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Other Name
BIBLE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, LEATHER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20120045012
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BIBLE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
PAPER, LEATHER, INK
No. Pieces
2
Height
3.3
Length
20
Width
13
Description
A. BLACK LEATHER COVER WITH COVER TEXT ON SPINE AND FRONT COVER, “HOLY BIBLE” AND AT BASE OF SPINE “CAMBRIDGE”. COVER AND SPINE ARE SCUFFED AND WORN; TOP AND BOTTOM EDGE ARE CURLED IN. PAGES ARE EDGED IN RED. REVERSE OF FIRST PAGE HAS HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK IN “BEST WISH FOR YOUR BIRTHDAY, FROM JOYCE.” OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT BIBLE, “APPOINTED TO BE READ IN CHURCHES”. “PRINTED BY JAMES B. PEACE, M.A., AT THE CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS”, “LONDON: CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS, FETTER LANE, E.C.”. INSIDE BACK COVER HAS STAINING AND SOILING. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. TORN PAGE FROM “HOLY BIBLE”. PAGE 127 AND 128, “NUMBERS 16-18”, “HIS ROD BUDDETH”. PAGE HAS A CREASE ALONG LEFT EDGE.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
RELIGION
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE PURPOSE AND HISTORY OF THE BIBLE, CAREFOOT NOTED, “[THE BIBLE] WAS ON THE TABLE [WITH THE CANDLES AT RITUALS].” “[MEMBERS STOPPED USING IT BECAUSE] SOCIETY HAD CHANGED ENOUGH THAT THEY DIDN’T WANT TO BOTHER WITH THAT RITUAL. I SUSPECT THAT’S WHY. [THE RITUALS WERE] KIND OF STRANGE TO ME. BUT I ACCEPTED IT BECAUSE THAT IS PART OF WHAT YOU DID.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045012
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CARTON, MILK
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160019000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CARTON, MILK
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1970
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Height
24
Length
7.4
Width
7.2
Description
CARDBOARD MILK CARTON. SIDE ONE HAS “HOMOGENIZED MILK” ON TOP FOLD IN GREEN BLOCK LETTERING. FADED, BLACK INK STAMP ON THIS FOLD SAYS “?A 2 -45.” ON THE MAIN SECTION OF THIS SIDE THERE IS THE PURITY LOGO (“PURITY” IN PURPLE CURSIVE FONT), A PURPLE AND GREEN FLOWER, AND THE WORDS “CREAM IN EVERY DROP” IN PURPLE CURSIVE. ON THE BASE OF THIS PANEL IT SAYS “… HEAD OFFICE LETHBRIDGE.” THE OPPOSING SIDE (SIDE 3) IS SIMILAR, BUT WITH THE INDICATION OF “NET CONTENTS ONE QUART” AT THE BASE OF THE PANEL. SIDE 2’S TOP FOLD SAYS, “THE CONTAINER COVERED BY CANADIAN PATENTS 1941 – 395.645 1957 – 542-432… MANUFACTURED UNDER LICENSE FROM EX-CELL-O CORPORATION.” THE MAIN SECTION HAS THE PURITY LOGO AND THE SLOGANS “IT’S PURE. THAT’S SURE” AND “YOURS TO LOVE. OURS TO PROTECT.” ADDITIONALLY THIS SIDE INDICATED THAT THE MILK IS “PASTURIZED” AND IS “NOT LESS THAN 3.25% B.F.” PARALLEL TO THAT IS SIDE 4 WITH A TOP FOLD THAT HAS “SPOUT” MARKED ON IT. ON THE TOP FOLD, IT SAYS “PUREPAK” “YOUR PERSONAL MILK CONTAINER.” THE MAIN SECTION OF THIS HAS A GREEN ILLUSTRATION OF A CHURCH WITH “ATTEND THE CHURCH OF YOUR CHOICE…” ON THE BOTTOM OF THE CARTON, THERE ARE NUMBERS AND/OR LETTERS THAT WERE STAMPED INTO THE BOTTOM. A “W” IS VISIBLE. GOOD CONDITION. COLOUR OF CARDBOARD HAS YELLOWED OVERALL. THERE ARE VARIOUS STAINS ON THE SURFACE. BLACK STAINING AROUND THE CHURCH ILLUSTRATION. THE TOP FLAP OF THE CARTON IS DETERIORATING (BENT/TORN) WITH NOTICEABLE LOSS OF MATERIAL ON ONE SIDE’S CORNER.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
BUSINESS
INDUSTRY
History
THE DONOR, HANK VROOM, FOUND THE MILK CARTON IN LETHBRIDGE APPROXIMATELY A DECADE BEFORE THE DATE OF DONATION (JULY 2016), AS A RESULT OF HIS CITY EMPLOYMENT AS A GARBAGE TRUCK DRIVER. THE LOCATION OF THE FIND IS UNKNOWN. IN THE TIME SINCE HIS POSSESSION, THE CARTON HAS BEEN IN A PLASTIC BAG IN A CUPBOARD. ACCORDING TO ADDITIONAL RESEARCH INTO THE EXISTENCE OF THIS TYPE OF MILK CARTON AND BRAND, IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THIS CARTON ORIGINATED PRIOR TO THE MID-1970S BECAUSE MILK MEASUREMENTS WERE CHANGED FROM QUARTS TO LITERS AROUND THAT TIME AND THIS CARTON’S MEASUREMENT IS INDICATED IN QUARTS. IN THE LATE 1950’S, PURITY DAIRY ADVERTISED BEING 100% PURE-PAK, MEANING THAT ALL MILK PRODUCTS CAME IN CARDBOARD CARTONS. BLOW MOLD PLASTIC CONTAINERS REPLACED CARDBOARD SHORTLY AFTER. WITH THE INDICATION OF THE 1957 PATENT NUMBER ON THE CARTON, THIS PLACES THE DATE OF THE MILK CARTON BETWEEN 1957 AND THE 1970S. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT PURITY DAIRY IS FROM THE RECORD FOR ARTIFACT P20070013001: SIMONIE (SAM) FABBI STARTED FABBI DAIRY IN 1923 IN LETHBRIDGE. HE WAS AN ITALIAN IMMIGRANT WHO BEGAN THE BUSINESS WITH THREE COWS AND SOME LARD BUCKETS. THE DAIRY WAS LOCATED AT 12 STREET B NORTH. AT THAT TIME, MILK WAS TRANSPORTED USING LARD PAILS OR CANS, WHICH, WITH THE HELP OF SAM’S SONS, WOULD BE LADLED INTO CUSTOMER’S CONTAINERS. FABBI DAIRY EXPANDED TO THE SOUTHSIDE DAIRY HILL IN THE EARLY 1930S. SHORTLY AFTERWARDS, FABBI DAIRY BOUGHT CITY DAIRY. SONS STAN AND ROMEO BOUGHT THE BUSINESS FROM THEIR FATHER IN 1936. AT THIS POINT, MILK WAS PACKAGED AND SOLD IN GLASS BOTTLES IN PINT, QUART OR GALLON SIZES. THE DAIRY HAD ITS OWN COWS, WHICH WERE MILKED DAILY AND WOULD PASTURE IN THE COULEES. BY 1936, HOWEVER, MILK AND CREAM WERE BROUGHT IN FROM OFFSITE. BETWEEN 1939 AND 1944, THE FABBI DAIRY BOUGHT PAVAN DAIRY AND THE BELLEVUE DAIRY. AT THAT POINT IN TIME, MANY SMALL DAIRIES WERE SUBJECT TO PASTEURIZATION LAWS, AND CHOSE TO CLOSE DOWN RATHER THAN CONVERT. FABBI DAIRY PURCHASED MAJESTIC THEATRE IN THE LATE 1930S OR EARLY 1940S FOR $10,000 FROM MAYOR SHACKERFORD, CONVERTING IT INTO A MILK BOTTLING PLANT. FABBI DAIRY CHANGED ITS NAME TO PURITY DAIRY, AND EXPANDED THROUGHOUT THE LATE 1940S AND 1950S, OPENING UP BUSINESSES IN MEDICINE HAT (1948), CALGARY (1950), EDMONTON (1950), CRANBROOK (1958), RED DEER AND TABER. ALL THESE LOCATIONS HAD DAIRIES EXCEPT FOR TABER, WHICH HAD A DEPOT. ACCORDING TO KEN FABBI, STAN FABBI’S SON, STAN AND ROMEO ESTABLISHED A DAIRY IN CALGARY WITHOUT A LICENSE. THE ONLY WAY TO OBTAIN A LICENSE FOR A DAIRY AT THAT TIME WAS TO BUY OUT AN EXISTING DAIRY. EXPANSION WAS SEEN AS NECESSARY TO THE FABBI BROTHERS, IF THEY WERE TO REMAIN IN BUSINESS. THE PURITY DAIRY IN CALGARY WAS DEEMED ILLEGAL, AND IN THE EARLY 1960S, STAN AND ROMEO FABBI WERE HANDCUFFED AND ARRESTED. PUBLIC SYMPATHY FOR THE FABBI BROTHERS ENABLED THEM TO PURCHASE A LICENSE AFTER THE INCIDENT. PURITY DAIRY HAD MANY INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS THAT OTHER DAIRIES IN TOWN DID NOT HAVE, LIKELY CONTRIBUTING TO THE DAIRY’S POPULARITY WITH THE PUBLIC. PURITY DAIRY WAS THE FIRST DAIRY IN WESTERN CANADA TO RELY SOLELY ON THE USE OF MILK TANKERS, WHICH VISITED VARIOUS LOCALS TO PICK UP MILK AND BRING IT TO THE DAIRY. PRIOR TO 1957, FARMERS WERE REQUIRED TO DELIVER MILK IN CANS TO THE DAIRY THEMSELVES. PURITY DAIRY HAD A SUBSTANTIAL FLEET OF RETAIL DELIVERY VEHICLES. IN ITS EARLY DAYS, HORSES WERE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE DELIVERY SYSTEM. AT ONE POINT, 17 HORSES WERE BEING USED FOR DELIVERY PURPOSES. IN 1959, PURITY DAIRY REPLACED ITS LAST THREE HORSES WITH DELIVERY TRUCKS. IN THE 1950S, PURITY DIARY BEGAN TO STREAMLINE PRODUCTION. BUTTER WAS PRODUCED IN MEDICINE HAT, WHILE THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH PRODUCED ICE CREAM, NOVELTIES, BUTTER MILK, AND SOUR CREAM, IN ADDITION TO MILK AND COTTAGE CHEESE. THE EDMONTON PLANT SHARED MILK PRODUCTION WITH LETHBRIDGE, AND BECAME THE SOLE PRODUCER OF BLOW MOLD PLASTIC FOR PURITY DAIRY. BUSINESS BEGAN TO FALL IN THE 1960S, AND IN 1971 STAN AND ROMEO FABBI SOLD PURITY DAIRY TO CO-OP DAIRY, WHICH WAS SUBSEQUENTLY KNOWN AS PURITY CO-OP LTD. BEFORE THE SALE, PURITY DAIRY EMPLOYED ABOUT 200 FULL-TIME STAFF AND SUPPLIED MILK PRODUCTS TO THOUSANDS OF ALBERTANS DAILY. THE LETHBRIDGE PLANT EMPLOYED ABOUT 70 PEOPLE, AND MANUFACTURED ICE CREAM CONFECTIONS, COTTAGE CHEESE, BUTTER, YOGURT, BUTTERMILK, SOUR CREAM, AND FRUIT DRINKS. STAN’S WIFE, NETTI, SAID OF THE SALE, “WE LOST EVERYTHING…WE EXPANDED TOO FAST. I TOLD STAN ‘WHO CARES? I’VE GOT YOU AND WE STILL HAVE THREE MEALS A DAY.’” IN 1972, PURITY CO-OP LTD WAS BOUGHT OUT BY PALM DAIRY, WHICH WAS CLOSED DOWN FOLLOWING A DRAMATIC EXPLOSION IN 1978. IT REOPENED AT A DIFFERENT LOCATION ONE YEAR LATER. IN THE INTERIM, PRODUCTS WERE SHIPPED IN FROM THE CALGARY PLANT. STAN AND ROMEO FABBI DIED IN 1992 AND 1991, RESPECTIVELY. THIS INFORMATION WAS GATHERED IN 2008-09 FROM ANTOINETTE AND KEN FABBI, STAN’S WIFE AND SON, RESPECTIVELY, AND FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARCHIVES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR P20070013001. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR P20160019000 FOR ADDITIONAL LETHBRIDGE HERALD CLIPPINGS, PRINT RESEARCH, AND PATENT DOCUMENTS.
Catalogue Number
P20160019000
Acquisition Date
2016-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.6
Width
15
Description
BOOK WITH BLACK HARDCOVER. THE FRONT COVER OF THE BOOK HAS IN GOLD LETTERING “NACCO DYES” WITH A SMALL, GOLD LOGO IN THE CENTER AND “NATIONAL ANILINE & CHEMICAL CO. …” IN GOLD AT THE BOTTOM. THE SPINE OF THE BOOK HAS “NACCO DYES NO. 172” IN GOLD LETTERS. THE INSIDE COVER OF THE BOOK BEGINS WITH “NATIONAL SERVICE” WITH ADDITIONAL TEXT SUCCEEDING. THE PAGES ARE THICK, WHITE BOARD THAT ARE ATTACHED TO ONE ANOTHER WITH PAPER SEAMS. THE BOARDS FOLD OUT ACCORDIAN-STYLE INTO A HORIZONTAL LINE. THERE ARE 6 BOARDS IN TOTAL. THE FIRST FOUR BEGINNING FROM THE LEFT ARE TITLED, “NACCO UNION DYES.” EACH BOARD HAS TWO COLUMNS OF RECTANGULAR DYE SAMPLES. THERE ARE 9 ROWS ON EACH BOARD. THE TWO SAMPLES IN EACH ROW ARE THE SAME COLOUR BUT ON DIFFERENT TYPES OF FABRIC. THE 5TH BOARD IS DIVIDED INTO TWO COLUMNS. THE LEFT IS TITLED, “NACCO NEUTRAL DYES” AND THERE ARE 10 SAMPLES OF VARIOUS DYE COLOURS UNDERNEATH IT. THE RIGHT SIDE IS TITLED, “NACCO WOOL DYES.” GOOD CONDITION. THE BOARDS HAVE YELLOWED. SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE BLACK COVER. SLIGHT BROWN STAIN ON 5TH AND 6TH BOARDS. ACCRETION ON LOWER SECTION ON THE BACKSIDE OF BOARD TO THE RIGHT OF THE TITLE PAGE (5TH BOARD).
Subjects
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRADES
RETAIL TRADE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS’ FATHER SOLD DYE TO LOCALS ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY. MORRIS DESCRIBES THE PURPOSE OF THE DYES AND HOW HER FATHER BECAME INVOLVED: “DYEING WAS NECESSARY TO DYE THE WOOL THAT YOU SPUN AND SOMETIMES YOU COULDN’T GET THE NECESSARY DYES IN THE STORE, SO I DON’T KNOW WHERE MY DAD GOT THOSE. THEY MIGHT HAVE SENT HIM SOME OR WHAT AND THEN HE WOULD CHOOSE THE COLOURS THEY WANTED AND HE WOULD ORDER THEM. NOW IT SO HAPPENS THAT THE PEOPLE IN THE COLONY ALL WANTED THESE PARTICULAR DYES BECAUSE THEY WERE BETTER THAN THE KIND THEY GOT IN THE STORE. I DON’T KNOW WHY. SO MY DAD BUILT A SCALE AND I REMEMBER THIS SCALE. IT STOOD ON THE TABLE, IT HAD A CENTRAL PART, THEN THERE WAS A ROD GOING ACROSS AND IT CAME DOWN LIKE THIS AND THREE NAILS ON ONE SIDE BROUGHT IT DOWN AND WHEN YOU WANTED TO SELL THE DYE YOU PUT A PIECE OF PAPER DOWN, PUT IN A SPOONFUL UNTIL WE BALANCED [IT] AND THEN YOU GOT AN EVEN BALANCE AND THAT AMOUNT CAME TO TEN CENTS. IF WANTED LESS THEN YOU PUT TWO NAILS DOWN AND THOSE CAME TO FIVE CENTS SO… I SUPPOSE [HE SOLD THE DYE] BECAUSE HE WANTED TO MAKE SOME MONEY. HE SOLD VEGETABLES IN THE WINTERTIME TO THE LOCALS WHO DIDN’T GROW GARDENS. IN SUMMERTIME IF HE COULD GET A JOB HARVESTING WORKING SOMEWHERE ON FARMS HE DID THAT. [HE WAS] THE MIDDLE MAN [SELLING DYES]… [A]ND NOBODY TOLD ANYONE THE STOREKEEPERS THAT OR HE’D HAVE PROBABLY BEEN TOLD TO STOP IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41
Width
36
Description
HANDMADE BAG MADE OF 3 SECTIONS OF STRIPS OF ABOUT 5 INCHES (APPROX. 13 CM) EACH. IT IS RED WITH BLUE, YELLOW, GREEN, AND RAW MATERIAL ACCENTS. THE TRIM AT THE TOP OF THE BAG IS BLUE WITH A HANDLE OF THE SAME FABRIC ON EITHER SIDE. THERE IS A STRIP OF RAW, NOT PATTERNED FABRIC AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAG. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAG HAVE THE SAME ARRANGEMENT OF PATTERNED STRIPS. THERE IS ONE SEAM CONNECTING THE FRONT AND THE BACK OF THE BAG ON BOTH SIDES. THE INSIDE IS UNLINED. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SOME STITCHING COMING LOOSE AT VARIOUS POINTS OF THE PATTERNING.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A STATEMENT WRITTEN BY MORRIS ATTACHED TO THE BAG STATES THAT THE MATERIAL OF THE BAG ORIGINATES FROM THE 1870S. THE STATEMENT READS: “THIS BAG WAS HAND WOVEN IN STRIPS [THAT WERE USED] TO SEW ON THE BOTTOM OF PETTICOATS. THE GIRLS AT THAT TIME HAD TO HAVE A TROUSEUA [SIC] TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE AFTER MARRIAGE THERE WOULD BE NO TIME TO MAKE CLOTHES SO WHAT THEY MADE WAS STURDY. THEY STARTED ON THEIR TROUSEUS [SIC] AS SOON AS THEY COULD HOLD A NEEDLE. WHEN IT WAS HAYING TIME THE GIRLS WENT OUT INTO THE FIELD TO RAKE THE HAY. THEY WORE PETTICOATS OF LINEN TO WHICH THESE BANDS WERE SEWN. THE LONG SKIRTS WERE PICKED UP AT THE SIDES AND TUCKED INTO THE WAISTBANDS SO THAT THE BOTTOMS OF THE PETTICOATS WERE ON DISPLAY.” “THESE BANDS WERE ORIGINALLY MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER’S WHO CAME OUT OF RUSSIA WITH THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT IN 1899. THEY WERE PASSED ON TO MY MOTHER, ELIZABETH KONKIN, WHO MADE THEM INTO A BAG IN THE 1940S” THE STRIPS THAT MAKE UP THE BAG SERVED A UTILITARIAN PURPOSE WHEN SEWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PETTICOATS. IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS EXPLAINS: “… THESE STRIPS ARE VERY STRONG. THEY’RE LIKE CANVAS. THEY WERE SEWN ONTO THE BOTTOM OF THE LADY’S PETTICOATS AND THEY WORE A SKIRT ON TOP OF THE PETTICOATS. THESE STRIPS LASTED A LIFETIME, IN FACT MORE THAN ONE LIFETIME BECAUSE I’VE GOT THEM NOW. THEY WOULD TUCK THE SKIRTS INTO THEIR WAISTBAND ON THE SIDE SO THEIR PETTICOATS SHOWED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO PRESERVE THEIR SKIRTS NOT TO GET CAUGHT IN THE GRAIN. THE GIRLS LIKED TO WEAR THEM TO SHOW OFF BECAUSE THE BOYS WERE THERE AND THEY ALWAYS WORE THEIR VERY BEST SUNDAY CLOTHES WHEN THEY WENT CUTTING WHEAT OR GRAIN." “[THE FABRIC] CAME FROM RUSSIA. WITH THE AREA WHERE THEY CAME FROM IS NOW GEORGIA AND THEY LIVED ABOUT SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE TURKISH BORDER, THE PRESENT DAY TURKISH BORDER… [THE DOUKHOBORS] CAME TO CANADA IN 1897 AND 1899.” MORRIS EXPLAINS THAT SURPLUS FABRIC WOULD HAVE BEEN BROUGHT TO CANADA FROM RUSSIA BY HER MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER FOR FUTURE USE AND TO AID THE GIRLS IN MAKING THEIR TROUSSEAUS: “THE TROUSSEAU THE GIRLS MADE HAD TO LAST THEM A LIFETIME BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T HAVE TIME BUT RAISING CHILDREN TO SEWING THINGS. SEWING MACHINES WERE UNKNOWN THEN.” THE BANDS OF FABRIC THAT MAKE UP THE BAG WOULD HAVE BEEN REMAINS NEVER USED FROM ELIZABETH KONKIN’S TROUSSEAU. SHE HAND WOVE THE BAG WHILE SHE WAS LIVING IN SHOULDICE. THE BAG WAS USED BY MORRIS’ MOTHER TO STORE HER KNITTING SUPPLIES. WHEN MORRIS ACQUIRED THE BAG IN THE 1990S, IT MAINTAINED A SIMILAR PURPOSE: “WELL I USED TO CARRY MY STUFF FOR THE WEAVER’S GUILD BUT NOW I DON’T USE IT FOR ANYTHING. IT’S VERY HANDY YOU KNOW IT DOESN’T WEAR OUT.” THERE WAS ONLY ONE BAG MADE OUT OF THESE REMNANTS BY MORRIS’ MOTHER. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1933
Date Range To
2000
Materials
CLOTH, FELT, PAINT
No. Pieces
2
Height
29.5
Width
15
Description
A: HANDMADE DOLL. THE “ESKIMO” DOLL IS MADE WITH LIGHT BLUE, FELT-LIKE FABRIC WITH WHITE FABRIC ACCENTS. THE FACE IS MADE OUT OF A LIGHTER FABRIC THAT IS PEACH-COLOURED. THE FACIAL DETAILS ARE HAND PAINTED. THE DOLL HAS BLUE EYES, EYEBROWS, NOSTRILS, RED LIPS, AND ROSY CHEEKS. THE LIGHT BLUE FABRIC THAT MAKES UP THE MAJORITY OF THE DOLL’S BODY IS ENCOMPASSING THE DOLL’S FACE LIKE A HOOD. THE DOLL’S TORSO IS COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. TWO HEART-SHAPED ARMS, MADE OF THE SAME MATERIAL, ARE ATTACHED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE BODY. THE DOLLS UPPER LEG AND FEET ARE COVERED IN THE LIGHT BLUE FELT. FROM THE KNEES TO THE ANKLES, A LIGHTER, WHITE FABRIC IS COVERING THE LEGS. B: DOLL SKIRT. AROUND THE DOLL’S WAIST IS A DETACHABLE SKIRT MADE OF THE SAME FABRIC AND A WHITE WAISTBAND. POOR CONDITION. ALL FABRIC IS WELL-WORN AND THREADBARE IN MULTIPLE PLACES. THE DOLL’S RED STUFFING IS VISIBLE THROUGH PARTS OF THE FABRIC. THERE IS DISCOLORATION (YELLOWING) OVERALL. THE STUFFING IS NOT EVENLY DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT THE DOLL. THE SEAMS AT THE ARMS ARE FRAGILE. THE PAINT FOR THE DOLL’S FACE IS SEVERELY FADED.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
LEISURE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THE FAMILY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. THIS DOLL BELONGED TO MORRIS AS A CHILD. SHE EXPLAINS, “THIS CAME FROM A GREAT AUNT WHO CAME TO VISIT US AND SHE ALWAYS BROUGHT GIFTS AND THIS ONE WAS MINE AND I LOVED THIS DOLL… I REMEMBER PLAYING WITH IT, IT WAS SOFT AND CUDDLY WHEN I HAD IT… MY DAUGHTER WENT THROUGH IT AND MY GRANDDAUGHTER AND THEN I PUT A STOP TO IT BEFORE THEY ATE IT UP OR DID SOMETHING… THEY LOVED IT AND THEY, YOU KNOW LITTLE KIDS, THEY’RE CARELESS SO I’LL KEEP IT...” IN A PHONE CALL WITH COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK ON OCTOBER 24, 2017, MORRIS SAID SHE RECIEVED THE DOLL FROM HER GREAT AUNT WHO HAD BROUGHT IT FROM VISITING BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS PLAYED WITH THE DOLL AS A CHILD, AS DID MORRIS' CHILDREN. THE DOLL WAS LOVED BY MULTIPLE GENERATIONS IN MORRIS' FAMILY AS HER GRANDCHILDREN AND GREAT GRANDCHILDREN WOULD ALSO PLAY WITH THE DOLL WHEN THEY CAME TO VISIT. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003002
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20180021001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
55
Width
31
Description
BROWN, STUFFED "PUNKINHEAD" BEAR WITH LIGHTER BROWN PATCHES ON CHEST, ARMS, NOSE, INSIDE EARS, AND TOP OF HEAD. BEAR HAS TWO CLEAR GLASS EYES WITH BLACK CENTERS; FEET ARE COVERED IN BROWN LEATHER; SNOUT HAS BLACK STITCHING FOR NOSE AND MOUTH. DRESSED IN BROWN AND WHITE PAISLEY-PATTERNED ROMPER; ROMPER HAS ELASTIC WAIST AND THREE WHITE OPAQUE PLASTIC BUTTONS ON FRONT. TOP OF ROMPER HAS TWO STRAPS THAT CROSS CHEST AND ATTACH TO CHEST WITH WHITE BUTTONS; BOTTOMS OF ROMPER FORM SHORTS. ROMPER SEAMS MACHINE-STITCHED WITH WHITE THREAD; HOMEMADE; THREADS FRAYING ON RIGHT SIDE. ARMS AND LEGS ARE MOVEABLE; FUR IS MISSING IN THINNED; FRONT PAWS HAVE FELT PATCHES SEWN ON. LEFT FRONT PAW HAS HOLES IN FELT; BLACK THREAD ON RIGHT SIDE OF MOUTH IS LOOSE; LEATHER FEET CRACKED AND WORN; BUTTONS ON ROMPER DISCOLORED YELLOW; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE LARGEST PUNKINHEAD IN A BROWN ROMPER, OBERG RECALLED, “[I WOULD SAY] SAY IT IS IN ’57 [THAT I RECEIVERED THE BEAR] WITH THE BROWN JUMPER.” “HE WAS THE LAST ONE. FROM WHAT I UNDERSTAND, THEY ONLY CAME; THEY WERE ONLY ACCESSIBLE IN THE THREE SIZES. I HAD SHOWN SO MUCH FONDNESS TOWARDS THEM THAT MY GRANDPARENTS DECIDED THAT THEY WOULD GET ANOTHER SMALL ONE, BECAUSE THIS FELLOW [IN THE BROWN JUMPER] WAS ALMOST UNTOUCHABLE. I TRIED TO WASH HIS HAIR ONCE.” “I TRIED TO WASH HIS HAIR, AND THAT WAS FROWNED UPON BY MY PARENTS, AND MY GRANDPARENTS, BECAUSE THEY HAVE WOODEN STUFFING/WOODEN SHAVINGS. THIS FELLOW, I THINK HE HUNG OVER THE REGISTER FOR PROBABLY A MONTH, HOPING THAT HE WOULD DRY AND NOT GO MOLDY. [MY FAMILY] WANTED TO GIVE ME ANOTHER ONE, THAT I WOULD BE ABLE TO LOVE, AND CARE FOR, LIKE LITTLE GIRLS DO WITH THEIR TEDDY BEARS.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MCINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MCINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021001
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20180021002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
No. Pieces
3
Length
36
Width
24.5
Description
A. STUFFED TOY, “PUNKINHEAD”, 36 CM LONG X 24.5 CM WIDE. BROWN PUNKINHEAD BEAR DRESSED IN BLUE SHORTS AND SHIRT. BEAR HAS TWO CLEAR GLASS EYES WITH BLACK CENTERS; FACE STITCHED WITH BLACK THREAD CREATING NOSE AND MOUTH; FEET CASED IN BROWN LEATHER STITCHED ON WITH BLACK THREAD. PUNKINHEAD BEAR HAS LIGHTER BROWN SNOUT, CHEST, TOP OF HEAD, AND INSIDE OF EARS. FUR ON BEAR IS MISSING IN PACTHES AND THINNED; BEAR IS MISSING LIGHT HAIR FROM TOP OF HEAD; NOSE IS TORN ON SIDES AND HAS LOSS IN FABRIC SHOWING INSIDE STUFFING. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. BLUE COTTON SHIRT, 11.5 CM LONG X 7.5 CM WIDE. HOMEMADE WITH WHITE MACHINE STITCHING ALONG CUFFS AND HEM; BACK HAS CINCHING WITH WHITE THREAD. FRONT OF SHIRT TIED AT NECK AND OPEN AT FRONT. FABRIC IS FADED; RIP IN RIGHT SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. BLUE COTTON SHORTS, 8.5 CM LONG X 9 CM WIDE. HANDMADE WITH WHITE MACHINE STITCHING ALONG LEG-HOLES AND WAIST. SHORTS FADED; TEAR INSIDE RIGHT LEG; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE PUNKINHEAD IN THE BLUE OUTFIT, OBERG RECALLED, “THE MIDDLE-SIZED ONE [IN BLUE I RECEIVED] ’55.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MCINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MCINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021002
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20180021003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, GLASS, LEATHER
No. Pieces
1
Length
24.3
Width
12.3
Description
BROWN “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEAR WITH LIGHTER BROWN PATCHES ON CHEST, ARMS, NOSE, INSIDE EARS, AND TOP OF HEAD. BEAR HAS TWO CLEAR GLASS EYES WITH BLACK CENTERS; FEET ARE COVERED IN BROWN SUEDE; SNOUT HAS BLACK STITCHING FOR NOSE AND MOUTH. DRESSED IN RED VELVET SHORTS SEWN TO BODY. ARMS ARE MOVEABLE; FUR IS MISSING IN PATCHES AND THINNED; TOP OF HEAD IS MISSING LIGHTER HAIR. SNOUT HAS RIP IN UNDERSIDE EXPOSING INNER STUFFING; OVERALL FAIR CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE PUNKINHEAD IN RED SHORTS, OBERG RECALLED, “[THAT CAME LAST] IN ’59.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MCINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MCINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021003
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180021004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PUNKINHEAD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
3
Length
24
Width
12.3
Description
A. BROWN “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFD BEAR, 24 CM LONG X 12.3 CM WIDE. BEAR DRESSED IN GREEN SHIRT AND SHORTS; BEAR HAS TWO WHITE PLASTIC BUTTON EYES WITH BLACK PLASTIC BEAD ON TOP, SEWN ONTO FACE; BEAR IS BROWN WITH LIGHTER BROWN CHEST, INSIDE OF EARS, SNOUT, AND TOP OF HEAD. SNOUT HAS BLACK STITCHING FOR NOSE AND MOUTH; FEET ENCASED IN BROWN LEATHER. FUR IS MISSING IN PATCHES AND THIINED; LEATHER ON FEET IS CRACKED AND FADED; BEAR IS MISSING FUR FROM LIGHTER PATCH ON TOP OF HEAD. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. GREEN COTTON SHIRT, 8 CM LONG X 6 CM WIDE. HANDMADE WITH BLACK MACHINE STITCHING AT CUFFS AND HEM; BACK IS CINCHED WITH BLACK THREAD; SLEEVES HAVE ROLLED CUFFS. FRONT IS OPEN WITH TIES AT COLLAR TO ATTACH. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. C. GREEN COTTON SHORTS, 5.5 CM LONG X 6 CM WIDE. HANDMADE WITH BLACK MACHINE STITCHING INSIDE LEG HOLES AND AT WAIST. WAIST IS ELASTIC; BACK HAS MINOR FRAYING AT EDGE OF LEFT LEG HOLE. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF “PUNKINHEAD” STUFFED BEARS. OBERG DONATED THE PUNKINHEADS AS A CONTRIBUTION FOR THE UPCOMING GALT MUSEUM EXHIBIT “RECOLLECTING HOME” FROM FEBRUARY 1-MAY 5, 2019. ON THE PUNKINHEAD IN THE GREEN OUTFIT, OBERG RECALLED, “THE OLDEST IS THE RATTIEST LITTLE GUY [IN GREEN]…I WAS BORN IN ’49, SO IT WOULD HAVE BEEN [GIVEN TO ME] ’53.” “THE FIRST ONE [IS SPECIAL TO ME], BECAUSE HE OPENED UP MY EYES TO, AT THAT AGE, BEING TO LOVE AN INANIMATE OBJECT, AS OPPOSED TO PARENTS, GRANDPARENTS, OR SIBLINGS. HE’S PROBABLY GOT A LOT MORE SECRETS TO TELL THAN THE BIGGER ONE.” “[THE BEAR WAS] WELL- LOVED, HE’S LOST A LOT OF HAIR. HE’S GOT NEW SHOES ON…AS FAR AS I KNOW, THE FIRST ONE…WAS SO WELL-WORN, AND SO WELL- LOVED, THAT MY GRANDMOTHER, WHO DID A LOT OF SEWING AND HAND-WORK, GAVE HIM NEW SHOES. HIS LITTLE FELT PANTS, THAT CAME WITH HIM, WERE LONG WORN-OUT, SO SHE SEWED HIM ANOTHER LITTLE OUTFIT.” “I GUESS, AS A MOTHER OF ACTUAL CHILDREN, IT’S POLITICALLY CORRECT TO SAY, “I LOVE THEM ALL THE SAME.” AS A CHILD, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT I LOVED THEM ALL THE SAME. BUT OF COURSE, WITH CHILDREN, OFTEN [TIMES], BIGGER IS BETTER. THE LARGEST OF THEM ALL, WHO IS IN STILL THE BEST CONDITION, I WOULD GUESS THAT HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN THE MOST LOVED. AS I GOT OLDER, HE WAS ON DISPLAY WITH OTHER STUFFED ANIMALS THAT I HAD ACQUIRED OVER THE YEARS, BECAUSE OF HIS CONDITION, WHEREAS THE OTHER, MORE DILAPIDATED CHARACTERS PROBABLY TOOK A LITTLE BIT MORE OF A BACK SEAT. THEY WERE NOT IN AS GOOD CONDITION. THAT’S A QUESTION THAT I HADN’T REALLY THOUGHT ABOUT. I’M JUST GOING ON [MY] INTUITION.” OBERG ELABORATED ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE BEARS, “FOLK LORE WITHIN THE FAMILY IS THAT I WOULD GET ONE TEDDY BEAR EVERY TWO YEARS…MY [MATERNAL] GRANDPARENTS [JAMES “JIMMY” MCINTOSH AND ELSIE PEARL MCINTOSH] GIFTED [MY FIRST] TO ME AT CHRISTMAS WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD. AS FAR AS I AM AWARE, IT IS A MERRYTHOUGHT PUNKINHEAD, AND IT WOULD HAVE BEEN PURCHASED THROUGH EATON’S…THE PUNKINHEAD WAS KIND OF A CHRISTMAS MASCOT. IT WAS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR MY GRANDPARENTS TO GIVE IT TO ME AT CHRISTMAS. EATON’S WAS A VERY PROMINENT DEPARTMENT STORE IN LETHBRIDGE AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND MOST EVERYBODY DID THEIR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING AT EATON’S. WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY OTHER (AT LEAST THAT I WAS AWARE OF, AS A CHILD GROWING UP) DEPARTMENT STORES. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE WALMARTS. EATON’S WAS THE PLACE TO GO. SO, [MY FIRST] ONE WAS FROM WHEN I WAS 3 YEARS OLD.” “WHEN I WAS A CHILD, GROWING UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T BELIEVE THAT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HAD THE DISPOSABLE INCOME TO BE GENEROUS. IN THOSE DAYS, CHILDREN WEREN’T EXPECTING AN AWFUL LOT. WE GOT ONE GIFT FROM OUR GRANDPARENTS, AND SANTA WOULD ALWAYS BRING A FEW. I DON’T EVEN RECALL IF OUR PARENTS GAVE US ANYTHING. IT WAS JUST SANTA, AND WE ALWAYS HAD OUR CHRISTMAS MEAL ON CHRISTMAS EVE, AT MY GRANDPARENT’S HOME. AFTER THE DISHES WERE ALL CLEANED UP, AND WE’D HAD OUR MEAL, THEN THE CHILDREN WERE ALLOWED TO OPEN OUR PRESENTS, OR OUR ONE GIFT, FROM THE GRANDPARENTS. THAT WAS EVEN MORE OF A CULMINATION OF THAT TENSION, FOR CHILDREN, WAITING FOR CHRISTMAS. IT WAS ALWAYS A VERY EXCITING TIME. I AM ASSUMING THAT I HAD SOME SORT OF AWARENESS OF PUNKINHEAD, SO, OF COURSE, [I] WAS VERY EXCITED TO GET ONE.” “[THERE WAS] LOTS OF CARRYING THEM AROUND. AS A CHILD, I DIDN’T HAVE A FAVORITE BLANKET OR ANYTHING. IT WAS MY TEDDY BEARS. I LIKED, ALWAYS, TO HAVE SOMETHING SOFT AND FUZZY UP AGAINST MY FACE, AND AGAINST MY NOSE. THEY WERE JUST THE RIGHT SIZE THAT I COULD HANG ON TO THEM WITH ONE HAND, AND RUB MY NOSE AGAINST THEM. THEY WERE A SECURITY FEATURE. AGAIN, BEING MADE OF NON-WASHABLE SUBSTANCES, THE WOODEN STUFFING AND THE LEATHER SHOES, THEY WEREN’T WASHABLE. MAYBE WITH THE NOWADAYS, MOTHERS CAN THROW THE STUFFIES IN THE WASHING MACHINE AND REFRESH THEM, AND THE FIBER IS A LOT MORE [DURABLE]. THEY’RE PROBABLY SO RATTY-LOOKING BECAUSE OF BEING CONSTANTLY WITH ME–-HAVING TEA PARTIES WITH THEM, AND JUST GENERALLY PUTTING THEM IN STROLLERS AND TAKING THEM OUT AROUND THE NEIGHBORHOOD. THEY WERE VERY WELL GUARDED. WE NEVER HAD ANY PETS IN THE HOUSE TO COME AND CHEW THEM UP. ALL OF THEIR DISTRESSED LOOK IS FROM LOVE. “WHEN THE BIG ONE CAME, THAT WAS A BONE OF CONTENTION, BECAUSE WITH ALL OF THE FOUR BEARS IN THE BED, THERE WAS HARDLY ROOM FOR ME [TO SLEEP]. I HAD BEEN, ON OCCASION, FOUND ON THE FLOOR, BECAUSE THERE WASN’T ROOM FOR ME IN BED. THAT WAS A “NO-NO.” MY PARENTS SAID, “NO, IF ANYBODY GOES ON THE FLOOR, IT’S THE BEARS.” THEY WERE A HUGE PART OF MY LIFE.” “I NEVER DID LET THEM OUT OF MY SIGHT LONG ENOUGH, AS A CHILD. MY PARENTS KNEW HOW IMPORTANT THEY WERE, SO IT HAS TO BE THAT MY PARENTS HAD THEM STASHED AWAY SOMEWHERE, FOR WHEN I WAS OLD ENOUGH OR INTERESTED ENOUGH TO GET THEM BACK. THEY MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME, BECAUSE THEY WERE GIFTED TO ME BY MY GRANDPARENTS. I SPENT MANY HOURS IN THEIR HOME. MY MOTHER WORKED OUT OF OUR BASEMENT. SHE WAS A CERAMICS TEACHER, AND SO SHE WAS ONE OF THE FEW WOMEN, IN THE EARLY ‘50S, THAT WAS EARNING AN INCOME. I HAD SUCH A FONDNESS FOR MY GRANDPARENTS, AND THEY WERE ONLY BLOCKS AWAY FROM OUR HOME, THAT I SPENT MOST OF MY DAYS THERE.” “THE CLOTHING IS NOT ORIGINAL. THE ORIGINAL SHORTS WERE JUST A LITTLE PANT IN A FELT FABRIC, AND THE FELT WAS NOT STURDY. IT GOT ALL SHREDDED, AND FELL OFF. MY GRANDMOTHER REPLACED THE CLOTHING ON ALL OF THEM.” “BUT NOW, THE NEWEST OF THEM, THE ONE WITH THE RED PANTS–-THE REPAIRS ON HIS SNOUT ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE WAY MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD REPAIR THEM. I THINK I REPAIRED THAT ONE MYSELF. MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY WHEN I WAS 13, AND, BY THAT POINT IN MY LIFE, IT WAS ONLY THE LARGE ONE THAT I HAD KEPT OUT. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PASSED AWAY, AND THEN WHEN I REVIVED BRINGING THESE ONES OUT A NUMBER OF YEARS LATER, I DID A VERY ‘MICKEY MOUSE’ JOB OF REPAIRING HIM. THE OTHER ONES WOULD HAVE BEEN REPAIRED BY MY GRANDMOTHER.” “WHEN MY HUSBAND AND I WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET GRANDCHILDREN, AT CHRISTMAS TIME I WOULD PUT UP [THE BEARS]. I WOULD MAKE A LITTLE TEDDY BEAR DISPLAY AT CHRISTMAS TIME, AND THE GRANDCHILDREN WERE INTRODUCED TO THEM. THEY DIDN’T MEAN ANYTHING TO THE GRANDCHILDREN WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG. THEY HAD THEIR OWN TEDDIES. THEY JUST KNEW THAT THEY WEREN’T ALLOWED TO TOUCH THEM.” “THE MUSEUM IS IN THE PROCESS NOW OF DEVELOPING A NEW EXHIBIT FOR THE BEGINNING OF NEXT YEAR, 2019, AND I MADE THE CHOICE TO VOLUNTEER MYSELF TO BE PART OF THAT EXHIBIT. I BELIEVE THAT SOME OF THESE ITEMS MIGHT BE BENEFICIAL TO BE A PART OF WHAT I DEEM TO BE “HOME”. MY TWO CHILDREN DON’T HAVE ANY DESIRE TO ACQUIRE ANY OF THE OLD THINGS THAT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME, PARTICULARLY AS A CHILD. THAT I UNDERSTAND, BUT I ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT LETHBRIDGE IS WANTING TO CONTINUE TO ACQUIRE ITEMS THAT ARE IMPORTANT TO LETHBRIDGE’S HISTORY, AND THE HISTORY OF THE PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021004
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.