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Other Name
WALL TROPHY
Date Range From
1964
Date Range To
1972
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20200006005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WALL TROPHY
Date Range From
1964
Date Range To
1972
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.5
Length
30.5
Width
23
Description
A. WOOD AND METAL WALL MOUNTING TROPHY WITH GOLD ENGRAVED PLATES ATTACHED. ONE LARGE PLATE ON THE TOP READS “LETH. DIST. FISH + GAME ASSOC. GUN CLUB WESTERN METALS FABRICATORS LADIES HIGH”. THE SMALL PLATES READ: “S BRENNAN 98 X 100 1964 CALGARY” “SANDY BRENNAN 85 X 100 1965” (THIS PLATE IS COMPONANT PART B) “EVELYN LEFFINGWELL 100 X 9 1966” “EVELYN LEFFINGWELL 1971” “SHEILA KEARNS CALGARY 1967” “1968 EVELYN LEFFINGWELL 100 X 7 LETH MARKSMEN” “S. TIMMERMAN 1969” “E. LEFFINGWELL 1970” “EVELYN LEFFINGWELL 1972” THERE IS A GOLD TROPHY FIGURE PIECE ATTACHED, FEATURING A PERSON SHOOTING A RIFLE. ON THE BACK THERE ARE TWO METAL LOOPS ATTACHED TO THE TOP WITH BLUE AND WHITE CORD STRUNG AND TIED BETWEEN THEM. THERE ARE TWO ADDITIONAL HOLES IN THE WOOD NEAR THE BOTTOM WITH SCREWS FOR MOUNTING THE FIGURE PIECE ON THE FRONT. ONE SMALL PLATE FROM THE LEFT SIDE AND THE SECOND IN THE COLUMN HAS FALLEN OFF. IT HAS BEEN INCLUDED AS A COMPONENT PART. B. LENGTH 5 CM WIDTH 2.5 CM GOLD PLATE ENGRAVED WITH “SANDY BRENNAN 85 X 100 1965”. THE PLATE WAS ATTACHED ON THE LEFT SIDE SECOND IN THE COLUMN.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SPORTS
ASSOCIATIONS
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON FEBRUARY 27TH AND MARCH 5TH, 2020 COLLECTIONS TECHINICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN MET WITH EVELYN LEFFINGWELL IN HER LETHBRIDGE HOME ALONG WITH HER DAUGHTER, LYNDA BARANIECKI. EVELYN AND HER LATE HUSBAND FRANK WERE PROMINENT LOCAL MARKSMEN, TAUGHT YOUNG PEOPLE THE SKILL, WON MANY AWARDS WHILE COMPETING, AND WERE INDUCTED INTO THE LETHBRIDGE SPORTS HALL OF FAME. THEY WERE BOTH VERY INVOLVED WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES, AND SHOOTING CLUBS. EVELYN DONATED A COLLECTION OF ITEMS RELATED TO THE COUPLE’S SPORTING DAYS TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS DERIVED FROM THE TWO AFOREMENTIONED INTERVIEWS. LYNDA CLARIFIED THE DIFFERENCE AND OVERLAP BETWEEN THE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION AND THE LETHBRIDGE MARKSMEN CLUB: “…THE FISH AND GAME REALLY ISN’T A SHOOTING CLUB. THE FISH AND GAME INVOLVES IT ALL… CERTAINLY, IT’S FISHING, IT’S HUNTING, IT’S SAFETY OF GUNS, ALL THAT KIND OF THING. THEIR MARKSMAN CLUB WAS JUST THEIR COMPETITION.” LYNDA EXPLAINED THE LABEL ON THE TROPHY: “…[THE LADIES HIGH] JUST MEANT THAT SHE WAS THE HIGHEST SCORER IN THE ’22. WHEN THEY SHOT ’22, THEY’D SHOOT FROM KNEELING, SITTING, AND STANDING… SO SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN THE COMBINATION SCORE, THE AGGREGATE SCORE OF THE WOMAN’S.” EVELYN ELABORATED ON THE DONATED WALL TROPHY: “…THIS IS THE ‘LADIES HIGH’. I’VE WON IT QUITE A FEW TIMES AND REPLACED IT. THAT’S WHAT THE DEAL WAS, IF YOU WIN IT THREE TIMES, YOU CAN TAKE IT OUT OF CIRCULATION [AND] PUT A NEW ONE IN… OUR LADIES TEAM, WE’VE DONE THAT.” EVELYN’S REACTION TO WINNING THE LADIES HIGH WAS: “...ANYTIME YOU CAN WIN IT, IT’S LOVELY…” WHEN ASKED WHAT EVELYN THOUGHT ABOUT WHEN LOOKING AT THE AWARD, SHE RESPONDED: “HOW I USED TO BE ABLE TO SHOOT.” LYNDA ADDED: “WHEN SHE WAS GOOD.” EVELYN CONTINUED: “THAT’S RIGHT. NOWADAYS, IF I GOT DOWN I WOULDN’T BE ABLE TO GET UP ANYMORE.” “I’M 85 YEARS OLD, YOU KNOW… IT WAS ALWAYS AN HONOUR WHEN YOU COULD WIN…” AN OCTOBER 3RD, 1991 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE OUTLINED EVELYN’S ACHIEVEMENTS, NOTING THAT “EVELYN WAS THE CANADIAN WOMEN’S CHAMPION IN 1967 FOR .22 RIFLE POSTAL MATCHES AND THIRD IN KNEELING. SHE WON THE RIFLEMAN’S RODEO TITLE A NUMBER OF TIMES AND SET CANADIAN BENCHREST RECORDS THREE TIMES. IN 1983 SHE SET THE 100-YARD AGGREGATE HUNTER SCORE MARK AND IN 1984 THE 100-200 YARD AGGREGATE HUNTER SCORE. IN 1987 SHE SET THE VARMIT HUNTER, 200-YARD GROUP RECORD WHICH STILL STANDS.” WHEN ASKED WHAT THE COMPETITION WAS LIKE, EVELYN REPLIED: “WELL, SOME PRETTY TOUGH COMPETITION WE WOULD HAVE. WE HAD A COUPLE OF GIRLS FROM CALGARY, THEY WERE REALLY GOOD… THERE’S A LOT OF GOOD LADY SHOOTERS. IT WAS FUN TO JUST...BE FRIENDS AND HAVE FUN AND TRY [AND] BEAT [THEM].” EVELYN REVEALED WHAT HELPED HER WIN: “[I] HAD MY HUSBAND [TELLING] ME WHAT TO DO. HE TRAINED ME.” LYNDA ADDED: “AND…SOMETIMES IT’S JUST LUCK OF THE DRAW. YOU KNOW, THE WIND HAPPENS TO BLOW THE RIGHT WAY.” LYNDA COMMENTED THAT HER MOM WAS ALSO SKILLFUL: “BUT…IT’S NOT LIKE IT’S A LUCKY THING, SHE WON LOTS. IT WASN’T LIKE IT WAS JUST ALL LUCK, EITHER.” WHEN ASKED IF EVELYN WAS INTO ANY SPORTS EARLIER IN LIFE, EVELYN RESPONDED: “…SPORTS? NOPE. NEVER, UNTIL I STARTED SHOOTING.” EVELYN SAID THAT SHE WAS MOTIVATED TO GET GOOD AT THE SPORT BY HER HUSBAND: “‘…FRANK DID IT ALL THE TIME, WE JUST DID IT TOGETHER, AND HE TAUGHT ME WHAT TO DO…” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT WHAT SHE GAINED FROM THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “[WHAT I GAINED THROUGH SHOOTING WAS] FRIENDSHIP… WE WERE ALL IN THE SAME THING. WE WERE ALL FRIENDS. WE TRAVELED TOGETHER TO THE DIFFERENT SHOOTS… WE ALL WANTED EVERYBODY ELSE TO WIN. IT WAS ENJOYABLE. I LOVED IT. IN FACT, I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO [GO TO THE] SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES. I SHOT IN THE FIRST ONE… FRANK AND I, WE STARTED DOWN AT THE LETHBRIDGE RANGE WITH OUR KIDS, [GETTING THEM] READY, AND US, TO GO TO THE GAMES... I’D GO TO A LOT OF SMALL TOWNS THAT WERE HAVING [THEM], THAT DIDN’T KNOW QUITE WHAT TO DO; GET THEM ALL SET UP FOR THE GAMES. GO IN AND GET THEIR TARGETS… I ALWAYS HAD THEIR TARGETS ALL READY AND THE RANGE READY FOR PEOPLE TO COME IN. I JUST WON A VERY SPECIAL AWARD, ‘HEART OF A CHAMPION’, FROM THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES. [WE ALSO WON THE] MAX GIBB AWARD THAT FRANK AND I BOTH WON. IT’S WORTH IT. PEOPLE APPRECIATE YOU FOR WHAT YOU DO.” EVELYN ELABORATED ON THE SENSE OF COMMUNITY SHE FOUND IN THE SHOOTING CLUBS AND COMPETITIONS: “…I FIND WHEREVER I GO AND WHENEVER THE MEMBERS…ARE THERE, THEY’RE ALWAYS UP, THEY’RE [HUGGING] ME… WHEN WE USED TO HOLD THE SHOOTS…AND KIDS WOULD SHOOT, THEY’D ALWAYS SHOOT THEIR TARGETS AND RUN [THEM] OVER TO ME…SO THAT I COULD CHECK [THEM] OUT BEFORE ANYTHING HAPPENED… [WHEN] WE WERE AT A SHOOT, EVEN IF I WASN’T IN CHARGE OF IT, I WAS THERE, AND…[SOMEBODY] SHOT A TARGET AND THEY DIDN’T FIGURE IT WAS RIGHT, THEY’D BRING IT TO ME. I’D CHECK IT OVER AND THEN I’D GO TO THE SCORERS AND SAY, ‘WILL YOU CHECK THIS OVER, AGAIN?’ IT’S JUST THE TOGETHERNESS THAT I THINK THAT WE FIND.” LYNDA ADDED: “IT’S DEFINITELY A FAMILY... MY DAD WAS A COWBOY…THERE’S NO DOUBT ABOUT IT... HE WORE HIS COWBOY BOOTS, HE WORE HIS COWBOY HAT, THAT’S WHAT HE DID. HE WAS JUST A DOWN TO EARTH PERSON… THERE WAS NO AIRS...AND THAT’S HOW I FIND THAT THE SHOOTERS ARE… THEY DON’T HAVE TO PUT ON AIRS FOR ANYBODY… THEY LOVED WHAT THEY DID…” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO BE RICH AND YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE MONEY…AND EVEN IF YOU HAD MONEY, YOU COULD STILL COME…AND I THINK THE FACT THAT MY DAD WAS A MENTOR… HE TOOK MORE PRIDE IN SEEING HIS JUNIOR SHOOTERS WIN A COMPETITION THAN WINNING IT HIMSELF. HE TOOK MORE PRIDE IN WATCHING…[MY MOM] WIN.” “…EVEN IN THE WINTERTIME WE DIDN’T SHOOT…BUT THEY STILL MET ALL THE TIME... THEY’D GO FOR COFFEE. THIS WAS THEIR GROUP…IT WAS THEIR FAMILY…” EVELYN CONTINUED: “[IT WAS] THE FRIENDSHIP.” “…AFTER FRANK PASSED AWAY, I HAD FRIENDS THAT WOULD PHONE ME EVERY DAY, TELL ME A JOKE TO MAKE ME LAUGH AND THEY JUST DIDN’T FORGET…[YOU]… THAT REALLY MAKES A DIFFERENCE.” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HER DAD’S LEGACY IN THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “THEY HAVE A MEMORIAL SHOOT FOR MY DAD IN AUGUST, ONCE A YEAR, AS WELL…” LYNDA CONTINUED: “PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER [SHOOT IN THE MEMORIAL]. PEOPLE THAT DON’T KNOW HIM, THOUGH, COME BECAUSE THEY’VE HEARD OF HIM… THE PEOPLE THAT DID KNOW HIM…THEY’RE THE ONES THAT CAN TELL THE STORIES.” WHEN ASKED WHAT MADE FRANK UNIQUE IN HIS COMMUNITY, EVELYN RESPONDED: “HE WAS SO INTERESTED IN PROPER WAY OF SHOOTING, OF TEACHING THE JUNIORS—” “—AND EVERYBODY ELSE…TO SHOOT AND HOW…[TO] BE CAREFUL.” EVELYN WENT ON: “…THAT WAS HIS LIFE. HE LOVED SHOOTING, HE LOVED TO TEACH. GARY ELLISON WROTE A STORY ABOUT HIS SON; HE COULD REMEMBER HOW THANKFUL HIS SON WAS THAT HE WAS DOWN THE RANGE ONE DAY AND FRANK HAD HAD HIM USE HIS GUN TO SHOOT. EVERYBODY RESPECTED HIM BECAUSE OF HIS SAFETY.” LYNDA ADDED: “PROPER HANDLING OF GUNS.” “HE WAS A MASTER IN WHAT HE DID, DEFINITELY.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…HE JUST HAD [AN] EXTREME KNOWLEDGE… HE WANTED TO LEARN AND HE LEARNED ALL THE TIME.” WHEN ASKED WHAT VALUES EVELYN AND FRANK TRIED TO INSTILL IN THE YOUNG PEOPLE THEY TAUGHT, SHE REPLIED: “SAFETY FIRST. KNOW WHAT YOU’RE [DOING]. WATCH WHAT YOU’RE [DOING]… IN THE ROOM THERE…I HAVE A BARREL THAT I TAKE DOWN WHENEVER WE HAVE OUR JUNIOR SHOOTERS SO THAT WE TEACH [THEM] YOU DON’T PUT IT DOWN [TO] GET THROUGH THE FENCE; YOU DON’T PUT YOUR RIFLE DOWN, YOUR BARREL, [BECAUSE] IT’S JUST BLOWN ALL APART… I’VE BEEN AT SHOOTS WHERE GUYS HAVE LAID DOWN AND PUT THE WRONG AMMUNITION IN THEIR GUN AND IT BLOWS UP… [IT] MAKES A DIFFERENCE. YOU…[HAVE TO] REALLY KNOW WHAT YOU’RE [DOING] AND HOW TO DO IT. SAFETY IS THE FIRST THING.” EVELYN COMMENTED ON BEING REMEMBERED FOR TEACHING JUNIORS THE SPORT: “…I HAVE A LOT OF PEOPLE FROM THE FISH AND GAME THAT COME UP TO ME AND SAY, ‘YOU TAUGHT ME AS JUNIOR’ …IT’S…REALLY AMAZING HOW PEOPLE REMEMBER YOU.” LYNDA ELABORATED ON THE MEANING BEHIND HER PARENTS BEING INDUCTED INTO THE HALL OF FAME: “MY DAD WAS INDUCTED AS A BUILDER, NOT AS AN ATHLETE. [MY MOM] WAS INDUCTED AS AN ATHLETE, SO THERE WERE TWO DIFFERENT CATEGORIES… TO ME, MY DAD WAS A MENTOR. HE TAUGHT, THAT WAS HIS FIELD. THAT’S…WHERE HE SHONE… I MEAN, HE WAS A SHOOTER, THERE’S NO DOUBT ABOUT IT, HE WAS A MASTER OF WHAT HE DID, BUT IT’S THE TEACHING THAT WAS SO IMPORTANT TO HIM. NOT THAT IT WASN’T TO HER BUT…THAT’S WHY.” EVELYN OFFERED HER CLOSING THOUGHTS ON BEING IN THE HALL OF FAME: “I FEEL…ABSOLUTELY HONOURED. I’VE BEEN THINKING OF THIS FOR A LONG TIME AND TO ME, IT’S GREAT. [FRANK] DESERVES IT. I HEAR EVERYBODY ELSE GOING IN THERE, WHY CAN’T HE? WE GOT OUR ROCK BUT NOBODY SEES THAT. BUT, IT IS AN HONOUR.” AN OCTOBER 3RD, 1991 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE MADE REFERENCE TO THE ROCK EVELYN MENTIONED. THE ARTICLE STATED THAT “A CAIRN AT THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME TARGET RANGE, IN MEMORY OF FRANK LEFFINGWELL, ONE OF THE MAIN FORCES BEHIND THE RANGE WILL BE UNVEILED…” EVELYN REVEALED WHAT MOTIVATED HER TO DONATE THE MEMORABILIA TO THE MUSEUM: “…I HAVE SO MUCH STUFF AND FRANK HAS BEEN AWARDED…AND WORKED SO HARD TO GET EVERYTHING THAT HE GOT. HE WAS A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION. HE DID AN AWFUL LOT THROUGH CONSTRUCTION OF THE RANGE DOWN THERE, AND ALL OF THE AWARDS THAT HE HAS WON, HE’S THE GREATEST… THIS WAY, I FIGURED OTHER PEOPLE CAN…SEE JUST WHAT A KIND OF A GENTLEMAN HE WAS…AND HOW GREAT HE WAS AT SHOOTING.” “…I’M [GETTING] OLDER ALL THE TIME AND THERE COULD BE A TIME WHEN I’M…[GOING TO] HAVE TO LEAVE OUR HOME. WHAT AM I…[GOING TO] DO WITH THIS STUFF…? I’VE HAD PEOPLE COME AND I’LL SEE IF THERE’S ANYTHING THAT YOU’D REALLY LIKE TO REMEMBER HIM BY, BY ALL MEANS TAKE IT HOME WITH YOU. BUT THE THING IS, WHAT’S MY FAMILY…[GOING TO] DO WITH EVERYTHING THAT’S HERE? NOBODY WANTS IT. THE TROPHIES, YOU CAN’T DO…[ANYTHING] WITH THEM; THEY END UP IN THE DUMP, WHICH IS SAD TO SAY.” EVELYN WENT ON: “I DON’T THINK YOU’LL SEE [ANYTHING LIKE MY BASEMENT]…AGAIN. THIS IS ALL THE AWARDS AND THINGS THAT WE HAVE WON THROUGH THE YEARS. WE STARTED SHOOTING IN…[1966].” EVELYN PROVIDED THE ORIGINS OF HOW SHE STARTED SHOOTING: “[I STARTED SHOOTING] JUST TO BE WITH HIM, THAT’S ALL.” “…IT WAS JUST THAT WE TRAVELED TOGETHER AND…THAT’S WHY HE HAD ME WITH HIM. IF ANYTHING HAPPENED, IT WAS BOTH OF US TOGETHER. [THAT’S] JUST THE WAY IT WAS.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT LEARNING TO HUNT FROM FRANK: “…IT WAS JUST NICE TO BE OUT THERE, TO BE ABLE TO JUST BE OUT IN THE COUNTRY AND SEE THE ANIMALS. IT’S VERY FUNNY, THE FIRST TIME I WENT OUT WITH HIM AND HE SHOT A DEER… HE DECIDED HE’S…[GOING TO] CLEAN IT… HE SAID, ‘HOLD THIS LEG FOR ME.’ SO I HELD THIS LEG AND THEN PRETTY SOON, ‘HOW ABOUT THIS ONE?’ …BEFORE LONG, I’M…LOOKING DOWN INTO IT. HE DIDN’T WANT ME TO DO IT BECAUSE HE THOUGHT I’D GET SICK, BUT, HERE I WAS. [THAT] WAS A GOOD WAY TO TEACH ME.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT HOW HER AND FRANK SHARED A COMMITMENT TO THE SPORT OVER TIME: “…THEN IT JUST SEEMED LIKE BEING INVOLVED WITH GOING DOWN TO THE RANGE AND HAVING THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME RANGE... HIS DAD AND MOM LIVED WITH US. HIS DAD AND HIM WOULD LOAD ALL THE TIME AND GO DOWN SHOOTING AND THEN WHEN DAD PASSED AWAY…FRANK JUST CONTINUED ON… THEN…A BUNCH OF US…GOT TOGETHER WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME AND WE WERE UNDER THE GREEN ACRES KIWANIS CLUB. PERCY BUTLER…WANTED TO START THE SHOOTING PROGRAM AND WE GOT INVOLVED IN THAT, AND THAT WAS THE START OF IT; WE JUST CONTINUED ON.” “…IT WAS ALSO THE GREEN ACRES KIWANIS [THAT PROMPTED FRANK TO START TARGET SHOOTING]… THEY WANTED TO START A JUNIOR PROGRAM SO SOME OF OUR MEMBERS FROM THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME, THEY WERE IN THERE, THEY WERE…[GOING TO] TEACH THE PROPER WAY OF HANDLING GUNS AND EVERYTHING AND FRANK AND I [WERE] WITH [THEM]. SO WE JUST WENT IN…[TO TEACHING] THEM AND CONTINUED ON. WE HAD PROGRAMS WHERE WE HAVE SENIORS, WE USED TO SHOOT IN THE RCMP INDOOR RANGE. THAT WAS BELOW THE GARAGE. [THAT] WAS MANY YEARS AGO…” “…WE STARTED WITH…TEACHING JUNIORS [SHOOTING]…AND THEN JUST WENT ON TO COMPETITION-SHOOTING. [WE] TRAVELED ALL OVER AND, LUCKY ENOUGH, THAT WE WERE GOOD ENOUGH TO DO IT. BUT WE DID IT TOGETHER. [THAT] WAS THE MAIN THING. WE LOADED BEFORE WE WENT TO A SHOOT, RIGHT UP UNTIL TWELVE O’CLOCK AT NIGHT, JUMP INTO THE TRUCK, AND DROVE TO WHEREVER WE WERE GOING TO COMPETE. WE PRACTICED TOGETHER, WE SHOT TOGETHER, WE DID JUNIORS TOGETHER, WE DID EVERYTHING TOGETHER… THAT’S THE MAIN THING… I WANT HIS MEMORY TO GO ON. THAT’S WHY I’M…[DONATING THE ITEMS TO MUSEUM].” LYNDA TALKED ABOUT THE COUPLE’S COMMON PASSION FOR SHOOTING: “…THEY’D BE TOGETHER… IT WOULD ALWAYS BE FRANK AND EVELYN. THAT’S THE WAY THAT PEOPLE THINK OF THE WHOLE THING… NOW…THERE ARE OTHER KIDS THAT ARE COMING UP, THE ONES THAT SHE TEACHES IN THE SUMMERTIME THAT ARE DIFFERENT… BUT ANY OF THE SHOOTERS, IT WAS ALWAYS FRANK AND EVELYN; ‘WE DID THIS WITH FRANK AND EVELYN.’ IT WAS ALWAYS TOGETHER.” LYNDA OFFERED A STORY AS TO HOW HER DAD STARTED TARGET SHOOTING, WANTING TO BECOME A BETTER SHOT: “...THERE IS AN ARTICLE WHERE DAD IS TALKING ABOUT WHEN HE WAS DOWN AT THE RANGE SIGHTING IN ON ONE OF HIS GUNS TO GO HUNTING… GENE SCULLY, WHO WAS ALSO ONE OF THE INSTRUCTORS FOR THE YOUNG KIDS SAID TO HIM, ‘WELL, WHY DON’T YOU SHOOT AT THIS TARGET?’ AND [DAD] SAID, ‘I SHOT TEN ROUNDS. THAT’S WHEN I FIGURED OUT I BETTER LEARN HOW TO SHOOT. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED DOING TARGET SHOOTING.’ SO THAT…[WAS] HIS INSPIRATION, [IT] WAS THAT, ‘I’M NOT QUITE AS GOOD AS I THINK I AM. MAYBE I BETTER PRACTICE A LITTLE BIT MORE’.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT THE CLUB NAME SHE WAS A PART OF: “THE LETHBRIDGE MARKSMAN, WE WERE. [IN THE 1970S].” EVELYN REVEALED HOW THE VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE SHOOTING RANGE LOCATIONS CHANGED OVER TIME: “…ALLAN JARVIE WAS A VETERAN… HE OPENED A RED ASH COMPANY DOWN IN THE RIVER, BUT EVERYBODY CONTINUED TO GO DOWN AND SHOOT ALL HIS MACHINERY… WE KNEW ALLAN AND HIS WIFE AND FAMILY FROM THE TIME THEY WERE KIDS. BUT HE WENT TO THE [LETHBRIDGE] FISH AND GAME [ASSOCIATION] AND HE SAID, ‘I’LL MAKE YOU A DEAL. I OWN SO MUCH PROPERTY DOWN HERE, I’LL GIVE YOU THIS PARCEL OF LAND IF YOU WILL AGREE TO KEEP IT CLEAN AND HAVE IT SHOOTING SO PEOPLE WON’T COME DOWN AND SHOOT MY STUFF SO MUCH.’ AND THAT WAS THE START OF…[THE FIRST SHOOTING RANGE].” “THAT WAS THE FIRST RANGE. THEN, PEENAQUIM PARK DECIDED THEY WANTED TO MOVE IN THERE. THEY WANTED TO MAKE A WALKING TRAIL WHERE WE WERE…” “…SO THAT’S WHAT THEY WANT– THEY COME TO US TO SEE IF THAT PROPERTY WAS OPEN, IF WE WOULD MOVE. WELL, WE WENT TO UMPTEEN DOZEN MEETINGS WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE TRYING TO MAKE ARRANGEMENTS TO GET OUR RANGE MOVED. FINALLY, THE CITY…[CAME] TO US AND THEY SAID, ‘WE’VE GOT A COULEE THAT IS FALLING DOWN. WE’LL TAKE THAT DIRT AND WE WILL BUILD YOU NINE-FEET BERMS BETWEEN EACH DISCIPLINE OF SHOOTING, IF YOU’LL AGREE TO MOVE.’ WELL, IT SOUNDED PRETTY GOOD. IT WAS A LOT BIGGER THAN WHAT WE HAD.” EVELYN TALKED ABOUT THE GENDER MAKEUP IN THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “[THERE WAS] PROBABLY MORE MEN [SHOOTING] BUT THERE’S A LOT OF WOMEN THAT ARE IN THERE NOW, TOO. A LOT OF KIDS.” LYNDA ESTIMATED THE RATIO AT: “FIVE [MEN] TO ONE [WOMAN], I BET YOU ANYWAY.” LYNDA ELABORATED: “I MEAN, WHEN YOU’D GO TO A SHOOT THERE’D MAYBE BE SIX OR SEVEN WOMEN BUT THERE’D BE THIRTY MEN…” EVELYN ORGANIZED AND VOLUNTEERED IN THE COMMUNITY: “[WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION, I WAS A PART OF THE] BANQUET COMMITTEE, BINGO COMMITTEE. ANYTIME THEY HAD ONE THAT THEY WERE TAKING THE KIDS OUT [I WAS INVOLVED]… WE’D TAKE KIDS OUT FISHING AND THEN GO SOMEWHERE AND HAVE LUNCH AND EVERYTHING… JUST ANYTHING TO DO PRIMARILY WITH KIDS, I WAS WILLING TO DO IT. AND I STILL AM.” “…I USED TO GO HELP ALL THE SMALLER TOWNS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO AND THINGS. I’D GO [AND] HELP WITH THE SCORING AND GETTIN’ PEOPLE TO WORK, SET UP THE RANGES, GET THEIR TARGETS READY AND SO I ENJOYED IT, I LOVED IT…” WHEN ASKED WHAT TIME PERIOD THE FAMILY HAD PEAK MEMORIES AND INVOLVEMENT IN THE SPORT, LYNDA RESPONDED: “70S.” TO THE SAME QUESTION AS ABOVE, EVELYN REPLIED: “YEAH, 70S, ’75, ‘80S.” WHEN ASKED HOW EVELYN GOT SO GOOD AT SHOOTING, SHE ANSWERED: “WE PRACTICED ALL THE TIME.” LYNDA ADDED: “SPEND HOURS AND HOURS AND HOURS AT THE RANGE.” EVELYN SAID SHE PRACTICED REGULARILY: “SOMETIMES EVERY EVENING, AFTER WORK.” “…ALWAYS HAD TIME FOR IT… I’M NOT DOING THAT MUCH NOW BECAUSE I’M OLDER...” “…BUT I’LL HELP WHEREVER I CAN. I ENJOY IT. IT’S A GOOD ORGANIZATION. I’VE MADE A LOT OF FRIENDS…” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HER FATHER’S COMMITMENT TO SHOOTING: “…EVEN INTO THE ‘80S, WHEN [MY PARENTS] WERE STILL GOING TO ALL [THEIR] SHOOTS, WHEN MY DAD FIRST GOT SICK…HE WAS STILL DOING JUNIOR SHOOTERS AND…THAT’S BASICALLY WHEN HE WAS SETTING UP THE NEW RANGE, IN THAT AREA… HE WAS BUSY…DOING THAT STILL AND HE [HAD A SURGERY]…DONE AND WAS STILL DOWN AT THE RANGE PROBABLY TWO WEEKS LATER.” FRANK WAS ALSO ALWAYS PRACTICING, ACCORDING TO EVELYN: “…IF HE WAS SITTIN’ HERE NOW AND HE’D HAVE A GUN IN HIS HAND, HE’D BE AIMING AT SOMETHING...PRACTICING... NO MATTER WHERE IT WAS… HE’D ALWAYS SAY, ‘WELL, PICK IT UP AND TRY IT. AIM AT SOMETHING.’ HE HAD HIS OWN, SPECIAL WAY OF [DOING] THINGS… HE WAS GREAT.” LYNDA CONFIRMED THE FREQUENCY OF HER PARENT’S SHOOTING PRACTICE: “DEFINITELY EVERY EVENING AFTER WORK, SOMETIMES TWICE A DAY.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…IT’S LIKE ANY SPORT, I SUPPOSE… IT GETS IN…[YOU], IT’S YOURS… YOU STRIVE TO BE BETTER AND YOU WORK HARDER TO BE BETTER… THEN YOU [ALSO] GO DOWN THERE [TO THE SHOOTING RANGE] TO SEE WHO’S DOWN THERE [BECAUSE] YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS ANYBODY.” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HOW HER DAD DID THE PREPARATION WORK OF LOADING BULLETS: “…[THE COST WAS] WHY THEY LOADED THEIR OWN BULLETS… DAD USED TO HAVE, IN THAT BEDROOM THERE, WAS…WHERE HIS LOADING ROOM WAS… IN THAT ARTICLE I READ THIS MORNING, HE SAYS THAT…IT WAS PROBABLY A THIRD OF THE COST TO LOAD HIS OWN BUT HE ALSO TALKS IN THAT ARTICLE ABOUT HOW PRECISE [LOADING WAS]… HE HAD TO LEARN, OVER THE YEARS, HOW…[TO LOAD]… YOU HAD TO HAVE EXACT AMOUNT OF POWDER, YOU LEARNED THE BETTER THINGS TO USE… HE USED CASTOR OIL RATHER THAN THE MANUFACTURER’S OIL… HE LEARNED DIFFERENT THINGS AND HOW PERFECT IT WAS… IT’S AN ART JUST TO DO THE LOADING ITSELF… HE WOULD BE DOWN HERE FOR HOURS AND HOURS AND HOURS, LOADING BULLETS… HE’D HAVE FIVE HUNDRED OF [THEM] AND A HUNDRED OF [THEM] MIGHT BE GOOD AND THE OTHER FOUR HUNDRED HE’D DUMP OUT AND START ALL OVER AGAIN… IT’S QUITE AN ART JUST DOING THAT.” “IN THE EVENINGS. HE’D BE DOWN LOADING, EVERY NIGHT. HE’D BE DOWN WORKING IN HIS LOADING ROOM, [DOING] THINGS… THIS WAS IS SPECIALTY…” EVELYN STILL IS INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY: “…I STILL GO DOWN [TO THE RANGE]… A FRIEND OF MINE THAT IS A FISH AND GAME MEMBER, WE TEACH…FISH AND GAME MEMBER JUNIORS ALL THE TIME. WE HAVE ABOUT A FOUR TO FIVE-WEEK COURSE EVERY YEAR AND WHEN THE COURSE IS FINISHED, I RECYCLE MY TROPHIES AND GIVE EACH CHILD A TROPHY AND IT MEANS A LOT TO [THEM].” “IT WAS A GOOD SPORT. I REALLY ENJOYED IT WHILE I WAS IN AND I ENJOYED THE PEOPLE, SO IT’S TOO BAD IF I GOT DOWN THERE I WOULDN’T BE ABLE TO GET UP AGAIN. I CAN’T GET DOWN IN THE PROPER POSITION ANYMORE.” EVELYN TALKED ABOUT HAVING TO SELL HER GUNS: “...[IT] BROKE MY HEART TO HAVE TO GET RID OF [THEM] ALL.” EVELYN CONTINUED: “I HAD SPECIAL…[FIREARMS] THAT…[FRANK] HAD BUILT JUST FOR ME.” LYNDA ADDED ON THE TOPIC OF GETTING RID OF THE FIREARMS A DECADE AGO FOLLOWING FRANK’S DEATH: “…DAD BUILT HIS OWN GUNS. HE DID BUILD FOR HER, HE BUIL[T] THE STOCKS…AND PAINTED ON [THEM] AND HAD WRITINGS... IT WOULD HAVE BEEN NICE TO KEEP SOME OF THE STOCKS BUT IT’S HARD…[TO] JUST SELL A BARREL.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…IT WAS TO THE POINT WHERE WE HAVE TO DO SOMETHING WITH THEM. SOMEONE NEEDS TO ENJOY THEM LIKE DAD DID… THERE ARE PEOPLE OUT THERE THAT WANTED THESE THINGS AND…WE JUST HAD TO DO IT…” EVELYN REFLECTED ON RETIRING FROM THE SPORT: “IT’S TOUGH WHEN YOU CAN’T DO IT ANYMORE. BUT WHEN YOU MAKE UP YOUR MIND YOU CAN’T, YOU DON’T WANNA GET OUT THERE AND MAKE A FOOL OUT OF YOURSELF, SO IT’S EASIER TO WATCH OR WORK.” LYNDA TALKED ABOUT HER MOM STILL PARTAKING THE THE MEMORIAL SHOOT FOR HER FATHER: “SHE STILL SHOOTS ONCE A YEAR WHICH I DON’T REALLY THINK SHE SHOULD BUT SHE DOES, AT MY DAD’S MEMORIAL SHOOT… SO SHE HASN’T GIVEN THAT UP COMPLETELY EVEN THOUGH SHE WANTS TO TELL YOU SHE HAS, SHE HASN’T.” EVELYN ADDED: “…I WILL CONTINUE SHOOTING IT UNTIL THEY PUT ME IN MY CASKET.” FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SEE THE FULL TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20200006005
Acquisition Date
2020-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1969
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20200006006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1969
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
48.5
Length
30.8
Width
15
Description
A. WOOD AND METAL TROPHY WITH THREE PEDESTALS. ATOP THE SIDE PEDESTALS THERE ARE GOLD STARS. AT THE CENTRE PEDESTAL THERE IS A GOLD ANGEL FIGURE. AT THE CENTRE ATTACHED TO THE BASE THERE IS A GOLD PERSON SHOOTING. THE TROPHY HAS A LARGE ENGRAVED PLATE THAT READS “WHITNEY TROPHY LETHBRIDGE FISH & GAME SMALLBORE CLUB”. THERE ARE 5 SMALLER ENGRAVED SHIELDS THAT READ: “FRANK LEFFINGWELL 397 X 400 1965” “FRANK LEFFINGWELL 395 X 400 1966” “EARL J. MILLER 316 X 400 1967” “EVELYN LEFFINGWELL 399 X 400 1968” “FRANK LEFFINGWELL 399 X 400 1969” THE LAST ENGRAVED SHIELD IN THE ROW HAS FALLEN OFF AND IS INCLUDED AS A COMPONENT PART. THERE ARE THREE SCREWS IN THE BASE ON THE BOTTOM SIDE. B. LENGTH 4 CM WIDTH 3.6 CM SHIELD SHAPED GOLD PLATE ENGRAVED WITH “FRANK LEFFINGWELL 399 X 400 1969”. THE ENGRAVING WAS ATTACHED ON THE FAR RIGHT OF THE ROW OF SHIELDS.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SPORTS
COMMEMORATIVE
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON FEBRUARY 27TH AND MARCH 5TH, 2020 COLLECTIONS TECHINICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN MET WITH EVELYN LEFFINGWELL IN HER LETHBRIDGE HOME ALONG WITH HER DAUGHTER, LYNDA BARANIECKI. EVELYN AND HER LATE HUSBAND FRANK WERE PROMINENT LOCAL MARKSMEN, TAUGHT YOUNG PEOPLE THE SKILL, WON MANY AWARDS WHILE COMPETING, AND WERE INDUCTED INTO THE LETHBRIDGE SPORTS HALL OF FAME. THEY WERE BOTH VERY INVOLVED WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES, AND SHOOTING CLUBS. EVELYN DONATED A COLLECTION OF ITEMS RELATED TO THE COUPLE’S SPORTING DAYS TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS DERIVED FROM THE TWO AFOREMENTIONED INTERVIEWS. LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT FRANK’S TROPHY FROM 1965: “IT’S HARD TO READ. THAT WAS ONE OF THE EARLY ONES THOUGH, THE WHITNEY TROPHY…” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…THAT WAS ONE OF THE FIRST ONES, I BET…” “...THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN IN LETHBRIDGE.” EVELYN ADDED ON THE LIKELY ORIGIN OF THE TROPHY: “PROBABLY THE FISH AND GAME. THEY HAD A WHOLE BUNCH OF TROPHIES…” LYNDA CLARIFIED THE DIFFERENCE AND OVERLAP BETWEEN THE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION AND THE LETHBRIDGE MARKSMEN CLUB: “…THE FISH AND GAME REALLY ISN’T A SHOOTING CLUB. THE FISH AND GAME INVOLVES IT ALL… CERTAINLY, IT’S FISHING, IT’S HUNTING, IT’S SAFETY OF GUNS, ALL THAT KIND OF THING. THEIR MARKSMAN CLUB WAS JUST THEIR COMPETITION.