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Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
174
Width
82
Description
YELLOW COTTON-BLEND COVER WITH MACHINE-STITCHED EDGES; FRONT OF COVER HAS LOGO IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF WHITE SHIELD WITH RED BORDER, A WHITE ROSE WITH GREEN LEAVES ON YELOW CIRCLE ON SHIELD, AND RED TEXT “WHITE ROSE”. FRONT OF COVER HAS STENCILED GREEN TEXT AT TOP “DRIVE IN-“ AND RED STENCILED TEXT BELOW “LET US CLEAN YOUR WINDSHIELD!” BACK OF COVER IS WHITE COTTON-NYLON FABRIC. FRONT IS STAINED WITH TWO LARGE HOLES ON LEFT AND RIGHT WITH RIPS EXTENDING FROM HOLES; BACK IS STAINED; RIGHT EDGE FRAYED; COVER IS SEVERELY CREASED AND FOLDED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARG OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF AN AUTOMOBILE WINDSHIELD COVER. THE COVER WAS USED BY HER FATHER IN LETHBRIDGE. ON HER FATHER’S USE OF THE COVER, OBERG ELABORATED, “[I REMEMBER] HOW EMBARRASSING IT WAS THAT ALL THE OTHER DADS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WOULD JUST GET OUT IN THE MORNING, AND SCRAPE THEIR WINDSHIELD OFF, BUT OUR DAD [JACK GRANT KEYS] HAD THIS BRIGHT YELLOW THING STRAPPED ONTO HIS WINDSHIELD TO KEEP THE SNOW OFF. AS CHILDREN, THE PEER PRESSURE WAS PRETTY INTENSE, AND WE WERE THE ONLY ONES ON THE STREET THAT HAD THIS GREAT BIG CANVAS THING ON THE FRONT OF OUR DAD’S CAR. WHEN WE MOVED TO EDMONTON, WE DIDN’T HAVE A GARAGE AT THAT POINT. AGAIN, THERE GOES THIS (EVEN THOUGH WHITE ROSE GASOLINE HAD BECOME OBSOLETE). MY DAD DIDN’T THROW TOO MANY THINGS OUT IF THEY STILL HAD A USEFUL PURPOSE, AND SO, THERE IT WAS, FRONT AND CENTER AGAIN–-THE ONLY GUY ON THE BLOCK. I DON’T KNOW WHY SOMEBODY DIDN’T COME UP WITH SOMETHING NOT QUITE SO OBVIOUS. IT WAS JUST AN EMBARRASSMENT THAT MY FATHER ALWAYS HAD TO COVER UP HIS WINDSHIELD.” “HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE [WHITE ROSE OIL COMPANY] PLANT. WELL, HE CALLED IT ‘THE PLANT’, BUT THEY DIDN’T MANUFACTURE ANY PRODUCTS THERE. THERE WERE BIG TANKS. I BELIEVE THEY WERE UP ON THIRD AVENUE SOUTH–-I WANT TO SAY IN THE AREA OF HARLEY-DAVIDSON. WE LIVED ON 18TH STREET, AND I KNOW THAT IT WAS STRAIGHT NORTH ON 18TH STREET, AND EITHER LEFT OR RIGHT. IT WAS IN THAT GENERAL AREA. IT WAS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE, [AND] HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE PLANT. I THINK HE WAS EVEN THE ONLY EMPLOYEE, BUT HE USED TO GO AROUND IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TO ALL OF THE GAS STATIONS THAT WERE DEALING IN WHITE ROSE OIL, AND GET THEIR ORDERS…THEN, THERE MUST HAVE BEEN A DRIVER THAT WOULD COME AND FILL UP THEIR TANKER TRUCKS FROM WHERE HE WAS–-THE BULK STATION–-AND GO AND DELIVER IT. I KNOW THAT [DAD] WAS ON THE ROAD AN AWFUL LOT, BUT I DON’T RECALL, AS A CHILD, THAT THERE WERE OTHER EMPLOYEES, OTHER THAN THE TRUCK DRIVER.” “I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS THAT FOND OF HIS JOB. IN THE WINTER-TIME, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH. HE USED TO FREEZE HIS FINGERS, ON OCCASION, BECAUSE HE WAS THE ONE THAT HAD TO CLIMB UP THE STAIRCASE THAT WENT AROUND THESE BIG TANKS IN THE COLD OF WINTER, AND DO A DIP STICK TO MEASURE HOW MUCH FUEL WAS IN THE TANKS. WE DIDN’T HAVE SNOW BLOWERS…IT WAS TOUGH BECAUSE HE DID SPEND SOME TIME OUTSIDE, WITH HIS JOB, AND THEN [HAD] AN AWFUL LOT OF TIME ON THE ROADS. THERE WERE MANY TIMES THAT HE WOULD…BE STRANDED IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, BECAUSE OF BAD ROADS. OF COURSE HE WOULD HAVE PREFERRED TO BE HOME WITH HIS FAMILY. I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS REALLY ‘GUNG-HO’. I KNOW THAT SHELL TRIED TO GET HIM TO MOVE TO EDMONTON ON A FEW OCCASIONS, AND HE FLATLY REFUSED…WE MOVED IN ’63, SO IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MY GRANDMOTHER WAS ILL, AND DEALING WITH CANCER, AND IT WAS JUST A VERY INAPPROPRIATE TIME FOR US TO LEAVE. MY MOTHER WAS AN ONLY CHILD, SO THERE WERE NO OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS TO STAY AND LOOK AFTER HER. THEN, FINALLY SHELL SAID, “THIS IS YOUR FINAL CHOICE, AND THERE IS NO OPTION.” I GUESS IT WASN’T A CHOICE–-IT WAS EITHER MOVE, OR LOSE YOUR JOB. IT WAS A MATTER OF PUTTING IN TIME UNTIL HE RETIRED.” “MY DAD PASSED AWAY, AND WE ACQUIRED IT FROM HIS WIDOW…IT’S A SMALL PART OF MY DAD. I DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF THINGS [FROM HIM]. THIS WAS MY DAD’S THIRD MARRIAGE, WHEN HE PASSED, AND HIS FAMILY/HIS WIFE DISPOSED OF A LOT OF THINGS THAT WE [THE CHILDREN] POSSIBLY WOULD HAVE KEPT. THEY MEANT NOTHING TO HER, BUT THEY WERE LIVING OUT ON SALT SPRING ISLAND AT THE TIME. I WAS LIVING IN REGINA. MY BROTHER LIVED IN CHICAGO, AND MY SISTER LIVED IN CALIFORNIA. NONE OF US REALLY WANTED ‘THINGS’, LIKE FURNITURE, SO IT WAS JUST A LITTLE TRINKET THAT BROUGHT BACK SO MANY MEMORIES, AND IT WENT BACK AS FAR AS LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
FLAIL PADDLE
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
4
Length
41
Width
12
Description
WOODEN FLAIL. ONE END HAS A PADDLE WITH A WIDTH THAT TAPERS FROM 12 CM AT THE TOP TO 10 CM AT THE BASE. THE PADDLE IS WELL WORN IN THE CENTER WITH A HEIGHT OF 4 CM AT THE ENDS AND 2 CM IN THE CENTER. HANDLE IS ATTACHED TO THE PADDLE AND IS 16 CM LONG WITH A CIRCULAR SHAPE AT THE END OF THE HANDLE. ENGRAVED ON THE CIRCLE THE INITIALS OF DONOR’S MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER, ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, “ . . .” GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SLIGHT SPLITTING OF THE WOOD ON THE PADDLE AND AROUND THE JOINT BETWEEN THE HANDLE AND THE PADDLE. OVERALL WEAR FROM USE.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. THIS WOODEN DOUKHOBOR TOOL IS CALLED A “FLAIL.” A NOTE WRITTEN BY ELSIE MORRIS THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THE FLAIL AT THE TIME OF DONATION EXPLAINS, “FLAIL USED FOR BEATING OUT SEEDS. BELONGED TO ELIZABETH EVANAVNA WISHLOW, THEN HANDED TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH PETROVNA KONKIN WHO PASSED IT ON TO HER DAUGHTER ELIZABETH W. MORRIS.” ALTERNATELY, IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS REMEMBERED HER GRANDMOTHER’S, “… NAME WAS JUSOULNA AND THE MIDDLE INITIAL IS THE DAUGHTER OF YVONNE. YVONNE WAS HER FATHER’S NAME AND WISHLOW WAS HER LAST NAME.” THE FLAIL AND THE BLANKET, ALSO DONATED BY MORRIS, WERE USED TOGETHER AT HARVEST TIME TO EXTRACT AND COLLECT SEEDS FROM GARDEN CROPS. ELSIE RECALLED THAT ON WINDY DAYS, “WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS, OR WHATEVER, AND WE WOULD [LAY THEM OUT ON THE BLANKET], BEAT AWAY AND THEN HOLD [THE BLANKET] UP, AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN.” THE FLAIL CONTINUED TO BE USED BY ELIZABETH “RIGHT UP TO THE END,” POSSIBLY INTO THE 1990S, AND THEREAFTER BY MORRIS. WHEN ASKED WHY SHE STOPPED USING IT HERSELF, MORRIS SAID, “I DON’T GARDEN ANYMORE. FURTHERMORE, PEAS ARE SO INEXPENSIVE THAT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO TO ALL THAT WORK... I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY PEOPLE HARVEST THEIR SEEDS. I THINK WE JUST GO AND BUY THEM IN PACKETS NOW.” THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. DOUKHOBOURS CAME TO CANADA IN FINAL YEARS OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO ESCAPE RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN RUSSIA. ELIZABETH KONKIN (NEE WISHLOW) WAS BORN IN CANORA, SK ON JANUARY 22, 1907 TO HER PARENTS, PETER AND ELIZABETH WISHLOW. AT THE AGE OF 6 SHE MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT BRILLIANT, BC, AND THEY LATER MOVED TO THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT AT SHOULDICE. IT WAS HERE THAT SHE MET AND MARRIED WILLIAM KONKIN. THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE MORRIS (NÉE KONKIN), WAS BORN IN SHOULDICE IN 1928. INITIALLY, WILLIAM TRIED TO SUPPORT HIS FAMILY BY GROWING AND PEDDLING VEGETABLES. WHEN THE FAMILY RECOGNIZED THAT GARDENING WOULD NOT PROVIDE THEM WITH THE INCOME THEY NEEDED, WILLIAM VENTURED OUT TO FARM A QUARTER SECTION OF IRRIGATED LAND 120 KM (75 MILES) AWAY IN VAUXHALL. IN 1941, AFTER THREE YEARS OF FARMING REMOTELY, HE AND ELIZABETH DECIDED TO LEAVE THE ALBERTA COLONY AND RELOCATE TO VAUXHALL. MORRIS WAS 12 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. MORRIS STATED: “… [T]HEY LEFT THE COLONY BECAUSE THERE WERE THINGS GOING ON THAT THEY DID NOT LIKE SO THEY WANTED TO FARM ON THEIR OWN. SO NOW NOBODY HAD MONEY, SO VAUXHALL HAD LAND, YOU KNOW, THAT THEY WANTED TO HAVE THE PEOPLE AND THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PUT ANY DOWN DEPOSIT THEY JUST WERE GIVEN THE LAND AND THEY HAD TO SIGN A PAPER SAYING THEY WOULD GIVE THEM ONE FOURTH OF THE CROP EVERY YEAR. THAT WAS HOW MY DAD GOT PAID BUT WHAT MY DAD DIDN’T KNOW WAS THAT THE MONEY THAT WENT IN THERE WAS ACTUALLY PAYING OFF THE FARM SO HE WENT TO SEE MR., WHAT WAS HIS LAST NAME, HE WAS THE PERSON IN CHARGE. ANYWAY HE SAID TO HIM “HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE I CAN PAY OFF THIS FARM” AND HE SAYS “YOU’VE BEEN PAYING IT RIGHT ALONG YOU OWE ABOUT TWO HUNDRED AND A FEW DOLLARS”. WELL THAT WAS A REAL SURPRISE FOR THEM SO THEY GAVE THEM THE TWO HUNDRED AND WHATEVER IT WAS THAT HE OWED AND HE BECAME THE OWNER OF THE FARM." MORRIS WENT ON, ”THE DOUKHOBORS ARE AGRARIAN, THEY LIKE TO GROW THINGS THAT’S THEIR CULTURE OF OCCUPATION AND SO THE ONES WHO LIKED FRUIT MOVED TO B.C. LIKE MY UNCLE DID AND MY DAD LIKED FARMING SO HE MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THERE WERE LET’S SEE, I THINK THERE WERE FOUR OTHER FAMILIES THAT MOVED TO VAUXHALL AND THREE OF THE MEN GOT TOGETHER AND DECIDED THEY WERE GOING TO GET THEIR TOOLS TOGETHER LIKE A TRACTOR AND MACHINERY THEY NEEDED AND THEN THEY WOULD TAKE TURNS…” THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. THE KONKINS RETIRED TO LETHBRIDGE FROM VAUXHALL IN 1968. MORRIS, BY THEN A SCHOOL TEACHER, RELOCATED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH HER OWN FAMILY. WILLIAM KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MARCH 3, 1977 AT THE AGE OF 72 AND 23 YEARS LATER, ON APRIL 8, 2000, ELIZABETH KONKIN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. A NUMBER OF ARTIFACTS PREVIOUSLY BELONGING TO THE FAMILY EXIST IN THE GALT COLLECTION. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003001
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
STREET SIGN; "3RD AVENUE S."
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1952
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PORCELIN, ENAMEL, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160039002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
STREET SIGN; "3RD AVENUE S."
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1952
Materials
PORCELIN, ENAMEL, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
11.5
Length
53.5
Description
BLUE SIGN WITH ENAMEL BASE COVERED IN PORCELAIN THAT HAS BEEN BAKED TO THE SURFACE. "3RD AVENUE S. PAINTED IN WHITE BLOCK LETTERS OVER BLUE. 3 HOLES PUNCHED AT EACH THE TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES. EACH HOLE HAS A METAL RIVET. THE SIGN IS CURVED OUTWARDS TO THE FACE. THE BACK SIDE OF SIGN IS UNFINISHED AND LIGHT GREY IN COLOUR WITH THE BLUE GLAZE AROUND THE EDGES WHERE IT HAS RUN OVER FROM THE FRONT SIDE. CONDITION: THERE ARE IMPERFECTIONS IN OVERALL GLAZE ON THE SIGN AND A SIGNIFICANT LOSS OF THAT GLAZE AROUND THE EDGES.SLIGHT CHIPPING ALONG TOP. SURFACE SLIGHTLY SCUFFED OVERALL. GENERAL WEAR AROUND RIVETS.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
IN 2016, THE GALT MUSEUM APPROVED A PURCHASE OF TWO FORMER LETHBRIDGE STREET SIGNS – ONE FROM 5TH STREET SOUTH AND THE OTHER FROM 3RD AVENUE SOUTH. THEY WERE COLLECTED FROM AN ESTATE DISPERSAL AGENT, BRENT CUMMINS, WHO BOUGHT AND DISPERSED THE ESTATE OF THE LATE MR. MICHEAL VARZARI. AS STATED IN HIS OBITUARY, “[VAZARI] WAS A GREAT COLLECTOR OF RELICS FROM DAYS GONE BY…” THE ESTIMATED DATE OF ORIGIN FOR THE SIGNS IS 1910-11. AT THE TIME OF DONATION, THERE ARE IDENTICAL VERSIONS OF THESE SIGNS STILL INSTALLED ON THE CORNERS OF THE RESIDENCES AT 1505 - 4TH AVENUE SOUTH AND 920 – 9TH AVENUE SOUTH. THROUGH LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARCHIVAL RESEARCH IT WAS DETERMINED THAT THE ISSUE OF LETHBRIDGE’S USE OF STREET NAMES OVER STREET NUMBERS WAS RAISED AS EARLY AS 1907. STREETS ASSIGNED WITH NUMBERS OPPOSED TO NAMES WERE SEEN TO BE AN INDICATOR OF A MORE MODERN CITY. AN EDITORIAL IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON 11 APRIL 1908 SHEDS LIGHT INTO THE STREET SIGN SENTIMENTS OF THE EARLY DAYS OF THE CITY: “TWO OR THREE YEARS AGO THEY ORDERED STREET SIGNS. THEY CAME AND REPOSED PEACEFULLY IN THE DUSTY CORNERS OF THE FIRE HALL UNTIL IT DAWNED UPON THE MIND OF [AN] ALDERMAN… THAT IT WAS TIME THAT THE CITY STARTED USING THEM. ‘TWAS ORDERED THIS, AND NOW THEY ARE UP. NOW THE ALDERMEN ARE FEELING THE HUNCH THAT SOME PEOPLE HAVE HAD FOR A LONG TIME THAT THE STREETS SHOULD BE NUMBERED AND DIVIDED SYSTEMATICALLY INTO STREETS AND AVENUES… BUT IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO WASTE THE PRICE OF THOSE STREET SIGNS. SO I SUPPOSE THAT THE PRESENT AWKWARD SYSTEM WILL HOLD GOOD UNTIL THE SIGNS WEAR OUT... THE CHANGE SHOULD BE MADE BEFORE THE CITY PUTS IN ITS PERMANENT SIDEWALKS AND THEN THE NAMES COULD BE PUT IN THE CEMENT IN NICE COLORED CEMENT ALMOST AS PRETTY AS THE BEAUTIFUL BLUE AND WHITE SIGNS THAT ARE STUCK UP ALL OVER THE CITY WHERE THERE IS A CORNER BUILDING TO STICK THEM ON.” ON 18 JULY 1908, THE HERALD PUBLISHED AN ARTICLE THAT STATED, “THE WALKS ARE GOING AND ON THEM ARE BEING PLACED IN LARGE LETTERS THE NAMES OF THE STREETS NOT THE NUMBERS… NINETEEN OUT OF EVERY TWENTY PEOPLE IN THE CITY ARE IN FAVOR OF THE CHANGE [TO A NUMBER SYSTEM]… IF ANYONE IS NOT IN FAVOR OF IT LET HIM GO TO CALGARY AND SEE HOW EASY IT IS FOR HIM TO GO ANYWHERE HE WANTS WITHOUT POKING QUESTIONS AT EVERY ONE HE MEETS… IT’S A REGULAR SNAP.” THE DEBATE CONTINUED UNRESOLVED AND WAS REFERENCED AGAIN IN 1909 AS AN OBSTACLE TO THE CITY SECURING STREET MAIL DELIVERY. ON 8 FEBRUARY 1910, THE HERALD SAID: “… IS IT NOT ABOUT TIME THE CITY COUNCIL WERE ADOPTING THE METHOD IN HAVING THE STREETS AND AVENUES NUMBERED SYSTEMATICALLY? THE HERALD HAS ADVOCATED THIS CHANGE IN SEASON AND OUT OF SEASON ALMOST TO WEARINESS. SUPT. ROSS OF THE POSTAL SERVICE NOW ADVOCATES A MORE MODERN SYSTEM AND SAYS IT WOULD AID VERY MATERIALLY IN THE SUCCESSFUL WORKING OF THE SERVICE.” AND ON 4 OCTOBER 1910, IT IS PUBLISHED THAT “THE HERALD HAS SEEN ONE MORE OF THE THINGS IT HAS ADVOCATED BROUGHT TO PASS. THE STREETS AND AVENUES ARE NUMBERED.” BY THE LATE 40S, STREET SIGNS WERE IN THE NEWS ONCE MORE, SPECIFICALLY THE NEED FOR MORE OF THEM, AS THE CITY GRAPPLED WITH ITS EXPANDING URBAN FOOTPRINT. BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLECTOR COMES FROM HIS OBITUARY, WHICH STATES MICHAEL ARTHUR “COUTTSO” VARZARI WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE ON 17 NOVEMBER 1929 AND “WAS RAISED ‘DOWN NUMBER THREE.’” THE OBITUARY GOES ON SAYING, “HE ALWAYS ATTRIBUTED HIS STRONG AND SOLID WORK ETHIC AND HIS APPRECIATION FOR THE SIMPLE THINGS IN LIFE TO HIS UPBRINGING ‘DOWN NUMBER THREE’.” HE WORKED FROM THE GROUND UP IN THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT, FIRST AS AN APPRENTICE, THEN AS A “FULL-FLEDGED ELECTRICIAN,” AND HE RETIRED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF CONSTRUCTION. VARZARI’S BROTHER WAS GEORGE VARZARI WHO WAS THE OWNER AND PRESIDENT OF NATIONAL SALVAGE, A BUSINESS HE STARTED AROUND 1951. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING IN-DEPTH LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE CITY’S STREET SIGNS.
Catalogue Number
P20160039002
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
STREET SIGN; "5TH STREET S."
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1952
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ENAMEL, PORCELAIN, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160039001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
STREET SIGN; "5TH STREET S."
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1952
Materials
ENAMEL, PORCELAIN, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
11.5
Length
53.5
Description
BLUE SIGN WITH ENAMEL BASE COVERED IN PORCELAIN THAT HAS BEEN BAKED TO THE SURFACE. "5TH STREET S" PAINTED IN WHITE BLOCK LETTERS OVER BLUE. 3 HOLES PUNCHED AT EACH THE TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES. EACH HOLE HAS A METAL RIVET. THE SIGN IS CURVED OUTWARDS TO THE FACE. THE BACK SIDE OF SIGN IS UNFINISHED AND LIGHT GREY IN COLOUR WITH THE BLUE GLAZE AROUND THE EDGES WHERE IT HAS RUN OVER FROM THE FRONT SIDE. CONDITION: TOP CENTER RIVET IS MISSING. AROUND THAT CENTER HOLE THERE IS A LOSS OF THE PORCELAIN INTO THE "TR" OF "STREET". THERE ARE IMPERFECTIONS IN OVERALL GLAZE ON THE SIGN AND A SIGNIFICANT LOSS OF THAT GLAZE AROUND THE EDGES. WHITE PAINT ON TOP OF FINISHED PAINT ON THE UPPER RIGHT SECTION OF SIGN. SLIGHT CHIPPING ALONG TOP. GENERAL WEAR AROUND RIVETS. BACK SIDE HAS LOSS OF THE PORCELAIN OVERALL AND A DUST/ROUGH MATERIAL STUCK TO THE SURFACE.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
IN 2016, THE GALT MUSEUM APPROVED A PURCHASE OF TWO FORMER LETHBRIDGE STREET SIGNS – ONE FROM 5TH STREET SOUTH AND THE OTHER FROM 3RD AVENUE SOUTH. THEY WERE COLLECTED FROM AN ESTATE DISPERSAL AGENT, BRENT CUMMINS, WHO BOUGHT AND DISPERSED THE ESTATE OF THE LATE MR. MICHEAL VARZARI. AS STATED IN HIS OBITUARY, “[VAZARI] WAS A GREAT COLLECTOR OF RELICS FROM DAYS GONE BY…” THE ESTIMATED DATE OF ORIGIN FOR THE SIGNS IS 1910-11. AT THE TIME OF DONATION, THERE ARE IDENTICAL VERSIONS OF THESE SIGNS STILL INSTALLED ON THE CORNERS OF THE RESIDENCES AT 1505 - 4TH AVENUE SOUTH AND 920 – 9TH AVENUE SOUTH. THROUGH LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARCHIVAL RESEARCH IT WAS DETERMINED THAT THE ISSUE OF LETHBRIDGE’S USE OF STREET NAMES OVER STREET NUMBERS WAS RAISED AS EARLY AS 1907. STREETS ASSIGNED WITH NUMBERS OPPOSED TO NAMES WERE SEEN TO BE AN INDICATOR OF A MORE MODERN CITY. AN EDITORIAL IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON 11 APRIL 1908 SHEDS LIGHT INTO THE STREET SIGN SENTIMENTS OF THE EARLY DAYS OF THE CITY: “TWO OR THREE YEARS AGO THEY ORDERED STREET SIGNS. THEY CAME AND REPOSED PEACEFULLY IN THE DUSTY CORNERS OF THE FIRE HALL UNTIL IT DAWNED UPON THE MIND OF [AN] ALDERMAN… THAT IT WAS TIME THAT THE CITY STARTED USING THEM. ‘TWAS ORDERED THIS, AND NOW THEY ARE UP. NOW THE ALDERMEN ARE FEELING THE HUNCH THAT SOME PEOPLE HAVE HAD FOR A LONG TIME THAT THE STREETS SHOULD BE NUMBERED AND DIVIDED SYSTEMATICALLY INTO STREETS AND AVENUES… BUT IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO WASTE THE PRICE OF THOSE STREET SIGNS. SO I SUPPOSE THAT THE PRESENT AWKWARD SYSTEM WILL HOLD GOOD UNTIL THE SIGNS WEAR OUT... THE CHANGE SHOULD BE MADE BEFORE THE CITY PUTS IN ITS PERMANENT SIDEWALKS AND THEN THE NAMES COULD BE PUT IN THE CEMENT IN NICE COLORED CEMENT ALMOST AS PRETTY AS THE BEAUTIFUL BLUE AND WHITE SIGNS THAT ARE STUCK UP ALL OVER THE CITY WHERE THERE IS A CORNER BUILDING TO STICK THEM ON.” ON 18 JULY 1908, THE HERALD PUBLISHED AN ARTICLE THAT STATED, “THE WALKS ARE GOING AND ON THEM ARE BEING PLACED IN LARGE LETTERS THE NAMES OF THE STREETS NOT THE NUMBERS… NINETEEN OUT OF EVERY TWENTY PEOPLE IN THE CITY ARE IN FAVOR OF THE CHANGE [TO A NUMBER SYSTEM]… IF ANYONE IS NOT IN FAVOR OF IT LET HIM GO TO CALGARY AND SEE HOW EASY IT IS FOR HIM TO GO ANYWHERE HE WANTS WITHOUT POKING QUESTIONS AT EVERY ONE HE MEETS… IT’S A REGULAR SNAP.” THE DEBATE CONTINUED UNRESOLVED AND WAS REFERENCED AGAIN IN 1909 AS AN OBSTACLE TO THE CITY SECURING STREET MAIL DELIVERY. ON 8 FEBRUARY 1910, THE HERALD SAID: “… IS IT NOT ABOUT TIME THE CITY COUNCIL WERE ADOPTING THE METHOD IN HAVING THE STREETS AND AVENUES NUMBERED SYSTEMATICALLY? THE HERALD HAS ADVOCATED THIS CHANGE IN SEASON AND OUT OF SEASON ALMOST TO WEARINESS. SUPT. ROSS OF THE POSTAL SERVICE NOW ADVOCATES A MORE MODERN SYSTEM AND SAYS IT WOULD AID VERY MATERIALLY IN THE SUCCESSFUL WORKING OF THE SERVICE.” AND ON 4 OCTOBER 1910, IT IS PUBLISHED THAT “THE HERALD HAS SEEN ONE MORE OF THE THINGS IT HAS ADVOCATED BROUGHT TO PASS. THE STREETS AND AVENUES ARE NUMBERED.” BY THE LATE 40S, STREET SIGNS WERE IN THE NEWS ONCE MORE, SPECIFICALLY THE NEED FOR MORE OF THEM, AS THE CITY GRAPPLED WITH ITS EXPANDING URBAN FOOTPRINT. BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLECTOR COMES FROM HIS OBITUARY, WHICH STATES MICHAEL ARTHUR “COUTTSO” VARZARI WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE ON 17 NOVEMBER 1929 AND “WAS RAISED ‘DOWN NUMBER THREE.’” THE OBITUARY GOES ON SAYING, “HE ALWAYS ATTRIBUTED HIS STRONG AND SOLID WORK ETHIC AND HIS APPRECIATION FOR THE SIMPLE THINGS IN LIFE TO HIS UPBRINGING ‘DOWN NUMBER THREE’.” HE WORKED FROM THE GROUND UP IN THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT, FIRST AS AN APPRENTICE, THEN AS A “FULL-FLEDGED ELECTRICIAN,” AND HE RETIRED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF CONSTRUCTION. VARZARI’S BROTHER WAS GEORGE VARZARI WHO WAS THE OWNER AND PRESIDENT OF NATIONAL SALVAGE, A BUSINESS HE STARTED AROUND 1951. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING IN-DEPTH LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE CITY’S STREET SIGNS.
