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Other Name
ALBERTA RANCH BOYS UNIFORM PANTS
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SYNTHETIC FABRIC
Catalogue Number
P20150016007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALBERTA RANCH BOYS UNIFORM PANTS
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Materials
SYNTHETIC FABRIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
104.5
Width
35.5
Description
MEN’S PANTS, COMMERCIALLY MADE. KHAKI-COLOURED, SYNTHETIC FABRIC BODY WITH BLUE FABRIC ACCENTS AT SEAT, THE BELT LOOPS, SCALLOPED POCKET FLAPS AND CENTER LEG STRIPE. INSIDE WAISTBAND AND POCKET LINING DISPLAY MULTIPLE HAND INK MARKINGS, INCLUDING NUMBERS AND “HORHOZER”. ATTACHED TO THE HEM OF THE PANTS ARE ELASTIC STIRRUPS (ONE BLACK AND ONE KHAKI-COLOURED). THERE IS A STRONG CREASE DOWN THE CENTER OF THE PANTS. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION. ON THE RIGHT SIDE THERE IS A STAIN AND SLIGHT TEARING AT THE BOTTOM HEM. THERE IS A STAIN AT THE KNEE, AND TEARING AT THE POCKET. THE BOTTOM BUTTON OF THE FLY HAS BEEN LOST. THERE IS TEARING AT THE CROTCH SEAM. ON THE LEFT SIDE, THERE IS TEARING NEAR THE POCKET. THERE IS SLIGHT STAINING ON THE OVERALL SURFACE OF THE PANTS.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
LEISURE
PROFESSIONS
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. THESE PANTS WERE PART OF THE STAGE OUTFIT WORN BY JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY HISTORY. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER DESCRIBED HOW SHE MET HER HUSBAND, JOE HORHOZER, WHEN HE CAME TO WORK FOR SUPINA’S MERCANTILE. FOR THE STORY OF HOW THEY MET, PLEASE SEE RECORDS P20150016003 AND P20150016004. JOE HORHOZER WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. HORHOZER SAYS OF HER HUSBAND: “I WOULD CALL HIM THE LEAD INSTRUMENT BECAUSE AN ACCORDION IS, EH? AND HE WAS EXCEPTIONALLY GIFTED WITH THE ACCORDION; THAT’S WHAT EVERYBODY SAID, THAT THERE ISN’T ANYONE, AT LEAST AROUND THIS COUNTRY, THAT COULD COMPARE WITH HIM.” DESCRIBED IN THEIR SOUVENIR BOOK PUBLISHED IN 1941 AS “PROFESSIONAL RADIO ENTERTAINERS”, THE ‘ALBERTA RANCH BOYS’ WERE FORMED WHEN THE LOCAL EXHIBITION AND STAMPEDE PARADE WAS FOUND WANTING FOR A “COWBOY BAND” AS PART OF ITS LINEUP. ACCOLADES FOR THE PARADE ACT FOLLOWED, INSPIRING THE GROUP “TO EMBARK ON THE LONG ROAD TO FAME AND FORTUNE”. IN A YEAR’S TIME – AND AFTER TOURING THROUGH ALBERTA AND BC – THE BAND ENDED UP IN VANCOUVER. THERE, IT ESTABLISHED ITSELF, ACCORDING TO THE BOOKLET, AS “WESTERN CANADA’S MOST VERSATILE STAGE AND DANCE FAVOURITE,” BROADCASTING ITS COWBOY MELODIES FOR OVER TWO CONTINUOUS YEARS VIA CKWX (VANCOUVER’S LARGEST RADIO STUDIO AT THE TIME). DURING THE WAR, IT DONATED ITS TALENTS TO THE PROMOTION OF WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES. ONE VICTORY RALLY SONG FOR STAMPS WAS “WE’VE BOUGHT THEM BEFORE AND WE’LL BUY THEM AGAIN.” BY EARLY JAN-FEB 1943, THE BAND HAD PEAKED. ONE MEMBER IS REPORTED TO HAVE ENLISTED IN THE CANADIAN ARMY WHILE OTHERS, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, “GOT SICK”. “THEY DID A LOT IN TORONTO.” RECALLED EVERAL IN AN INTERVIEW. “[IT WAS FROM] TORONTO THEN THEY COULD HAVE GONE [TO NEW YORK] - THAT’S WHERE THEY WERE OFFERED THE BIG JOB OF RECORDING AND BEING ON TV…BUT THEN [JOE] SAYS THAT HE DOESN’T CARE, BECAUSE HE SAYS IF HE WOULD HAVE WENT, HE WOULDN’T HAVE MET ME, SO, I MEAN, THAT WAS A NICE THING TO SAY. HE SAYS LIFE TURNED OUT GOOD FOR HIM.” EVERAL WAS NOT AWARE OF THIS AT THE TIME OF THEIR MEETING. AFTER FINDING OUT, SHE SAID, “WELL, I THOUGHT, GEE WHIZ, HE JUST ISN’T AN EVERYDAY JOE AND EVERYBODY IN TOWN KNEW HIM AND ADMIRED HIM. YEAH, IT MADE ME A LITTLE MORE HAPPY.” OF THE PERFORMANCE COSTUME EVERAL HORHOZER SAID: “THEY WORE [THE SAME UNIFORM] WHEN THEY PLAYED AT THE TRIANON FOR A WHILE AND THEY JUST STARTED TO USE SUITS … WELL HE DIDN’T WANT - SEE, WHEN THEY STARTED PLAYING AT THE TRIANON. THEN I TELL YOU, THEY START WEARING MORE BAND [CLOTHING] - LIKE, THEY HAD DIFFERENT BLAZERS, COLOURED BLAZERS – BLUE ONES AND RED ONES AND ALL WORE BLAZERS THEN. ‘CAUSE THEY WANTED TO BECOME LIKE A DANCE BAND, I GUESS YOU’D SAY.” “HE WOULD NEVER FORGET THAT TIME [WITH THE RANCH BOYS],” HORHOZER SAID OF HER HUSBAND, “HE TALKED ABOUT IT ALL THE TIME. HOW THEY MET SO MANY [PEOPLE], LIKE THEY’D PLAY AT PRIVATE PARTIES FOR WEALTHY PEOPLE. HE ABSOLUTELY LOVED HIS MUSIC. HE LIVED FOR HIS MUSIC.” BACK HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, EVERAL’S HUSBAND JOE WENT ON TO PERFORM WITH THE COUNTRY CAPERS, PLAYING ACCORDION FOR A WEEKLY BROADCAST VIA THE LOCAL TV STATION CJLH. IN 1961, THE STATION AND THE BROADCAST WERE PRESENTED WITH A NATIONAL LIBERTY AWARD FOR “TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP” AND “BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING.” IN HIS TIME, ‘LITTLE JOE’ PLAYED WITH ROY ROGERS, GENE AUTRY, AND TOMMY HUNTER. HE DIED IN 2010 AT AGE 89. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND FURTHER PUBLICATIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20150016007
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ACME BOOT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20150016005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ACME BOOT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Materials
LEATHER
No. Pieces
2
Height
28.5
Length
30.5
Description
A-B: RED COWBOY BOOTS (LEFT AND RIGHT BOOT). THE LEATHER BOOT BODIES ARE RED WITH GOLD ACCENTS AND GOLD OPENING TRIMS. LEATHER SOLES HAVE BEEN RE-HEELED. INTERIORS LABELLED “ACME BOOT” AND INK STAMPED, “MADE IN THE USA”. GOOD CONDITION. ON BOTH BOOTS, THERE IS A RED DYE LOSS IN VARIOUS PLACES, ESPECIALLY AT THE TOES. SOME OF THE GOLD ACCENTS ARE SCUFFED. REGULAR WEAR TO THE BOTTOM SOLES. THERE IS WEAR TO THE INSIDE SOLES (MORE SEVERELY ON BOOT A). BOTH BOOTS ARE MISSHAPEN (BOOT B TO A GREATER EXTENT). ON BOOT A, THERE IS A LOOSE THREAD ON THE TOE DESIGN. THERE IS A LOOSE YELLOW THREAD ON THE INSIDE HEEL ON BOOT B.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. THESE COWBOY BOOTS WERE PART OF THE STAGE OUTFIT WORN BY JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY HISTORY. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER EXPLAINED SHE MET HER HUSBAND, JOE HORHOZER, WHEN HE CAME TO WORK FOR SUPINA’S MERCANTILE. FOR THE STORY OF HOW THEY MET, PLEASE SEE RECORDS P20150016003 AND P20150016004. WHEN DESCRIBING HER HUSBAND'S MUSIC CAREER, HORHOZER SAID, “I WOULD CALL HIM THE LEAD INSTRUMENT BECAUSE AN ACCORDION IS, EH? AND HE WAS EXCEPTIONALLY GIFTED WITH THE ACCORDION; THAT’S WHAT EVERYBODY SAID, THAT THERE ISN’T ANYONE, AT LEAST AROUND THIS COUNTRY, THAT COULD COMPARE WITH HIM.” DESCRIBED IN THEIR SOUVENIR BOOK PUBLISHED IN 1941 AS “PROFESSIONAL RADIO ENTERTAINERS”, THE ‘ALBERTA RANCH BOYS’ WERE FORMED WHEN THE LOCAL EXHIBITION AND STAMPEDE PARADE WAS FOUND WANTING FOR A “COWBOY BAND” AS PART OF ITS LINEUP. ACCOLADES FOR THE PARADE ACT FOLLOWED, INSPIRING THE GROUP “TO EMBARK ON THE LONG ROAD TO FAME AND FORTUNE”. IN A YEAR’S TIME – AND AFTER TOURING THROUGH ALBERTA AND BC – THE BAND ENDED UP IN VANCOUVER. THERE IT ESTABLISHED ITSELF, ACCORDING TO THE BOOKLET, AS “WESTERN CANADA’S MOST VERSATILE STAGE AND DANCE FAVOURITE,” BROADCASTING ITS COWBOY MELODIES FOR OVER TWO CONTINUOUS YEARS VIA CKWX (VANCOUVER’S LARGEST RADIO STUDIO AT THE TIME). DURING THE WAR, IT DONATED ITS TALENTS TO THE PROMOTION OF WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES. ONE VICTORY RALLY SONG FOR STAMPS WAS “WE’VE BOUGHT THEM BEFORE AND WE’LL BUY THEM AGAIN.” BY EARLY JAN-FEB 1943, THE BAND HAD PEAKED. ONE MEMBER IS REPORTED TO HAVE ENLISTED IN THE CANADIAN ARMY WHILE OTHERS, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, “GOT SICK”. “THEY DID A LOT IN TORONTO.” RECALLED EVERAL IN AN INTERVIEW. “[IT WAS FROM] TORONTO THEN THEY COULD HAVE GONE [TO NEW YORK] - THAT’S WHERE THEY WERE OFFERED THE BIG JOB OF RECORDING AND BEING ON TV…BUT THEN [JOE] SAYS THAT HE DOESN’T CARE, BECAUSE HE SAYS IF HE WOULD HAVE WENT, HE WOULDN’T HAVE MET ME, SO, I MEAN, THAT WAS A NICE THING TO SAY. HE SAYS LIFE TURNED OUT GOOD FOR HIM.” EVERAL WAS NOT AWARE OF THIS AT THE TIME OF THEIR MEETING. AFTER FINDING OUT, SHE SAID, “WELL, I THOUGHT, GEE WHIZ, WELL, HE JUST ISN’T AN EVERYDAY JOE AND EVERYBODY IN TOWN KNEW HIM AND ADMIRED HIM. YEAH, IT MADE ME A LITTLE MORE HAPPY.” THESE RED COWBOY BOOTS WERE PART OF THE COSTUME JOE HORHOZER WORE WHEN HE PERFORMED WITH THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS, AND LATER THE 'COUNTRY CAPERS,' A LETHBRIDGE-BASED BAND FOR WHICH HE PLAYED THE ACCORDION BEGINNING IN 1958. IT WAS EVERAL WHO DYED THEM THE BRIGHT RED COLOUR: “HE ASKED ME [TO DYE THE BOOTS]. HE SAID HE WANTED TO CHANGE, THEY WERE GETTING TO LOOK KIND OF SHABBY, AND I DON’T KNOW WHY HE PICKED RED, BUT THAT’S WHAT HE DID SO, THAT’S WHAT I - ACTUALLY THESE STOOD UP QUITE WELL [LAUGHS]. THE REGULAR COLOUR WAS - I THINK THEY WERE BLACK-LIKE. BLACK WITH WHITE... THOSE WERE THE ONLY BOOTS THAT HE HAD.” OF THE PERFORMANCE COSTUME EVERAL HORHOZER SAID: “WHEN THEY STARTED PLAYING AT THE TRIANON THEN, I TELL YOU, THEY START WEARING MORE BAND [CLOTHES] - LIKE THEY HAD DIFFERENT BLAZERS, COLOURED BLAZERS – BLUE ONES AND RED ONES AND ALL WORE BLAZERS THEN ‘CAUSE THEY WANTED TO BECOME LIKE A DANCE BAND, I GUESS YOU’D SAY.” “HE WOULD NEVER FORGET THAT TIME [WITH THE RANCH BOYS],” HORHOZER SAID OF HER HUSBAND, “HE TALKED ABOUT IT ALL THE TIME. HOW THEY MET SO MANY [PEOPLE], LIKE THEY’D PLAY AT PRIVATE PARTIES FOR WEALTHY PEOPLE. HE ABSOLUTELY LOVED HIS MUSIC. HE LIVED FOR HIS MUSIC.” BACK HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, EVERAL’S HUSBAND JOE WENT ON TO PERFORM WITH THE COUNTRY CAPERS, PLAYING ACCORDION FOR A WEEKLY BROADCAST VIA THE LOCAL TV STATION CJLH. IN 1961, THE STATION AND THE BROADCAST WERE PRESENTED WITH A NATIONAL LIBERTY AWARD FOR “TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP” AND “BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING.” IN HIS TIME, ‘LITTLE JOE’ PLAYED WITH ROY ROGERS, GENE AUTRY AND TOMMY HUNTER. HE DIED IN 2010 AT AGE 89. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND FURTHER PUBLICATIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20150016005
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALBERTA RANCH BOYS UNIFORM SHIRT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SYNTHETIC FABRIC
Catalogue Number
P20150016006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALBERTA RANCH BOYS UNIFORM SHIRT
Date Range From
1937
Date Range To
1962
Materials
SYNTHETIC FABRIC
No. Pieces
1
Length
78
Width
38
Description
COLLARED MEN’S SHIRT. TAILOR-MADE WITH LONG-SLEEVED, OFF-WHITE SYNTHETIC SILK BODY AND NAVY BLUE FABRIC ACCENTS EDGING FRONT CLOSURE, ON SHOULDERS, AND BORDERING CUFFS. OPEN CRESCENT POCKETS AT BREASTS. BLUE IRIDESCENT SNAP CLOSURES. 5 SNAPS ON THE CUFFS AND 7 SNAPS DOWN THE FRONT OF THE SHIRT. THE LENGTH IS 78 CM, THE WIDTH ACROSS THE BACK IS 38 CM, AND THE SLEEVES ARE 60 CM LONG. FAIR CONDITION. AT LEAST 11 STAINS ON THE FRONT. DARK BROWN STAIN ON THE BOTTOM OF THE LEFT SLEEVE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
LEISURE
PROFESSIONS
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. THIS DRESS SHIRT WAS PART OF THE STAGE OUTFIT WORN BY JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY HISTORY. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER DESCRIBED HOW SHE MET HER HUSBAND, JOE HORHOZER, WHEN HE CAME TO WORK FOR SUPINA’S MERCANTILE. FOR THE STORY OF HOW THEY MET, PLEASE SEE RECORDS P20150016003 AND P20150016004. JOE HORHOZER WAS THE ACCORDION PLAYER AND MUSIC ARRANGER FOR A WELL-KNOWN LETHBRIDGE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN THE SUMMER OF 1937 WITH MEMBERS LOUIS (LOU) GONZY, MATT (BUCK) WASOWICH, PETER (CURLY) GURLOCK, REMO BACEDA, AND ‘LITTLE JOE’ HORHOZER. HORHOZER SAYS OF HER HUSBAND: “I WOULD CALL HIM THE LEAD INSTRUMENT BECAUSE AN ACCORDION IS, EH? AND HE WAS EXCEPTIONALLY GIFTED WITH THE ACCORDION; THAT’S WHAT EVERYBODY SAID, THAT THERE ISN’T ANYONE, AT LEAST AROUND THIS COUNTRY, THAT COULD COMPARE WITH HIM.” DESCRIBED IN THEIR SOUVENIR BOOK PUBLISHED IN 1941 AS “PROFESSIONAL RADIO ENTERTAINERS”, THE ‘ALBERTA RANCH BOYS’ WERE FORMED WHEN THE LOCAL EXHIBITION AND STAMPEDE PARADE WAS FOUND WANTING FOR A “COWBOY BAND” AS PART OF ITS LINEUP. ACCOLADES FOR THE PARADE ACT FOLLOWED, INSPIRING THE GROUP “TO EMBARK ON THE LONG ROAD TO FAME AND FORTUNE”. IN A YEAR’S TIME – AND AFTER TOURING THROUGH ALBERTA AND BC – THE BAND ENDED UP IN VANCOUVER. THERE, IT ESTABLISHED ITSELF, ACCORDING TO THE BOOKLET, AS “WESTERN CANADA’S MOST VERSATILE STAGE AND DANCE FAVOURITE,” BROADCASTING ITS COWBOY MELODIES FOR OVER TWO CONTINUOUS YEARS VIA CKWX (VANCOUVER’S LARGEST RADIO STUDIO AT THE TIME). DURING THE WAR, IT DONATED ITS TALENTS TO THE PROMOTION OF WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES. ONE VICTORY RALLY SONG FOR STAMPS WAS “WE’VE BOUGHT THEM BEFORE AND WE’LL BUY THEM AGAIN.” BY EARLY JAN-FEB 1943, THE BAND HAD PEAKED. ONE MEMBER IS REPORTED TO HAVE ENLISTED IN THE CANADIAN ARMY WHILE OTHERS, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, “GOT SICK”. “THEY DID A LOT IN TORONTO.” RECALLED EVERAL IN AN INTERVIEW. “[IT WAS FROM] TORONTO THEN THEY COULD HAVE GONE [TO NEW YORK] - THAT’S WHERE THEY WERE OFFERED THE BIG JOB OF RECORDING AND BEING ON TV…BUT THEN [JOE] SAYS THAT HE DOESN’T CARE, BECAUSE HE SAYS IF HE WOULD HAVE WENT, HE WOULDN’T HAVE MET ME, SO, I MEAN, THAT WAS A NICE THING TO SAY. HE SAYS LIFE TURNED OUT GOOD FOR HIM.” EVERAL WAS NOT AWARE OF THIS AT THE TIME OF THEIR MEETING. AFTER FINDING OUT, SHE SAID, “WELL, I THOUGHT, GEE WHIZ, HE JUST ISN’T AN EVERYDAY JOE AND EVERYBODY IN TOWN KNEW HIM AND ADMIRED HIM. YEAH, IT MADE ME A LITTLE MORE HAPPY.” OF THE PERFORMANCE COSTUME EVERAL HORHOZER SAID: “THEY WORE [THE SAME UNIFORM] WHEN THEY PLAYED AT THE TRIANON FOR A WHILE AND THEY JUST STARTED TO USE SUITS … WELL HE DIDN’T WANT - SEE, WHEN THEY STARTED PLAYING AT THE TRIANON. THEN I TELL YOU, THEY START WEARING MORE BAND [CLOTHING] - LIKE, THEY HAD DIFFERENT BLAZERS, COLOURED BLAZERS – BLUE ONES AND RED ONES AND ALL WORE BLAZERS THEN. ‘CAUSE THEY WANTED TO BECOME LIKE A DANCE BAND, I GUESS YOU’D SAY.” “HE WOULD NEVER FORGET THAT TIME [WITH THE RANCH BOYS],” HORHOZER SAID OF HER HUSBAND, “HE TALKED ABOUT IT ALL THE TIME. HOW THEY MET SO MANY [PEOPLE], LIKE THEY’D PLAY AT PRIVATE PARTIES FOR WEALTHY PEOPLE. HE ABSOLUTELY LOVED HIS MUSIC. HE LIVED FOR HIS MUSIC.” BACK HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, EVERAL’S HUSBAND JOE WENT ON TO PERFORM WITH THE COUNTRY CAPERS, PLAYING ACCORDION FOR A WEEKLY BROADCAST VIA THE LOCAL TV STATION CJLH. IN 1961, THE STATION AND THE BROADCAST WERE PRESENTED WITH A NATIONAL LIBERTY AWARD FOR “TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP” AND “BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING.” IN HIS TIME, ‘LITTLE JOE’ PLAYED WITH ROY ROGERS, GENE AUTRY, AND TOMMY HUNTER. HE DIED IN 2010 AT AGE 89. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND FURTHER PUBLICATIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20150016006
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
No. Pieces
2
Height
29.5
Width
15
Description
A: HANDMADE DOLL. THE “ESKIMO” DOLL IS MADE WITH LIGHT BLUE, FELT-LIKE FABRIC WITH WHITE FABRIC ACCENTS. THE FACE IS MADE OUT OF A LIGHTER FABRIC THAT IS PEACH-COLOURED. THE FACIAL DETAILS ARE HAND PAINTED. THE DOLL HAS BLUE EYES, EYEBROWS, NOSTRILS, RED LIPS, AND ROSY CHEEKS. THE LIGHT BLUE FABRIC THAT MAKES UP THE MAJORITY OF THE DOLL’S BODY IS ENCOMPASSING THE DOLL’S FACE LIKE A HOOD. THE DOLL’S TORSO IS COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. TWO HEART-SHAPED ARMS, MADE OF THE SAME MATERIAL, ARE ATTACHED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE BODY. THE DOLLS UPPER LEG AND FEET ARE COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. FROM THE KNEES TO THE ANKLES, A LIGHTER, WHITE FABRIC IS COVERING THE LEGS. B: DOLL SKIRT. AROUND THE DOLL’S WAIST IS A DETACHABLE SKIRT MADE OF THE SAME FABRIC AND A WHITE WAISTBAND. POOR CONDITION. ALL FABRIC IS WELL-WORN AND THREADBARE IN MULTIPLE PLACES. THE DOLL’S RED STUFFING IS VISIBLE THROUGH PARTS OF THE FABRIC. THERE IS DISCOLORATION (YELLOWING) OVERALL. THE STUFFING IS NOT EVENLY DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT THE DOLL. THE SEAMS AT THE ARMS ARE FRAGILE. THE PAINT FOR THE DOLL’S FACE IS SEVERELY FADED.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
LEISURE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THE FAMILY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. THIS DOLL BELONGED TO MORRIS AS A CHILD. SHE EXPLAINS, “THIS CAME FROM A GREAT AUNT WHO CAME TO VISIT US AND SHE ALWAYS BROUGHT GIFTS AND THIS ONE WAS MINE AND I LOVED THIS DOLL… I REMEMBER PLAYING WITH IT, IT WAS SOFT AND CUDDLY WHEN I HAD IT… MY DAUGHTER WENT THROUGH IT AND MY GRANDDAUGHTER AND THEN I PUT A STOP TO IT BEFORE THEY ATE IT UP OR DID SOMETHING… THEY LOVED IT AND THEY, YOU KNOW LITTLE KIDS, THEY’RE CARELESS SO I’LL KEEP IT...” IN A PHONE CALL WITH COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK ON OCTOBER 24, 2017, MORRIS SAID SHE RECIEVED THE DOLL FROM HER GREAT AUNT WHO HAD BROUGHT IT FROM VISITING BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS PLAYED WITH THE DOLL AS A CHILD, AS DID MORRIS' CHILDREN. THE DOLL WAS LOVED BY MULTIPLE GENERATIONS IN MORRIS' FAMILY AS HER GRANDCHILDREN AND GREAT GRANDCHILDREN WOULD ALSO PLAY WITH THE DOLL WHEN THEY CAME TO VISIT. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20180021001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
55
Width
31
Description
STUFFED BEAR, “PUNKINHEAD”, 55 CM LONG X 31 CM WIDE. BROWN PUNKINHEAD BEAR WITH LIGHTER BROWN PATCHES ON CHEST, ARMS, NOSE, INSIDE EARS, AND TOP OF HEAD. BEAR HAS TWO CLEAR GLASS EYES WITH BLACK CENTERS; FEET ARE COVERED IN BROWN LEATHER; SNOUT HAS BLACK STITCHING FOR NOSE AND MOUTH. DRESSED IN BROWN AND WHITE PAISLEY-PATTERNED ROMPER; ROMPER HAS ELASTIC WAIST AND THREE WHITE OPAQUE PLASTIC BUTTONS ON FRONT. TOP OF ROMPER HAS TWO STRAPS THAT CROSS CHEST AND ATTACH TO CHEST WITH WHITE BUTTONS; BOTTOMS OF ROMPER FORM SHORTS. ROMPER SEAMS MACHINE-STITCHED WITH WHITE THREAD; HOMEMADE; THREADS FRAYING ON RIGHT SIDE. ARMS AND LEGS ARE MOVEABLE; FUR IS MISSING IN THINNED; FRONT PAWS HAVE FELT PATCHES SEWN ON. LEFT FRONT PAW HAS HOLES IN FELT; BLACK THREAD ON RIGHT SIDE OF MOUTH IS LOOSE; LEATHER FEET CRACKED AND WORN; BUTTONS ON ROMPER DISCOLORED YELLOW; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARY OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE LARGEST PUNKINHEAD IN A BROWN ROMPER, OBERG RECALLED, “[I WOULD SAY] SAY IT IS IN ’57 [THAT I RECEIVERED THE BEAR] WITH THE BROWN JUMPER.” “HE WAS THE LAST ONE. FROM WHAT I UNDERSTAND, THEY ONLY CAME; THEY WERE ONLY ACCESSIBLE IN THE THREE SIZES. I HAD SHOWN SO MUCH FONDNESS TOWARDS THEM THAT MY GRANDPARENTS DECIDED THAT THEY WOULD GET ANOTHER SMALL ONE, BECAUSE THIS FELLOW [IN THE BROWN JUMPER] WAS ALMOST UNTOUCHABLE. I TRIED TO WASH HIS HAIR ONCE.” “I TRIED TO WASH HIS HAIR, AND THAT WAS FROWNED UPON BY MY PARENTS, AND MY GRANDPARENTS, BECAUSE THEY HAVE WOODEN STUFFING/WOODEN SHAVINGS. THIS FELLOW, I THINK HE HUNG OVER THE REGISTER FOR PROBABLY A MONTH, HOPING THAT HE WOULD DRY AND NOT GO MOLDY. [MY FAMILY] WANTED TO GIVE ME ANOTHER ONE, THAT I WOULD BE ABLE TO LOVE, AND CARE FOR, LIKE LITTLE GIRLS DO WITH THEIR TEDDY BEARS.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MACINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MACINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021001
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20180021002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
No. Pieces
3
Length
36
Width
24.5
Description
A. STUFFED TOY, “PUNKINHEAD”, 36 CM LONG X 24.5 CM WIDE. BROWN PUNKINHEAD BEAR DRESSED IN BLUE SHORTS AND SHIRT. BEAR HAS TWO CLEAR GLASS EYES WITH BLACK CENTERS; FACE STITCHED WITH BLACK THREAD CREATING NOSE AND MOUTH; FEET CASED IN BROWN LEATHER STITCHED ON WITH BLACK THREAD. PUNKINHEAD BEAR HAS LIGHTER BROWN SNOUT, CHEST, TOP OF HEAD, AND INSIDE OF EARS. FUR ON BEAR IS MISSING IN PACTHES AND THINNED; BEAR IS MISSING LIGHT HAIR FROM TOP OF HEAD; NOSE IS TORN ON SIDES AND HAS LOSS IN FABRIC SHOWING INSIDE STUFFING. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. BLUE COTTON SHIRT, 11.5 CM LONG X 7.5 CM WIDE. HOMEMADE WITH WHITE MACHINE STITCHING ALONG CUFFS AND HEM; BACK HAS CINCHING WITH WHITE THREAD. FRONT OF SHIRT TIED AT NECK AND OPEN AT FRONT. FABRIC IS FADED; RIP IN RIGHT SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. BLUE COTTON SHORTS, 8.5 CM LONG X 9 CM WIDE. HANDMADE WITH WHITE MACHINE STITCHING ALONG LEG-HOLES AND WAIST. SHORTS FADED; TEAR INSIDE RIGHT LEG; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARY OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE PUNKINHEAD IN THE BLUE OUTFIT, OBERG RECALLED, “THE MIDDLE-SIZED ONE [IN BLUE I RECEIVED] ’55.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MACINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MACINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021002
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20180021003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
No. Pieces
1
Length
24.3
Width
12.3
Description
BROWN “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEAR, 24.3 CM LONG X 12.3 CM WIDE. BROWN BODY WITH LIGHTER BROWN PATCHES ON CHEST, ARMS, NOSE, INSIDE EARS, AND TOP OF HEAD. BEAR HAS TWO CLEAR GLASS EYES WITH BLACK CENTERS; FEET ARE COVERED IN BROWN SUEDE; SNOUT HAS BLACK STITCHING FOR NOSE AND MOUTH. DRESSED IN RED VELVET SHORTS SEWN TO BODY. ARMS ARE MOVEABLE; FUR IS MISSING IN PATCHES AND THINNED; TOP OF HEAD IS MISSING LIGHTER HAIR. SNOUT HAS RIP IN UNDERSIDE EXPOSING INNER STUFFING; OVERALL FAIR CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARY OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE PUNKINHEAD IN RED SHORTS, OBERG RECALLED, “[THAT CAME LAST] IN ’59.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MACINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MACINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021003
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180021004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
3
Description
A. BROWN “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFD BEAR, 24 CM LONG X 12.3 CM WIDE. BEAR DRESSED IN GREEN SHIRT AND SHORTS; BEAR HAS TWO WHITE PLASTIC BUTTON EYES WITH BLACK PLASTIC BEAD ON TOP, SEWN ONTO FACE; BEAR IS BROWN WITH LIGHTER BROWN CHEST, INSIDE OF EARS, SNOUT, AND TOP OF HEAD. SNOUT HAS BLACK STITCHING FOR NOSE AND MOUTH; FEET ENCASED IN BROWN LEATHER. FUR IS MISSING IN PATCHES AND THIINED; LEATHER ON FEET IS CRACKED AND FADED; BEAR IS MISSING FUR FROM LIGHTER PATCH ON TOP OF HEAD. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. GREEN COTTON SHIRT, 8 CM LONG X 6 CM WIDE. HANDMADE WITH BLACK MACHINE STITCHING AT CUFFS AND HEM; BACK IS CINCHED WITH BLACK THREAD; SLEEVES HAVE ROLLED CUFFS. FRONT IS OPEN WITH TIES AT COLLAR TO ATTACH. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. C. GREEN COTTON SHORTS, 5.5 CM LONG X 6 CM WIDE. HANDMADE WITH BLACK MACHINE STITCHING INSIDE LEG HOLES AND AT WAIST. WAIST IS ELASTIC; BACK HAS MINOR FRAYING AT EDGE OF LEFT LEG HOLE. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARY OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE PUNKINHEAD IN THE GREEN OUTFIT, OBERG RECALLED, “THE OLDEST IS THE RATTIEST LITTLE GUY [IN GREEN]…I WAS BORN IN ’49, SO IT WOULD HAVE BEEN [GIVEN TO ME] ’53.” “THE FIRST ONE [IS SPECIAL TO ME], BECAUSE HE OPENED UP MY EYES TO, AT THAT AGE, BEING TO LOVE AN INANIMATE OBJECT, AS OPPOSED TO PARENTS, GRANDPARENTS, OR SIBLINGS. HE’S PROBABLY GOT A LOT MORE SECRETS TO TELL THAN THE BIGGER ONE.” “[THE BEAR WAS] WELL- LOVED, HE’S LOST A LOT OF HAIR. HE’S GOT NEW SHOES ON…AS FAR AS I KNOW, THE FIRST ONE…WAS SO WELL-WORN, AND SO WELL- LOVED, THAT MY GRANDMOTHER, WHO DID A LOT OF SEWING AND HAND-WORK, GAVE HIM NEW SHOES. HIS LITTLE FELT PANTS, THAT CAME WITH HIM, WERE LONG WORN-OUT, SO SHE SEWED HIM ANOTHER LITTLE OUTFIT.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MACINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MACINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021004
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS, CORK
Catalogue Number
P20100049001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, GLASS, CORK
No. Pieces
3
Height
34.5
Width
27
Diameter
21.5
Description
A: LARGE, GREEN AND SILVER PORTABLE THERMAL JUG. MAIN BODY OF THE JUG IS FOREST GREEN, WITH THE UPPER PORTION MADE OF SILVER COLOURED METAL. LARGE SILVER HANDLE ON SIDE AND TWO SILVER POSTS OPPOSITE EACH OTHER, (POSSIBLY FOR A STRAP TO BE ATTACHED). INTERIOR IS LINED WITH GLASS. "WILLOUGHBY" WRITTEN IN BLACK MARKER ON BOTTOM. B: REMOVABLE LID IS METAL AND CORK, WITH A METAL SECTION ON THE INSIDE TO PROTECT THE CORK FROM THE LIQUID WITHIN. ADJUSTABLE HANDLE ON TOP HAS A BOLT THAT CAN BE SCREWED INTO THE LID, TO KEEP THE LID IN PLACE. C: SMALL CORK STOPPER IN THE SPOUT ON THE LID. JUG HAS BEEN WELL USED. GREEN PORTION IS IN GOOD CONDITION, WITH ONLY A FEW SPOTS WHERE THE FINISH HAS WORN OFF. UPPER SILVER PORTION HAS SEVERAL SEVERAL DENTS, SCUFF MARKS, AND A LARGE DRIP OF GREY PAINT. SIDE HANDLE HAS A YELLOW SUBSTANCE ON THE METAL. CORK IN LID DARK AND DISCOLOURED ON LOWER PORTION. INTERIOR METAL PORTION OF LID HAS COME AWAY FROM THE CORK SLIGHTLY. CORK STOPPER WELL WORN AND APPEARS TO HAVE BEEN HAND CARVED, POSSIBLY FROM A WINE CORK. INTERIOR GLASS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
LEISURE
History
THIS WATER COOLER/THERMAL JUG USUALLY HELD LEMONADE, EITHER FROZEN OR POWERED “LEMON SQUASH”. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB RECALLED THAT “DAD WOULD SELL POWDERED LEMON SQUASH. HE HAD A BIN OF IT IN THE BASEMENT OF THE STORE … HE WOULD PROVIDE IT FOR THE SOUTHMINSTER SUNDAY SCHOOL PICNICS … BUT WE HAD THE FROZEN LEMONADE TOO, THAT WAS A TREAT.” BARB ELABORATED FURTHER IN A SHORT HISTORY SHE WROTE, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, SAYING: "WE WOULD HAVE LEMONADE IN THE BIG GREEN THERMOS, WITH ANOTHER THERMOS OF COFFEE FOR MUM. COKES WERE ALWAYS A TREAT. WE WOULD HAVE BUNS FROM ERICKSEN’S AND CARROT AND CELERY STICKS. THERE WAS OFTEN POTATO SALAD, BUT I DIDN’T CARE FOR IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS DESSERT, EVEN ON PICNICS – USUALLY HOMEMADE COOKIES. I’M SURE THERE WAS MORE, AS MUM WAS A GREAT COOK, BUT THESE ARE THE THINGS THAT STAND OUT.” THIS WATER COOLER IS PART OF A PICNIC SET, WHICH WAS USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB CONTINUED: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049001
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20100049002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
7
Height
36
Width
32.3
Diameter
29.5
Description
RED PLAID, 4-GALLON, CLYINDRICAL COOLER WITH RED HANDLE, REMOVABLE LID, PLASTIC SHELF INSERT, AND ICE PACKS. A: COOLER BODY. RED, BLACK, AND YELLOW PLAID. AROUND THE BOTTOM AND TOP OF COOLER IS A TAN SECTION, WITH A DOUBLE YELLOW DOTTED LINE, TO GIVE THE EFFECT OF STITCHES IN FABRIC. RED PLASTIC HANDLE ATTACHED ON ONE SIDE WITH A BLACK SCREW (MISSING ON OTHER SIDE). INSIDE OF COOLER IS SILVER COLOURED AND HAS A SMALL LIP 4.2CM DOWN FROM EDGE FOR THE SHELF (C) TO SIT ON. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. BLACK SCREW FOR ONE SIDE OF HANDLE MISSING. LARGE DENT IN CENTRE OF COOLER ON ONE SIDE. DENT DOES NOT EXTEND TO THE INSIDE OF THE COOLER. LOTS OF SCUFF MARKS AND SCRATCHES IN THE PLAID SURFACE ALL OVER BODY OF COOLER. SILVER COLOURED LINING SCUFFED AND SCRATCHED. RUST MARKS ON THE BOTTOM OF COOLER FROM ICE PACKS. B: COOLER LID. CIRCULAR. RED, BLACK, AND YELLOW PLAID. AROUND THE OUTSIDE IS A TAN SECTION, WITH A DOUBLE YELLOW DOTTED LINE, TO GIVE THE EFFECT OF STITCHES IN FABRIC. SLIGHT INDENDATIONS OPPOSITE EACH OTHER MAKE HAND GRIPS TO REMOVE LID. INSIDE OF LID IS SILVER COLOURED. STAMPED ONTO INSIDE OF LID: "HAMILTON - THE SKOTCH KOOLER* - A PETRA CABOT DESIGN - THE HAMILTON METAL PRODUCTS CO. HAMILTON, OHIO, PAT. APP. FOR" OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SURFACE HAS SOME SMALL SCRATCHES. A FEW WATER MARKS ON THE SURFACE. A FEW VERY SMALL DENTS ON THE INSIDE SURFACE. C: SHELF. CLEAR PLASTIC, CIRCULAR, REMOVABLE SHELF. HAS TWO INDENTED SECTIONS, OPPOSITE EACH OTHER, TO FACILITATE THE REMOVAL OF THE SHELF. GOOD CONDITION. PLASTIC IS SLIGHTLY OPAQUE FROM SCRATCHES. SMALL CRACK (5.5CM LONG) IN PLASTIC. SOME CIRCULAR RUST SPOTS ON SHELF. D-G: ICE PACKS. SMALL METAL CANS, RED, BLACK, AND YELLOW PLAID. AT JOINT OF CAN, THERE IS A 2.1CM STRIPE OF UNFINISHED METAL. TOPS AND BOTTOMS ARE TAN AND HAVE A YELLOW DOTTED LINE AROUND THE OUTSIDE. IN THE CENTRE READS: "HAMILTON - SKOTCH ICE - FREEZE AGAIN AND AGAIN - DO NOT OPEN". OTHER END READS: "HAMILTON - SKOTCH ICE - THE HAMILTON METAL PRODUCTS CO. HAMILTON, OHIO" OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. SOME SMALL SCRATCHES IN PLAID FINISH. EVIDENCE OF RUST ON TOPS AND BOTTOMS AND ALONG EXPOSED METAL SURFACE OF CAN.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
LEISURE
History
THIS COOLER SET WAS ACQUIRED SOMETIME IN THE LATE 1950s. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER, KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB AND KIT BELIEVE THAT THE COOLER CAME FROM A WHOLESALE STORE LOCATED ON 5TH STREET, AND THAT THE STOREFRONT IS NOW OCCUPIED BY BREAD, MILK, AND HONEY (FORMERLY THE ROUND STREET CAFÉ). BARB RECALLED THAT “BECAUSE DAD HAD A RETAIL STORE HE COULD GO AND BUY THINGS THERE … AND THIS MAY HAVE COME FROM THERE OR IT MAY HAVE BEEN A PROMOTION THAT IF YOU BOUGHT SO MANY ITEMS FROM A PARTICULAR WHOLESALER, THAT THEY WOULD GIVE YOU STUFF … I DON’T THINK WE EVER ASKED WHERE IT CAME FROM. BUT IT WOULD BE IN THE LATE ‘50s THAT WE STARTED USING IT.” IN A NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB SPECULATED THAT THE COOLER WAS “A PROMOTIONAL GIFT RECEIVED THROUGH THE DRUG STORE (LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOLTEL), BUT IT MAY HAVE BEEN PURCHASED IN THE LATE 50s.” THIS COOLER SET IS PART OF A LARGER SET OF PICNIC ITEMS THAT WERE USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB CONTINUED, SAYING: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049002
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20100049004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1985
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
52
Height
2.1
Length
27.1
Width
9.2
Diameter
0.4
Description
A: BOX OF STRAWS. BOX IS CARDBOARD, WITH A SMALL CLEAR PLASTIC WINDOW. BACKGROUND OF BOX IS A LIGHT BROWN WOOD GRAIN PATTERN. "EXTRA-LONG STRAWS FOR EXTRA-TALL BOTTLED DRINKS - SWEETHEART EXTRA-LONG DRINKING STRAWS - 100-10 1/2" SWEETHEART STRAWS. MANUFACTURED BY THE IMPERIAL CONE COMPANY, LONDON - CANADA". ON REVERSE: "THE CONVENIENT SANITARY WAY TO DRINK ... MILK, ICED DRINKS, BOTTLED BEVERAGES". PRICE STAMPED ONTO TOP OF BOX, VERY FADED, APPEARS TO READ "2/35 CENTS". BOTTOM LEFT CORNER IS AN IMAGE OF A BOY IN A RED SHIRT DRINKING FROM A GLASS BOTTLE. BEHIND HIM ARE THREE ADULTS, 2 WOMEN IN DRESSES AND APRONS AND ONE MAN WITH A CHEF'S HAT. B-AAA: BOX CONTAINS 52 STRAWS: 18 ARE OFF-WHITE; 16 ARE LIGHT PINK; 15 ARE MEDIUM-LIGHT GREEN AND; 3 ARE BRIGHT ORANGE.
Subjects
FOOD SERVICE T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
DOMESTIC
History
THESE STRAWS ARE PART OF A PICNIC SET THAT WERE USED BY THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY, BEGINNING IN THE 1950s UNTIL THE 1980s. GEORGE AND JEAN WOULD TAKE THEIR DAUGHTERS, BARB AND KIT (CATHERINE), FOR PICNICS IN THE SUMMER, ON SUNDAYS. IN AN ORAL INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR, BARB CAVERS, AND HER SISTER KIT MCRAE, CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN IN JULY 2015, BARB RECALLED THAT "MOM ALWAYS HAD HER THERMOS OF COFFEE". BARB ELABORATED FURTHER IN A SHORT HISTORY SHE WROTE, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, SAYING: "WE WOULD HAVE LEMONADE IN THE BIG GREEN THERMOS, WITH ANOTHER THERMOS OF COFFEE FOR MUM. COKES WERE ALWAYS A TREAT." THE FAMILY OUTINGS WERE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GEORGE TO RELAX FOLLOWING A LONG WORK WEEK. THE PICNICS WERE A CHANCE FOR GEORGE TO “GET OUT IN HIS NICE CAR AND GO FOR A DRIVE”, ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE PASTTIMES. PICNICS WERE HELD IN VARIOUS PLACES, INCLUDING LITTLE BOW, CHAIN LAKES, WILLOW CREEK CAMPGROUND, PARK LAKE, WATERTON NATIONAL PARK, AND THE ST. MARY’S DAM. IN A NARRATIVE HISTORY, SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF DONATION, BARB ELABORATED WRITING: “OUR SUNDAY DRIVES TOOK US TO MANY PLACES IN THE SURROUNDING AREA. EARLY TRIPS WERE TO THE ST. MARY RIVER. WE WOULD PUT ON OUR SNEAKERS AND WADE ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE HUGE SAND BAR, WHERE WE WOULD PLAY IN THE SAND FOR HOURS.” IN HER NARRATIVE HISTORY, BARB EXPLAINED THAT “OUR PICNIC MEALS WERE OFTEN QUITE ELABORATE. MUM WOULD BE UP EARLY MAKING FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH SHE WOULD PACK IN A SMALL ROUND ROASTER AND WRAP IT IN NEWSPAPER BEFORE PACKING IT INTO A CARDBOARD BOX, WHERE IT WOULD STAY WARM FOR SEVERAL HOURS. OTHER PICNICS MIGHT BE JUST SANDWICHES INSTEAD OF THE CHICKEN. I REMEMBER SLICED CHICKEN, TUNA SALAD, AND CHEESE IN DOUBLE DECKER SANDWICHES, AND OF COURSE, PEANUT BUTTER AND CRABAPPLE JELLY WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER." ACCORDING TO JEAN’S OBITUARY, GEORGE AND JEAN WERE CLASSMATES IN THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES, THEY WERE MARRIED IN EDMONTON IN SEPTEMBER 1941. THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1948 WITH THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS AND OPERATED WILLOUGHBY DRUGS (LATER KNOWN AS THE MARQUIS DRUGSTORE), LOCATED IN THE MARQUIS HOTEL. JEAN RENEWED HER PHARMACIST LICENSE IN 1961 AND SHE AND GEORGE WORKED TOGETHER UNTIL 1980, WHEN THEY RETIRED. GEORGE PASSED AWAY IN 2005 AT THE AGE OF 90 AND JEAN IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 93. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE WILLOUGHBY FAMILY.
Catalogue Number
P20100049004
Acquisition Date
2010-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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