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Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BAKELITE
Catalogue Number
P20160044004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Materials
BAKELITE
No. Pieces
1
Height
3
Length
8.3
Width
0.7
Description
RED TRANSLUCENT BAKELITE KEY CASE. OVAL-SHAPED KEY HOLDER WITH FADED GOLD METALLIC TEXT ON ONE SIDE WHICH READS, “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA." SLOTS ALONG BOTH SIDES TO HOLD TWO KEYS. GOOD CONDITION: MODERATE LOSS OF GOLD PAINT OF TEXT. OVERALL SCUFFING.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
LEISURE
DOMESTIC
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS KEY HOLDER CAME TO THE MUSEUM WITH A NOTE THAT STATED, “EACH OF THE SISTERS HAD A KEY HOLDER. THIS ONE IS ALICE’S.” IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. IN THE INTERVIEW, RUTH EXPLAINED THE KEY HOLDER WAS FROM THE EARLY 1940S (1940-41) AND ORIGINATED IN THE ERA THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS PERFORMING FREQUENTLY. “MOM SAID THAT EACH OF [THE SISTERS] HAD ONE OF THE KEY HOLDERS,” RUTH STATED, “YOU CAN SEE THROUGH IT [AND] THERE’S A LITTLE PLACE THAT A LITTLE KEY CAN BE KIND OF FOLDED IN OR TWO KEYS. I’M NOT SURE IF THE REASON THEY EVEN HAD ONE TO START WITH WAS SOMEONE THINKING THAT MAYBE THEY’D WANT TO SELL A BUNCH [TO] MAYBE MARKET AT THEIR CONCERTS, BUT THAT WASN’T SOMETHING THEY DID. THEY WERE THERE TO SELL MUSIC NOT ITEMS. THEY DIDN’T SELL ANYTHING BUT TICKETS.” “SO, THEY ALL ENDED UP WITH [A KEY HOLDER]. I BELIEVE MOM [WAS] THE ONLY ONE WHO HAD HERS STILL. THEY WERE ALWAYS GETTING APPROACHED WITH A MARKETING IDEA. I THINK UNLESS IT WAS SOMETHING THAT GRANDPA FELT COMPLIMENTED THINGS THEY DIDN’T GET INTO DOING THAT, WHICH MAYBE WAS A MISTAKE WHEN YOU THINK OF IT FROM A MARKETING STAND POINT. BUT THEY LOOKED AT THE MUSIC FIRST, AND THE TRINKETS WEREN’T SOMETHING THEY EVER REALLY GOT INTO.” MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING THIS KEY HOLDER, WERE KEPT TOGETHER IN ONE OF ALICE’S TRUNKS. WHEN RUTH AND ELEANOR WERE HELPING THEIR MOTHER SORT HER THINGS, SHE EXPLAINED THE ITEMS IN THE TRUNK TO THEM. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044004
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PAPER, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20120045003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, PAPER, LEATHER
No. Pieces
1
Height
28.5
Length
26.7
Width
46.2
Description
GREY CHEST WITH BLACK TRIM ALONG EDGES AND GOLD-FINISHED METAL CLASPS, NAILS, AND TRIM. CORNERS HAVE GOLD-FINISHED METAL PROTECTORS. HANDLE ON TOP OF CASE IS BLACK LEATHER WITH METAL RINGS CONNECTED TO GOLD-FINISHED BASES. CHEST HAS THREE CLASPS ON FRONT WITH LARGER CENTER CLASP INCLUDING A LOCK. TWO CLASPS ON OUTER ENDS HAVE STAMP READING “EAGLE LOCK[…], TERRYVILLE, MADE IN U.S.A.”. CENTER CLASP WITH LOCK HAS STAMPED TEXT ON RIGHT SIDE OF CLASP “126” AND STAMPED TEXT ON LOWER CLASP READING “U.S.A., EXCELSIOR, STAMFORD, CONN.”. TOP OF CASE HAS RED LABEL IN SHIELD SHAPE WITH GOLD BORDER AND GOLD GLOBE SURROUNDED BY LUGGAGE, TEXT BELOW READS “MCBRINE BAGGAGE”. INSIDE OF CASE IS LINED WITH WHITE AND BLUE FOUR-LEAF CLOVER PATTERNED PAPER. PAPER ON INSIDE IS STAINED WITH RED AND BLACK; OUTSIDE OF CASE SHOWS HEAVY RUSTING AND CORROSION ON RIGHT SIDE AND ALONG TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES OF FRONT. TOP OF CASE IS RUSTED; HANDLE ON TOP IS WORN WITH LEATHER CRACKLING AND CREASED, AND LEATHER TORN AND FRAYED AROUND METAL LOOPS SECURING IT TO THE CASE. BOTTOM EDGES ARE SCRATCHED AND RUSTED; BASE IS RUSTED AND CORRODED. OVERALL FAIR CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE HISTORY AND PURPOSE OF THE TRUNK, CAREFOOT NOTED, “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE SOME OF] THESE [DONATED] THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “IT WENT TO EACH CHIEF RANGER OR PRESIDENT.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045003
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CARTON, MILK
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160019000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CARTON, MILK
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1970
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
24
Length
7.4
Width
7.2
Description
CARDBOARD MILK CARTON. SIDE ONE HAS “HOMOGENIZED MILK” ON TOP FOLD IN GREEN BLOCK LETTERING. FADED, BLACK INK STAMP ON THIS FOLD SAYS “?A 2 -45.” ON THE MAIN SECTION OF THIS SIDE THERE IS THE PURITY LOGO (“PURITY” IN PURPLE CURSIVE FONT), A PURPLE AND GREEN FLOWER, AND THE WORDS “CREAM IN EVERY DROP” IN PURPLE CURSIVE. ON THE BASE OF THIS PANEL IT SAYS “… HEAD OFFICE LETHBRIDGE.” THE OPPOSING SIDE (SIDE 3) IS SIMILAR, BUT WITH THE INDICATION OF “NET CONTENTS ONE QUART” AT THE BASE OF THE PANEL. SIDE 2’S TOP FOLD SAYS, “THE CONTAINER COVERED BY CANADIAN PATENTS 1941 – 395.645 1957 – 542-432… MANUFACTURED UNDER LICENSE FROM EX-CELL-O CORPORATION.” THE MAIN SECTION HAS THE PURITY LOGO AND THE SLOGANS “IT’S PURE. THAT’S SURE” AND “YOURS TO LOVE. OURS TO PROTECT.” ADDITIONALLY THIS SIDE INDICATED THAT THE MILK IS “PASTURIZED” AND IS “NOT LESS THAN 3.25% B.F.” PARALLEL TO THAT IS SIDE 4 WITH A TOP FOLD THAT HAS “SPOUT” MARKED ON IT. ON THE TOP FOLD, IT SAYS “PUREPAK” “YOUR PERSONAL MILK CONTAINER.” THE MAIN SECTION OF THIS HAS A GREEN ILLUSTRATION OF A CHURCH WITH “ATTEND THE CHURCH OF YOUR CHOICE…” ON THE BOTTOM OF THE CARTON, THERE ARE NUMBERS AND/OR LETTERS THAT WERE STAMPED INTO THE BOTTOM. A “W” IS VISIBLE. GOOD CONDITION. COLOUR OF CARDBOARD HAS YELLOWED OVERALL. THERE ARE VARIOUS STAINS ON THE SURFACE. BLACK STAINING AROUND THE CHURCH ILLUSTRATION. THE TOP FLAP OF THE CARTON IS DETERIORATING (BENT/TORN) WITH NOTICEABLE LOSS OF MATERIAL ON ONE SIDE’S CORNER.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