Catalogue Number
P20160039001
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1957
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, VINYL, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170005002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1957
Materials
FABRIC, VINYL, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.5
Length
25.5
Diameter
19.5
Description
BLACK CONDUCTOR’S HAT WITH GOLD ACCENTS; BLACK VINYL BRIM WITH GREEN COLOURED FABRIC ON BOTTOM; TWO PARALLEL GOLD-COLOURED BANDS STITCHED ONTO HAT; “CPR CONDUCTOR” IS STITCHED ONTO FRONT OF HAT IN A BRONZE-COLOURED THREAD; TWO BLACK EYELETS LOCATED ON BOTH SIDES OF THE HAT. INSIDE IS LINED WITH GREY FABRIC. INSIDE TAG READS "4 - SCULLY 7 1/8 MONTREAL" PRINTED IN BLACK INK. THE "4" HAS BEEN CROSSED OUT AND "5" HAS BEEN WRITTEN BY HAND BOTH IN BLUE INK. TAN LEATHER RIM AROUND THE INSIDE CIRCUMFERENCE OF HAT. GOOD CONDITION: WHITE BAND INSIDE OF HAT BRIM IS STAINED GREY; PIECES OF YELLOWED PAPER ARE STUCK INTO BOTH SIDES OF THE HAT; CIRCULAR-SHAPED INDENT IS PRESENT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TOP OF THE HAT. SEVERE WEAR/STAIN IN CENTER OF THE INSIDE OF HAT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
THIS CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (CPR) CONDUCTOR CAP BELONGED TO JAMES (JIM) FRANCES LOGAN, WHO WORKED FOR THE CPR IN LETHBRIDGE FOR FORTY-FOUR YEARS FOLLOWING WORLD WAR I. IN A PHONE CALL THAT TOOK PLACE ON JULY 16, 2018 BETWEEN LOGAN'S GRANDSON, CALVIN LOGAN AND GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CALVIN LOGAN STATED HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED FOR CPR FROM 1913 TO 1957. ON MARCH 9, 2017 MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CALVIN LOGAN, WHO HAD POSSESSION OF THE CAP AT THE TIME OF DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “MY FATHER (DENZIL LOGAN) GAVE ME THIS HAT PROBABLY FIFTEEN YEARS AGO. IT CAME FROM HIS FATHER, JAMES FRANCES LOGAN… MY DAD FELT IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT I HAVE SOMETHING, A KEEPSAKE, OF MY GRANDFATHER’S AND WITH THAT, I’VE ALWAYS ADMIRED [THE CAP]. I REMEMBER IT IN MY FATHER’S POSSESSION, IN HIS HOUSE. [THE CAP WAS] ON A SHELF IN HIS STUDY." "MY GRANDFATHER LIVED HERE SINCE THE EARLY 1900’S AND MY DAD WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1926, SO THIS HAT KIND OF HAS A REAL SIGNIFICANCE FOR ME IN LETHBRIDGE," LOGAN EXPLAINED, "MY GRANDFATHER WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE WORKED FOR THE CPR FOR WELL OVER FORTY YEARS AND WAS VERY PROUD OF HIS POSITION AND ROLE IN THE CPR." “I WOULD BE OVER AT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HOME; GRANDMA WOULD THERE AND [GRANDPA] WOULD BE ON THE ROAD,” LOGAN SAID AS HE RECALLED HIS EARLIEST MEMORIES OF HIS GRANDFATHER AND THE CPR, “HE ALSO WOULD ALWAYS BE WEARING OVERALLS AND I AM STILL A PERSON THAT LOVES TO WEAR OVERALLS TOO. THE FIRST PAIR OF OVERALLS [I HAD] WHEN I GOT TO BE OLDER WERE FROM MY GRANDFATHER. THEY WERE BLUE AND WHITE STRIPED OVERALLS. HE HAD LOTS OF PAIRS OF THEM FROM HIS DAYS AT THE CPR. I HAVE INHERITED THAT KIND OF TRADITION FROM MY GRANDFATHER, I GUESS.” “MY OTHER MEMORY [WOULD BE] WHEN I GOT TO BE PROBABLY SEVEN OR EIGHT WHEN [CPR] OFFERED OUR FAMILY TO RIDE THE LAST ACTUAL PASSENGER TRAIN THAT RAN FROM LETHBRIDGE TO CALGARY. THE IMMEDIATE FAMILY MEMBERS OF MY GRANDFATHER WERE INVITED TO JOIN HIM ON THE TRAIN. WE GOT TO RIDE FROM LETHBRIDGE, OVER THE HIGH LEVEL BRIDGE, TO CALGARY AND BACK AGAIN… THAT IS THE ONLY TRIP AS A KID THAT I DO REMEMBER." "ANOTHER ONE OF MY MEMORIES," LOGAN CONTINUED, "IS OF THE TRAIN THAT THEY HAD AT GALT GARDENS. I WOULD IMAGINE MYSELF AS A CONDUCTOR AND BACK THEN YOU COULD GO RIGHT INSIDE THE TRAIN. ONE MINUTE I WAS THE ENGINEER AND THE NEXT MINUTE I WAS THE CONDUCTOR. I WAS TRYING TO IMAGINE MYSELF AS A TRAIN PERSON AND WORKING WITH THE ENGINES SO LARGE AND JUST HOW COOL IT WOULD BE AS A KID GROWING UP THINKING OF MYSELF WORKING ON THESE BIG HUGE STEAM ENGINE TRAINS." "[WHEN I WAS YOUNG], I WANTED TO SEE WHERE [MY GRANDFATHER] WAS WORKING AND WHAT HE DID, BUT OFTEN TIMES IT WAS VERY DIFFICULT TO DO THAT BECAUSE OF THE TYPE OF JOB HE HAD. MY LAST MEMORIES OF THE RUN THAT HE HAD WERE FROM WHEN HE WORKED AS A CONDUCTOR IN THE REGULAR RUN FROM LETHBRIDGE TO YAK AND THEN IT WAS A RETURN TRIP FROM YAK TO LETHBRIDGE. THAT WAS THE LAST ROUTE HE WAS RUNNING BEFORE HE RETIRED,” LOGAN RECALLED. “I’D ALWAYS FELT A CONNECTION [TO TRAINS],” LOGAN CONTINUED, “NOT ONLY THROUGH MY GRANDFATHER, BUT ALSO THROUGH MY FATHER. A GREAT DEAL OF LIVESTOCK WAS HAULED IN THOSE DAYS THROUGH TRAIN AND FOR MANY OF THE PUBLIC YARDS ACROSS CANADA, TRAINS WERE THEIR WAY OF SHIPPING CATTLE TO DIFFERENT AREAS FOR PROCESSING. EVERY DAY OF [MY DAD’S] WORK WAS LOADING BOXCARS WITH CATTLE. I WAS AROUND THE YARDS PROBABLY MORE THAN MOST KIDS, BECAUSE MY DAD ON A SATURDAY OR SUNDAY WOULD HAVE TO STOP IN AT THE YARDS. I WOULD ALWAYS BE THE FIRST ONE IN THE CAR TO COME WITH HIM, I SAW MANY A CATTLE LOADED UP INTO THE BOXCARS. MY CLEARER MEMORIES [OF THE RAILWAY YARDS] WERE MORE SO OF MY FATHER’S CONNECTION WITH THE RAILWAY. [I ALSO REMEMBER] THERE WERE TIMES WHEN THERE WERE TRAIN ACCIDENTS [MY FATHER WOULD BE] CALLED OUT.” LOGAN WENT ON TO DESCRIBE HIS GRANDFATHER’S HISTORY, “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN IN POTSDAM, NEW YORK. [AROUND THAT TIME] THERE WAS A LOT OF OPPORTUNITY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I THINK THE REASON MY GRANDFATHER ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE WAS BECAUSE HIS FATHER HAD ACQUIRED LAND HERE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA… [MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER] OWNED QUITE A NUMBER OF ACRES IN THAT AREA OF LETHBRIDGE. SO AS FAR AS THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF HOW THEY ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T REALLY KNOW THAT PART OF IT, BUT I DO KNOW THAT MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER DID OWN A FARM AND IT WAS A PART OF THE FAIRWAY PLAZA AREA TODAY.” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE APRIL 6TH, 1944 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD LISTED JAMES LOGAN JR. AS ONE OF THE EIGHT REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE CRANBROOK SECTION OF C.P.R. EMPLOYEES (FROM THE TERRITORY COVERING CROW’S NEST TO CRESTON) TO ATTEND A PROVINCIAL C. P. R. MEETING ABOUT VICTORY BOND SALE METHODS IN VANCOUVER. JAMES FRANCIS LOGAN’S OBITUARY WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1983. IT READS: “LOGAN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MAY 8TH, 1983 AT THE AGE OF 90 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. DOROTHY LOGAN… MR. LOGAN WAS BORN MAY 9TH, 1892 AT OGDENSBURG, NEW YORK AND CAME TO CANADA AND LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, WHERE HE FIRST WORKED IN THE MINES. HE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE 20TH BATTERY FROM 1914 TO 1918 AND WAS THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF 25TH CANADIAN FIELD ARTILLERY. HE WORKED FOR THE C. P. R. FOR 44 YEARS AND AT THE TIME OF HIS RETIREMENT WAS A CONDUCTOR.” FOR INFORMATION ABOUT J. F. LOGAN’S EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR I, PLEASE SEE ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 19861018001. PLEASE REFERENCE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD CLIPPINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20170005002
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2002
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160008001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
2002
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
38.3
Length
121.5
Width
4.6
Description
SIGN. WOOD AND METAL. BORDER OF SIGN IS PAINTED MEDIUM/DARK BROWN. MAIN PORTION OF SIGN IS GOLDEN ROD YELLOW, WITH BLACK LETTERING. TEXT READS: “A SAFE WORKER IS A VALUABLE EMPLOYEE”. TWO METAL BRACKETS FOR HANGING ATTACH TO BACK OF SIGN. EACH BRACKET ATTACHES TO THE BACK WITH TWO FLAT HEADED BOLTS, WHICH ARE VISIBLE ON THE YELLOW SIDE OF THE SIGN. NUTS HOLD THE BOLTS ON THE BACK. HANDWRITTEN IN BLUE INK ON BOTTOM LEFT SIDE “317-9353”. REVERSE OF SIGN IS UNFINISHED DARK, ROUGH PINE BORDER. OVERALL IN GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SIGN IS VERY DIRTY. SOME OF BROWN PAINT AROUND BORDER HAS SCRATCHED OFF, REVEALING BLACK PAINT UNDERNEATH.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRANSPORTATION
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A SERIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND AN INTERVIEW WITH DONOR JOHN SUMPTION CONDUCTED BY GALT MUSEUM TECH KEVIN MACLEAN ON 22 MARCH 2016: JOHN STARTED WORKING AT THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP, AB IN 1992. HE DESCRIBED HOW IT WAS THAT HE CAME TO WORK THERE: “I WAS WORKING AS A SEASONAL MACHINE OPERATOR ON THE PACIFIC REGION, WHICH MEANT THAT IN THE SPRINGTIME EVERY YEAR, I GENERALLY START OUT SOMEWHERE NEAR THE FRASER CANYON AND OVER THE COURSE OF THE YEAR I’D WORK ANYWHERE FROM THERE TO SWIFT CURRENT AND FROM THE U.S. BORDER AS FAR NORTH AS [THE CPR HAD TRACKS, TO ROUGHLY ST. PAUL, AB]. THE LENGTH OF MY YEAR’S EMPLOYMENT WOULD BE DETERMINED IN MY SENIORITY AND THE AMOUNT OF WORK THAT WAS AVAILABLE. I WAS REAL TIRED OF BEING ON THE ROAD. THE YEAR PREVIOUSLY, THERE’D BEEN A TEMPORARY JOB – A COUPLE OF TEMPORARY JOBS THAT WERE BULLETINED AT THE FROG SHOP IN THE FALL, PROCESSING SOME SCRAP MATERIAL THAT WAS THERE. A FRIEND AND MINE BID THOSE JOBS AND GOT THEM. THAT MEANT WE WERE ON THE SHOP’S SENIORITY LIST AND WHEN THE OPPORTUNITY AROSE, THERE WAS A POSITION THERE BULLETINED – ACTUALLY A COUPLE OF POSITIONS BULLETINED THERE – MY FRIEND AND I BID THEM TO BE ABLE TO BE AT HOME AND HAVE A YEAR ROUND JOB. MIGHT NOT HAVE BEEN THE BEST IDEA EVER, BUT IT WAS GOOD TO BE HOME AND SLEEP IN MY OWN BED AT NIGHT AND WAKE UP AND SEE MY HORSES IN THE MORNING.” JOHN REMOVED THIS SIGN FROM HIS WORKPLACE WHEN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY ELECTED TO CLOSE THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP IN THE SPRING OF 2002. JOHN’S SUPERVISOR, GUY MITCHELL, KNEW THAT HE HAD AN INTEREST IN HISTORY AND OLD THINGS AND ALLOWED JOHN TO TAKE SOME ITEMS HOME. JOHN RECOUNTED THE EXPERIENCE: “WHEN I ASKED [GUY] WHAT WAS TO BECOME OF THE [SAFE WORKER] SIGN HE SAID, ‘YOU CAN HAVE IT, JOHN. THEY’LL JUST THROW IT AWAY. IT’S JUST JUNK AS FAR AS ANYONE ELSE CONCERNED.’ I ASKED HIM, ‘GEE, COULD I HAVE THE LITTLE PLAQUE OFF THE DOOR?’ AND HE SAID, ‘OF COURSE, YEAH, TAKE IT. IT’S GOING TO GET – SOMEONE ELSE WILL KNOCK IT OFF AND IT’LL GET BROKEN. SO MUCH THE BETTER. YOU WANNA SEE IT HANG IN THERE, GO FOR IT. IT’S ALL YOURS.’” JOHN EXPLAINED THAT THIS SIGN HUNG ON THE WALL: “IT WAS HANGING ON THE WALL WELL ABOVE THE DOORWAY, AND [I] PUT A LADDER UP AND TOOK THE TWO BIG SCREWS OUT OF THE WALL THAT HELD IT IN PLACE, AND TOOK THE TWO LITTLE TINY SCREWS OUT OF THE DOORWAY THAT HELD THE FROG SHOP SIGN IN PLACE. THAT WAS ONE OF THE LAST DAY – I THINK IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN EVEN THE LAST DAY THAT WE WERE THERE – AS I RECALL THAT’S THE CASE.” JOHN EXPLAINED WHY HE WAS SO INTERESTED IN THIS PARTICULAR SIGN: “BUT THE SIGN WAS SIGNIFICANT TO ME IN IT OF ITSELF GIVEN THAT WE SOMETIMES JOKED THAT THAT WAS THE ENTIRETY, FOR A LONG TIME, OF THE RAILWAY’S SAFETY PROGRAM – WAS A SIGN LIKE THIS. ON ALL THE MIRRORS IN ALL OF THE EMPLOYEES’ BATHROOMS, GOING BACK AT LEAST WHEN I FIRST WORKED FOR THE RAILWAY THE SUMMER OUT OF THE UNIVERSITY IN 1975, THE MIRRORS WERE ALL PAINTED WITH A SIGN ABOVE - AT THE TOP AND THE BOTTOM OF THE MIRROR THAT SAID, “YOU’RE LOOKING AT THE MAN MOST RESPONSIBLE YOUR SAFETY.” THOSE WERE QUITE OFTEN CHANGED BY EMPLOYEES TO SAY SOMETHING QUITE DIFFERENT, BUT YEAH, IT WAS SOMETHING OF A JOKE.” HE WENT ON FURTHER, SAYING THAT IN 1978 HE AND A FRIEND LOOKED INTO THE OLD ROUNDHOUSE AT THE RAIL YARD IN LETHBRIDGE AND “WAS MORTIFIED” TO SEE THE WORKING CONDITIONS: “WE PULLED UP BEHIND THE OLD ROUNDHOUSE IN THE OLD YARD HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, AND LOOKED IN THE DOORWAY. THAT’S AS MUCH AS I KNOW OF THE OLD ROUNDHOUSE, AND I WAS MORTIFIED TO SEE MEN WORKING IN A POORLY VENTILATED, ANCIENT, REALLY FALLING APART BUILDING. MORE PIGEONS THAN PEOPLE INSIDE, IN A CLOUD OF DUST AND WELDING SMOKE THAT YOU COULD NOT SEE THROUGH. THAT’S WHERE THIS SIGN CAME FROM.” IN COMPARISON, THE WORKING CONDITIONS IN THE KIPP FROG SHOP WERE MUCH BETTER, BUT JOHN EXPLAINS THAT THERE WERE STILL PROBLEMS: “WHEN I WENT TO WORK AT THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP IN EARLY ’92, A GREAT NUMBER OF PEOPLE WORKING THERE, AND THEN THERE WERE ONLY 12 EMPLOYEES THERE AND A SUPERVISOR, HAD WORKED THERE. CONSEQUENTLY, THAT FACILITY WAS LIGHT YEARS BEYOND WHERE THEY WORKED PREVIOUSLY, AND THEY’RE PRETTY COMFORTABLE IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT. THEY FELT THAT, YOU KNOW, THEY WERE DOING PRETTY WELL. THERE WERE A NUMBER OF US OVER THE COURSE OF THE NEXT COUPLE OF YEARS THAT CAME TO WORK THERE THAT HAD PREVIOUSLY WORKED ON THE SEASONAL WORK CREWS, AS MACHINE OPERATORS, WERE HAPPY TO HAVE A FULL TIME, YEAR-ROUND JOB. IT WASN’T A VERY PLEASANT PLACE TO WORK. IT WAS VERY DUSTY, VERY NOISY, AND DESPITE A RELATIVELY DECENT WELDING FUME VENTILATION SYSTEM, IT WASN’T A GOOD PLACE TO BE. AND WE LOOKED AT THE SIGN EVERY DAY AS YOU WALKED OUT. IN THE COURSE OF READING THE MSDS ON THE WELDING WIRE AND THE WELDING ROD WE USED, AFTER I WORKED THERE FOR MAYBE A YEAR OR SO – MAYBE A COUPLE YEARS – I SAW THAT THE WELDING WIRE MANUFACTURER – WELL THE WELDING ROD MANUFACTURER – SUGGESTED THAT PEOPLE HAVE AT LEAST ANNUAL BLOOD TESTS TO DETERMINE THEIR BLOOD LEVELS OF HEAVY METALS, IN PARTICULAR MANGANESE.” JOHN EXPLAINED THAT TOO MUCH MAGNESIUM IN THE HUMAN BODY CAN MIMIC PARKINSON’S DISEASE, A CONDITION CALLED PARKINSONISM. SUMPTION PUSHED FOR BLOOD TESTING TO BE DONE IN THE 1990S: “THAT STARTED US DOWN THE ROAD THAT RESULTED IN A STUDY BEING DONE BY A GROUP OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE SPECIALISTS FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY, INCLUDING OF THE FOREMOST – THE WORLD’S MOST FOREMOST – MOVEMENT DISORDER SPECIALIST … . CONSEQUENTLY, WE ALL SPENT TWO DAYS IN CALGARY, GOT MRI, GOT BLOOD TESTS, AND THEREAFTER WERE REGULARLY SUBJECTED TO URINE TESTS.” THE RESULTS OF ALL OF THIS TESTING: “CONSEQUENTLY, THE VENTILATION SYSTEM WAS IMPROVED, THE DUST CAPTURE SYSTEM WAS IMPROVED FOR THE GRINDING PROCEDURES, AND ALL EMPLOYEES WORE POWER PURIFIED AIR RESPIRATORS THEREAFTER. SO WE HAD A MUCH SAFER WORK ENVIRONMENT.” JOHN NEVER SAW THIS SIGN HANGING IN THE ROUNDHOUSE AND HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY: “IT’S FAR TOO OLD TO HAVE BEEN MADE FOR THE FROG SHOP IN 1982. WHEN YOU LOOK AT THESE … BOLTS – HAVEN’T SEEN THEM DO LIKE THAT IN AN AWFUL LONG TIME. THIS IS HAND-PUNCHED – THIS IS HAND-CUT AND HAND-PUNCHED. LOOT AT THE WIDTH OF THE PINE PLANK THAT IT’S ON. IT’S NOT REGULAR, OLD CPR RED. THEY DIDN’T BUY THINGS. THEY ARE NOTORIOUSLY CHEAP. I REMEMBER THIS YELLOW PAINT. THIS IS THE SAME YELLOW PAINT THAT THEY PAINTED THEIR MOTOR CARS WITH – THE LITTLE, FREEZE-YOUR-ASS-OFF TRACK MOBILES WE USED TO TRAVEL ON WHEN WE’RE WORKING ON THE TRACK. YEAH, I WAS TOLD THAT. BUT I KNOW THEY WOULDN’T HAVE A SIGN PAINTED. I KNOW THEY WOULDN’T BUY ONE FROM ANYONE. AND THAT WAS WHAT I WAS TOLD BY ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I WORKED WITH THERE; SOME OF WHOM HAD A GREAT MANY YEARS. AND THERE WERE A COUPLE OLD GUYS THAT I WORKED WITH THAT RETIRED AT 35 YEARS, SHORTLY AFTER I ARRIVED IN THE FROG SHOP THERE IN ’92.” JOHN DESCRIBED WHERE THE SIGN HUNG IN THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP: “IT HUNG IN THE DOORWAY THAT LEAD OUT OF THE SHOP INTO THE HALLWAY INTO OUR CHANGE ROOM. I LOOKED AT IT EVERY DAY, AT LUNCHTIME, COFFEE TIME.” JOHN ADDED THE FOLLOWING ABOUT WORKER SAFETY: “I JUST THINK THAT THIS IS TO ME ILLUSTRATIVE OF HOW FAR WE’VE COME WHEN IT COMES TO WORKERS’ SAFETY. AND WHEN YOU TAKE A LOOK AROUND TODAY OF HOW HORRIFYINGLY FAR WE HAVE TO GO. TO THINK THAT THERE ARE PEOPLE, WHAT LESS THAN TWO WEEKS AGO, STANDING IN FRONT OF THE LEGISLATURE IN EDMONTON FIGHTING THE NOTION THAT FARM WORKERS IN ALBERTA SHOULD HAVE THE SAME PROTECTION THAT THEY DO EVERYWHERE ELSE IN THE COUNTRY AND HAVE FOR YEARS AND YEARS. TOO MANY PEOPLE DIE GOING TO WORK. IT’S TOO EASY TO HAPPEN AND IT’S EVEN EASIER NOW. IT’S SCARY TO THINK OF YOUNG PEOPLE. I’VE WORKED WITH LOTS OF YOUNG PEOPLE AS THE YEARS HAVE GONE ON. I’M OLD. I KNOW OLD PEOPLE - OLDER PEOPLE - LOOKED OUT FOR ME AND HELPED ME; AND I’M REALLY FORTUNATE FOR THAT. BUT IN THIS HURRY-UP WORLD, NOW AND PARTICULARLY AS YOU SEE UNION MEMBERSHIP DECLINING AND IT BECOMING MORE AND MORE DIFFICULT TO OBTAIN A UNION CONTRACT, TO RATIFY A UNION VOTE, GEE I DON’T WANT TO SEE ANYONE - ANYBODY ELSE GET HURT. AND I HOPE THAT THAT GETS BETTER. BECAUSE I’VE SEEN REALLY BAD THINGS HAPPEN TO PEOPLE AND IT WASN’T BECAUSE THEY WERE DUMB AND IT WASN’T BECAUSE THEY WERE CARELESS. FAR TOO OFTEN IT WAS BECAUSE THEY JUST DIDN’T KNOW AND SOMEBODY WHO SHOULD KNOW BETTER DIDN’T GET IN LINE.” RELOCATING THE RAIL YARDS TO KIPP IS COVERED IN DETAIL IN SEVERAL LETHBRIDGE HERALD NEWSPAPER ARTICLES, ESPECIALLY IN THE PERIOD OF 1980 TO 1982. THESE ARTICLES TEND TO FOCUS ON THE BENEFIT FOR THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE AND THE ABILITY TO REDEVELOP THE YARDS. FOR EXAMPLE, AN OCTOBER 10, 1980 ARTICLE DISCUSSES REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES: “THERE MUST BE A GOOD CORRIDOR WITH A DIVIDED HIGHWAY THROUGH THE CITY TO ACCOMMODATE BOTH TRAFFIC THAT DOESN’T WANT TO STOP AND TRAFFIC THAT WANTS TO GET OFF AT DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE. RAILWAY RELOCATION GIVES ROOM FOR SUCH A CORRIDOR FROM THE RAILWAY BRIDGE THROUGH TO 13TH ST.” FOR MORE DETAILS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE. FOR COPIES OF NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160008001
Acquisition Date
2016-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.