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT WHAT SHE GAINED FROM THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “[WHAT I GAINED THROUGH SHOOTING WAS] FRIENDSHIP… WE WERE ALL IN THE SAME THING. WE WERE ALL FRIENDS. WE TRAVELED TOGETHER TO THE DIFFERENT SHOOTS… WE ALL WANTED EVERYBODY ELSE TO WIN. IT WAS ENJOYABLE. I LOVED IT. IN FACT, I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO [GO TO THE] SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES. I SHOT IN THE FIRST ONE… FRANK AND I, WE STARTED DOWN AT THE LETHBRIDGE RANGE WITH OUR KIDS, [GETTING] [THEM] READY, AND US, TO GO TO THE GAMES... I’D GO TO A LOT OF SMALL TOWNS THAT WERE HAVING [THEM], THAT DIDN’T KNOW QUITE WHAT TO DO; GET THEM ALL SET UP FOR THE GAMES. GO IN AND GET THEIR TARGETS… I ALWAYS HAD THEIR TARGETS ALL READY AND THE RANGE READY FOR PEOPLE TO COME IN. I JUST WON A VERY SPECIAL AWARD, ‘HEART OF A CHAMPION’, FROM THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA SUMMER GAMES. [WE ALSO WON THE] MAX GIBB AWARD THAT FRANK AND I BOTH WON. IT’S WORTH IT. PEOPLE APPRECIATE YOU FOR WHAT YOU DO.” EVELYN ELABORATED ON THE SENSE OF COMMUNITY SHE FOUND IN THE SHOOTING CLUBS AND COMPETITIONS: “…I FIND WHEREVER I GO AND WHENEVER THE MEMBERS…ARE THERE, THEY’RE ALWAYS UP, THEY’RE [HUGGING] ME… WHEN WE USED TO HOLD THE SHOOTS…AND KIDS WOULD SHOOT, THEY’D ALWAYS SHOOT THEIR TARGETS AND RUN [THEM] OVER TO ME…SO THAT I COULD CHECK [TH]EM OUT BEFORE ANYTHING HAPPENED… [WHEN] WE WERE AT A SHOOT, EVEN IF I WASN’T IN CHARGE OF IT, I WAS THERE, AND…[SOMEBODY] SHOT A TARGET AND THEY DIDN’T FIGURE IT WAS RIGHT, THEY’D BRING IT TO ME. I’D CHECK IT OVER AND THEN I’D GO TO THE SCORERS AND SAY, ‘WILL YOU CHECK THIS OVER, AGAIN?’ IT’S JUST THE TOGETHERNESS THAT I THINK THAT WE FIND.” LYNDA ADDED: “IT’S DEFINITELY A FAMILY... MY DAD WAS A COWBOY…THERE’S NO DOUBT ABOUT IT... HE WORE HIS COWBOY BOOTS, HE WORE HIS COWBOY HAT, THAT’S WHAT HE DID. HE WAS JUST A DOWN TO EARTH PERSON… THERE WAS NO AIRS...AND THAT’S HOW I FIND THAT THE SHOOTERS ARE… THEY DON’T HAVE TO PUT ON AIRS FOR ANYBODY… THEY LOVED WHAT THEY DID…” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO BE RICH AND YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE MONEY…AND EVEN IF YOU HAD MONEY, YOU COULD STILL COME…AND I THINK THE FACT THAT MY DAD WAS A MENTOR… HE TOOK MORE PRIDE IN SEEING HIS JUNIOR SHOOTERS WIN A COMPETITION THAN WINNING IT HIMSELF. HE TOOK MORE PRIDE IN WATCHING…[MY MOM] WIN.” “…EVEN IN THE WINTERTIME WE DIDN’T SHOOT…BUT THEY STILL MET ALL THE TIME... THEY’D GO FOR COFFEE. THIS WAS THEIR GROUP…IT WAS THEIR FAMILY…” EVELYN CONTINUED: “[IT WAS] THE FRIENDSHIP.” “…AFTER FRANK PASSED AWAY, I HAD FRIENDS THAT WOULD PHONE ME EVERY DAY, TELL ME A JOKE TO MAKE ME LAUGH AND THEY JUST DIDN’T FORGET…[YOU]… THAT REALLY MAKES A DIFFERENCE.” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HER DAD’S LEGACY IN THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “THEY HAVE A MEMORIAL SHOOT FOR MY DAD IN AUGUST, ONCE A YEAR, AS WELL…” LYNDA CONTINUED: “PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER [SHOOT IN THE MEMORIAL]. PEOPLE THAT DON’T KNOW HIM, THOUGH, COME BECAUSE THEY’VE HEARD OF HIM… THE PEOPLE THAT DID KNOW HIM…THEY’RE THE ONES THAT CAN TELL THE STORIES.” WHEN ASKED WHAT MADE FRANK UNIQUE IN HIS COMMUNITY, EVELYN RESPONDED: “HE WAS SO INTERESTED IN PROPER WAY OF SHOOTING, OF TEACHING THE JUNIORS—” “—AND EVERYBODY ELSE…TO SHOOT AND HOW…[TO] BE CAREFUL.” EVELYN WENT ON: “…THAT WAS HIS LIFE. HE LOVED SHOOTING, HE LOVED TO TEACH. GARY ELLISON WROTE A STORY ABOUT HIS SON; HE COULD REMEMBER HOW THANKFUL HIS SON WAS THAT HE WAS DOWN THE RANGE ONE DAY AND FRANK HAD HAD HIM USE HIS GUN TO SHOOT. EVERYBODY RESPECTED HIM BECAUSE OF HIS SAFETY.” LYNDA ADDED: “PROPER HANDLING OF GUNS.” “HE WAS A MASTER IN WHAT HE DID, DEFINITELY.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…HE JUST HAD [AN] EXTREME KNOWLEDGE… HE WANTED TO LEARN AND HE LEARNED ALL THE TIME.” WHEN ASKED WHAT VALUES EVELYN AND FRANK TRIED TO INSTILL IN THE YOUNG PEOPLE THEY TAUGHT, SHE REPLIED: “SAFETY FIRST. KNOW WHAT YOU’RE [DOING]. WATCH WHAT YOU’RE [DOING]… IN THE ROOM THERE…I HAVE A BARREL THAT I TAKE DOWN WHENEVER WE HAVE OUR JUNIOR SHOOTERS SO THAT WE TEACH [THEM] YOU DON’T PUT IT DOWN [TO] GET THROUGH THE FENCE; YOU DON’T PUT YOUR RIFLE DOWN, YOUR BARREL, [BECAUSE] IT’S JUST BLOWN ALL APART… I’VE BEEN AT SHOOTS WHERE GUYS HAVE LAID DOWN AND PUT THE WRONG AMMUNITION IN THEIR GUN AND IT BLOWS UP… [IT] MAKES A DIFFERENCE. YOU…[HAVE TO] REALLY KNOW WHAT YOU’RE [DOING] AND HOW TO DO IT. SAFETY IS THE FIRST THING.” EVELYN COMMENTED ON BEING REMEMBERED FOR TEACHING JUNIORS THE SPORT: “…I HAVE A LOT OF PEOPLE FROM THE FISH AND GAME THAT COME UP TO ME AND SAY, ‘YOU TAUGHT ME AS JUNIOR’ …IT’S…REALLY AMAZING HOW PEOPLE REMEMBER YOU.” LYNDA ELABORATED ON THE MEANING BEHIND HER PARENTS BEING INDUCTED INTO THE HALL OF FAME: “MY DAD WAS INDUCTED AS A BUILDER, NOT AS AN ATHLETE. [MY MOM] WAS INDUCTED AS AN ATHLETE, SO THERE WERE TWO DIFFERENT CATEGORIES… TO ME, MY DAD WAS A MENTOR. HE TAUGHT, THAT WAS HIS FIELD. THAT’S…WHERE HE SHONE… I MEAN, HE WAS A SHOOTER, THERE’S NO DOUBT ABOUT IT, HE WAS A MASTER OF WHAT HE DID, BUT IT’S THE TEACHING THAT WAS SO IMPORTANT TO HIM. NOT THAT IT WASN’T TO HER BUT…THAT’S WHY.” EVELYN OFFERED HER CLOSING THOUGHTS ON BEING IN THE HALL OF FAME: “I FEEL…ABSOLUTELY HONOURED. I’VE BEEN THINKING OF THIS FOR A LONG TIME AND TO ME, IT’S GREAT. [FRANK] DESERVES IT. I HEAR EVERYBODY ELSE GOING IN THERE, WHY CAN’T HE? WE GOT OUR ROCK BUT NOBODY SEES THAT. BUT, IT IS AN HONOUR.” AN OCTOBER 3RD, 1991 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE MADE REFERENCE TO THE ROCK EVELYN MENTIONED. THE ARTICLE STATED THAT “A CAIRN AT THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME TARGET RANGE, IN MEMORY OF FRANK LEFFINGWELL, ONE OF THE MAIN FORCES BEHIND THE RANGE WILL BE UNVEILED…” EVELYN REVEALED WHAT MOTIVATED HER TO DONATE THE MEMORABILIA TO THE MUSEUM: “…I HAVE SO MUCH STUFF AND FRANK HAS BEEN AWARDED…AND WORKED SO HARD TO GET EVERYTHING THAT HE GOT. HE WAS A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION. HE DID AN AWFUL LOT THROUGH CONSTRUCTION OF THE RANGE DOWN THERE, AND ALL OF THE AWARDS THAT HE HAS WON, HE’S THE GREATEST… THIS WAY, I FIGURED OTHER PEOPLE CAN…SEE JUST WHAT A KIND OF A GENTLEMAN HE WAS…AND HOW GREAT HE WAS AT SHOOTING.” “…I’M GETTIN[G] OLDER ALL THE TIME AND THERE COULD BE A TIME WHEN I’M…[GOING TO] HAVE TO LEAVE OUR HOME. WHAT AM I…[GOING TO] DO WITH THIS STUFF…? I’VE HAD PEOPLE COME AND I’LL SEE IF THERE’S ANYTHING THAT YOU’D REALLY LIKE TO REMEMBER HIM BY, BY ALL MEANS TAKE IT HOME WITH YOU. BUT THE THING IS, WHAT’S MY FAMILY…[GOING TO] DO WITH EVERYTHING THAT’S HERE? NOBODY WANTS IT. THE TROPHIES, YOU CAN’T DO…[ANYTHING] WITH THEM; THEY END UP IN THE DUMP, WHICH IS SAD TO SAY.” EVELYN WENT ON: “I DON’T THINK YOU’LL SEE [ANYTHING LIKE MY BASEMENT]…AGAIN. THIS IS ALL THE AWARDS AND THINGS THAT WE HAVE WON THROUGH THE YEARS. WE STARTED SHOOTING IN…[1966].” EVELYN PROVIDED THE ORIGINS OF HOW SHE STARTED SHOOTING: “[I STARTED SHOOTING] JUST TO BE WITH HIM, THAT’S ALL.” “…IT WAS JUST THAT WE TRAVELED TOGETHER AND…THAT’S WHY HE HAD ME WITH HIM. IF ANYTHING HAPPENED, IT WAS BOTH OF US TOGETHER. [THAT’S] JUST THE WAY IT WAS.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT LEARNING TO HUNT FROM FRANK: “…IT WAS JUST NICE TO BE OUT THERE, TO BE ABLE TO JUST BE OUT IN THE COUNTRY AND SEE THE ANIMALS. IT’S VERY FUNNY, THE FIRST TIME I WENT OUT WITH HIM AND HE SHOT A DEER… HE DECIDED HE’S…[GOING TO] CLEAN IT… HE SAID, ‘HOLD THIS LEG FOR ME.’ SO I HELD THIS LEG AND THEN PRETTY SOON, ‘HOW ABOUT THIS ONE?’ …BEFORE LONG, I’M…LOOKING DOWN INTO IT. HE DIDN’T WANT ME TO DO IT BECAUSE HE THOUGHT I’D GET SICK, BUT, HERE I WAS. [THAT] WAS A GOOD WAY TO TEACH ME.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT HOW HER AND FRANK SHARED A COMMITMENT TO THE SPORT OVER TIME: “…THEN IT JUST SEEMED LIKE BEING INVOLVED WITH GOING DOWN TO THE RANGE AND HAVING THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME RANGE... HIS DAD AND MOM LIVED WITH US. HIS DAD AND HIM WOULD LOAD ALL THE TIME AND GO DOWN SHOOTING AND THEN WHEN DAD PASSED AWAY…FRANK JUST CONTINUED ON… THEN…A BUNCH OF US…GOT TOGETHER WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME AND WE WERE UNDER THE GREEN ACRES KIWANIS CLUB. PERCY BUTLER…WANTED TO START THE SHOOTING PROGRAM AND WE GOT INVOLVED IN THAT, AND THAT WAS THE START OF IT; WE JUST CONTINUED ON.” “…IT WAS ALSO THE GREEN ACRES KIWANIS [THAT PROMPTED FRANK TO START TARGET SHOOTING]… THEY WANTED TO START A JUNIOR PROGRAM SO SOME OF OUR MEMBERS FROM THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME, THEY WERE IN THERE, THEY WERE…[GOING TO] TEACH THE PROPER WAY OF HANDLING GUNS AND EVERYTHING AND FRANK AND I [WERE] WITH [THEM]. SO WE JUST WENT IN…[TO] TEACHIN[G] THEM AND CONTINUED ON. WE HAD PROGRAMS WHERE WE HAVE SENIORS, WE USED TO SHOOT IN THE RCMP INDOOR RANGE. THAT WAS BELOW THE GARAGE. [THAT] WAS MANY YEARS AGO…” “…WE STARTED WITH…TEACHING JUNIORS [SHOOTING]…AND THEN JUST WENT ON TO COMPETITION-SHOOTING. [WE] TRAVELED ALL OVER AND, LUCKY ENOUGH, THAT WE WERE GOOD ENOUGH TO DO IT. BUT WE DID IT TOGETHER. [THAT] WAS THE MAIN THING. WE LOADED BEFORE WE WENT TO A SHOOT, RIGHT UP UNTIL TWELVE O’CLOCK AT NIGHT, JUMP INTO THE TRUCK, AND DROVE TO WHEREVER WE WERE GOING TO COMPETE. WE PRACTICED TOGETHER, WE SHOT TOGETHER, WE DID JUNIORS TOGETHER, WE DID EVERYTHING TOGETHER… THAT’S THE MAIN THING… I WANT HIS MEMORY TO GO ON. THAT’S WHY I’M…[DONATING THE ITEMS TO MUSEUM].” LYNDA TALKED ABOUT THE COUPLE’S COMMON PASSION FOR SHOOTING: “…THEY’D BE TOGETHER… IT WOULD ALWAYS BE FRANK AND EVELYN. THAT’S THE WAY THAT PEOPLE THINK OF THE WHOLE THING… NOW…THERE ARE OTHER KIDS THAT ARE COMING UP, THE ONES THAT SHE TEACHES IN THE SUMMERTIME THAT ARE DIFFERENT… BUT ANY OF THE SHOOTERS, IT WAS ALWAYS FRANK AND EVELYN; ‘WE DID THIS WITH FRANK AND EVELYN.’ IT WAS ALWAYS TOGETHER.” LYNDA OFFERED A STORY AS TO HOW HER DAD STARTED TARGET SHOOTING, WANTING TO BECOME A BETTER SHOT: “...THERE IS AN ARTICLE WHERE DAD IS TALKING ABOUT WHEN HE WAS DOWN AT THE RANGE SIGHTING IN ON ONE OF HIS GUNS TO GO HUNTING… GENE SCULLY, WHO WAS ALSO ONE OF THE INSTRUCTORS FOR THE YOUNG KIDS SAID TO HIM, ‘WELL, WHY DON’T YOU SHOOT AT THIS TARGET?’ AND [DAD] SAID, ‘I SHOT TEN ROUNDS. THAT’S WHEN I FIGURED OUT I BETTER LEARN HOW TO SHOOT. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED DOING TARGET SHOOTING.’ SO THAT…[WAS] HIS INSPIRATION, [IT] WAS THAT, ‘I’M NOT QUITE AS GOOD AS I THINK I AM. MAYBE I BETTER PRACTICE A LITTLE BIT MORE’.” EVELYN SPOKE ABOUT THE CLUB NAME SHE WAS A PART OF: “THE LETHBRIDGE MARKSMAN, WE WERE. [IN THE 1970S].” EVELYN REVEALED HOW THE VARIOUS LETHBRIDGE SHOOTING RANGE LOCATIONS CHANGED OVER TIME: “…ALLAN JARVIE WAS A VETERAN… HE OPENED A RED ASH COMPANY DOWN IN THE RIVER, BUT EVERYBODY CONTINUED TO GO DOWN AND SHOOT ALL HIS MACHINERY… WE KNEW ALLAN AND HIS WIFE AND FAMILY FROM THE TIME THEY WERE KIDS. BUT HE WENT TO THE [LETHBRIDGE] FISH AND GAME [ASSOCIATION] AND HE SAID, ‘I’LL MAKE YOU A DEAL. I OWN SO MUCH PROPERTY DOWN HERE, I’LL GIVE YOU THIS PARCEL OF LAND IF YOU WILL AGREE TO KEEP IT CLEAN AND HAVE IT SHOOTING SO PEOPLE WON’T COME DOWN AND SHOOT MY STUFF SO MUCH.’ AND THAT WAS THE START OF…[THE FIRST SHOOTING RANGE].” “THAT WAS THE FIRST RANGE. THEN, PEENAQUIM PARK DECIDED THEY WANTED TO MOVE IN THERE. THEY WANTED TO MAKE A WALKING TRAIL WHERE WE WERE…” “…SO THAT’S WHAT THEY WANT– THEY COME TO US TO SEE IF THAT PROPERTY WAS OPEN, IF WE WOULD MOVE. WELL, WE WENT TO UMPTEEN DOZEN MEETINGS WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE TRYING TO MAKE ARRANGEMENTS TO GET OUR RANGE MOVED. FINALLY, THE CITY…[CAME] TO US AND THEY SAID, ‘WE’VE GOT A COULEE THAT IS FALLING DOWN. WE’LL TAKE THAT DIRT AND WE WILL BUILD YOU NINE-FEET BERMS BETWEEN EACH DISCIPLINE OF SHOOTING, IF YOU’LL AGREE TO MOVE.’ WELL, IT SOUNDED PRETTY GOOD. IT WAS A LOT BIGGER THAN WHAT WE HAD.” EVELYN TALKED ABOUT THE GENDER MAKEUP IN THE SHOOTING COMMUNITY: “[THERE WAS] PROBABLY MORE MEN [SHOOTING] BUT THERE’S A LOT OF WOMEN THAT ARE IN THERE NOW, TOO. A LOT OF KIDS.” LYNDA ESTIMATED THE RATIO AT: “FIVE [MEN] TO ONE [WOMAN], I BET YOU ANYWAY.” LYNDA ELABORATED: “I MEAN, WHEN YOU’D GO TO A SHOOT THERE’D MAYBE BE SIX OR SEVEN WOMEN BUT THERE’D BE THIRTY MEN…” EVELYN ORGANIZED AND VOLUNTEERED IN THE COMMUNITY: “[WITH THE LETHBRIDGE FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION, I WAS A PART OF THE] BANQUET COMMITTEE, BINGO COMMITTEE. ANYTIME THEY HAD ONE THAT THEY WERE TAKING THE KIDS OUT [I WAS INVOLVED]… WE’D TAKE KIDS OUT FISHING AND THEN GO SOMEWHERE AND HAVE LUNCH AND EVERYTHING… JUST ANYTHING TO DO PRIMARILY WITH KIDS, I WAS WILLING TO DO IT. AND I STILL AM.” “…I USED TO GO HELP ALL THE SMALLER TOWNS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO AND THINGS. I’D GO [AND] HELP WITH THE SCORING AND GETTIN’ PEOPLE TO WORK, SET UP THE RANGES, GET THEIR TARGETS READY AND SO I ENJOYED IT, I LOVED IT…” WHEN ASKED WHAT TIME PERIOD THE FAMILY HAD PEAK MEMORIES AND INVOLVEMENT IN THE SPORT, LYNDA RESPONDED: “70S.” TO THE SAME QUESTION AS ABOVE, EVELYN REPLIED: “YEAH, 70S, ’75, ‘80S.” WHEN ASKED HOW EVELYN GOT SO GOOD AT SHOOTING, SHE ANSWERED: “WE PRACTICED ALL THE TIME.” LYNDA ADDED: “SPEND HOURS AND HOURS AND HOURS AT THE RANGE.” EVELYN SAID SHE PRACTICED REGULARILY: “SOMETIMES EVERY EVENING, AFTER WORK.” “…ALWAYS HAD TIME FOR IT… I’M NOT DOING THAT MUCH NOW BECAUSE I’M OLDER...” “…BUT I’LL HELP WHEREVER I CAN. I ENJOY IT. IT’S A GOOD ORGANIZATION. I’VE MADE A LOT OF FRIENDS…” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HER FATHER’S COMMITMENT TO SHOOTING: “…EVEN INTO THE ‘80S, WHEN [MY PARENTS] WERE STILL GOING TO ALL [THEIR] SHOOTS, WHEN MY DAD FIRST GOT SICK…HE WAS STILL DOING JUNIOR SHOOTERS AND…THAT’S BASICALLY WHEN HE WAS SETTING UP THE NEW RANGE, IN THAT AREA… HE WAS BUSY…DOING THAT STILL AND HE [HAD A SURGERY]…DONE AND WAS STILL DOWN AT THE RANGE PROBABLY TWO WEEKS LATER.” FRANK WAS ALSO ALWAYS PRACTICING, ACCORDING TO EVELYN: “…IF HE WAS SITTIN’ HERE NOW AND HE’D HAVE A GUN IN HIS HAND, HE’D BE AIMING AT SOMETHING...PRACTICING... NO MATTER WHERE IT WAS… HE’D ALWAYS SAY, ‘WELL, PICK IT UP AND TRY IT. AIM AT SOMETHING.’ HE HAD HIS OWN, SPECIAL WAY OF [DOING] THINGS… HE WAS GREAT.” LYNDA CONFIRMED THE FREQUENCY OF HER PARENT’S SHOOTING PRACTICE: “DEFINITELY EVERY EVENING AFTER WORK, SOMETIMES TWICE A DAY.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…IT’S LIKE ANY SPORT, I SUPPOSE… IT GETS IN…[YOU], IT’S YOURS… YOU STRIVE TO BE BETTER AND YOU WORK HARDER TO BE BETTER… THEN YOU [ALSO] GO DOWN THERE [TO THE SHOOTING RANGE] TO SEE WHO’S DOWN THERE [BECAUSE] YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS ANYBODY.” LYNDA SPOKE ABOUT HOW HER DAD DID THE PREPARATION WORK OF LOADING BULLETS: “…[THE COST WAS] WHY THEY LOADED THEIR OWN BULLETS… DAD USED TO HAVE, IN THAT BEDROOM THERE, WAS…WHERE HIS LOADING ROOM WAS… IN THAT ARTICLE I READ THIS MORNING, HE SAYS THAT…IT WAS PROBABLY A THIRD OF THE COST TO LOAD HIS OWN BUT HE ALSO TALKS IN THAT ARTICLE ABOUT HOW PRECISE [LOADING WAS]… HE HAD TO LEARN, OVER THE YEARS, HOW…[TO LOAD]… YOU HAD TO HAVE EXACT AMOUNT OF POWDER, YOU LEARNED THE BETTER THINGS TO USE… HE USED CASTOR OIL RATHER THAN THE MANUFACTURER’S OIL… HE LEARNED DIFFERENT THINGS AND HOW PERFECT IT WAS… IT’S AN ART JUST TO DO THE LOADING ITSELF… HE WOULD BE DOWN HERE FOR HOURS AND HOURS AND HOURS, LOADING BULLETS… HE’D HAVE FIVE HUNDRED OF [THEM] AND A HUNDRED OF [THEM] MIGHT BE GOOD AND THE OTHER FOUR HUNDRED HE’D DUMP OUT AND START ALL OVER AGAIN… IT’S QUITE AN ART JUST DOING THAT.” “IN THE EVENINGS. HE’D BE DOWN LOADING, EVERY NIGHT. HE’D BE DOWN WORKING IN HIS LOADING ROOM, [DOING] THINGS… THIS WAS IS SPECIALTY…” EVELYN STILL IS INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY: “…I STILL GO DOWN [TO THE RANGE]… A FRIEND OF MINE THAT IS A FISH AND GAME MEMBER, WE TEACH…FISH AND GAME MEMBER JUNIORS ALL THE TIME. WE HAVE ABOUT A FOUR TO FIVE-WEEK COURSE EVERY YEAR AND WHEN THE COURSE IS FINISHED, I RECYCLE MY TROPHIES AND GIVE EACH CHILD A TROPHY AND IT MEANS A LOT TO [THEM].” “IT WAS A GOOD SPORT. I REALLY ENJOYED IT WHILE I WAS IN AND I ENJOYED THE PEOPLE, SO IT’S TOO BAD IF I GOT DOWN THERE I WOULDN’T BE ABLE TO GET UP AGAIN. I CAN’T GET DOWN IN THE PROPER POSITION ANYMORE.” EVELYN TALKED ABOUT HAVING TO SELL HER GUNS: “...[IT] BROKE MY HEART TO HAVE TO GET RID OF [THEM] ALL.” EVELYN CONTINUED: “I HAD SPECIAL…[FIREARMS] THAT…[FRANK] HAD BUILT JUST FOR ME.” LYNDA ADDED ON THE TOPIC OF GETTING RID OF THE FIREARMS A DECADE AGO FOLLOWING FRANK’S DEATH: “…DAD BUILT HIS OWN GUNS. HE DID BUILD FOR HER, HE BUIL[T] THE STOCKS…AND PAINTED ON [THEM] AND HAD WRITINGS... IT WOULD HAVE BEEN NICE TO KEEP SOME OF THE STOCKS BUT IT’S HARD…[TO] JUST SELL A BARREL.” LYNDA CONTINUED: “…IT WAS TO THE POINT WHERE WE HAVE TO DO SOMETHING WITH THEM. SOMEONE NEEDS TO ENJOY THEM LIKE DAD DID… THERE ARE PEOPLE OUT THERE THAT WANTED THESE THINGS AND…WE JUST HAD TO DO IT…” EVELYN REFLECTED ON RETIRING FROM THE SPORT: “IT’S TOUGH WHEN YOU CAN’T DO IT ANYMORE. BUT WHEN YOU MAKE UP YOUR MIND YOU CAN’T, YOU DON’T WANNA GET OUT THERE AND MAKE A FOOL OUT OF YOURSELF, SO IT’S EASIER TO WATCH OR WORK.” LYNDA TALKED ABOUT HER MOM STILL PARTAKING THE THE MEMORIAL SHOOT FOR HER FATHER: “SHE STILL SHOOTS ONCE A YEAR WHICH I DON’T REALLY THINK SHE SHOULD BUT SHE DOES, AT MY DAD’S MEMORIAL SHOOT… SO SHE HASN’T GIVEN THAT UP COMPLETELY EVEN THOUGH SHE WANTS TO TELL YOU SHE HAS, SHE HASN’T.” EVELYN ADDED: “…I WILL CONTINUE SHOOTING IT UNTIL THEY PUT ME IN MY CASKET.” FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SEE THE FULL TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE SEE THE DONATION’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20200006006
Acquisition Date
2020-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD, ONYX
Catalogue Number
P20190011004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ST. MICHAEL'S HOSPITAL
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1966
Materials
GOLD, ONYX
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.6
Length
2
Width
1.3
Description
GOLD RING WITH RECTANGULAR ONYX RING FACE; RING HAS NARROW BAND AND TEXT ENGRAVED ON THE INSIDE, “10 K, 8”. RING FACE HAS RECTANGULAR ONYX STONE SET IN GOLD FRAME, WITH GOLD LETTERS ON ONYX “S M H”; RING BAND SPLITS INTO TWO PRONGS AT THE SIDES OF THE RING FACE, AND DUAL PRONGS ATTACH TO THE RING FACE. RING HAS MINOR STAINING INSIDE FRONT DUAL PRONGS; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING BETWEEN 1962 AND 1965. ON THE ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL RING, KIMERY RECALLED, “THE CUFFLINKS…AND THE RING WITH ‘SMH’… WERE GRADUATING GIFTS…[WHEN I GRADUATED FROM ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING IN 1965 AS] SHARON GEORGESON.” “I [WORE THE RING] UNTIL…THE OTHER ONE [THE O.R. RING] WAS MADE…[IN] I’M GOING TO SAY, ‘70 BECAUSE I WAS BACK [IN LETHBRIDGE] THEN.” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS...I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011004
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PIN CARD W / ASSORTED PINS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1993
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, PAPER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160017004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PIN CARD W / ASSORTED PINS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1993
Materials
FELT, PAPER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
14.8
Width
13.4
Description
GREY CARDBOARD PIN CARD LINED WITH RED FELT ON FRONT, IN THE SHAPE OF A MAPLE LEAF. PIN CARD HAS PINS ATTACHED INCLUDING: “LIONS INTERNATIONAL” SERVICE PIN COMPRISED OF GOLD SHIELD WITH VIOLET CENTER AND GOLD “L”, WITH RED, WHITE, AND BLUE CHEVRON BELOW SHIELD AND THREE VIOLET CHEVRONS BELOW, WITH BRASS BACKING; BOY SCOUTS PIN COMPRISED OF UNPAINTED FLEUR DE LIS ON YELLOW BACKGROUND WITH GREEN BANNER BELOW AND TEXT “GROUP COMMITTEE”, WITH TARNISHED SILVER BACKING; SECOND DIVISION OFFICERS MILITARY PIN OF VIOLET WITH SYMBOL OF “C” WITH TWO LINES THROUGH IT ON FRONT, WITH BRASS BACKING; TARNISHED “GENERAL SERVICE” PIN COMPRISED OF SHIELD WITH THREE MAPLE LEAVES ON FRONT AND TEXT “GENERAL SERVICE” ALONG LOWER EDGE OF SHIELD, WITH BRASS BACKING; ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION 25 YEARS PIN COMPRISED OF GOLD SHIELD WITH WHITE CENTER AND RED MAPLE LEAF, WITH GOLD “25” ON MAPLE LEAF, AND VIOLET BANNER BELOW WITH GOLD TEXT “LEGION”, WITH BRASS BACKING; ROTARY CLUB PIN COMPRISED OF GOLD WHEEL WITH VIOLET RING AROUND OUTER EDGE OF WHEEL AND GOLD TEXT “ROTARY INTERNATIONAL”, WITH GOLD BACKING; CANADIAN HEART ASSOCIATION PIN COMPRISED OF GOLD HEART WITH RED FRONT, WHITE MAPLE LEAF IN CENTER, AND BLACK TORCH WITH YELLOW FLAME ON LEAF, WITH NO BACKING; ALBERTA CIVIEL DEFENSE PIN COMPRISED OF ALBERTA SHIELD BETWEEN GOLD LETTERS ON VIOLET BACKGROUNDS “C” AND “D”, WITH BRASS BACKING; TARNISHING DOMINION LEGION PIN COMPRISED OF ROUND SHIELD WITH BLUE AND RED BRITISH FLAG IN CENTER WITH MAPLE LEAF OVERLAID, AND TEXT AROUND EDGES “DOMINION GENERAL SERVICE LEAGUE, CANADIAN, LEGION”, WITH BRASS BACKING; SMALL MASONIC PIN COMPRISED OF MASONIC COMPASS WITH VIOLET CENTER AND EMBOSSED “G”, WITH SILVER BACKING; GOLD LIONS CLUB PAST PRESIDENT PIN COMPRISED OF GOLD SHIELD WITH VIOLET CENTER, EMBOSSED “L” AND GOLD BANNER ACROSS FRONT WITH TEXT “PAST PRES” AND TEXT EMBOSSED AT TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES OF SHIELD “LIONS CLUB”, PIN HAS ATTACHMENT OF GOLD BANNER WITH EMBOSSED TEXT “100% ATTENDANCE” AND SHIELD BELOW BANNER WITH WHITE BACKGROUND AND GOLD TEXT “20”, WITH SILVER BACKING. CARDBOARD BACKING ON CARD IS PEELING IN LOWER RIGHT CORNERS; BACK HAS CUTS DOWN RIGHT AND LEFT EDGES; STEM OF MAPLE LEAF IS SEVERELY CREASED AND BENT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (FIRST WORLD WAR) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (SECOND WORLD WAR AND POST-WAR). THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, HE MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, HE WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO BRANCH MANAGER OF CANADA LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, IN 1969 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. REED AINSCOUGH WAS A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC LODGE, LODGE OF PERFECTION, ROSE CROIX, CONSISTORY, SHRINE, ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR, AND SERVED AS THE MASTER OF THE LODGE OF PERFECTION UNTIL 1977. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, REED AINSCOUGH WAS ALSO ACTIVE WITH THE FORT MACLEOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LIONS’ CLUB, HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND FORT MACLEOD MUSEUM DURING HIS TIME LIVING IN FORT MACLEOD. IN MEDICINE HAT, AISNCOUGH SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THE HEART AND STROKE ASSOCIATION, AND ACTED AS A SENATOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE UPON MOVING TO THE CITY. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “I THINK [THE OBJECTS ARE] A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS]…IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FAMILY MILITARY SERVICE FILES, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017004
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
32 DEGREE SCOTTSH RITE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1993
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD, COTTON, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20160017005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
32 DEGREE SCOTTSH RITE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1993
Materials
GOLD, COTTON, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
39
Width
14.3
Description
GOLD MEDAL ATTACHED TO RED COLLAR RIBBON WITH GOLD BORDERS. MEDAL SHAPED AT GOLD CROSS WITH CROSS PAINTED RED. CENTER OF CROSS HAS FOUR GOLD TRIANGLES SURROUNDING CIRCULAR CENTER PIECE; CENTER PIECE HAS LAUREL BRANCHES AROUND A BLUE BACKGROUND WITH “32” IN PAINTED IN GOLD. MEDAL IS ATTACHED TO COLLAR RIBBON WITH BRASS RINGS. COLLAR RIBBON HAS SILVER RING AND HOOK FOR SECURING RIBBON; BACK OF RIBBON IS WHITE WITH GOLD BORDERS. BACK OF MEDAL IS GOLD. RIBBON HAS MINOR CREASING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (FIRST WORLD WAR) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (SECOND WORLD WAR AND POST-WAR). THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, HE MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, HE WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO BRANCH MANAGER OF CANADA LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, IN 1969 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. REED AINSCOUGH WAS A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC LODGE, LODGE OF PERFECTION, ROSE CROIX, CONSISTORY, SHRINE, ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR, AND SERVED AS THE MASTER OF THE LODGE OF PERFECTION UNTIL 1977. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, REED AINSCOUGH WAS ALSO ACTIVE WITH THE FORT MACLEOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LIONS’ CLUB, HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND FORT MACLEOD MUSEUM DURING HIS TIME LIVING IN FORT MACLEOD. IN MEDICINE HAT, AISNCOUGH SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THE HEART AND STROKE ASSOCIATION, AND ACTED AS A SENATOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE UPON MOVING TO THE CITY. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “I THINK [THE OBJECTS ARE] A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS]…IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FAMILY MILITARY SERVICE FILES, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017005
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PORCELAIN
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SUPINA SOUVENIR BOWL
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1960
Materials
PORCELAIN
No. Pieces
1
Height
6
Diameter
21.5
Description
CHINA BOWL WITH AN IRREGULAR RIM THAT EXTENDS A FLORAL PETAL MOTIF ALONG BOWL’S INSIDE EDGE. CENTRE FEATURES COUNTRY LANDSCAPE INCLUDING A COTTAGE, SURROUNDED BY STAMP MARK IN GOLD STENCIL AND SCRIPT, “COMPLIMENTS OF N. F. SUPINA”. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT CRACKING IN THE BOTTOM. THE BASE IS SCUFFED AND DIRTY. THERE ARE SOME MARKS ON THE OUTSIDE EDGE.
Subjects
FURNITURE
Historical Association
BUSINESS
COMMEMORATIVE
DOMESTIC
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING HORHOZER AND HER FAMILY. THIS BOWL IS A REMINDER OF THE STORE THAT WAS AN INTEGRAL PART OF LIFE IN THE SUPINA FAMILY. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “MY DAD ALWAYS GAVE A CHRISTMAS GIFT. SO ONE YEAR HE GAVE THE PLATE AND ANOTHER YEAR HE GAVE THIS BOWL AND ACTUALLY THAT’S ALL I KNOW ABOUT IT… [A]LL THE CUSTOMERS, THE ONES THAT DEALT THERE ALL THE TIME [GOT A CHRISTMAS PRESENT]. THE GOOD PAYING ONES AND THE NOT-SO-GOOD PAYING ONES, I THINK THEY PROBABLY EVEN GOT IT TOO, BUT, AS LONG AS THEY WERE CUSTOMERS THEN THEY GOT ONE… MY MOTHER SAVED [IT] FIRSTLY, BECAUSE THEY REALLY MEANT SOMETHING - PART OF THE STORE I GUESS SHE’D SAY. SO, HAD THEM FOR A LONG, LONG TIME… MY MOM HAD ALL KINDS OF ORNAMENTS AROUND AND SHE’D JUST PUT THEM ON A TABLE OR WHATEVER. SHE WOULD CHANGE HER ORNAMENTS EVERY ONCE AND AWHILE, AND THEN SHE’D PUT THESE IN THE CUPBOARD." ABOUT THE HISTORY OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE, HORHOZER EXPLAINS: “I WAS BORN INTO [THE STORE]. MY DAD STARTED SMALL. HIS DAD HAD A LITTLE CONFECTIONARY; THEN HE TURNED IT INTO A GROCERY STORE AND THEN HE SOLD IT TO MY DAD. MY DAD WAS THE ONE THAT TOOK IT OVER, THAT WAS ALREADY TAKING PLACE WHEN I WAS BORN. THERE WAS NO SPECIFIC MEMORY [OF THAT TRANSITIION] BECAUSE THAT’S ALL I KNEW REALLY.” “… MY DAD WAS BORN IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA. [HIS FAMILY] CAME HERE WHEN HE WAS TWO. [HIS YOUNGER SIBLINGS], THE FIVE BROTHERS AND THE ONE SISTER, WERE ALL BORN IN THAT SAME LITTLE HOUSE THERE. AND THAT’S WHERE MY GRANDPA HAD STARTED THE STORE, IT WAS JUST A CONFECTIONARY. EVENTUALLY IT GREW INTO QUITE A BUSINESS… IN THOSE DAYS, IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, SO THEY HAD FIVE HORSES AND BUGGIES THAT WERE RUNNING, WORKING, AND MY UNCLE ALWAYS LOOKED AFTER THE HORSES AND MAINTAINED THEM. THEY’D GO AND THEY’D PICK UP THE ORDER. LOTS OF THE PEOPLE THEN COULDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH, BUT MY DAD COULD SPEAK CZECH, AND THEN THEY’D USUALLY SEND – HE HAD ALL KINDS OF NATIONALITIES WORKING FOR HIM - [A PERSON OF MATCHING ETHNICITY], THAT KNEW THEIR LANGUAGE TO PICK UP THE ORDER. THEY BROUGHT IT BACK TO THE STORE, AND THEN DELIVERED IT BACK TO THE CUSTOMER, THAT WAS REAL SERVICE IN THOSE DAYS, ESPECIALLY WITH HORSE AND BUGGY IN THOSE WINTRY DAYS, AFTER THAT IT DEVELOPED INTO TRUCKS. THERE WERE LOTS OF MINERS IN THOSE DAYS AND WERE GOOD CUSTOMERS… HE AT ONE TIME EMPLOYED THIRTY-SIX PEOPLE IN THE STORE THERE.” AN ARTICLE IN LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON MAY 5, 2004 STATES THAT NICK SUPINA PURCHASED THE STORE FROM HIS FATHER, MIKE SUPINA, IN 1918. IN THE INTERVIEW, HORHOZER CONTINUED TO SPEAK ABOUT THE BEGINNING DAYS OF THE SUPINA’S STORE: “MY GRANDPA WAS WORKING IN THE MINE. I DON’T KNOW HOW IT CAME THAT HE HAD THIS LITTLE BUSINESS… IT’S MY DAD THEN THAT HAD TO LOOK AFTER THE FAMILY BECAUSE THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY MONEY. THERE WAS FIVE BOYS SO HE HAD THEM ALL. THEY WERE ALL CLOSE TOGETHER IN AGE. THERE’S STEVE AND BILLY AND JOHN AND MIKE… UNCLE STEVE, IS THE SECOND, HE’S THE ONE THAT STAYED WITH MY DAD, AND JOHNNY DID TOO. THEN THE OTHER TWO PURSUED THEIR OWN BUSINESSES. BILLY HAD A BUSINESS IN RED DEER AND SMALL BUSINESSES IN TWO OTHER PLACES. THEN MIKE, HE WENT TO THE STATES AND—OH, THAT WAS GEORGE, PARDON ME. HE HAD A SHOE STORE WHICH WAS VERY, VERY SUCCESSFUL. MIKE WAS THE ONLY ONE THAT WASN’T IN BUSINESS. THAT WAS BECAUSE HE WAS IN THE WAR…” THINKING BACK ON HER MEMORIES OF SUPINA’S, HORHOZER DESCRIBES, “[I]N THOSE DAYS YOU HAD GOOD FRUIT. I REMEMBER THE DELICIOUS PEACHES. I HAVEN’T SEEN A PEACH LIKE THAT SINCE… LOTS OF TIMES, THE FRUIT WOULD GO OVER-RIPE, LIKE YOUR APRICOTS AND PEACHES. MY MOTHER WOULD GO AND GET ALL THE OVER-RIPE FRUIT AND TAKE IT HOME AND MAKE BEAUTIFUL PIES AND TAKE THE PIES BACK TO THE STORE AND SELL THEM. SHE WAS A WONDERFUL BAKER. THEY DID EVERYTHING LIKE THAT TO HELP MAKE MORE MONEY. SOMETIMES MY DAD WOULD HAVE A SPECIAL ON, 3 CENTS A LOAF [OF BREAD. I HAD LOTS OF ADS FROM THE STORE, AND YOU’D GET SUCH A KICK OUT OF SEEING HAMBURGER, TWENTY-FIVE CENTS A POUND AND THINGS LIKE THAT. SO, YES I REMEMBER.” HORHOZER BEGAN WORKING AT THE STORE AT THE AGE OF 14: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.’” HORHOZER BELIEVED THAT AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE STORE’S SUCCESS WAS “… BECAUSE, [OF] THE SERVICE MAINLY. JUST THINK, GOING THERE, GETTING YOUR ORDERS, BRINGING THEM BACK, DOING THEM UP, THEY’D MAKE SURE THINGS WERE TOP QUALITY. THEY GOT TO KNOW EVERY CUSTOMER, OF COURSE, AND THEY KNEW WHAT THEY LIKED. HE HAD WONDERFUL PEOPLE WORKING FOR HIM. THEY JUST GAVE FANTASTIC SERVICE ALL THE TIME. PLUS, MY DAD WAS GRUFF, BUT HE WAS VERY, VERY KIND TO POOR PEOPLE THAT COULDN’T AFFORD –THERE’S LOTS THAT YEARS AFTER HE HAD PASSED AWAY [PEOPLE] WOULD COME UP TO ME AND SAY, ‘IF IT WASN’T FOR YOUR DAD, JOHNNY WOULDN’T HAVE HAD CHEESE,’ OR SOMETHING. I DIDN’T KNOW A THING ABOUT IT, BECAUSE HE WAS ONE THAT NEVER, EVER TOLD ANYBODY… THEN AT CHRISTMAS TIME HE WOULD GO TO THE STORE AND HE HAD A LIST OF EVERYBODY THAT HE KNEW WAS EXCEPTIONALLY POOR, AND HE WOULD FILL BASKETS. HE WOULD DO IT ALL BY HIMSELF… HE WOULDN’T TELL MY MOTHER AND I. HE WAS SO TIGHT-MOUTHED, FILL ALL THESE BASKETS AND DELIVER THEM TO THE PEOPLE HIMSELF WITHOUT TELLING A SOUL ABOUT IT. HE WAS THAT KIND OF PERSON. HE WAS VERY KIND THAT WAY.” SUPINA’S MERCANTILE SERVED LETHBRIDGE UNTIL IT CLOSED IN 1960. HORHOZER REMAINED IN RETAIL IN VARIOUS SHOPS IN THE CITY, INCLUDING THE DEPARTMENT STORE WOOLCO UNTIL HER RETIREMENT IN 1988. HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE IN 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS OLD. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT SUPINA’S MERCANTILE AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016001
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1961
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, STONE, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20150016002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1961
Materials
METAL, STONE, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Diameter
12.5
Description
AWARD TROPHY, “ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING CJLH-TV LETHBRIDGE, ALTA. 1960-61”. CAST METAL PEBBLED, LAUREL LEAF BASE, FINISHED IN GOLD. PEDESTAL CONSTRUCTED OF WOOD AND POLISHED STONE. GREEN FELT BOTTOM. VERY GOOD CONDITION. GOLD FINISH SCUFFED IN SOME AREAS WITH SOME SCRATCHES ON THE BASE AND DUST BUILD UP. MINOR LOSS TO THE BLACK PAINT AROUND THE BASE AND SLIGHT WEAR TO THE FELT BOTTOM.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
PROFESSIONS
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY AND THE COUNTRY CAPERS - TO WHOM THE TROPHY WAS AWARDED IN 1961. EVERAL MET JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE CAME TO SUPINA’S TO WORK. SHE REMEMBERS: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.” THIS TROPHY IS REPRESENTATIVE OF JOE HORHOZER’S TIME AS PART OF THE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE COUNTRY CAPERS. PRIOR TO THAT, HE WAS A PART OF THE MUSICAL GROUP, THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN 1937 AND HAD SEEN SUCCESS ON BOTH THE LOCAL AND NATIONAL LEVELS. AROUND 1955, THE GROUP HAD SLOWED DOWN FROM THEIR TOURING SCHEDULE, AS A RESULT HORHOZER AND A FELLOW BAND MEMBER, REMO BACEDA, WERE ABLE TO JOIN A GROUP FORMING IN LETHBRIDGE THAT CAME TO BE THE 'COUNTRY CAPERS.' THIS GROUP CONSISTED OF THE POTTS FAMILY ON VOCALS, EDDIE, BETTY (WAGGONTAIL), AND TWINS SHIRLEY ANN (PETRAK) AND SHARON (SCOVILLE), AS WELL AS DONN PETRAL ON VOCALS AND GUITAR, HERB URANO ON BASS, REMO BACEDA ON FIDDLE, AND HORHOZER WITH HIS ACCORDION. HORHOZER SAYS OF THAT TIME, “WELL, THE POTTS ALWAYS SIGNED TOGETHER. THERE WERE THREE SISTERS AND THEN EDDIE, THE BROTHER, AND THEY WERE VERY GOOD SINGERS, BUT THEY WANTED SOMEBODY THAT WAS PROFESSIONAL TO KIND OF TEACH THEM HOW TO SING IN HARMONY. REMO WAS GOOD AT THAT ‘CAUSE HE WAS THE HEAD OF A CHOIR AND [KNEW] HOW TO DO GROUP MUSIC, ‘CAUSE [THE POTTS] WERE GREEN. THEY DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING. THEN THEY WOULD PRACTICE AND PRACTICE TOGETHER, AND THEN DONN PETRAK, I GUESS, GOT THE RADIO STATION TO HIRE THEM. THEY’VE GOT TO -THEY’VE GOT TO HEAR YOU PLAY FIRST, SO THEY HAD THIS BAND CALLED THE COUNTRY CAPERS AND THEY ALL PLAYED TOGETHER FOR QUITE A LONG TIME ON THE RADIO. I THINK THEY WERE ON THE RADIO FOR MAYBE TWO YEARS OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT – CJOC.” HORHOZER’S DAUGHTER, MELODEE “MEL” MUTCH, WHO WAS ALSO IN THE ROOM FOR THE INTERVIEWS WITH MACLEAN, ADDED, “… IT WAS A TELEVISION SHOW. THAT’S WHAT THEY WERE KNOWN FOR.” ON MARCH 1, 1998, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD’S “THE WAY WE WERE” COLUMN FEATURED A HISTORY OF THE COUNTRY CAPERS WRITTEN BY GARRY ALLISON. THIS ARTICLE STATES, “THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE FEATURED ON CJOC RADIO WITH THEIR OWN SHOW AND ON CJLH-TV FOR FIVE YEARS. THEY ALSO TRAVELED TO CALGARY EACH WEEK FOR A CROSS-CANADA RADIO SHOW ON CBC IN 1958. THEIR LOCALLY-PRODUCED TV SHOW WAS SHOWN EACH TUESDAY NIGHT AT FIRST, THEN LATER ON THURSDAY NIGHT.” CJLH-TV WON SEVEN LIBERTY MAGAZINE AWARDS IN TOTAL DURING THE 1950S AND 1960S. THESE AWARDS INCLUDED THE 1960 – 1961 AWARD FOR BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING, WHICH THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE A PART OF, AND IN 1962 THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE PRESENTED WITH THE AWARD FOR BEST STATION MUSIC SHOW. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT [THE TROPHY], EXCEPT THIS IS WHEN THEY PLAYED ON TV, THEY ALWAYS GIVE AN AWARD FOR THE BEST MUSICAL BAND ON TV OR SOMETHING. THAT’S WHEN THEY GOT THAT." FOR AN ARTICLE WRITTEN ABOUT JOE HORHOZER IN 2002 FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, JOE STATED, “[MUSIC’S] MY LIFE – OUTSIDE OF MY FAMILY. [WITHOUT IT], I’D BE LOST.” MUTCH REAFFIRMS HER FATHER’S STATEMENT BY SAYING, “… HIS HANDS WERE ALWAYS TAPPING. HE WAS ALWAYS TAPPING. YOU COULD SEE THAT IN HIS HEAD. PLUS HE HELD DOWN A FULL TIME JOB. AND WHEN THEY NEEDED ENTERTAINMENT – LIKE GARY KIRK. GOSH, IT’S GOT TO BE 50 YEARS AGO, SAID TO MY DAD AND BUCK, 'WOULD YOU COME DOWN TO PLAY AT THIS CABIN?' – LONG LOST RANCH, OR WHEREVER THEY WERE HAVING A FAMILY REUNION – SO THEY WERE THE ENTERTAINMENT. HE WAS … SOUGHT-AFTER, LET’S PUT IT THAT WAY. AND WHEN HE WOULD PLAY MUSIC UNTIL YOU’D WANT TO THROW UP. HE’D COME HOME FROM A DANCE; POUR HIMSELF ANOTHER ONE; AND THEN THE RECORDS WOULD START TO COME OUT. THAT IS HOW THE NIGHT WENT. I’D EVEN COME HOME SOME NIGHTS AND MY MOM AND DAD WOULD BE DANCING. WHEN YOU ARE A TEENAGER, THAT’S HORRIFIC. SO, THERE IS THE HENDERSON LAKE HOTEL, WHATEVER – THE DANCE HALL. THAT WAS VERY MUCH A PART OF THEIR LIVES AS WELL.” JOE HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON OCTOBER 21, 2010 AT THE AGE OF 89 YEARS. HORHOZER WAS THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE COUNTRY CAPERS, THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS, AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016002
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BOXING TROPHY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Catalogue Number
P20150015000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BOXING TROPHY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
No. Pieces
1
Height
35.5
Length
32
Width
8.9
Description
BOXING TROPHY WITH A COPPER-FINISHED BOXER ON A WOODEN PEDESTAL FLANKED BY COPPER GLOVERS ON INDEPENDENT WOOD PEDESTALS. THE TROPHY IS MARKED “COMPETITION IN MEMORY OF F/O (FLIGHT OFFICER) SYD & JACK EMERY RCAF SOUTH ALBERTA ELIMINATIONS”. THERE IS A WOOD BASE WITH FIVE COPPER-FINISHED BADGES ATTACHED IN A ROW ACROSS THE FRONT. THE FIRST TWO READ “1950” AND “1960”. THE LAST THREE ARE BLANK. GOOD – VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT LOSS OF COPPER FINISH ON THE BOXER AND BOXING GLOVES. SLIGHT LOSS OF WOOD FINISH IN VARIOUS AREAS OVERALL. THE LEFT PEDESTAL IS SLIGHTLY LOOSE AND THE RIGHT IS VERY LOOSE.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
SPORTS
ASSOCIATIONS
History
THIS BOXING TROPHY THAT WAS GIVEN IN HONOUR OF TWO BROTHERS, SYD AND JACK EMERY, WHO LOST THEIR LIVES IN WORLD WAR II. THE BOYS WERE COMPETITIVE BOXERS IN LETHBRIDGE PRIOR TO THE WAR AND THEIR FATHER, JOHN LIONEL “JACK” EMERY (C. 1890-1976) WAS A LARGE PART OF THE BOXING COMMUNITY IN LETHBRIDGE INCLUDING ACTING AS PRESIDENT OF THE LETHBRIDGE AMATEUR BOXING CLUB BEGINNING IN 1951. ON OCTOBER 9, 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH DONOR, DORINDA EMERY, WHO IS THE BIOLOGICAL DAUGHTER OF THE YOUNGER JACK EMERY AND THE STEP DAUGHTER OF THE YOUNGEST EMERY BROTHER, JAMES “JIM” EMERY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: WHEN ASKED ABOUT HOW SHE CAME TO POSSESS THE TROPHY, EMERY STATES: “WELL, IT’S BEEN IN MY PARENTS’ BASEMENT FOR SOME TIME AND WHEN MY LAST PARENT DIED – MY DAD - TWO YEARS AGO. WE WERE PACKING UP THE HOUSE [AND] I FOUND THE TROPHY IN THE BASEMENT… I WAS VERY AWARE [OF THE TROPHY GROWING UP]. IT USED TO BE GIVEN OUT EVERY YEAR, AND THEN I THINK THAT SORT OF DIED OUT IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THEN IT CAME BACK TO THE HOUSE. I DON’T KNOW [FOR SURE], ‘CAUSE I CAN’T REMEMBER. I GOT THE PICTURES OF MY GRANDFATHER AND HE IS THE ALBERTA SPORTS HALL OF FAME AND HE’S IN THE LETHBRIDGE SPORTS HALL OF FAME. DORINDA BELIEVES THIS TROPHY IS A REMINDER “THAT MY FAMILY DID CONTRIBUTE AND DID MAKE SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF LETHBRIDGE… MY GRANDFATHER (JOHN LIONEL “JACK” EMERY) WAS A GREAT PROPONENT OF AMATEUR SPORTS AND THOUGHT THAT THE SPORT ELEMENT WAS VERY IMPORTANT FOR KIDS TO PARTICIPATE IN REGARDLESS OF THEIR ATHLETIC LEVELS, BUT ALSO TO ACKNOWLEDGE THOSE WHO EXCELLED.” DORINDA DISCUSSES GROWING UP IN THE EMERY HOUSEHOLD: “I GREW UP WITH [MY GRANDFATHER]. I GREW UP IN A THREE GENERATIONAL HOUSE. SO MY MOTHER BROUGHT ME FROM ENGLAND AND WE LIVED WITH MY FATHER’S PARENTS AND THAT’S JACK… SO I CAME FROM ENGLAND IN 1946 AND WE STAYED IN LETHBRIDGE EVER AFTER… MY MOTHER MARRIED MY REAL FATHER’S BROTHER WHEN I WAS 7. SO JAMES IS ACTUALLY MY UNCLE AND MY DAD…WELL [MY GRANDFATHER] WAS A BIT OF A CURMUDGEON IN A LOT OF WAYS, EX-NAVY. HE HAD BEEN TORPEDOED IN WORLD WAR I, AND THEY CAME TO CANADA RIGHT IN THE DEPRESSION, AND SO THINGS WERE NOT ALWAYS EASY FOR THE FAMILY. MY OLDEST UNCLE, SID, WHO WAS THEIR OLDEST CHILD, WAS BORN IN ENGLAND, BUT THEN JACK OR JOHN – WHO WAS ALSO MY REAL FATHER – AND JIM AND DORIS WERE ALL BORN IN CANADA. THEY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, WHERE MY DAD WAS BORN AND RAISED. [MY DAD] REMEMBERS THE DAYS WHEN ANYTHING PAST 10TH AVENUE SOUTH IN LETHBRIDGE WAS BALD PRAIRIE AND SPENDING MUCH TIME AS CHILDREN ENTERTAINING THEMSELVES IN THE PRAIRIES AND COULEES.” EMERY GOES ON TO DESCRIBE HER GRANDFATHER’S COMMITMENT TO BOXING IN LETHBRIDGE: “HE FORMED THE ALBERTA AMATEUR SPORTS – AMATEUR BOXING ASSOCIATION. HE WAS VERY HIGH UP IN THE BOXING AND WRESTLING IN ALBERTA BACK IN THE ‘50S. HE WAS ON THE COMMISSION FOR BOXING AND WRESTLING IN ALBERTA. HE’S IN THE SPORTS HALL OF FAME… HE WAS VERY MUCH 'THE MAN’S MAN,' AND I THINK HE FELT IT WAS A GENTLEMEN’S SPORT RATHER THAN A ROUGHIAN’S SPORT. HE FELT THAT THERE WAS AN ART IN A WAY OF DEFENDING YOURSELF.” “KAI YIP WAS STILL ACTIVE IN BOXING WHEN I LEFT LETHBRIDGE 3 YEARS AGO. AND KAI KNEW MY GRANDFATHER EXCEPTIONALLY WELL. IN FACT, I THINK THAT IN LOTS OF CASES, GRANDAD HAD CLOSER RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE YOUNG ONES HE WAS FOSTERING IN BOXING THAN HE DID HIS OWN FAMILY… JUST THE NATURE OF HIM, YOU KNOW. VERY BRITISH, VERY UPRIGHT. IF SOMEONE DIDN’T SHARE HIS PASSION FOR BOXING, THEY WEREN’T QUITE THE SAME IN HIS ESTIMATION… HE ENCOURAGED A LOT OF RECREATIONAL ACTIVITY IN HIS KIDS. MY AUNT DORIS WAS A RUNNER. TO HIM THAT WAS AN IMPORTANT, SPORTS WERE IMPORTANT.” JACK EMERY’S INVOLVEMENT IN BOXING WAS AN ACT OF COMMUNITY SERVICE RATHER THAN PROFESSIONAL. THE TOPIC OF BOXING WAS PREVALENT IN THE EMERY HOUSEHOLD: “IT WOULD BE THE TOPIC OF CONVERSATION. WE ALWAYS HAD FAMILY DINNERS. THAT WAS WHEN FAMILIES ACTUALLY ATE TOGETHER 2 OR 3 TIMES A DAY. AND IT WAS ALWAYS A GREAT TOPIC, WHO WAS DOING WHAT AND WHO HE WAS DEVELOPING OR WHAT WAS GOING ON WITH THE BOXING AND WRESTLING COMMISSION. BUT HE WAS ALSO INTENSELY INTERESTED IN POLITICS. WE WERE A FAMILY WITH GREAT DISCUSSIONS DURING MEALTIMES. PLUS HE WOULD BE OFF AND HE’D END UP AT THE LEGION AND WE’D GO AND PULL HIM [OUT] - THE ARMY AND NAVY WAS HIS FAVORITE HANGOUT. HE [WAS] VERY INVOLVED IN THAT, AS WELL. HE LIKED HIS EX-MILITARY CONNECTIONS. HE LOST TWO SONS TO THE WAR, THE SECOND WORLD WAR. [HE] SAW THAT AS A PATRIOTIC DUTY IN LOTS OF WAYS. WHATEVER HE WAS INTERESTED IN, HE WAS INTENSELY DEVOTED TO IT, BUT HE NEVER EARNED MONEY FROM IT AT ALL.” FROM HER GRANDFATHER, EMERY HAS LEARNED: “WELL PROBABLY JUST MY WILLINGNESS TO TRY AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN A COMMUNITY AND CERTAINLY A WILLINGNESS TO DISCUSS ISSUES. TO ME, THE GREATEST THING I LEARNED FROM MY GRANDFATHER WAS DEBATE AND QUESTIONING, AND COMING TO YOUR OWN CONCLUSIONS ABOUT WHAT WAS RIGHT FOR YOU. ‘CAUSE I CAN REMEMBER THE FIRST TIME I EVER WON A REAL, ONE OF OUR LUNCH HOUR DEBATES AND I FELT EXTREMELY VIRTUOUS, AND THEN I FELT ALMOST SORRY BECAUSE HE WAS VERY, VERY GOOD AT HAVING DISCUSSIONS.” REFLECTING ON THE LIFE OF THE EMERY FAMILY, EMERY SAYS, “I THINK THAT, YOU KNOW, THE FAMILY WAS ONE THAT HAD A LOT OF VERY INCREDIBLE CHALLENGES AND A LOT OF GRIEF AND DISAPPOINTMENT, AND YET THEY STILL HAD THE SPIRIT TO TRY AND FIND A WAY TO MAKE THOSE LOSES SIGNIFICANT AND BRING SOME KIND OF LASTING CONTRIBUTION.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN TAKEN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S DIGITIZED COLLECTION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH.” JOHN LIONEL (JACK) EMERY WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE TO HIS FATHER BEARING THE SAME NAME AND MOTHER, CECILIA EMERY. HE WENT TO FLEETWOOD SCHOOL AND LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. HE COMPETED IN BOXING AND WORKED AS A JUNIOR CLERK AT THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA PRIOR TO ENLISTING IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE (RCAF) IN 1941. HE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM IN 1943 WHERE HE WAS ATTACHED TO THE 405 SQUADRON RCAF. HE SERVED FOR SIXTEEN MONTHS ON A LANCASTER AS A NAVIGATOR AND A BOMB AIMER. ON JUNE 11, 1944, FLYING OFFICER EMERY WAS PART OF AN ALL-CANADIAN CREW IN A LANCASTER DETAILED TO BOMB THE VERSAILLES MARSHALLING YARD. THE AIRCRAFT WAS SHOT DOWN BY ENEMY AIRCRAFT AND HEAVY GROUND FIRE. SIX OF THE EIGHT MEN ON THE AIRCRAFT WERE KILLED, INCLUDING EMERY. HE WAS LAID TO REST IN A COLLECTIVE GRAVE AT AUNEAU COMMUNAL CEMETERY. FURTHER INFORMATION ON “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH” DISCUSSES JACK’S OLDER BROTHER, SYDNEY JAMES EMERY. HE WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE TO JACK (C.1890-1976) AND CECILIA EMERY, AND WENT TO THE SAME SCHOOLS AS HIS BROTHER, JACK. “HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED BOXER, HOLDING THREE ALBERTA CHAMPIONSHIPS AND TWICE CONTENDING FOR THE DOMINION TITLE. AT THE TIME OF ENLISTMENT, HE WAS SINGLE AND TRAINING AS A PILOT FOR TRANS-CANADA AIRLINES. HE ENLISTED FOR SERVICE IN THE RCAF IN 1941, AND AFTER TRAINING IN CANADA TO RECEIVE HIS PILOT’S WINGS AND A PROMOTION TO FLYING OFFICER, HE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM IN 1943. THERE, HE WAS ATTACHED TO THE 177 SQUADRON RCAF. THE SQUADRON WAS DEPLOYED TO A BASE IN INDIA IN NOVEMBER OF 1943... ON OCTOBER 17, 1944, EMERY AND HIS NAVIGATOR WERE FLYING A COMBAT MISSION OVER BURMA WHEN THEIR AIRCRAFT CRASHED INTO A HILLSIDE. THEIR SQUADRON WAS ABLE TO LOCATE THE WRECKAGE AND MARK THE MEN’S GRAVES, HOWEVER, FOLLOWING THE WAR THE GRAVES COULD NOT BE RE-LOCATED. THEY ARE REMEMBERED AT THE SINGAPORE MEMORIAL FOR THE MISSING. JACK (C.1890-1976) AND CECILIA HAD TWO OTHER CHILDREN, JAMES (JIM) FREDRICK AND DORIS EMERY. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150015000
Acquisition Date
2017-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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