THE DONOR, HANK VROOM, FOUND THE MILK CARTON IN LETHBRIDGE APPROXIMATELY A DECADE BEFORE THE DATE OF DONATION (JULY 2016), AS A RESULT OF HIS CITY EMPLOYMENT AS A GARBAGE TRUCK DRIVER. THE LOCATION OF THE FIND IS UNKNOWN. IN THE TIME SINCE HIS POSSESSION, THE CARTON HAS BEEN IN A PLASTIC BAG IN A CUPBOARD. ACCORDING TO ADDITIONAL RESEARCH INTO THE EXISTENCE OF THIS TYPE OF MILK CARTON AND BRAND, IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THIS CARTON ORIGINATED PRIOR TO THE MID-1970S BECAUSE MILK MEASUREMENTS WERE CHANGED FROM QUARTS TO LITERS AROUND THAT TIME AND THIS CARTON’S MEASUREMENT IS INDICATED IN QUARTS. IN THE LATE 1950’S, PURITY DAIRY ADVERTISED BEING 100% PURE-PAK, MEANING THAT ALL MILK PRODUCTS CAME IN CARDBOARD CARTONS. BLOW MOLD PLASTIC CONTAINERS REPLACED CARDBOARD SHORTLY AFTER. WITH THE INDICATION OF THE 1957 PATENT NUMBER ON THE CARTON, THIS PLACES THE DATE OF THE MILK CARTON BETWEEN 1957 AND THE 1970S. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT PURITY DAIRY IS FROM THE RECORD FOR ARTIFACT P20070013001: SIMONIE (SAM) FABBI STARTED FABBI DAIRY IN 1923 IN LETHBRIDGE. HE WAS AN ITALIAN IMMIGRANT WHO BEGAN THE BUSINESS WITH THREE COWS AND SOME LARD BUCKETS. THE DAIRY WAS LOCATED AT 12 STREET B NORTH. AT THAT TIME, MILK WAS TRANSPORTED USING LARD PAILS OR CANS, WHICH, WITH THE HELP OF SAM’S SONS, WOULD BE LADLED INTO CUSTOMER’S CONTAINERS. FABBI DAIRY EXPANDED TO THE SOUTHSIDE DAIRY HILL IN THE EARLY 1930S. SHORTLY AFTERWARDS, FABBI DAIRY BOUGHT CITY DAIRY. SONS STAN AND ROMEO BOUGHT THE BUSINESS FROM THEIR FATHER IN 1936. AT THIS POINT, MILK WAS PACKAGED AND SOLD IN GLASS BOTTLES IN PINT, QUART OR GALLON SIZES. THE DAIRY HAD ITS OWN COWS, WHICH WERE MILKED DAILY AND WOULD PASTURE IN THE COULEES. BY 1936, HOWEVER, MILK AND CREAM WERE BROUGHT IN FROM OFFSITE. BETWEEN 1939 AND 1944, THE FABBI DAIRY BOUGHT PAVAN DAIRY AND THE BELLEVUE DAIRY. AT THAT POINT IN TIME, MANY SMALL DAIRIES WERE SUBJECT TO PASTEURIZATION LAWS, AND CHOSE TO CLOSE DOWN RATHER THAN CONVERT. FABBI DAIRY PURCHASED MAJESTIC THEATRE IN THE LATE 1930S OR EARLY 1940S FOR $10,000 FROM MAYOR SHACKERFORD, CONVERTING IT INTO A MILK BOTTLING PLANT. FABBI DAIRY CHANGED ITS NAME TO PURITY DAIRY, AND EXPANDED THROUGHOUT THE LATE 1940S AND 1950S, OPENING UP BUSINESSES IN MEDICINE HAT (1948), CALGARY (1950), EDMONTON (1950), CRANBROOK (1958), RED DEER AND TABER. ALL THESE LOCATIONS HAD DAIRIES EXCEPT FOR TABER, WHICH HAD A DEPOT. ACCORDING TO KEN FABBI, STAN FABBI’S SON, STAN AND ROMEO ESTABLISHED A DAIRY IN CALGARY WITHOUT A LICENSE. THE ONLY WAY TO OBTAIN A LICENSE FOR A DAIRY AT THAT TIME WAS TO BUY OUT AN EXISTING DAIRY. EXPANSION WAS SEEN AS NECESSARY TO THE FABBI BROTHERS, IF THEY WERE TO REMAIN IN BUSINESS. THE PURITY DAIRY IN CALGARY WAS DEEMED ILLEGAL, AND IN THE EARLY 1960S, STAN AND ROMEO FABBI WERE HANDCUFFED AND ARRESTED. PUBLIC SYMPATHY FOR THE FABBI BROTHERS ENABLED THEM TO PURCHASE A LICENSE AFTER THE INCIDENT. PURITY DAIRY HAD MANY INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS THAT OTHER DAIRIES IN TOWN DID NOT HAVE, LIKELY CONTRIBUTING TO THE DAIRY’S POPULARITY WITH THE PUBLIC. PURITY DAIRY WAS THE FIRST DAIRY IN WESTERN CANADA TO RELY SOLELY ON THE USE OF MILK TANKERS, WHICH VISITED VARIOUS LOCALS TO PICK UP MILK AND BRING IT TO THE DAIRY. PRIOR TO 1957, FARMERS WERE REQUIRED TO DELIVER MILK IN CANS TO THE DAIRY THEMSELVES. PURITY DAIRY HAD A SUBSTANTIAL FLEET OF RETAIL DELIVERY VEHICLES. IN ITS EARLY DAYS, HORSES WERE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE DELIVERY SYSTEM. AT ONE POINT, 17 HORSES WERE BEING USED FOR DELIVERY PURPOSES. IN 1959, PURITY DAIRY REPLACED ITS LAST THREE HORSES WITH DELIVERY TRUCKS. IN THE 1950S, PURITY DIARY BEGAN TO STREAMLINE PRODUCTION. BUTTER WAS PRODUCED IN MEDICINE HAT, WHILE THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH PRODUCED ICE CREAM, NOVELTIES, BUTTER MILK, AND SOUR CREAM, IN ADDITION TO MILK AND COTTAGE CHEESE. THE EDMONTON PLANT SHARED MILK PRODUCTION WITH LETHBRIDGE, AND BECAME THE SOLE PRODUCER OF BLOW MOLD PLASTIC FOR PURITY DAIRY. BUSINESS BEGAN TO FALL IN THE 1960S, AND IN 1971 STAN AND ROMEO FABBI SOLD PURITY DAIRY TO CO-OP DAIRY, WHICH WAS SUBSEQUENTLY KNOWN AS PURITY CO-OP LTD. BEFORE THE SALE, PURITY DAIRY EMPLOYED ABOUT 200 FULL-TIME STAFF AND SUPPLIED MILK PRODUCTS TO THOUSANDS OF ALBERTANS DAILY. THE LETHBRIDGE PLANT EMPLOYED ABOUT 70 PEOPLE, AND MANUFACTURED ICE CREAM CONFECTIONS, COTTAGE CHEESE, BUTTER, YOGURT, BUTTERMILK, SOUR CREAM, AND FRUIT DRINKS. STAN’S WIFE, NETTI, SAID OF THE SALE, “WE LOST EVERYTHING…WE EXPANDED TOO FAST. I TOLD STAN ‘WHO CARES? I’VE GOT YOU AND WE STILL HAVE THREE MEALS A DAY.’” IN 1972, PURITY CO-OP LTD WAS BOUGHT OUT BY PALM DAIRY, WHICH WAS CLOSED DOWN FOLLOWING A DRAMATIC EXPLOSION IN 1978. IT REOPENED AT A DIFFERENT LOCATION ONE YEAR LATER. IN THE INTERIM, PRODUCTS WERE SHIPPED IN FROM THE CALGARY PLANT. STAN AND ROMEO FABBI DIED IN 1992 AND 1991, RESPECTIVELY. THIS INFORMATION WAS GATHERED IN 2008-09 FROM ANTOINETTE AND KEN FABBI, STAN’S WIFE AND SON, RESPECTIVELY, AND FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARCHIVES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR P20070013001. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR P20160019000 FOR ADDITIONAL LETHBRIDGE HERALD CLIPPINGS, PRINT RESEARCH, AND PATENT DOCUMENTS.
Catalogue Number
P20160019000
Acquisition Date
2016-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41
Width
36
Description
HANDMADE BAG MADE OF 3 SECTIONS OF STRIPS OF ABOUT 5 INCHES (APPROX. 13 CM) EACH. IT IS RED WITH BLUE, YELLOW, GREEN, AND RAW MATERIAL ACCENTS. THE TRIM AT THE TOP OF THE BAG IS BLUE WITH A HANDLE OF THE SAME FABRIC ON EITHER SIDE. THERE IS A STRIP OF RAW, NOT PATTERNED FABRIC AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAG. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAG HAVE THE SAME ARRANGEMENT OF PATTERNED STRIPS. THERE IS ONE SEAM CONNECTING THE FRONT AND THE BACK OF THE BAG ON BOTH SIDES. THE INSIDE IS UNLINED. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SOME STITCHING COMING LOOSE AT VARIOUS POINTS OF THE PATTERNING.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A STATEMENT WRITTEN BY MORRIS ATTACHED TO THE BAG STATES THAT THE MATERIAL OF THE BAG ORIGINATES FROM THE 1870S. THE STATEMENT READS: “THIS BAG WAS HAND WOVEN IN STRIPS [THAT WERE USED] TO SEW ON THE BOTTOM OF PETTICOATS. THE GIRLS AT THAT TIME HAD TO HAVE A TROUSEUA [SIC] TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE AFTER MARRIAGE THERE WOULD BE NO TIME TO MAKE CLOTHES SO WHAT THEY MADE WAS STURDY. THEY STARTED ON THEIR TROUSEUS [SIC] AS SOON AS THEY COULD HOLD A NEEDLE. WHEN IT WAS HAYING TIME THE GIRLS WENT OUT INTO THE FIELD TO RAKE THE HAY. THEY WORE PETTICOATS OF LINEN TO WHICH THESE BANDS WERE SEWN. THE LONG SKIRTS WERE PICKED UP AT THE SIDES AND TUCKED INTO THE WAISTBANDS SO THAT THE BOTTOMS OF THE PETTICOATS WERE ON DISPLAY.” “THESE BANDS WERE ORIGINALLY MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER’S WHO CAME OUT OF RUSSIA WITH THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT IN 1899. THEY WERE PASSED ON TO MY MOTHER, ELIZABETH KONKIN, WHO MADE THEM INTO A BAG IN THE 1940S” THE STRIPS THAT MAKE UP THE BAG SERVED A UTILITARIAN PURPOSE WHEN SEWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PETTICOATS. IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS EXPLAINS: “… THESE STRIPS ARE VERY STRONG. THEY’RE LIKE CANVAS. THEY WERE SEWN ONTO THE BOTTOM OF THE LADY’S PETTICOATS AND THEY WORE A SKIRT ON TOP OF THE PETTICOATS. THESE STRIPS LASTED A LIFETIME, IN FACT MORE THAN ONE LIFETIME BECAUSE I’VE GOT THEM NOW. THEY WOULD TUCK THE SKIRTS INTO THEIR WAISTBAND ON THE SIDE SO THEIR PETTICOATS SHOWED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO PRESERVE THEIR SKIRTS NOT TO GET CAUGHT IN THE GRAIN. THE GIRLS LIKED TO WEAR THEM TO SHOW OFF BECAUSE THE BOYS WERE THERE AND THEY ALWAYS WORE THEIR VERY BEST SUNDAY CLOTHES WHEN THEY WENT CUTTING WHEAT OR GRAIN." “[THE FABRIC] CAME FROM RUSSIA. WITH THE AREA WHERE THEY CAME FROM IS NOW GEORGIA AND THEY LIVED ABOUT SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE TURKISH BORDER, THE PRESENT DAY TURKISH BORDER… [THE DOUKHOBORS] CAME TO CANADA IN 1897 AND 1899.” MORRIS EXPLAINS THAT SURPLUS FABRIC WOULD HAVE BEEN BROUGHT TO CANADA FROM RUSSIA BY HER MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER FOR FUTURE USE AND TO AID THE GIRLS IN MAKING THEIR TROUSSEAUS: “THE TROUSSEAU THE GIRLS MADE HAD TO LAST THEM A LIFETIME BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T HAVE TIME BUT RAISING CHILDREN TO SEWING THINGS. SEWING MACHINES WERE UNKNOWN THEN.” THE BANDS OF FABRIC THAT MAKE UP THE BAG WOULD HAVE BEEN REMAINS NEVER USED FROM ELIZABETH KONKIN’S TROUSSEAU. SHE HAND WOVE THE BAG WHILE SHE WAS LIVING IN SHOULDICE. THE BAG WAS USED BY MORRIS’ MOTHER TO STORE HER KNITTING SUPPLIES. WHEN MORRIS ACQUIRED THE BAG IN THE 1990S, IT MAINTAINED A SIMILAR PURPOSE: “WELL I USED TO CARRY MY STUFF FOR THE WEAVER’S GUILD BUT NOW I DON’T USE IT FOR ANYTHING. IT’S VERY HANDY YOU KNOW IT DOESN’T WEAR OUT.” THERE WAS ONLY ONE BAG MADE OUT OF THESE REMNANTS BY MORRIS’ MOTHER. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail