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Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PORCELAIN
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Materials
PORCELAIN
No. Pieces
1
Height
6
Diameter
21.5
Description
CHINA BOWL WITH AN IRREGULAR RIM THAT EXTENDS A FLORAL PETAL MOTIF ALONG BOWL’S INSIDE EDGE. CENTRE FEATURES COUNTRY LANDSCAPE INCLUDING A COTTAGE, SURROUNDED BY STAMP MARK IN GOLD STENCIL AND SCRIPT, “COMPLIMENTS OF N. F. SUPINA”. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT CRACKING IN THE BOTTOM. THE BASE IS SCUFFED AND DIRTY. THERE ARE SOME MARKS ON THE OUTSIDE EDGE.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
BUSINESS
COMMEMORATIVE
DOMESTIC
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING HORHOZER AND HER FAMILY. THIS BOWL IS A REMINDER OF THE STORE THAT WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF LIFE IN THE SUPINA FAMILY. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “MY DAD ALWAYS GAVE A CHRISTMAS GIFT. SO ONE YEAR HE GAVE THE PLATE AND ANOTHER YEAR HE GAVE THIS BOWL AND ACTUALLY THAT’S ALL I KNOW ABOUT IT… [A]LL THE CUSTOMERS, THE ONES THAT DEALT THERE ALL THE TIME [GOT A CHRISTMAS PRESENT]. THE GOOD PAYING ONES AND THE NOT-SO-GOOD PAYING ONES, I THINK THEY PROBABLY EVEN GOT IT TOO, BUT, AS LONG AS THEY WERE CUSTOMERS THEN THEY GOT ONE… MY MOTHER SAVED [IT] FIRSTLY, BECAUSE THEY REALLY MEANT SOMETHING - PART OF THE STORE I GUESS SHE’D SAY. SO, HAD THEM FOR A LONG, LONG TIME… MY MOM HAD ALL KINDS OF ORNAMENTS AROUND AND SHE’D JUST PUT THEM ON A TABLE OR WHATEVER. SHE WOULD CHANGE HER ORNAMENTS EVERY ONCE AND AWHILE, AND THEN SHE’D PUT THESE IN THE CUPBOARD." ABOUT THE HISTORY OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE, HORHOZER EXPLAINS: “I WAS BORN INTO [THE STORE]. MY DAD STARTED SMALL. HIS DAD HAD A LITTLE CONFECTIONARY; THEN HE TURNED IT INTO A GROCERY STORE AND THEN HE SOLD IT TO MY DAD. MY DAD WAS THE ONE THAT TOOK IT OVER, THAT WAS ALREADY TAKING PLACE WHEN I WAS BORN. THERE WAS NO SPECIFIC MEMORY [OF THAT TRANSITIION] BECAUSE THAT’S ALL I KNEW REALLY.” “… MY DAD WAS BORN IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA. [HIS FAMILY] CAME HERE WHEN HE WAS TWO. [HIS YOUNGER SIBLINGS], THE FIVE BROTHERS AND THE ONE SISTER, WERE ALL BORN IN THAT SAME LITTLE HOUSE THERE. AND THAT’S WHERE MY GRANDPA HAD STARTED THE STORE, IT WAS JUST A CONFECTIONARY. EVENTUALLY IT GREW INTO QUITE A BUSINESS… IN THOSE DAYS, IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, SO THEY HAD FIVE HORSES AND BUGGIES THAT WERE RUNNING, WORKING, AND MY UNCLE ALWAYS LOOKED AFTER THE HORSES AND MAINTAINED THEM. THEY’D GO AND THEY’D PICK UP THE ORDER. LOTS OF THE PEOPLE THEN COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, BUT MY DAD COULD SPEAK CZECH, AND THEN THEY’D USUALLY SEND – HE HAD ALL KINDS OF NATIONALITIES WORKING FOR HIM - [A PERSON OF MATCHING ETHNICITY], THAT KNEW THEIR LANGUAGE TO PICK UP THE ORDER. THEY BROUGHT IT BACK TO THE STORE, AND THEN DELIVERED IT BACK TO THE CUSTOMER, THAT WAS REAL SERVICE IN THOSE DAYS, ESPECIALLY WITH HORSE AND BUGGY IN THOSE WINTRY DAYS, AFTER THAT IT DEVELOPED INTO TRUCKS. THERE WERE LOTS OF MINERS IN THOSE DAYS AND WERE GOOD CUSTOMERS… HE AT ONE TIME EMPLOYED THIRTY-SIX PEOPLE IN THE STORE THERE.” AN ARTICLE IN LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON MAY 5, 2004 STATES THAT NICK SUPINA PURCHASED THE STORE FROM HIS FATHER, MIKE SUPINA, IN 1918. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER CONTINUED TO SPEAK ABOUT THE BEGINNING DAYS OF THE SUPINA’S STORE: “MY GRANDPA WAS WORKING IN THE MINE. I DON’T KNOW HOW IT CAME THAT HE HAD THIS LITTLE BUSINESS… IT’S MY DAD THEN THAT HAD TO LOOK AFTER THE FAMILY BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY MONEY. THERE WAS FIVE BOYS SO HE HAD THEM ALL. THEY WERE ALL CLOSE TOGETHER IN AGE. THERE’S STEVE AND BILLY AND JOHN AND MIKE… UNCLE STEVE, IS THE SECOND, HE’S THE ONE THAT STAYED WITH MY DAD, AND JOHNNY DID TOO. THEN THE OTHER TWO PURSUED THEIR OWN BUSINESSES. BILLY HAD A BUSINESS IN RED DEER AND SMALL BUSINESSES IN TWO OTHER PLACES. THEN MIKE, HE WENT TO THE STATES AND—OH, THAT WAS GEORGE, PARDON ME. HE HAD A SHOE STORE WHICH WAS VERY, VERY SUCCESSFUL. MIKE WAS THE ONLY ONE THAT WASN’T IN BUSINESS. THAT WAS BECAUSE HE WAS IN THE WAR…” THINKING BACK ON HER MEMORIES OF SUPINA’S, HORHOZER DESCRIBES, “[I]N THOSE DAYS YOU HAD GOOD FRUIT. I REMEMBER THE DELICIOUS PEACHES. I HAVEN’T SEEN A PEACH LIKE THAT SINCE… LOTS OF TIMES, THE FRUIT WOULD GO OVER-RIPE, LIKE YOUR APRICOTS AND PEACHES. MY MOTHER WOULD GO AND GET ALL THE OVER-RIPE FRUIT AND TAKE IT HOME AND MAKE BEAUTIFUL PIES AND TAKE THE PIES BACK TO THE STORE AND SELL THEM. SHE WAS A WONDERFUL BAKER. THEY DID EVERYTHING LIKE THAT TO HELP MAKE MORE MONEY. SOMETIMES MY DAD WOULD HAVE A SPECIAL ON, 3 CENTS A LOAF [OF BREAD. I HAD LOTS OF ADS FROM THE STORE, AND YOU’D GET SUCH A KICK OUT OF SEEING HAMBURGER, TWENTY-FIVE CENTS A POUND AND THINGS LIKE THAT. SO, YES I REMEMBER.” HORHOZER BEGAN WORKING AT THE STORE AT THE AGE OF 14: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.’” HORHOZER BELIEVED THAT AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE STORE’S SUCCESS WAS “… BECAUSE, [OF] THE SERVICE MAINLY. JUST THINK, GOING THERE, GETTING YOUR ORDERS, BRINGING THEM BACK, DOING THEM UP, THEY’D MAKE SURE THINGS WERE TOP QUALITY. THEY GOT TO KNOW EVERY CUSTOMER, OF COURSE, AND THEY KNEW WHAT THEY LIKED. HE HAD WONDERFUL PEOPLE WORKING FOR HIM. THEY JUST GAVE FANTASTIC SERVICE ALL THE TIME. PLUS, MY DAD WAS GRUFF, BUT HE WAS VERY, VERY KIND TO POOR PEOPLE THAT COULDN’T AFFORD –THERE’S LOTS THAT YEARS AFTER HE HAD PASSED AWAY [PEOPLE] WOULD COME UP TO ME AND SAY, ‘IF IT WASN’T FOR YOUR DAD, JOHNNY WOULDN’T HAVE HAD CHEESE,’ OR SOMETHING. I DIDN’T KNOW A THING ABOUT IT, BECAUSE HE WAS ONE THAT NEVER, EVER TOLD ANYBODY… THEN AT CHRISTMAS TIME HE WOULD GO TO THE STORE AND HE HAD A LIST OF EVERYBODY THAT HE KNEW WAS EXCEPTIONALLY POOR, AND HE WOULD FILL BASKETS. HE WOULD DO IT ALL BY HIMSELF… HE WOULDN’T TELL MY MOTHER AND I. HE WAS SO TIGHT-MOUTHED, FILL ALL THESE BASKETS AND DELIVER THEM TO THE PEOPLE HIMSELF WITHOUT TELLING A SOUL ABOUT IT. HE WAS THAT KIND OF PERSON. HE WAS VERY KIND THAT WAY.” SUPINA’S MERCANTILE SERVED LETHBRIDGE UNTIL IT CLOSED IN 1960. HORHOZER REMAINED IN RETAIL IN VARIOUS SHOPS IN THE CITY, INCLUDING THE DEPARTMENT STORE WOOLCO UNTIL HER RETIREMENT IN 1988. HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE IN 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS OLD. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT SUPINA’S MERCANTILE AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1961
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, STONE, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20150016002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1961
Materials
METAL, STONE, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Diameter
12.5
Description
AWARD TROPHY, “ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING CJLH-TV LETHBRIDGE, ALTA. 1960-61”. CAST METAL PEBBLED, LAUREL LEAF BASE, FINISHED IN GOLD. PEDESTAL CONSTRUCTED OF WOOD AND POLISHED STONE. GREEN FELT BOTTOM. VERY GOOD CONDITION. GOLD FINISH SCUFFED IN SOME AREAS WITH SOME SCRATCHES ON THE BASE AND DUST BUILD UP. MINOR LOSS TO THE BLACK PAINT AROUND THE BASE AND SLIGHT WEAR TO THE FELT BOTTOM.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
PROFESSIONS
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY AND THE COUNTRY CAPERS - TO WHOM THE TROPHY WAS AWARDED IN 1961. EVERAL MET JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE CAME TO SUPINA’S TO WORK. SHE REMEMBERS: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.” THIS TROPHY IS REPRESENTATIVE OF JOE HORHOZER’S TIME AS PART OF THE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE COUNTRY CAPERS. PRIOR TO THAT, HE WAS A PART OF THE MUSICAL GROUP, THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN 1937 AND HAD SEEN SUCCESS ON BOTH THE LOCAL AND NATIONAL LEVELS. AROUND 1955, THE GROUP HAD SLOWED DOWN FROM THEIR TOURING SCHEDULE, AS A RESULT HORHOZER AND A FELLOW BAND MEMBER, REMO BACEDA, WERE ABLE TO JOIN A GROUP FORMING IN LETHBRIDGE THAT CAME TO BE THE 'COUNTRY CAPERS.' THIS GROUP CONSISTED OF THE POTTS FAMILY ON VOCALS, EDDIE, BETTY (WAGGONTAIL), AND TWINS SHIRLEY ANN (PETRAK) AND SHARON (SCOVILLE), AS WELL AS DONN PETRAL ON VOCALS AND GUITAR, HERB URANO ON BASS, REMO BACEDA ON FIDDLE, AND HORHOZER WITH HIS ACCORDION. HORHOZER SAYS OF THAT TIME, “WELL, THE POTTS ALWAYS SIGNED TOGETHER. THERE WERE THREE SISTERS AND THEN EDDIE, THE BROTHER, AND THEY WERE VERY GOOD SINGERS, BUT THEY WANTED SOMEBODY THAT WAS PROFESSIONAL TO KIND OF TEACH THEM HOW TO SING IN HARMONY. REMO WAS GOOD AT THAT ‘CAUSE HE WAS THE HEAD OF A CHOIR AND [KNEW] HOW TO DO GROUP MUSIC, ‘CAUSE [THE POTTS] WERE GREEN. THEY DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING. THEN THEY WOULD PRACTICE AND PRACTICE TOGETHER, AND THEN DONN PETRAK, I GUESS, GOT THE RADIO STATION TO HIRE THEM. THEY’VE GOT TO -THEY’VE GOT TO HEAR YOU PLAY FIRST, SO THEY HAD THIS BAND CALLED THE COUNTRY CAPERS AND THEY ALL PLAYED TOGETHER FOR QUITE A LONG TIME ON THE RADIO. I THINK THEY WERE ON THE RADIO FOR MAYBE TWO YEARS OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT – CJOC.” HORHOZER’S DAUGHTER, MELODEE “MEL” MUTCH, WHO WAS ALSO IN THE ROOM FOR THE INTERVIEWS WITH MACLEAN, ADDED, “… IT WAS A TELEVISION SHOW. THAT’S WHAT THEY WERE KNOWN FOR.” ON MARCH 1, 1998, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD’S “THE WAY WE WERE” COLUMN FEATURED A HISTORY OF THE COUNTRY CAPERS WRITTEN BY GARRY ALLISON. THIS ARTICLE STATES, “THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE FEATURED ON CJOC RADIO WITH THEIR OWN SHOW AND ON CJLH-TV FOR FIVE YEARS. THEY ALSO TRAVELED TO CALGARY EACH WEEK FOR A CROSS-CANADA RADIO SHOW ON CBC IN 1958. THEIR LOCALLY-PRODUCED TV SHOW WAS SHOWN EACH TUESDAY NIGHT AT FIRST, THEN LATER ON THURSDAY NIGHT.” CJLH-TV WON SEVEN LIBERTY MAGAZINE AWARDS IN TOTAL DURING THE 1950S AND 1960S. THESE AWARDS INCLUDED THE 1960 – 1961 AWARD FOR BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING, WHICH THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE A PART OF, AND IN 1962 THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE PRESENTED WITH THE AWARD FOR BEST STATION MUSIC SHOW. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT [THE TROPHY], EXCEPT THIS IS WHEN THEY PLAYED ON TV, THEY ALWAYS GIVE AN AWARD FOR THE BEST MUSICAL BAND ON TV OR SOMETHING. THAT’S WHEN THEY GOT THAT." FOR AN ARTICLE WRITTEN ABOUT JOE HORHOZER IN 2002 FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, JOE STATED, “[MUSIC’S] MY LIFE – OUTSIDE OF MY FAMILY. [WITHOUT IT], I’D BE LOST.” MUTCH REAFFIRMS HER FATHER’S STATEMENT BY SAYING, “… HIS HANDS WERE ALWAYS TAPPING. HE WAS ALWAYS TAPPING. YOU COULD SEE THAT IN HIS HEAD. PLUS HE HELD DOWN A FULL TIME JOB. AND WHEN THEY NEEDED ENTERTAINMENT – LIKE GARY KIRK. GOSH, IT’S GOT TO BE 50 YEARS AGO, SAID TO MY DAD AND BUCK, 'WOULD YOU COME DOWN TO PLAY AT THIS CABIN?' – LONG LOST RANCH, OR WHEREVER THEY WERE HAVING A FAMILY REUNION – SO THEY WERE THE ENTERTAINMENT. HE WAS … SOUGHT-AFTER, LET’S PUT IT THAT WAY. AND WHEN HE WOULD PLAY MUSIC UNTIL YOU’D WANT TO THROW UP. HE’D COME HOME FROM A DANCE; POUR HIMSELF ANOTHER ONE; AND THEN THE RECORDS WOULD START TO COME OUT. THAT IS HOW THE NIGHT WENT. I’D EVEN COME HOME SOME NIGHTS AND MY MOM AND DAD WOULD BE DANCING. WHEN YOU ARE A TEENAGER, THAT’S HORRIFIC. SO, THERE IS THE HENDERSON LAKE HOTEL, WHATEVER – THE DANCE HALL. THAT WAS VERY MUCH A PART OF THEIR LIVES AS WELL.” JOE HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON OCTOBER 21, 2010 AT THE AGE OF 89 YEARS. HORHOZER WAS THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE COUNTRY CAPERS, THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS, AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016002
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BOXING TROPHY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Catalogue Number
P20150015000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BOXING TROPHY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
No. Pieces
1
Height
35.5
Length
32
Width
8.9
Description
BOXING TROPHY WITH A COPPER-FINISHED BOXER ON A WOODEN PEDESTAL FLANKED BY COPPER GLOVERS ON INDEPENDENT WOOD PEDESTALS. THE TROPHY IS MARKED “COMPETITION IN MEMORY OF F/O (FLIGHT OFFICER) SYD & JACK EMERY RCAF SOUTH ALBERTA ELIMINATIONS”. THERE IS A WOOD BASE WITH FIVE COPPER-FINISHED BADGES ATTACHED IN A ROW ACROSS THE FRONT. THE FIRST TWO READ “1950” AND “1960”. THE LAST THREE ARE BLANK. GOOD – VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT LOSS OF COPPER FINISH ON THE BOXER AND BOXING GLOVES. SLIGHT LOSS OF WOOD FINISH IN VARIOUS AREAS OVERALL. THE LEFT PEDESTAL IS SLIGHTLY LOOSE AND THE RIGHT IS VERY LOOSE.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
SPORTS
ASSOCIATIONS
History
THIS BOXING TROPHY THAT WAS GIVEN IN HONOUR OF TWO BROTHERS, SYD AND JACK EMERY, WHO LOST THEIR LIVES IN WORLD WAR II. THE BOYS WERE COMPETITIVE BOXERS IN LETHBRIDGE PRIOR TO THE WAR AND THEIR FATHER, JOHN LIONEL “JACK” EMERY (C. 1890-1976) WAS A LARGE PART OF THE BOXING COMMUNITY IN LETHBRIDGE INCLUDING ACTING AS PRESIDENT OF THE LETHBRIDGE AMATEUR BOXING CLUB BEGINNING IN 1951. ON OCTOBER 9, 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH DONOR, DORINDA EMERY, WHO IS THE BIOLOGICAL DAUGHTER OF THE YOUNGER JACK EMERY AND THE STEP DAUGHTER OF THE YOUNGEST EMERY BROTHER, JAMES “JIM” EMERY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: WHEN ASKED ABOUT HOW SHE CAME TO POSSESS THE TROPHY, EMERY STATES: “WELL, IT’S BEEN IN MY PARENTS’ BASEMENT FOR SOME TIME AND WHEN MY LAST PARENT DIED – MY DAD - TWO YEARS AGO. WE WERE PACKING UP THE HOUSE [AND] I FOUND THE TROPHY IN THE BASEMENT… I WAS VERY AWARE [OF THE TROPHY GROWING UP]. IT USED TO BE GIVEN OUT EVERY YEAR, AND THEN I THINK THAT SORT OF DIED OUT IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THEN IT CAME BACK TO THE HOUSE. I DON’T KNOW [FOR SURE], ‘CAUSE I CAN’T REMEMBER. I GOT THE PICTURES OF MY GRANDFATHER AND HE IS THE ALBERTA SPORTS HALL OF FAME AND HE’S IN THE LETHBRIDGE SPORTS HALL OF FAME. DORINDA BELIEVES THIS TROPHY IS A REMINDER “THAT MY FAMILY DID CONTRIBUTE AND DID MAKE SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF LETHBRIDGE… MY GRANDFATHER (JOHN LIONEL “JACK” EMERY) WAS A GREAT PROPONENT OF AMATEUR SPORTS AND THOUGHT THAT THE SPORT ELEMENT WAS VERY IMPORTANT FOR KIDS TO PARTICIPATE IN REGARDLESS OF THEIR ATHLETIC LEVELS, BUT ALSO TO ACKNOWLEDGE THOSE WHO EXCELLED.” DORINDA DISCUSSES GROWING UP IN THE EMERY HOUSEHOLD: “I GREW UP WITH [MY GRANDFATHER]. I GREW UP IN A THREE GENERATIONAL HOUSE. SO MY MOTHER BROUGHT ME FROM ENGLAND AND WE LIVED WITH MY FATHER’S PARENTS AND THAT’S JACK… SO I CAME FROM ENGLAND IN 1946 AND WE STAYED IN LETHBRIDGE EVER AFTER… MY MOTHER MARRIED MY REAL FATHER’S BROTHER WHEN I WAS 7. SO JAMES IS ACTUALLY MY UNCLE AND MY DAD…WELL [MY GRANDFATHER] WAS A BIT OF A CURMUDGEON IN A LOT OF WAYS, EX-NAVY. HE HAD BEEN TORPEDOED IN WORLD WAR I, AND THEY CAME TO CANADA RIGHT IN THE DEPRESSION, AND SO THINGS WERE NOT ALWAYS EASY FOR THE FAMILY. MY OLDEST UNCLE, SID, WHO WAS THEIR OLDEST CHILD, WAS BORN IN ENGLAND, BUT THEN JACK OR JOHN – WHO WAS ALSO MY REAL FATHER – AND JIM AND DORIS WERE ALL BORN IN CANADA. THEY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, WHERE MY DAD WAS BORN AND RAISED. [MY DAD] REMEMBERS THE DAYS WHEN ANYTHING PAST 10TH AVENUE SOUTH IN LETHBRIDGE WAS BALD PRAIRIE AND SPENDING MUCH TIME AS CHILDREN ENTERTAINING THEMSELVES IN THE PRAIRIES AND COULEES.” EMERY GOES ON TO DESCRIBE HER GRANDFATHER’S COMMITMENT TO BOXING IN LETHBRIDGE: “HE FORMED THE ALBERTA AMATEUR SPORTS – AMATEUR BOXING ASSOCIATION. HE WAS VERY HIGH UP IN THE BOXING AND WRESTLING IN ALBERTA BACK IN THE ‘50S. HE WAS ON THE COMMISSION FOR BOXING AND WRESTLING IN ALBERTA. HE’S IN THE SPORTS HALL OF FAME… HE WAS VERY MUCH 'THE MAN’S MAN,' AND I THINK HE FELT IT WAS A GENTLEMEN’S SPORT RATHER THAN A ROUGHIAN’S SPORT. HE FELT THAT THERE WAS AN ART IN A WAY OF DEFENDING YOURSELF.” “KAI YIP WAS STILL ACTIVE IN BOXING WHEN I LEFT LETHBRIDGE 3 YEARS AGO. AND KAI KNEW MY GRANDFATHER EXCEPTIONALLY WELL. IN FACT, I THINK THAT IN LOTS OF CASES, GRANDAD HAD CLOSER RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE YOUNG ONES HE WAS FOSTERING IN BOXING THAN HE DID HIS OWN FAMILY… JUST THE NATURE OF HIM, YOU KNOW. VERY BRITISH, VERY UPRIGHT. IF SOMEONE DIDN’T SHARE HIS PASSION FOR BOXING, THEY WEREN’T QUITE THE SAME IN HIS ESTIMATION… HE ENCOURAGED A LOT OF RECREATIONAL ACTIVITY IN HIS KIDS. MY AUNT DORIS WAS A RUNNER. TO HIM THAT WAS AN IMPORTANT, SPORTS WERE IMPORTANT.” JACK EMERY’S INVOLVEMENT IN BOXING WAS AN ACT OF COMMUNITY SERVICE RATHER THAN PROFESSIONAL. THE TOPIC OF BOXING WAS PREVALENT IN THE EMERY HOUSEHOLD: “IT WOULD BE THE TOPIC OF CONVERSATION. WE ALWAYS HAD FAMILY DINNERS. THAT WAS WHEN FAMILIES ACTUALLY ATE TOGETHER 2 OR 3 TIMES A DAY. AND IT WAS ALWAYS A GREAT TOPIC, WHO WAS DOING WHAT AND WHO HE WAS DEVELOPING OR WHAT WAS GOING ON WITH THE BOXING AND WRESTLING COMMISSION. BUT HE WAS ALSO INTENSELY INTERESTED IN POLITICS. WE WERE A FAMILY WITH GREAT DISCUSSIONS DURING MEALTIMES. PLUS HE WOULD BE OFF AND HE’D END UP AT THE LEGION AND WE’D GO AND PULL HIM [OUT] - THE ARMY AND NAVY WAS HIS FAVORITE HANGOUT. HE [WAS] VERY INVOLVED IN THAT, AS WELL. HE LIKED HIS EX-MILITARY CONNECTIONS. HE LOST TWO SONS TO THE WAR, THE SECOND WORLD WAR. [HE] SAW THAT AS A PATRIOTIC DUTY IN LOTS OF WAYS. WHATEVER HE WAS INTERESTED IN, HE WAS INTENSELY DEVOTED TO IT, BUT HE NEVER EARNED MONEY FROM IT AT ALL.” FROM HER GRANDFATHER, EMERY HAS LEARNED: “WELL PROBABLY JUST MY WILLINGNESS TO TRY AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN A COMMUNITY AND CERTAINLY A WILLINGNESS TO DISCUSS ISSUES. TO ME, THE GREATEST THING I LEARNED FROM MY GRANDFATHER WAS DEBATE AND QUESTIONING, AND COMING TO YOUR OWN CONCLUSIONS ABOUT WHAT WAS RIGHT FOR YOU. ‘CAUSE I CAN REMEMBER THE FIRST TIME I EVER WON A REAL, ONE OF OUR LUNCH HOUR DEBATES AND I FELT EXTREMELY VIRTUOUS, AND THEN I FELT ALMOST SORRY BECAUSE HE WAS VERY, VERY GOOD AT HAVING DISCUSSIONS.” REFLECTING ON THE LIFE OF THE EMERY FAMILY, EMERY SAYS, “I THINK THAT, YOU KNOW, THE FAMILY WAS ONE THAT HAD A LOT OF VERY INCREDIBLE CHALLENGES AND A LOT OF GRIEF AND DISAPPOINTMENT, AND YET THEY STILL HAD THE SPIRIT TO TRY AND FIND A WAY TO MAKE THOSE LOSES SIGNIFICANT AND BRING SOME KIND OF LASTING CONTRIBUTION.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN TAKEN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S DIGITIZED COLLECTION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH.” JOHN LIONEL (JACK) EMERY WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE TO HIS FATHER BEARING THE SAME NAME AND MOTHER, CECILIA EMERY. HE WENT TO FLEETWOOD SCHOOL AND LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. HE COMPETED IN BOXING AND WORKED AS A JUNIOR CLERK AT THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA PRIOR TO ENLISTING IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE (RCAF) IN 1941. HE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM IN 1943 WHERE HE WAS ATTACHED TO THE 405 SQUADRON RCAF. HE SERVED FOR SIXTEEN MONTHS ON A LANCASTER AS A NAVIGATOR AND A BOMB AIMER. ON JUNE 11, 1944, FLYING OFFICER EMERY WAS PART OF AN ALL-CANADIAN CREW IN A LANCASTER DETAILED TO BOMB THE VERSAILLES MARSHALLING YARD. THE AIRCRAFT WAS SHOT DOWN BY ENEMY AIRCRAFT AND HEAVY GROUND FIRE. SIX OF THE EIGHT MEN ON THE AIRCRAFT WERE KILLED, INCLUDING EMERY. HE WAS LAID TO REST IN A COLLECTIVE GRAVE AT AUNEAU COMMUNAL CEMETERY. FURTHER INFORMATION ON “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH” DISCUSSES JACK’S OLDER BROTHER, SYDNEY JAMES EMERY. HE WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE TO JACK (C.1890-1976) AND CECILIA EMERY, AND WENT TO THE SAME SCHOOLS AS HIS BROTHER, JACK. “HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED BOXER, HOLDING THREE ALBERTA CHAMPIONSHIPS AND TWICE CONTENDING FOR THE DOMINION TITLE. AT THE TIME OF ENLISTMENT, HE WAS SINGLE AND TRAINING AS A PILOT FOR TRANS-CANADA AIRLINES. HE ENLISTED FOR SERVICE IN THE RCAF IN 1941, AND AFTER TRAINING IN CANADA TO RECEIVE HIS PILOT’S WINGS AND A PROMOTION TO FLYING OFFICER, HE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM IN 1943. THERE, HE WAS ATTACHED TO THE 177 SQUADRON RCAF. THE SQUADRON WAS DEPLOYED TO A BASE IN INDIA IN NOVEMBER OF 1943... ON OCTOBER 17, 1944, EMERY AND HIS NAVIGATOR WERE FLYING A COMBAT MISSION OVER BURMA WHEN THEIR AIRCRAFT CRASHED INTO A HILLSIDE. THEIR SQUADRON WAS ABLE TO LOCATE THE WRECKAGE AND MARK THE MEN’S GRAVES, HOWEVER, FOLLOWING THE WAR THE GRAVES COULD NOT BE RE-LOCATED. THEY ARE REMEMBERED AT THE SINGAPORE MEMORIAL FOR THE MISSING. JACK (C.1890-1976) AND CECILIA HAD TWO OTHER CHILDREN, JAMES (JIM) FREDRICK AND DORIS EMERY. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150015000
Acquisition Date
2017-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail