAPE. THERE IS A STAPLE LOOSE ON A TOP FLAP. THE BOX IS DIRTY AND STAINED OVERALL.DIRTY AND STAINED OVERALL.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRADES
DOMESTIC
History
DONOR MIKE MYCHAJLUK ACQUIRED THIS SET OF CERAMIC DISHES WHEN TROPICAL GARDENS IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA WAS CLOSING BETWEEN THE YEARS 2004 AND 2006. THE OWNER OF THAT BUSINESS HELD AN AUCTION AT HIS WAREHOUSE AND PART OF THAT LOT WAS THE SUNBURST CERAMIC SET, WHICH MYCHAJLUK BOUGHT FOR THIRTY-FIVE DOLLARS. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THIS CERAMIC SET COMES FROM AN INTERVIEW WITH MYCHAJLUK THAT WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JANUARY 22, 2016: “TROPICAL GARDENS WAS GOING OUT OF BUSINESS AND THEY WERE SELLING OFF IN THEIR STORE. A COUPLE OF BOXES THEY HAD ON DISPLAY THEN A COUPLE OF MONTHS LATER HE HAD THE AUCTION AT HIS WAREHOUSE ON HIS ACREAGE. HE HAD BINS - TONS OF STUFF THERE AND THIS [BOX] HAPPENED TO BE IN [THE SALE] WHEN I BOUGHT IT. I HAD TO BUY THE WHOLE LOT… [FIRST], I’M INTERESTED IN ALBERTA POTTERY STUFF AND NUMBER TWO I KNEW OTHER PEOPLE WERE [TOO]. I WAS GOING TO SELL SOME OF IT OFF BUT THERE WAS SO MUCH OF IT. I’LL NEVER SELL [ALL OF IT] IN MY LIFETIME TO COLLECTORS… NOBODY KNOWS MUCH ABOUT [SUNBURST] AND IF I BRING IT MORE TO THE ATTENTION, MORE PEOPLE WOULD BE INTERESTED IN IT. IT’S ONE OF THE LAST POTTERIES THAT WAS IN ALBERTA… THE STUFF IS ORIGINALLY FROM LETHBRIDGE.” ON THE CERAMICS BEING UNGLAZED, MYCHAJLUK STATES: “I THINK THAT’S WHEN [SUNBURST WAS] GOING OUT OF BUSINESS. THEY JUST PACKAGED WHAT WAS LEFT AND SOLD IT OFF OR EVEN AFTER IT COULD BE A DISPERSAL… I’M ASSUMING [TROPICAL GARDENS] BOUGHT IT TO SELL DRY FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS… THE ONLY THOUGHTS WAS HE COULDN’T USE IT FOR LIVE [FLOWERS] WITH WATER BECAUSE IT WOULD COME APART.” ACCORDING TO MYCHAJLUK, WHO IS INTERESTED IN ALBERTA POTTERY, IT IS NOT USUAL TO FIND A LARGE QUANTITY OF UNGLAZED CERAMICS LIKE WHAT HE FOUND AT TROPICAL GARDENS. WHILE MYCHAJLUK WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE, HE DID NOT SPEND MUCH TIME LIVING HERE. SUNBURST CERAMICS WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1961 BY RALPH THRALL SR. AND JR. WHEN THEY BOUGHT OUT NEW MEDALTA CERAMICS FROM MALCOM MCARTHUR IN MEDICINE HAT. AFTER OPERATING WITH THOSE KILNS FOR THE COMPANY’S FIRST YEARS, A NECESSITY TO UPGRADE INFLUENCED THE COMPANY TO MOVE THEIR OPERATION TO LETHBRIDGE, WHERE THEY OPENED A PLANT ON 3RD AVENUE NORTH IN 1965. DURING THEIR EXISTENCE, THE PLANT PRODUCED 200 TYPES OF PRODUCTS. IN THE EARLY 1970S, THEY EXPANDED THEIR OPERATION TO PRODUCE GIFTWARE IN ADDITION TO WHAT THEY WERE PRODUCING IN THE MEDALTA STYLE. THE COMPANY DEVELOPED A REPUTATION AS LEADERS IN THE ALBERTAN CERAMIC INDUSTRY, BRINGING IN THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGIES AND EQUIPMENT FROM GERMANY WITH PROVINCIAL SUPPORT. THIS ALLOWED THEM TO ADD DINNERWARE TO THEIR PRODUCTION LINE. SUNBURST CERAMICS CLOSED ITS DOORS IN 1975. THE THRALL FAMILY BOUGHT THE MCINTYRE RANCH FOLLOWING THE DEATH OF BILLY MCINTYRE IN 1947. THE FAMILY CONTINUES TO OPERATE IT AT THE TIME OF DONATION. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REGARDING SUNBURST CERAMICS. SEE ALSO FILES FOR ARTIFACTS P19960004001, P19980077001, AND P200000056000 FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT SUNBURST CERAMICS.
Catalogue Number
P20160001000
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail