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Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
2
Height
13.7
Length
5.4
Width
1.8
Description
A: THERMOMETER. THE THERMOMETER'S CASING IS METAL. THERE IS A COVER ON THE THERMOMTER THAT HAS 17 HOLES PUNCHED OUT OF THE FRONT (7 ROWS ALTERNATING BETWEEN 3 AND 2 HOLES PER ROW). THERE IS A SHORT BACK TO THE COVER. THE COVER IS ATTACHED TO THE THERMOMETER WITH 2 SMALL NAILS ON EITHER SIDE. THE THERMOMETER GLIDES OUT OF THE COVER AND HINGES BACK TO STAND (SUPPORTED BY BACK OF CASE AND THE 2 NAILS). THE BACKGROUND OF THE THERMOMETER IS WHITE AND IS ATTACHED TO THE METAL CASE. “US PAT 2329685” IS ON THE BOTTOM OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE LEFT SIDE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS FROM 1 TO 6 ARE ETCHED. THE NUMBERS ARE DIVIDED INTO INCREMENTS OF FOUR. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER THERE ARE “00” ACROSS FROM EACH NUMBER ON THE LEFT. THE THERMOMETER’S GLASS IS TINTED YELLOW WITH A TRANSLUCENT CENTER. THIS TUBE IS 12.4CM IN LENGTH. TWO SMALL METAL RINGS HOLD THE GLASS THERMOMETER TO THE MEASUREMENT BACKING. THERE IS A SMALL METAL HOOK AT THE TOP OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER IN ITS CLOSED POSITION, "D. CARSE" IS HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. GOOD CONDITION. RUSTING/STAINING OVERALL SURFACE. LOSS OF WHITE BACKING BEHIND THE THERMOMETER (SEVERE ON THE UPPER LEFT CORNER AND SLIGHT ON THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER). B: CARDBOARD CASE WITH OVERALL DIMENSIONS OF 13.9 CM X 6 CM X 2 CM. CARDBOARD BOX WITH GREEN LABEL ON FRONT. THE LABEL SAYS “RUXCO” “NO-600-MO-10” “OVEN TEST THERMOMETER RANGE 100 TO 600°F IN 10° DIVISIONS.” GOOD CONDITION. MISSING LEFT END OF BOX. SCRATCH ON THE SURFACE OF THE LEFT SIDE OF THE LABEL. STAINING IN VARIOUS PLACES.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
THERMAL T&E
Historical Association
TRADES
DOMESTIC
History
IN SEPTEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED IRENE MOCH ABOUT THE HISTORY OF A THERMOMETER SHE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES. THE THERMOMETER BELONGED TO HER FATHER, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE, AND WAS USED BY HIM AS AN EMPLOYEE OF CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “HIS JOB WAS TO GO HOUSE-TO-HOUSE ON SPECIFIED CALLS TO REPAIR AND CHECK GAS APPLIANCES AT VARIOUS HOMES. HE LOVED HIS JOB. IT WAS GREAT PASSION AND HE WOULD SHARE A LOT OF HIS EXPERIENCES AT HOME WITH US. IT BECAME A BIG PART OF OUR FAMILY LIFE. HIS FIRST PASSION WAS HIS FAMILY AND HIS SECOND PASSION WAS HIS WORK. TWENTY- EIGHT YEARS, HE WAS WITH THE GAS COMPANY. HE WOULD BRING VARIOUS LITTLE ITEMS HOME, BUT MOSTLY IT WAS JUST HIS MEMORIES AND OUR MEMORIES OF THE STORIES THAT HE TOLD… MY MOM AND DAD WILLED THEIR HOUSE TO MY HUSBAND, WHO HAD BEEN CARING FOR IT OVER THE YEARS. [THEY] LEFT ALL THEIR TREASURES AS THEY WERE [TO] US BOTH TO DO WHAT WE FELT WAS BEST WITH EVERYTHING. THEY HAVE BEEN GONE SINCE 2000, 2003. SO FINALLY, THIS MOVE HAS FORCED ME TO GO THROUGH SOME OF THE THINGS THAT I HAVE, AND THIS HAS COME UP, AND IT MEANT A LOT. WE ALWAYS HAD GAS STOVE AND GAS RADIANT HEAT AND HE WOULD ALWAYS TEST MY MOTHER’S OVEN WITH THE THERMOMETER TO MAKE SURE THAT IT WAS FUNCTIONING PROPERLY. IT WAS VERY VISIBLE TO ALL OF US. IT WAS VERY IMPORTANT.” MOCH RECALLS THE THERMOMETER IN HER DAD’S WORK TOOLBOX: “… WHEREVER HE WENT, HE WOULD HAVE HIS TOOL BOX, AND THAT WAS THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF THE TOOL BOX. HE CARRIED IT IN HIS VEHICLE. HE DROVE TO THE HOUSES AND THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF HIS TOOL BOX WAS THAT.” IT WAS THE JOB AT CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY THAT BROUGHT CARSE AND HIS FAMILY TO LETHBRIDGE: “HE HAD ANDREW’S HARDWARE IN FORT MACLEOD FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS – QUITE A FEW – AND THEN HE WENT TO THE GAS PLANT IN BURDETT/ BOW ISLAND. AND FAMILY WAS COMING. [HE] NEEDED A STEADY JOB, [SO HE] CAME TO THE CITY [ TO] FIND A STEADY JOB. HE WAS A CERTIFIED PLUMBER AND GAS-FITTER SO HE APPLIED AT THE CANADIAN WESTERN AND NATURAL GAS… THAT WAS HIS WORLD. HE JUST BLOSSOMED. HE WAS A VERY PRIVATE PERSON, BUT HE LOVED TO BE WITH PEOPLE. THERE WAS A LOT OF COMRADERY AND HORSE-PLAY. HE WORKED BY HIMSELF. HE DIDN’T HAVE A PARTNER. AND [HE] WENT PLACE-TO-PLACE – AND IT GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW – 28 YEARS. AND IT WAS NOT UNCOMMON FOR OUR RESIDENCE PHONE AT HOME TO RING FROM VARIOUS PEOPLE, SAYING, ‘DON’T SEND SO-AND-SO; SEND DAVE BACK. DAVE KNOWS WHAT HE’S DONE HERE, AND THAT’S THE PERSON I WANT BACK.’ THAT WAS NOT UNCOMMON AT ALL TO HAPPEN AT OUR HOUSE. HE MADE A GOOD REPUTATION FOR HIMSELF, AND HE LOVED WHAT HE DID, AND IT SHOWED… HE BECAME A KIND OF AN IMAGE AND I THINK HE REVELED IN THAT. HE WAS KING OF HIS WORLD, REALLY. IT WAS VERY NICE.” “… THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEBODY ON CALL," CONTINUED MOCH, "BUT, IF IT WAS A MAJOR BLIZZARD, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THEN EVERYBODY WAS PRESSED INTO SERVICE. IF IT WAS TURKEY DAY, AND EVERYBODY WANTS TO COOK A TURKEY, AND THE PILOT LIGHT OR THE OVEN DIDN’T WORK, SOMEBODY HAD TO GO. AND THAT WAS THE BIG THING WITH THE GAS COMPANY. GAS COMPANY SERVICEMEN WERE FREE OF CHARGE AND THE ONLY CHARGE WOULD HAVE BEEN FOR A THERMOCOUPLE OR A PART THAT NEEDED TO BE REPLACED. PEOPLE WERE NOT SHY ABOUT CALLING THE GAS COMPANY TO REMEDY THEIR SITUATION. YES, THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEONE ON CALL, AND HE HAD TO TAKE HIS TURN DOING THAT. BUT, IF THERE WAS A MASS BLIZZARD OR STORM OF SOME SORT, THEN THEY WERE ALL CALLED OUT.” MOCH EXPLAINED THE THERMOMETER WAS OF GREAT IMPORTANCE TO CARSE’S WORK: “MOST OF HIS CALLS WERE [BAKING RELATED]. PEOPLE ALWAYS BAKED IN THOSE DAYS – ALWAYS BAKED AND [IF], ‘THE OVEN WASN’T COOKING RIGHT,’ OR ‘IT WASN’T HOT ENOUGH,’ OR ‘HOW COME THIS FLOPPED?’ ‘WE’D BETTER CALIBRATE THE OVEN PROPERLY.’ AND SO [THEY'D CALL IN], ‘CAN DAVE COME OUT AND CHECK IT OUT AND CHECK THAT OUT FOR US?’ SO YES, THAT [THERMOMETRE] WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT HE BROUGHT OUT… MOM BAKED ALL THE TIME AS WELL, TWICE A WEEK PROBABLY. ON A REGULAR BASIS, HE WOULD JUST DOUBLE CHECK [WITH THE THERMOMETER] TO MAKE SURE THINGS WERE WORKING THE WAY THEY SHOULD. NOT NECESSARILY THAT THERE WAS A PROBLEM, BUT JUST SO THAT THEY STAY THE WAY THEY SHOULD BE. HE EDUCATED US ALL ABOUT THE BLUE FLAME AND HOW THE BLUE FLAME HAD TO HAVE THE LITTLE TIP ON THE END OF THE BLUE FLAME AND THAT MEANS IT’S BURNING CLEAN. IT WAS VERY EDUCATIONAL, TOO.” “[HE] ALWAYS CAME HOME FOR LUNCH. MOM ALWAYS HAD LUNCH READY. WE HAD LUNCH IN THE LIVING ROOM WITH A SANDWICH AND HE HAD A LITTLE SNOOZE. FIVE MINUTES, AND HE WAS OUT THE DOOR. HE WAS NEVER LATE. HE WAS ALWAYS HOME, AND HE WAS NEVER LATE COMING HOME FROM WORK. HE JUST LOVED IT… HE RETIRED IN SEPTEMBER 30, ’73. SO, PROBABLY ’43, ’44 THAT HE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE TO [WORK AT THE] GAS COMPANY.” ACCORDING TO HIS OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON 15 NOVEMBER 2000. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND THERMOMETER PATENT.
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ATTIC LADDER
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2010
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
314.2
Length
4.9
Width
33.5
Description
ADJUSTABLE LADDER, SIDE RAILS COME TOGETHER TO MAKE THE LADDER MORE COMPACT (LADDER IS ONLY 8.0CM WIDE WHEN THE SIDE RAILS ARE TOGETHER). SILVER COLOURED METAL, WITH ORANGE PAINT, BLACK RUBBER, AND EIGHT RUNGS. ANTI-SLIP SAFETY SHOE ON THE BOTTOM OF BOTH SIDE RAILS. SAFETY SHOE IS BLACK RUBBER ON THE BOTTOM, WITH A PATTERN OF 10 CIRCLES PER SHOE BOTTOM. METAL TEETH ON THE FRONT OF THE SHOE. SHOES ARE ADJUSTABLE, BUT ARE VERY STIFF. BRACE COMES UP FROM THE BOTTOM AND LOCKS TO PREVENT LADDER RAILS FROM COLLAPSING BACK TOGETHER. BOTTOM OF LADDER HAS A 54.5CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT AND TOP HAS A 46.0CM SECTION OF BRIGHT ORANGE PAINT. TOP OF ONE RAIL HAS A BLACK RUBBER TOPPER. SMALL BLACK STICKER AT BOTTOM “P1” WITH SEVERAL STICKERS ON THE OPPOSITE RAIL: A ROUGHLY OVAL SHAPED, RED, BLACK, AND SILVER STICKER: “THIS IS A DUO-SAFETY LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP 519 W 9TH AVE. OSHKOSH, WIS.”; THEN A RECTANGULAR RED STICKER WITH WHITE WRITING: “THIS LADDER IS CERTIFIED TO COMPLY WITH N.F.P.A. SPEC 1931-1832; CURRENT EDITION, FOR FIRE DEPARTMENT GROUND LADDERS AND OSHA FIRE LADDER REQUIREMENTS. REFER TO DUO-SAFETY LADDER SAFETY BOOK FOR CARE – USE – MAINTENANCE ON THIS LADDER. DUO-SAFETY LADDER CORP. OSHKOSH, WI 54901”; THEN A WHITE STICKER WITH GOLD WRITING: “10”. THERE IS ALSO A SILVER COLOURED STICKER WITH HANDWRITING ON THIS SAME RAIL, LOCATED BETWEEN THE FIRST AND SECOND RUNGS: “TEST DATE: 25 NOV 2006. LADDER #: ATTIC #18. APPARATUS #: P1. APPARATUS #: P1.” BOTH RAILS HAVE THE FOLLOWING STICKERS, AT ROUGHLY THE MID-POINT OF THE LADDER: RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLUE BORDER, BLACK WRITING: “DANGER. FAILURE TO USE, UNDERSTAND, AND FOLLOW PROPER LADDER USAGE INSTRUCTIONS AS MADE AVAILABLE BY DUO-SAFETY LADDER, N.F.P.A., I.S.F.S.I., A.N.S.I., O.S.H.A., ETC. COULD CAUSE SERIOUS INJURY AND/OR DEATH.” RECTANGULAR, WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK BORDER AND WRITING: “DANGER. WATCH FOR WIRES. THIS LADDER CONDUCTS ELECTRICITY.” RECTANGULAR, YELLOW, WITH BLACK WRITING: CAUTION. SET UP LADDER PROPERLY TO REDUCE SLIP AND OVERHEAD HAZARDS. FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS. 1. PLACE TOES AGAINST BOTTOM OF LADDER SIDE RAILS. 2. STAND ERECT. 3. EXTEND ARMS STRAIGHT OUT. 4. PALMS OF HANDS SHOULD TOUCH TOP OF RUNG AT SHOULDER LEVEL. OUT -->” STICKER ON THE INSIDE OF FOURTH RUNG FROM THE BOTTOM: WHITE BACKGROUND, BLACK WRITING: “REMOVE LADDER FROM SERVICE AND TEST IF ANY HEAT SENSOR TURNS DARK -->” LADDER IS IN GOOD OVERALL CONDITION. ADJUSTABLE FEET ARE VERY STIFF. LOTS OF SCUFF MARKS ALL OVER LADDER AND SOME STICKERS HAVE BEEN PARTIALLY REMOVED/SCRATCHED.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS ATTIC LADDER WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDER WAS “USED TO ACCESS ATTIC SPACES THROUGH SMALL ACCESS HOLES IN CEILINGS. USED WHEN WE DID NOT WANT TO PULL A CEILING DOWN AFTER A FIRE TO ENSURE THAT THE FIRE IN THE ATTIC WAS OUT.” HE CONTINUED SAYING THAT THIS LADDER WAS DECOMMISSIONED BECAUSE IT IS “OLD AND WORN OUT. ALL LADDERS MUST MEET MINIMUM ACCEPTANCE STANDARDS.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT THIS IS “WHAT WE CALL A LITTLE ATTIC LADDER, TO GET BACK INTO A TIGHT PLACE WHERE YOU COULDN’T BRING A BIG LADDER IN … YOU COULD GET IT UP INTO THE ATTIC SO YOU COULD CHECK WHAT WAS IN THE ATTIC.” LAZENBY ELABORATED: “THIS IS A FOLDING ATTIC LADDER … THE RUNGS THAT SEPARATE THE TWO BEAM SECTIONS ARE ACTUALLY HINGED IN NATURE AND SO IT FOLDS UP AND FITS IN, TYPICALLY, A LITTLE COMPARTMENT ON THE BACK END OF THE TRUCK BECAUSE HAVE SOME LONG, LATERAL STORAGE THERE. THESE SURPRISINGLY GET USED A FAIR AMOUNT, STILL.” HE CONTINUED SAYING “THEY’RE NARROW ENOUGH THAT THEY’RE ALMOST DIFFICULT TO CLIMB WITH YOUR BIG FIRE BOOTS ON.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THAT THE LADDERS IN USE PRESENTLY ARE VERY SIMILAR TO THIS MODEL: “YOU CAN TELL BY LOOKING AT IT IT’S AN OLDER PIECE BUT THE CONSTRUCTION IS ESSENTIALLY THE SAME. THEY MIGHT BE USING SLIGHTLY LIGHTER MATERIALS NOW, BUT FROM WHAT I CAN SEE, THEY’RE BASICALLY THE SAME.” HE ADDED THAT HE WAS OFTEN THE ONE USING THE LADDER: “BECAUSE I WAS NEVER ONE OF THE BIGGER GUYS ON THE JOB, AND ESPECIALLY WHEN I STARTED I WAS PROBABLY TWENTY POUNDS LIGHTER THAN I AM NOW, IF THEY NEEDED SOMEONE TO GET INTO A SMALLER SPACE, I WAS THAT GUY, TYPICALLY, BECAUSE WHEN YOU WEIGHT 250 [POUNDS] AND YOU THROW THE SCBA ON AND ALL THE EQUIPMENT, IT’S DEFINITELY TOUGH FOR SOME OF THOSE GUYS TO GET THROUGH THAT ACCESS. SO, YES, I’VE BEEN IN MY FAIR SHARE OF ATTICS AND THAT’S THE ONLY MEANS TO GET UP THERE.” LAZENBY EXPLAINED THE IMPORTANCE OF USING THE LADDER: “ANY TIME A FIRE VENTS OUT OF A WINDOW AND TOUCHES ANY PART OF THE SOFFIT, IT’S INCUMBENT THAT YOU HAVE TO ABSOLUTELY CHECK THAT BECAUSE IF YOU DON’T AND YOU’RE OPERATING UNDERNEATH AN ATTIC FIRE, THAT’S A VERY, VERY UNSAFE PLACE TO BE.” DZUREN ADDED: “THAT’S A COLLAPSIBLE LADDER. IT’S KIND OF LIKE A SCISSOR TYPE OF LADDER. IT WAS VERY COMPACT, YOU COULD STORE IT ON ONE OF YOUR VEHICLES WITHOUT IT TAKING UP TOO MUCH ROOM … YOU’D CARRY THAT INTO YOUR HOUSE IF AN OFFICER WANTED YOU TO GO UP INTO AN ATTIC … IT WAS EASY TO TRANSPORT AND ONCE YOU GOT IT INTO THE OPENING YOU COULD JUST GIVE IT A SWITCH AND IT WOULD OPEN UP AND YOU COULD JUST CLIMB RIGHT UP TO THE SPOT THERE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010022
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE / PUMP LENGTH HOSE
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NYLON, BRASS, RUBBER,
Catalogue Number
P20150010021
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE / PUMP LENGTH HOSE
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1985
Materials
NYLON, BRASS, RUBBER,
No. Pieces
1
Length
416.0
Width
38.3
Diameter
17.5
Description
SHORT HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE, ALSO KNOW AS PONY LENGTH OR PUMP LENGTH FIRE HOSE. SHORT, WIDE, RED FIRE HOSE. COUPLINGS ON EACH END OF HOSE. ON THE LARGER END (17.5CM DIAMETER) THE CHROME PLATED COUPLING HAS 10.4CM LONG HANDLES AND A STRIPE OF GREEN PAINT NEAR THE CONNECTION WITH THE HOSE. THE HOSE HAS BEEN TRIPLE CLAMPED ONTO THE COUPLING. ON THE OTHER END OF THE HOSE, THE DIAMETER IS 14.0CM, AND THE COUPLING HAS HANDLES THAT ARE 4.7CM LONG. THIS END OF THE HOSE IS ALSO TRIPLE CLAMPED ONTO THE COUPLING. ON EACH END OF THE HOSE, TWO OF THE CLAMPS ARE SMALLER AND ARE STAMPED WITH A REPEATING "* DENVER * COLORADO * USA * BAND * IT *" THE LARGEST CLAMPS, EACH FURTHEST FROM ITS RESPECTIVE COUPLING, STAMPED: "DIXON V. & C. CO. USA 525" ON EITHER SIDE OF THE TWO LARGE BOLT SETS. VERY GOOD OVERALL CONDITION. CHROME PLATING HAS WORN AWAY ON EDGES. LOTS OF SCRATCHES AND GOUGES IN THE METAL HANDLES OF THE COUPLINGS.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS HIGH VOLUME FIRE HOSE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN A WRITTEN STATEMENT PROVIDED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, JESSE KURTZ, DEPUTY CHIEF – SUPPORT SERVICES (RETIRED), EXPLAINED THAT THIS HOSE WAS USED “WHEN A FIRE ENGING NEEDED TO CONNECT TO A FIRE HYDRANT AND WAS PARKED RIGHT BESIDE THE HYDRANT. THIS WAS BEFORE WE CARRIED LARGER BUT LIGHTER HOSES ON THE TRUCKS.” IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT “THIS WAS ONE OF YOUR MAIN PIECES OF EQUIPMENT WHEN YOU WENT TO A FIRE … WE’D HOOK THIS [THE HOSE] TO THE HYDRANT, AND THEN THIS INTO OUR PUMP, SO WE’D BE GETTING 8 INCHES OF WATER INTO OUR PUMP, AND THEN THE PUMP WOULD BOOST THAT LINE, AND WE COULD PUT UP 5 OR 6 LINES … THIS WAS ONLY USED AT LARGE FIRES … WHEN WE HAD TO USE THIS, THERE WAS BIG TROUBLE.” LAZENBY ADDED: “IF THIS WAS IN SERVICE WITH OUR DEPARTMENT, THIS WAS IN SERVICE BEFORE I GOT ON, SO I DON’T KNOW THAT I’VE EVEN EVER ACTUALLY SEEN ONE OF THESE, TO BE HONEST WITH YOU.” DZUREN ELABORATED: “THAT’S WHAT WE WOULD HOOK UP ONTO FROM OUR HYDRANT TO THE PUMP. THE HYDRANT MAN, HE WOULD CONNECT THAT TO THE HYDRANT GATE, TO THE HYDRANT, AND THIS WOULD GO TO THE INPUT SIDE OF THE PUMPER. AND THEN THEY WOULD TURN ON THE WATER WITH THAT NOZZLE AND THEY WOULD SUPPLY WATER TO THE FIRE TRUCK AND HE COULD PUMP IT TO A MULTITUDE OF LINES THAT COME OFF OF THERE.” WHEN ASKED WHY FIREFIGHTERS WOULD WANT TO RUN THE WATER THROUGH THE PUMPER TRUCK, RATHER THAN JUST OFF THE HYDRANT, DZUREN EXPLAINED: “WELL, IF THE HYDRANT PRESSURE IS NOT HIGH ENOUGH TO ACCOMMODATE FIREFIGHTING, LIKE SAY IF OUR HOSE, IF A NOZZLE LIKE THAT, YOU’VE GOT TO HAVE UP TO A HUNDRED POUNDS IN THERE, A HYDRANT NORMALLY DOESN’T HAVE THAT KIND OF HIGH PRESSURE.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010021
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160008001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
38.3
Length
121.5
Width
4.6
Description
SIGN. WOOD AND METAL. BORDER OF SIGN IS PAINTED MEDIUM/DARK BROWN. MAIN PORTION OF SIGN IS GOLDEN ROD YELLOW, WITH BLACK LETTERING. TEXT READS: “A SAFE WORKER IS A VALUABLE EMPLOYEE”. TWO METAL BRACKETS FOR HANGING ATTACH TO BACK OF SIGN. EACH BRACKET ATTACHES TO THE BACK WITH TWO FLAT HEADED BOLTS, WHICH ARE VISIBLE ON THE YELLOW SIDE OF THE SIGN. NUTS HOLD THE BOLTS ON THE BACK. HANDWRITTEN IN BLUE INK ON BOTTOM LEFT SIDE “317-9353”. REVERSE OF SIGN IS UNFINISHED DARK, ROUGH PINE BORDER. OVERALL IN GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SIGN IS VERY DIRTY. SOME OF BROWN PAINT AROUND BORDER HAS SCRATCHED OFF, REVEALING BLACK PAINT UNDERNEATH.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
SAFETY SERVICES
TRANSPORTATION
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A SERIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN. FROM JOHN’S INTERVIEW: JOHN STARTED WORKING AT THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP, AB IN 1992. HE DESCRIBED HOW IT WAS THAT HE CAME TO WORK THERE: “I WAS WORKING AS A SEASONAL MACHINE OPERATOR ON THE PACIFIC REGION, WHICH MEANT THAT IN THE SPRINGTIME EVERY YEAR, I GENERALLY START OUT SOMEWHERE NEAR THE FRASER CANYON AND OVER THE COURSE OF THE YEAR I’D WORK ANYWHERE FROM THERE TO SWIFT CURRENT AND FROM THE U.S. BORDER AS FAR NORTH AS [THE CPR HAD TRACKS, TO ROUGHLY ST. PAUL, AB]. THE LENGTH OF MY YEAR’S EMPLOYMENT WOULD BE DETERMINED IN MY SENIORITY AND THE AMOUNT OF WORK THAT WAS AVAILABLE. I WAS REAL TIRED OF BEING ON THE ROAD. THE YEAR PREVIOUSLY, THERE’D BEEN A TEMPORARY JOB – A COUPLE OF TEMPORARY JOBS THAT WERE BULLETINED AT THE FROG SHOP IN THE FALL, PROCESSING SOME SCRAP MATERIAL THAT WAS THERE. A FRIEND AND MINE BID THOSE JOBS AND GOT THEM. THAT MEANT WE WERE ON THE SHOP’S SENIORITY LIST AND WHEN THE OPPORTUNITY AROSE, THERE WAS A POSITION THERE BULLETINED – ACTUALLY A COUPLE OF POSITIONS BULLETINED THERE – MY FRIEND AND I BID THEM TO BE ABLE TO BE AT HOME AND HAVE A YEAR ROUND JOB. MIGHT NOT HAVE BEEN THE BEST IDEA EVER, BUT IT WAS GOOD TO BE HOME AND SLEEP IN MY OWN BED AT NIGHT AND WAKE UP AND SEE MY HORSES IN THE MORNING.” JOHN REMOVED THIS SIGN FROM HIS WORKPLACE WHEN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY ELECTED TO CLOSE THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP IN THE SPRING OF 2002. JOHN’S SUPERVISOR, GUY MITCHELL, KNEW THAT HE HAD AN INTEREST IN HISTORY AND OLD THINGS AND ALLOWED JOHN TO TAKE SOME ITEMS HOME. JOHN RECOUNTED THE EXPERIENCE: “WHEN I ASKED [GUY] WHAT WAS TO BECOME OF THE [SAFE WORKER] SIGN HE SAID, ‘YOU CAN HAVE IT, JOHN. THEY’LL JUST THROW IT AWAY. IT’S JUST JUNK AS FAR AS ANYONE ELSE CONCERNED.’ I ASKED HIM, ‘GEE, COULD I HAVE THE LITTLE PLAQUE OFF THE DOOR?’ AND HE SAID, ‘OF COURSE, YEAH, TAKE IT. IT’S GOING TO GET – SOMEONE ELSE WILL KNOCK IT OFF AND IT’LL GET BROKEN. SO MUCH THE BETTER. YOU WANNA SEE IT HANG IN THERE, GO FOR IT. IT’S ALL YOURS.’” JOHN EXPLAINED THAT THIS SIGN HUNG ON THE WALL: “IT WAS HANGING ON THE WALL WELL ABOVE THE DOORWAY, AND [I] PUT A LADDER UP AND TOOK THE TWO BIG SCREWS OUT OF THE WALL THAT HELD IT IN PLACE, AND TOOK THE TWO LITTLE TINY SCREWS OUT OF THE DOORWAY THAT HELD THE FROG SHOP SIGN IN PLACE. THAT WAS ONE OF THE LAST DAY – I THINK IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN EVEN THE LAST DAY THAT WE WERE THERE – AS I RECALL THAT’S THE CASE.” JOHN EXPLAINED WHY HE WAS SO INTERESTED IN THIS PARTICULAR SIGN: “BUT THE SIGN WAS SIGNIFICANT TO ME IN IT OF ITSELF GIVEN THAT WE SOMETIMES JOKED THAT THAT WAS THE ENTIRETY FOR A LONG TIME OF THE RAILWAY’S SAFETY PROGRAM – WAS A SIGN LIKE THIS. ON ALL THE MIRRORS IN ALL OF THE EMPLOYEES’ BATHROOMS, GOING BACK AT LEAST WHEN I FIRST WORKED FOR THE RAILWAY THE SUMMER OUT OF THE UNIVERSITY IN 1975, THE MIRRORS WERE ALL PAINTED WITH A SIGN ABOVE - AT THE TOP AND THE BOTTOM OF THE MIRROR THAT SAID, “YOU’RE LOOKING AT THE MAN MOST RESPONSIBLE YOUR SAFETY.” THOSE WERE QUITE OFTEN CHANGED BY EMPLOYEES TO SAY SOMETHING QUITE DIFFERENT, BUT YEAH, IT WAS SOMETHING OF A JOKE.” HE WENT ON FURTHER, SAYING THAT IN 1978 HE AND A FRIEND LOOKED INTO THE OLD ROUNDHOUSE AT THE RAIL YARD IN LETHBRIDGE AND “WAS MORTIFIED” TO SEE THE WORKING CONDITIONS: “WE PULLED UP BEHIND THE OLD ROUNDHOUSE IN THE OLD YARD HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, AND LOOKED IN THE DOORWAY. THAT’S AS MUCH AS I KNOW OF THE OLD ROUNDHOUSE, AND I WAS MORTIFIED TO SEE MEN WORKING IN A POORLY VENTILATED, ANCIENT, REALLY FALLING APART BUILDING. MORE PIGEONS THAN PEOPLE INSIDE, IN A CLOUD OF DUST AND WELDING SMOKE THAT YOU COULD NOT SEE THROUGH. THAT’S WHERE THIS SIGN CAME FROM.” IN COMPARISON, THE WORKING CONDITIONS IN THE KIPP FROG SHOP WERE MUCH BETTER, BUT JOHN EXPLAINS THAT THERE WERE STILL PROBLEMS: “WHEN I WENT TO WORK AT THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP IN EARLY ’92, A GREAT NUMBER OF PEOPLE WORKING THERE, AND THEN THERE WERE ONLY 12 EMPLOYEES THERE AND A SUPERVISOR, HAD WORKED THERE. CONSEQUENTLY, THAT FACILITY WAS LIGHT YEARS BEYOND WHERE THEY WORKED PREVIOUSLY, AND THEY’RE PRETTY COMFORTABLE IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT. THEY FELT THAT, YOU KNOW, THEY WERE DOING PRETTY WELL. THERE WERE A NUMBER OF US OVER THE COURSE OF THE NEXT COUPLE OF YEARS THAT CAME TO WORK THERE THAT HAD PREVIOUSLY WORKED ON THE SEASONAL WORK CREWS, AS MACHINE OPERATORS, WERE HAPPY TO HAVE A FULL TIME, YEAR-ROUND JOB. IT WASN’T A VERY PLEASANT PLACE TO WORK. IT WAS VERY DUSTY, VERY NOISY, AND DESPITE A RELATIVELY DECENT WELDING FUME VENTILATION SYSTEM, IT WASN’T A GOOD PLACE TO BE. AND WE LOOKED AT THE SIGN EVERY DAY AS YOU WALKED OUT. IN THE COURSE OF READING THE MSDS ON THE WELDING WIRE AND THE WELDING ROD WE USED, AFTER I WORKED THERE FOR MAYBE A YEAR OR SO – MAYBE A COUPLE YEARS – I SAW THAT THE WELDING WIRE MANUFACTURER – WELL THE WELDING ROD MANUFACTURER – SUGGESTED THAT PEOPLE HAVE AT LEAST ANNUAL BLOOD TESTS TO DETERMINE THEIR BLOOD LEVELS OF HEAVY METALS, IN PARTICULAR MANGANESE.” JOHN EXPLAINED THAT TOO MUCH MAGNESIUM IN THE HUMAN BODY CAN MIMIC PARKINSON’S DISEASE, A CONDITION CALLED PARKINSONISM. SUMPTION PUSHED FOR BLOOD TESTING TO BE DONE IN THE 1990S: “THAT STARTED US DOWN THE ROAD THAT RESULTED IN A STUDY BEING DONE BY A GROUP OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE SPECIALISTS FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY, INCLUDING OF THE FOREMOST – THE WORLD’S MOST FOREMOST – MOVEMENT DISORDER SPECIALIST … . CONSEQUENTLY, WE ALL SPENT TWO DAYS IN CALGARY, GOT MRI, GOT BLOOD TESTS, AND THEREAFTER WERE REGULARLY SUBJECTED TO URINE TESTS.” THE RESULTS OF ALL OF THIS TESTING: “CONSEQUENTLY, THE VENTILATION SYSTEM WAS IMPROVED, THE DUST CAPTURE SYSTEM WAS IMPROVED FOR THE GRINDING PROCEDURES, AND ALL EMPLOYEES WORE POWER PURIFIED AIR RESPIRATORS THEREAFTER. SO WE HAD A MUCH SAFER WORK ENVIRONMENT.” JOHN NEVER SAW THIS SIGN HANGING IN THE ROUNDHOUSE AND HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY: “IT’S FAR TOO OLD TO HAVE BEEN MADE FOR THE FROG SHOP IN 1982. WHEN YOU LOOK AT THESE … BOLTS – HAVEN’T SEEN THEM DO LIKE THAT IN AN AWFUL LONG TIME. THIS IS HAND-PUNCHED – THIS IS HAND-CUT AND HAND-PUNCHED. LOOT AT THE WIDTH OF THE PINE PLANK THAT IT’S ON. IT’S NOT REGULAR, OLD CPR RED. THEY DIDN’T BUY THINGS. THEY ARE NOTORIOUSLY CHEAP. I REMEMBER THIS YELLOW PAINT. THIS IS THE SAME YELLOW PAINT THAT THEY PAINTED THEIR MOTOR CARS WITH – THE LITTLE, FREEZE-YOUR-ASS-OFF TRACK MOBILES WE USED TO TRAVEL ON WHEN WE’RE WORKING ON THE TRACK. YEAH, I WAS TOLD THAT. BUT I KNOW THEY WOULDN’T HAVE A SIGN PAINTED. I KNOW THEY WOULDN’T BUY ONE FROM ANYONE. AND THAT WAS WHAT I WAS TOLD BY ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I WORKED WITH THERE; SOME OF WHOM HAD A GREAT MANY YEARS. AND THERE WERE A COUPLE OLD GUYS THAT I WORKED WITH THAT RETIRED AT 35 YEARS, SHORTLY AFTER I ARRIVED IN THE FROG SHOP THERE IN ’92.” JOHN DESCRIBED WHERE THE SIGN HUNG IN THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP: “IT HUNG IN THE DOORWAY THAT LEAD OUT OF THE SHOP INTO THE HALLWAY INTO OUR CHANGE ROOM. I LOOKED AT IT EVERY DAY, AT LUNCHTIME, COFFEE TIME.” JOHN ADDED THE FOLLOWING ABOUT WORKER SAFETY: “I JUST THINK THAT THIS IS TO ME ILLUSTRATIVE OF HOW FAR WE’VE COME WHEN IT COMES TO WORKERS’ SAFETY. AND WHEN YOU TAKE A LOOK AROUND TODAY OF HOW HORRIFYINGLY FAR WE HAVE TO GO. TO THINK THAT THERE ARE PEOPLE, WHAT LESS THAN TWO WEEKS AGO, STANDING IN FRONT OF THE LEGISLATURE IN EDMONTON FIGHTING THE NOTION THAT FARM WORKERS IN ALBERTA SHOULD HAVE THE SAME PROTECTION THAT THEY DO EVERYWHERE ELSE IN THE COUNTRY AND HAVE FOR YEARS AND YEARS. TOO MANY PEOPLE DIE GOING TO WORK. IT’S TOO EASY TO HAPPEN AND IT’S EVEN EASIER NOW. IT’S SCARY TO THINK OF YOUNG PEOPLE. I’VE WORKED WITH LOTS OF YOUNG PEOPLE AS THE YEARS HAVE GONE ON. I’M OLD. I KNOW OLD PEOPLE - OLDER PEOPLE - LOOKED OUT FOR ME AND HELPED ME; AND I’M REALLY FORTUNATE FOR THAT. BUT IN THIS HURRY-UP WORLD, NOW AND PARTICULARLY AS YOU SEE UNION MEMBERSHIP DECLINING AND IT BECOMING MORE AND MORE DIFFICULT TO OBTAIN A UNION CONTRACT, TO RATIFY A UNION VOTE, GEE I DON’T WANT TO SEE ANYONE - ANYBODY ELSE GET HURT. AND I HOPE THAT THAT GETS BETTER. BECAUSE I’VE SEEN REALLY BAD THINGS HAPPEN TO PEOPLE AND IT WASN’T BECAUSE THEY WERE DUMB AND IT WASN’T BECAUSE THEY WERE CARELESS. FAR TOO OFTEN IT WAS BECAUSE THEY JUST DIDN’T KNOW AND SOMEBODY WHO SHOULD KNOW BETTER DIDN’T GET IN LINE.” RELOCATING THE RAIL YARDS TO KIPP IS COVERED IN DETAIL IN SEVERAL LETHBRIDGE HERALD NEWSPAPER ARTICLES, ESPECIALLY IN THE PERIOD OF 1980 TO 1982. THESE ARTICLES TEND TO FOCUS ON THE BENEFIT FOR THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE AND THE ABILITY TO REDEVELOP THE YARDS. FOR EXAMPLE, AN OCTOBER 10, 1980 ARTICLE DISCUSSES REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES: “THERE MUST BE A GOOD CORRIDOR WITH A DIVIDED HIGHWAY THROUGH THE CITY TO ACCOMMODATE BOTH TRAFFIC THAT DOESN’T WANT TO STOP AND TRAFFIC THAT WANTS TO GET OFF AT DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE. RAILWAY RELOCATION GIVES ROOM FOR SUCH A CORRIDOR FROM THE RAILWAY BRIDGE THROUGH TO 13TH ST.” FOR MORE DETAILS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE. FOR COPIES OF NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160008001
Acquisition Date
2016-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010010
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
16.0
Length
50.3
Width
27.6
Description
FIRE-HOSE NOZZLE. SILVER COLOURED METAL, BLACK RUBBER AND PLASTIC. TWO LARGE BLACK RUBBER HANDLES COME OUT FROM THE CYLINDRICAL PORTION OF THE NOZZLE, MAKING A ROUNDED-CORNER SQUARE, WITH THE BODY OF THE NOZZLE GOING DOWN THE MIDDLE. "L" SHAPED METAL HANDLE WHERE BLACK RUBBER HANDLE MEETS BODY OF NOZZLE. DARK GREY COUPLING IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NOZZLE ALLOWS THE LOWER HANDLE PORTION TO BE REMOVED. STAMPED INTO THE DARK GREY METAL: "AKRON NPSH". SILVER METAL ADJUSTABLE HANDLE ALLOWS THE NOZZLE TO BE OPENED OR CLOSED AND IS EMBOSSED WITH "CLOSED" AND "OPEN" ON OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE HANDLE. STAMPED INTO THE METAL NEAR THIS OPEN/CLOSE LEVER IS "AKRON" AND THERE IS ALSO A BLACK STICKER OF "A1". ON THE UNDERSIDE OF THIS LEVER IS A SQUARE PATCH OF MEDIUM BLUE PAINT AND SCRATCHED INTO THE METAL IS "16 B". ABOVE THIS IS AN ADJUSTABLE RING, STAMPED WITH THE FOLLOWING MEASUREMENTS: "120 3/4; 150 7/8; 200 1; 250 1 1/8" (THESE MEASUREMENTS INDICATE HOW MANY GALLONS OF WATER PER MINUTE THE NOZZLE WILL EXPEL). IT IS ALSO STAMPED WITH: "FLUSH" AND "AKRON TURBOJET". THIS RING HAS 24 RAISED SQUARES FOR GRIPPING. BEYOND THIS IS ANOTHER ADJUSTABLE RING, STAMPED WITH "I V V", WHERE THE FIRST 'V' IS EXAGERATED AND EXTRA WIDE. (ADJUSTING THIS RING ADJUST THE FLOW OF WATER FROM A STRAIGHT STREAM TO A MIST OR FOG). THE BACKGROUND OF THESE STAMPS IS RED. BLACK RUBBER ABUTS THE ADJUSTABLE RING. THE RUBBER SECTION IS 7.7CM LONG AND IS TEXTURED, FIRST WITH A WIDE SET OF LINES, THEN ON THE VERY EDGE OF THE NOZZLE WITH A VERY CLOSE SET SECTION OF LINES. EMBOSSED ON THIS RUBBER SECTION IS: "US PAT. 3,387,791 - CAN PATENTED 1969". THE VERY END OF THE NOZZLE, WHERE THE WATER COMES OUT, HAS 24 BLACK PLASTIC TEETH. OVERALL IN VERY GOOD CONDITION. SIGNS OF WEAR ON THE SILVER FINISH, ESPECIALLY ON ADJUSTABLE OPEN/CLOSED HANDLE AND THE "L" SHAPED HANDLE.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE-HOSE NOZZLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). BROWN EXPLAINED THAT THIS NOZZLE WAS “PROBABLY ONE OF THE MOST DANGEROUS WEAPONS WE’VE GOT ON THAT DEPARTMENT. YOU HAD TO HAVE TWO GUYS HOLDING THAT THING … IT WAS FOR LARGER FIRES. YOU DIDN’T TAKE THAT INTO FIRES, BECAUSE YOU COULDN’T CONTROL IT. YOU’D TAKE IT MAYBE TO A DOOR OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT. THIS HERE NOZZLE – YOU’D TURN – IT WOULD BE A SPRAY OR A STRAIGHT STREAM. IF YOU PUT IT ON NON-STRAIGHT STREAM, IT WOULD DRAG YOU ALL OVER THE GROUND. I CAN REMEMBER SEEING GUYS ON THIS NOZZLE, SNAKING BACK AND FORTH LIKE THAT, AND THEM HANGING ONTO THE NOZZLE BEFORE THEY COULD GET THEIR BALANCE TO SHUT IT OFF … YOU HAD TO HAVE TWO GUYS ON IT, AND IF BY CHANCE, THEY FELL OFF IT, AND THEY LET IT LOOSE, WELL, YOU CAN IMAGINE. THAT THING PROBABLY WEIGHED … I’M GUESSING 40 POUNDS; IT WAS A VERY HEAVY NOZZLE. IF IT HIT ANYBODY … IT WOULD BE PRETTY HARD. SO, IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE TWO GUYS ON THAT NOZZLE, YOU’D TAKE IT AND YOU’D MAKE A CIRCLE ON IT, AND YOU’D SIT ON THE CIRCLE WITH THE NOZZLE LIKE THAT, AND JUST THAT LITTLE CIRCLE WOULD SORT OF KNOCK THE PRESSURE, SO IT DIDN’T ALL COME OUT OF THE NOZZLE. IT WOULD BE BACK IN THAT LITTLE CIRCLE SO ONE GUY COULD HOLD IT. BUT YOU’D PRETTY WELL HAVE TO SIT ON THAT NOZZLE. AND, AFTER YOU WERE ON THAT NOZZLE FOR ABOUT 15 MINUTES, YOU WERE JUST WIPED. IT WAS LIKE FIGHTING A TOUGH LITTLE CALF. BUT THAT WAS JUST MORE OR LESS FOR THE BIG FIRES, AND FOR THE FIRES YOU COULDN’T GET INTO.” LAZENBY EXPANDED SAYING: “IT’S A TWO AND A HALF INCH NOZZLE AND THIS WAS NEARING THE END OF ITS LIFE SPAN WHEN I WAS HIRED. THIS IS A FOG NOZZLE, WHICH MEANS THAT YOU CAN CHANGE THE PATTERN OF THE WATER FROM A RELATIVELY SMOOTH OR STRAIGHT STREAM INTO A 75 DEGREE FOG FOR YOUR PROTECTION. BEING A TWO AND HALF INCH NOZZLE, THIS CAN FLOW AN AWFUL LOT OF WATER … I BELIEVE THE ERGONOMIC PLASTIC HANDLES WERE JUST FOR ERGONOMICS AND EASE OF HOLDING ON TO THAT. THIS HOSE WAS BIG ENOUGH THAT TYPICALLY ONE PERSON WOULDN’T WANT TO OPERATE THAT BY THEMSELVES, UNLESS YOU’RE A REALLY BIG, STRONG GUY. EVEN EMPLOYING WHAT WAS CALLED THE KEENAN HOSE LOOP AND ACTUALLY ROTATE THE NOZZLE UNDERNEATH, AROUND AND UNDERNEATH ITSELF, UNDER THE HOSE AND YOU WOULD SIT ON THE CROSS OF THE HOSE SO THAT WOULD BEAR ALL THE NOZZLE REACTION AND ALL YOU WOULD HAVE TO DO IS DIRECT THE STREAM … GOOD NOZZLE, BUT QUITE HEAVY AND WE WERE GOING AWAY FROM THESE IN FAVOUR OF A NEWER, PISTOL-GRIP STYLE OF NOZZLE WHERE IT WAS ACTUALLY LIKE A PISTOL HANDLE WITH THE BALE FIXED ON TOP THAT IT JUST GAVE YOU A LITTLE BIT EASIER USE, LESS CUMBERSOME … I NEVER ACTUALLY USED ONE OF THESE EXCEPT FOR IN TRAINING, BUT THEY WERE ON OUR BACKUP ENGINES – THEY WEREN’T FRONT LINE, BUT THEY WERE ON THE BACKUP ENGINES WHEN I STARTED.” DZUREN ADDED: “THERE’S USUALLY EITHER TWO OR THREE GUYS, DEPENDING ON WHERE YOU WERE USING IT. BECAUSE THE PRESSURE ON THAT, YOU HAD TO HAVE FAIRLY HIGH PRESSURE TO HAVE THAT EVEN FUNCTION PROPERLY. SO YOU WOULD NEED TO HAVE ONE GUY THAT WOULD OPERATE THIS TRIGGER VALVE HERE, OR THE SPRAY VALVE, AND SOMEBODY WOULD BE BEHIND YOU MAKING SURE THAT IT DIDN’T GET AWAY ON YOU, BECAUSE IF A HOSE GOT AWAY ON YOU WITH IT RUNNING, IT WOULD … IT COULD BREAK A PERSON’S LEG OR KILL A PERSON … IF IT GOT AWAY FROM THEM.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010010
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HYDRANT WRENCH
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150010011
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HYDRANT WRENCH
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2000
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
42.5
Width
14.7
Description
METAL HYDRANT WRENCH, NOT ADJUSTABLE. WRENCH IS ROUGHLY AN 'L' SHAPE. ONE END OF THE WRENCH HAS A SINGLE CLAW, USED FOR PRYING. THE OPPOSITE END (THE SHORT END OF THE 'L') HAS A REULEAUX TRIANGLE, A SLIGHT HOOK, AND A SMALL (2.5CM) CIRCLE. IN THE MIDDLE OF THE HANDLE, ON ONE SIDE ONLY, IS A RECTANGULAR PATCH OF LIGHT GREY PAINT. THERE ARE REMNANTS OF LIGHT GREY FINISH ON THE REST OF THE WRENCH. OVERALL IN FAIR CONDITION. VERY RUSTED. GREY FINISH HAS ALMOST ENTIRELY FLAKED OFF. THE RECTANGULAR AREA OF GREY FINISH IS LOOSE.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS FIRE PLUG WRENCH, OR HYDRANT WRENCH, WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998), AND LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED 1959, RETIRED 1992). ACCORDING TO BROWN THIS IS A “GOOD OLD HYDRANT KEY. WE ALL CARRIED ONE ON OUR BELT … IT WAS MADE OF PRETTY DURABLE STEEL. YOU COULD PRY ON THAT THING ALL YOU WANTED. I DON’T EVER REMEMBER ONE BREAKING. YOU COULD USE IT AS A HAMMER, AS A CLUB. WE ALWAYS JOKED – WE’D USE IT AS A WEAPON IF WE EVER GOT INTO TROUBLE WITH OTHER PEOPLE. IT NEVER HAPPENED – JUST A JOKE. IT WAS PROBABLY YOUR MAIN LINE TOOL, BREAK WINDOWS, BREAK DOORS IN. YOU KNOW, WE DIDN’T HAVE A WHOLE LOT OF REAL FANCY TOOLS IN THOSE DAYS BUT THAT HYDRANT KEY WAS VERY IMPORTANT TO US. WE CARRIED THEM ON OUR HYDRANT BELTS.” LAZENBY EXPANDED: “WHEN I WAS HIRED EVERY MEMBER OF THE DEPARTMENT WAS ISSUED ONE OF THESE WHEN YOU GOT YOUR BUNKER GEAR OR YOUR TURNOUTS AND YOUR HELMET. YOU WERE ISSUED A HYDRANT KEY WITH A LEATHER HOLSTER BELT THAT YOU WORE OVER TOP OF YOUR JACKET … NOW THERE WAS A FEW ROLES OR A FEW USES FOR THIS TOOL. NUMBER ONE, FIRST AND FOREMOST, IT IS A HYDRANT KEY WHICH MEANS THAT THIS WAS THE KEY THAT YOU USED TO ESSENTIALLY OPEN THE HYDRANT. THE OPENING AT THE END AWAY FROM THE BEVELED EDGE IS CUT IN THE SAME SIZE AND SHAPE AS THE STEM ON TOP OF THE HYDRANT AND IT WAS SIMPLY LEFTY-LOOSE, RIGHTY-TIGHTY. BUT THIS COULD ALSO BE USED AS A FORCIBLE ENTRY TOOL, PERHAPS AS A TOOL TO FIND A MEANS OF EGRESS IF YOU HAPPEN TO BE TRAPPED, YOU COULD BREAK WINDOWS WITH THIS. YOU COULD USE THE PRYING END TO PRY IF YOU HAD TO. I DON’T RECALL WHAT THE PURPOSE OF THE ROUND OPENING ON THAT KIND OF FLANGE END WAS - I DON’T REMEMBER THAT. BUT I DO REMEMBER THAT THERE WAS A SORT OF A MINDSET AMONG SOME OF THE SENIOR MEMBERS THAT IF YOU LET YOUR HYDRANT KEY BECOME ALL RUSTED AND LOOK A LITTLE BIT DISHEVELED THAT THAT WAS SORT OF LIKE THE MARK OF A POOR FIREFIGHTER, SOMEONE THAT DIDN’T LOOK AFTER THEIR GEAR PROPERLY, AND SO WE USED TO – AT TIMES WE WOULD BREAK OUT SOME STEEL WOOL OR THE PNEUMATIC POLISHER AND ACTUALLY POLISH THESE TO A NICE BRIGHT, SILVERY - LIKE A CHROME SHEEN, ALMOST. SO WHEN THEY ISSUED THEM THEY LOOKED TERRIBLE - THEY WERE UNFINISHED AND IT WAS YOUR JOB TO SORT OF GET IT POLISHED UP AND GET IT INTO SERVICE, SO TO SPEAK.” LAZENBY CONTINUED, SAYING THAT BY 2000 “THESE ARE NO LONGER ISSUED TO INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS … WE’VE EVOLVED IN SOME WAYS IN THAT THE HYDRANT KEY NOW TYPICALLY IS … MOUNTED ON THE BACK OF THE TRUCK … THE WHOLE INDUSTRY IS STARTING TO CHANGE IN THAT WE’RE BECOMING MUCH MORE SAFETY-ORIENTED WHEN IT COMES TO THESE TYPES OF THINGS … THIS BECAME REDUNDANT, AND YOU KNOW, IT WAS A LITTLE BIT SMALL FOR THE JOB THAT IT WAS ASKED TO DO AS WELL. OBVIOUSLY, THE BIGGER YOUR TOOL, THE BETTER PRYING AND STRENGTH AND WEIGHT YOU GET. THIS, YOU RELIED A LOT ON THE PERSONAL STRENGTH OF THE PERSON TO BE ABLE TO USE THIS EFFECTIVELY … WHEREAS WITH THE BIGGER ONES NOW, THEY’RE HEAVIER, THEY’RE A LITTLE BIT LONGER, YOU CAN JUST GET BETTER LEVERAGE NATURALLY.” PETIT AGREED, ADDING THAT HE BELIEVED THE WRENCH “WAS MADE IN LETHBRIDGE. MAYBE LETHBRIDGE IRON WORKS.” DZUREN EXPLAINED THAT THE WRENCH “WAS CARRIED IN A LEATHER HOLSTER TYPE OF THING THAT HUNG AT YOUR SIDE AND IT WAS ONE OF THE THINGS YOU PUT ON RIGHT AWAY, AS SOON AS YOU PUT ON YOUR TURN OUT GEAR … THAT WOULD BE THERE BECAUSE YOU WOULD NEED THAT TO TURN ON YOUR FIRE HYDRANT IF YOU NEEDED THE HYDRANT FOR WATER … AND IT ALSO HAD, THERE WAS A LITTLE, TINY, THE TOP OF THE KEY THERE WAS A LITTLE ROUND THING THAT WAS THERE TO TIGHTEN THE CUP LINKS ON HOSES, IF YOU HAD TO TIGHTEN A HOSE THAT WAS LEAKING.” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010011
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2005
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20150010015
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2005
Materials
METAL, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
19.0
Length
24.8
Width
16.6
Diameter
9.0
Description
ADJUSTABLE SILVER COLOURED METAL WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE. CENTRAL CYLINDRICAL PORTION HAS A COUPLING ON ONE END, THROUGH WHICH BLACK RUBBER IS VISIBLE. THE OPPOSITE END HAS A CAP ON THE END OF THE CYLINDER. THIS CAP HAS A SMALL KNOB, WHICH HAS A VERY SHORT PIECE OF THIN CHAIN ATTACHED. COMING OUT FROM THE TOP OF THE CLYINDER IS THE DUAL-ADJUSTABLE NOZZLE: A 90 DEGREE FITTING ALLOWS THE NOZZLE TO ROTATE HORIZONTALLY AND HAS A BOLT THAT CAN BE TIGHTENED TO PREVENT FURTHER ROTATION; THE SECOND COMPONENT ROTATES VERTICALLY AND IS ROUGHLY SHAPED LIKE A THUMBLESS MITTEN AND AN 11CM LONG SLIT THAT ALLOWS THE WATER TO SPRAY OUT. BELOW THE NOZZLE, COMING OUT FROM THE SIDES OF THE CYLINDER, IS A ROUGHLY TRIANGULAR SHAPED PORTION, WHICH GOES UNDER THE CYLINDER AND HAS TWO SMALL BOLTS ON THE VERY BOTTOM. EACH OF THE ARMS OF THIS TRIANGULAR SHAPE HAVE A RED STRIPE, WITH ONE HAVING A STICKER OF "Q1" IN THE RED STRIPE. OVERALL IN FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. THE SILVER FINISH ON THE METAL HAS FLAKED OFF, ESPECIALLY ON THE EDGES/CORNERS, AROUND THE COVER WITH THE SMALL PIECE OF CHAIN AND AROUND THE COUPLING. THE RED STRIPES HAVE PARTIALLY SCRATCHED OFF. THE "Q1" STICKER IS LOOSE.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE WAS USED BY THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT. IN THE SUMMER OF 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING: CLIFF “CHARLIE” BROWN (HIRED IN 1966, RETIRED 2004), TREVOR LAZENBY (HIRED IN 1994), LAWRENCE DZUREN (HIRED IN 1959, RETIRED 1992), AND RAYMOND “RAY” PETIT (HIRED 1965, RETIRED 1998). BROWN RECALLED “THAT’S JUST A KIND OF SPRAY CURTAIN BETWEEN BUILDINGS. I DON’T EVER REMEMBER USING IT. THAT’S WHAT IT IS. IF ONE BUILDING IS ON FIRE, AND YOU WANT TO TRY AND SAVE THE OTHER BUILDING, YOU PUT IT ON THERE, JUST KIND OF A BIG WALL OF SPRAY, AND THAT WOULD KEEP THE OTHER BUILDING SAFE.” LAZENBY ADDED: “THIS IS CALLED A CURTAIN NOZZLE AND THE IDEA BEHIND THIS NOZZLE WAS … FOR EXPOSURE PROTECTION. AND, WHAT I MEAN BY THAT IS, IF YOU HAVE A HOUSE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE STREET THAT’S ON FIRE AND THE FIRE IS VENTING OUT THE WINDOWS ON ONE SIDE, THE HOUSE THAT IS IMMEDIATELY EXPOSED TO THAT HOUSE THAT’S ON FIRE, WE CONSIDER THAT AN EXPOSURE HAZARD … THE BEST WAY TO STOP HEAT FROM TRANSFERRING RADIANTLY FROM HOUSE A TO HOUSE B WAS TO PUT UP A STREAM OF WATER IN BETWEEN THE HOUSES … IT DIDN’T WORK VERY WELL WHEN IT WAS WINDY AND UNFORTUNATELY WITH THE WINDS THAT WE GET AROUND HERE IT BECAME INEFFECTIVE AT TIMES, AND IT ALSO WASN’T VERY STABLE. IF YOU PUMPED THIS THING TO MORE THAN ABOUT 60 POUNDS PER SQUARE INCH AT THIS NOZZLE, IT BECAME UNSTABLE AND IT WOULD FLIP OVER … THE IDEA AND THE CONCEPT WAS EXCELLENT … BUT I THINK [IN THE END] IT DIDN’T WORK AS WELL AS WHAT WAS HOPED.” LAZENBY CONTINUED, STATING THAT THE NOZZLES WERE “DEFINITELY ON THE TRUCKS WHEN I STARTED … [AND THAT] SOMEWHERE AROUND 2005” THEY WERE REMOVED FROM THE TRUCKS AND REPLACED WITH A “BLITZ FIRE NOZZLE”. HE RECALLED THAT THE WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE WAS USEFUL: “I SAW IT DEPLOYED. WE DID USE IT. AND AS FAR AS EFFICACY, IT’S HARD TO KNOW REALLY WHAT WOULD HAVE HAPPENED IF IT HADN’T BEEN THERE, SO, DID IT DO ITS JOB? YES, IT DID. THEY WERE JUST A LITTLE BIT TOO FINICKY AND JUST MAYBE DIDN’T WORK QUITE AS WELL AS THE NEWER TECHNOLOGY THAT WAS COMING ON THE MARKET.” PETIT ADDED THAT THE WATER CURTAIN NOZZLE WAS “JUST LIKE A SPRINKLER SYSTEM … YOU COULD PUT THAT BETWEEN THE TWO [CLOSE TOGETHER] BUILDINGS SO YOU COULD PROTECT THE OTHER ONE … I’VE SEEN IT USED, NOT IN A FIRE, BUT IN DRILLS … IT PROBABLY CAME IN AFTER [I STARTED IN THE 1960S] BUT LIKE I SAY, THE ONLY TIME I’VE EVER USED IT WAS WHEN WE HAD SOME DRILLS.” DZUREN RECALLED AN EARLIER VERSION: "I DON’T RECALL EVER USING THAT. NOW, THERE’S ANOTHER ONE THAT’S … GOT THESE LEGS SITTING HERE LIKE THAT [AND] YOU WOULD SET THAT ON THE GROUND. NOW IF THAT WAS TO HOOK UP A HOSE, THIS COULD BE SOMETHING WHERE YOU COULD HAVE A CONSTANT SPRAY GOING OUT. SAY IF THERE’S A FIRE THERE, AND YOU WANT TO PROTECT AN EXPOSURE CLOSE BY, AND THE FACT THAT THIS TRIPOD THERE, TO HAVE IT SITTING STEADY ON THE GROUND, AND THE SPRAY WOULD COME OUT OF THERE, THAT’S ALL THAT COMES TO MIND. WE HAD A FIRE DOWN TOWN HERE, IT WAS THE OLD SAAN STORES ON THIS STREET, AND THERE WAS A FIRE IN THE UPPER STORY, AND WE, THERE WERE POWER LINES AND TRANSFORMERS RIGHT IN THE ALLEY, AND WE SET UP WHAT WE CALL A CURTAIN NOZZLE, AND IT WAS BASICALLY, BUT IT DIDN’T LOOK LIKE THAT, IT WAS BASICALLY THAT, BUT IT WAS A FLAT PIECE OF BRASS ABOUT THAT LONG WITH HOLES IN IT, AND WE PUT THAT ON SO IT WOULD BE A SPRAY GOING UP FAIRLY HIGH, I THINK IT WENT PROBABLY TWENTY-FIVE, THIRTY FEET HIGH. ONCE YOU PUT THE TWO AND A HALF INCH NOZZLE ON THERE WITH THE HIGH PRESSURE TO PROTECT THE TRANSFORMERS FROM HEAT, FROM THE BUILDING THAT WAS BURNING. NOW, THAT’S THE ONLY THING I CAN THINK OF, OF WHAT THAT MIGHT BE, BUT I DON’T, I DON’T REMEMBER THAT…” SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE LETHBRIDGE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Catalogue Number
P20150010015
Acquisition Date
2015-02
Collection
Museum
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