Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2018
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180016001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2018
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
127
Length
40.8
Width
11.5
Description
SINGLE-SPACE DUPLEX PARKING METER WITH AN ELECTRONIC MECHANISM. THE METER CASING IS GREY FEATURING TWO GREEN DOMES IN THE SHAPE OF MICKEY MOUSE EARS. THE METERS ARE LABELED “30-61” AND “30-62” ON THE FRONT AND ATTACH TO A HOLLOW, METAL POLE. A STICKER NEAR THE BOTTOM OF THE CASING READS “THIS CAR – INSERT VALID COINS ONLY – DISPLAY INDICATES TIME PURCHASED – CITY OF LETHBRIDGE – THIS CAR.” BOTH METERS HAVE A COIN SLOT AND A LABEL WHICH SAYS “FREE PARKING – WEEKDAYS AFTER 5:30 PM – ALL DAY WEEKENDS AND HOLIDAYS.” THE DIGITAL METERS ARE VISIBLE AT THE TOP OF THE HOUSING, BEHIND SEMI-TRANSPARENT PLASTIC. ON EITHER SIDE OF THE METER'S TIME DISPLAY, THE WORDS “MACKAY" AND "GUARDIAN” ARE INSCRIBED VERTICALLY. A METAL PLATE FASTENS TO THE REAR, AND TWO KEYHOLES PROTRUDE ABOVE IT. THROUGHOUT, THERE ARE MANY SCRATCHES AND PAINT CHIPS. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON JULY 4TH, 2018, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE REMOVED THIS PARKING METER FROM THE 300 BLOCK OF 3RD STREET SOUTH AND DONATED IT TO THE GALT MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES. ALL OF THE COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS IN LETHBRIDGE’S DOWNTOWN CORE HAVE SINCE BEEN REMOVED AND REPLACED WITH MULTI-SPACE PARKING KIOSKS. IN DECEMBER 2015, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE HOSTED AN INFORMATIONAL SESSION INFORMING LETHBRIDGE RESIDENTS ABOUT AN IMPENDING UPGRADE TO THE DOWNTOWN PARKING SYSTEM. VAL FELLGER WAS THE 2015 INITIATIVE’S PARKING COORDINATOR. FELLGER OUTLINED REASONS FOR UPDATING THE EXISTING PARKING SYSTEM IN A 2018 CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASE. THE ANNOUNCEMENT SAYS, “THE PRIMARY OBJECTIVE OF PAID AND TIME ZONED PARKING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE IS TO ACHIEVE PARKING TURNOVER WHICH RESULTS IN EQUITABLE AVAILABILITY OF PARKING TO SHOPPERS AND VISITORS TO DOWNTOWN…THERE ARE CURRENTLY A LITTLE OVER 1500 PARKING METERS IN THE DOWNTOWN. APPROXIMATELY 95 PERCENT OF THE PARKING METER INFRASTRUCTURE, PARKING METER HOUSINGS AND SUPPORT POLES ARE GREATER THAN 25 YEARS OLD. THESE HOUSINGS AND POLES ARE STARTING TO SHOW SIGNS OF WEAR AND LOOK UNKEMPT. MANY OF THE METERS CANNOT BE REPROGRAMMED TO ACCEPT NEW COINS OR OTHER PAYMENT OPTIONS.” THE CITY PONDERED THREE OPTIONS FOR THE IMPROVED SYSTEM: 100 PERCENT SINGLE-SPACE METERS WITH FOOT PATROL ENFORCEMENT, 100 PERCENT PAY-BY-PLATE MULTI-SPACE SMART MACHINES WITH MOBILE LICENSE PLATE RECOGNITION ENFORCEMENT, AND A HYBRID SYSTEM COMPRISED OF PAY-BY-PLATE MACHINES WITH MOBILE LICENSE PLATE RECOGNITION ENFORCEMENT AND IN ISOLATED LOCATIONS, INCLUDING BARRIER-FREE PARKING STALLS, SINGLE-SPACE SMART METERS WITH FOOT PATROL ENFORCEMENT. IN THE DOWNTOWN PARKING METER REPLACEMENT PROJECT STAKEHOLDER & PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT REPORT, 80 PERCENT OF THE PUBLIC SELECTED THE HYBRID SYSTEM. IN AUGUST 2017, THE CITY CHOSE A VENDOR, AND BY JUNE 2018 THE NEW SYSTEM WAS UP AND RUNNING. AS A RESULT, 1526 COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS WERE REMOVED FROM DOWNTOWN STREETS AND 170 MULTI-SPACE KIOSKS WERE INSTALLED. IN A CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASE FROM MAY 28, 2018, MAYOR CHRIS SPEARMAN SAYS, “THIS IS ANOTHER SIGN OF HOW OUR CITY IS GROWING UP. WE TALK A LOT ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING A “SMART CITY” AND USING TECHNOLOGY TO MAKE US MORE EFFICIENT. THAT’S WHAT THIS NEW SYSTEM DOES.” FELLGER ADDED, “THE KIOSKS ARE SOLAR POWERED MAKING THEM MORE COST EFFECTIVE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY TO OPERATE THAN THE PREVIOUS PARKING METERS THAT USED AA BATTERIES.” ON DECEMBER 12, 2018, KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S ACTING PARKING COORDINATOR PHILLIP BERG. BERG ASSISTED FELLGER WITH THE PLANNING OF THE NEW PARKING SYSTEM. CONCERNING THE ROLLOUT OF THE METER REPLACEMENT PROJECT, BERG SAID, “IT WAS PRETTY HECTIC. PEOPLE WERE STILL A LITTLE RESISTANT TO CHANGE. WE HAD CONDITIONED PEOPLE TO A PARKING STYLE FOR THE LAST 50 TO 60 YEARS, AND IN ONE NIGHT WE CHANGED EVERYTHING OVER. SO THERE WAS A LOT OF RESISTANCE.” TO DEAL WITH THE RESISTANCE, BERG KEPT AN OPEN DIALOGUE WITH THE PUBLIC. “THERE WERE TIMES THAT MY PHONE DIDN’T STOP RINGING FOR DAYS, BUT WE’VE MADE A LOT OF CHANGES TO SCREEN DISPLAY AND SIGNAGE. [WE’VE DONE] EVERYTHING WE CAN POSSIBLY DO TO FACILITATE THE BEST PARKING MANAGEMENT STRATEGY WE CAN.” PRIOR TO THE PROJECT, BERG WORKED CLOSELY WITH THE COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS AS LETHBRIDGE’S PARKING AND TRAFFIC TECHNICIAN. HE SAID, “I DID ALL THE REPAIRS, MAINTENANCE, AND PROGRAMMING THAT HAPPENED WITH THESE SINGLE-SPACE METERS FOR THE LAST EIGHT YEARS. ANYTHING FROM RE-BUILDING HOUSINGS [TO] PUTTING THEM TOGETHER FROM DIFFERENT PIECES TO RE-PROGRAMMING THEM…THEY WERE BROKEN. THERE WAS A LOT OF PIECES THAT WERE ‘FRANKENSTEINED’ TOGETHER TO ALLOW THE METERS TO FUNCTION. THERE WERE TIMES THAT I WAS TAKING AND GRINDING DOWN PARTS TO MAKE THEM WORK. WHEN I FIRST STARTED, I CALLED THE MANUFACTURER OF THE HOUSINGS [AND ASKED TO ORDER PARTS]. THEY LAUGHED AT ME AND [SENT ME EVERYTHING THEY HAD LEFT FOR FREE]. I GOT ALL THESE OLD DUSTY BOXES WITH PIECES WRAPPED IN NEWSPAPER, AND I WOULD BUILD WHATEVER I COULD TO GET THEM OUT ON THE STREET.” BEFORE BERG, LARRY WYROSTOK WAS THE PARKING AND TRAFFIC TECHNICIAN FOR SEVEN YEARS, AND MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HIM ON DECEMBER 20, 2018. WYROSTOK SUGGESTED THAT THE TWO MAIN REASONS THAT THE PARKING METERS BROKE DOWN WERE THEIR AGE AND VANDALISM. REGARDING VANDALISM, HE SAID, “WE USED TO HAVE QUITE A BIT. [ONE TIME I WAS DRIVING BY THE COURT HOUSE] AND SOMEONE USED A ROLL OF DUCK-TAPE ON A METER, [AND] THEY JUST COVERED UP THE WHOLE THING. IT WAS PROBABLY TWO OR THREE INCHES THICK, JUST SO THAT THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PLUG IT. I TOOK ALL THE DUCK-TAPE OFF, AND THE METER SEEMED TO WORK FINE. YOU SEE ALL KINDS OF STUFF [ON THE STREET.]” WYROSTOK SUGGESTED THAT ANOTHER ASPECT OF THE JOB WAS COLLECTING THE COINS FROM THE METERS. HE SAID, “[I SPENT] A COUPLE OF DAYS A WEEK COLLECTING IN ALL KINDS OF WEATHER; RAIN, SLEET, AND SNOW. I CAN REMEMBER [DAYS THAT WERE] 35 DEGREES BELOW. [I WOULD PUT MY] METER KEY IN THE VAULT DOOR, AND IT WOULDN’T OPEN. IT WAS FROZEN SHUT. [SO I WOULD TAKE] A RUBBER MALLET AND GIVE THE [VAULT DOOR] A LITTLE TAP AND THEN [I WOULD] SPRAY SOME ETHER ON IT. IT COULD BE QUITE TEDIOUS BECAUSE [I HAD] 1500 METERS TO COLLECT FROM.” LIKE PARKING AND TRAFFIC TECHNICIANS, PARKING COMMISSIONAIRES ALSO HAD TO WORK IN ALL KINDS OF CONDITIONS. ON DECEMBER 18, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RETIRED PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE, MAVIS BASTIE ABOUT HER TIME WORKING WITH THE PARKING METERS IN LETHBRIDGE’S DOWNTOWN CORE. BASTIE MOVED FROM HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA IN 1993. SHE SAID, “WHEN I ARRIVED HERE THE VERY FIRST THING I DID THAT WEEK WAS GO OVER TO THE CORPS OF COMMISSIONAIRES HERE IN LETHBRIDGE AND SAID THAT I WANTED TO BECOME A COMMISSIONAIRE. I WAS IMMEDIATELY GIVEN A JOB, AND THAT JOB HAPPENED TO BE GOING OUT AND DOING PARKING, WHICH MEANT WALKING THE STREETS…WALKING THE STREETS WAS DOING THE METERS AND CHECKING VEHICLES.” BASTIE WORKED AS A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE FOR APPROXIMATELY TEN YEARS. DURING HER INTERVIEW, SHE EXPLAINED THAT THERE WERE FOUR PARKING BEATS WITHIN LETHBRIDGE, “THE FIRST ROUTE WAS MAINLY WALKING AROUND AND DOING THE TICKETING OF THE CARS THAT WERE AT METERS THAT WERE EXPIRED...BEAT ONE WAS DOWNTOWN, AND IT CAME OUT OF THE OLD POLICE STATION [TO THIRD AVENUE]…THIRD AVENUE BECAME BEAT TWO AND THEN BEAT THREE WAS A DRIVING [AND WALKING] AREA…BEAT THREE WOULD BE MORE OVER TOWARDS THE HOSPITAL…BEAT FOUR WAS JUST THE DRIVING, THAT MEANT DRIVING AROUND THE HOSPITAL.” BASTIE SUGGESTED THAT ONE OF THE BUSIEST TIMES OF YEAR TO BE A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE WAS DURING THE WHOOP-UP DAYS PARADE, “YOU’RE JOB IS TO MAKE SURE THAT PEOPLE REALIZE THAT JUST BECAUSE IT’S WHOOP-UP DAYS DOESN’T MEAN THAT THEY CAN GET AWAY WITH [PARKING ILLEGALLY]. YOU STILL HAVE TO PLUG THE METERS. IF THAT METER EXPIRES AND YOU DON’T MOVE YOUR VEHICLE YOU GET A TICKET.” BASTIE WAS THE ONLY FEMALE PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE IN LETHBRIDGE DURING THE 1990S. SHE SUGGESTED THAT DUE TO THIS SHE RECEIVED SUPPORT FROM HER COLLEAGUES AND THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE DEPARTMENT, “[IF SOMEONE WAS HARASSING ME] I JUST HAD TO PICK UP THE RADIO… THEY WERE THERE FOR YOU, AND I KNEW THAT NOBODY WOULD EVER HURT ME. THEY WOULDN’T DARE. IT WASN’T BECAUSE I COULDN’T TAKE THEM ON, BUT IT WAS BECAUSE THESE GUYS [WERE LOOKING OUT FOR ME]…YOU’VE ALWAYS GOT THE POLICE DEPARTMENT THERE BEHIND YOU, AND I HONESTLY HAVE TO SAY THAT WHEN I WORKED FOR THE CORP BACK IN THOSE YEARS, WE HAD THE MOST SENSATIONAL POLICE OFFICERS THAT I HAVE EVER HAD ANYTHING TO DO WITH.” FOR BASTIE THE BEST PART OF BEING A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE WAS WORKING WITH THE PUBLIC. SHE SAID, “[WORKING PARKING WAS] A GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO GET TO KNOW PEOPLE...[IT] WAS SOMETHING THAT I NEVER EXPECTED AND I DON’T THINK PEOPLE THINK OF WHEN THEY THINK OF PARKING… [I GOT TO] ASSOCIATE WITH SO MANY PEOPLE, AND IF [I SHOWED] THEM RESPECT THEY [SHOWED ME] RESPECT BACK…I FOUND YOU HAD TO HAVE A GOOD RAPPORT WITH THE BUSINESS OWNERS BECAUSE THE BUSINESS OWNERS APPRECIATED YOU. IF YOU NEEDED HELP, THEY WERE THERE FOR YOU. IF THEY NEEDED HELP, YOU WERE THERE FOR THEM.” OVERALL, BASTIE ENJOYED HER TIME WORKING AS A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE. SHE SAID, “WHEN I WORKED THE METERS, I LOVED IT. I ENJOYED WORKING PARKING AND EVERYTHING [THAT] IT INCLUDED…IF I HAD MY LIFE TO LIVE OVER, WOULD I DO IT [AGAIN]? DARN RIGHTS I WOULD.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASES, AND FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20180016001
Acquisition Date
2018-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RHINESTONE
Catalogue Number
P20160044005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, RHINESTONE
No. Pieces
2
Height
2.1
Length
2.5
Width
0.9
Description
A-B: PAIR OF GOLD-COLOURED COSTUME JEWELRY EARRINGS. CRESENT-SHAPED, CURVING OUT TO FRONT. WHITE RHINESTONES SET IN GOLD-COLOURED METAL VERTICALLY DOWN CURVE OF EARRING. SCREW-ON CLASP AT BACK. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION: BOTTOM RHINESTONE MISSING OFF COMPONENT A AND SECOND FROM THE TOP RHINESTONE MISSING OFF B. METAL MODERATELY WORN/SCUFFED.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. OF THESE EARRINGS, RUTH RECALLED, “I KNOW THAT THESE WERE WORN WHEN THEY WERE PERFORMING. IF THEY WERE DRESSED ALIKE, THEY USUALLY HAD THE SAME JEWELRY AS WELL.” BOTH RUTH AND ELEANOR RECALLED THE EARRINGS BEING WORN BY THEIR MOTHER UP UNTIL THE 1980S. THE JEWELRY THE SISTERS WORE DURING THE PERFORMANCES “SHOWED A LOT OF USE,” RUTH EXPLAINED. “OTHER ONES REPLACED [OLDER PAIRS AS THEY WORE OUT] AND THEY WERE JUST SET ASIDE.” “ALL [THE SISTERS] LOVED TO DRESS UP. THERE WERE SOME OUTFITS THEY HAD THAT ACTUALLY HAVE GONE DOWN THROUGH FAMILY MEMBERS. HER GRANDDAUGHTER HAS A BEAUTIFUL FORMAL THAT [EACH SISTER] HAD. WHEN THEY DRESSED UP, THEY [REALLY] DRESSED UP. IT WAS WITH BRILLIANT, SHINY, BEAUTIFUL JEWELRY,” RUTH REMEMBERED. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044005
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160044006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
3.7
Length
5
Width
0.6
Description
SILVER AND BLACK OVAL BROOCH; 3 RAISED SILVER METAL LINES (LIKE A STAFF ON SHEET MUSIC) HORIZONTALLY ACROSS BROOCH WITH A SILVER SIXTEENTH NOTE SET ON TOP OF THE LINES. BACKGROUND IS COATED IN MATTE BLACK VARNISH. GOOD CONDITION: BLACK PAINT PRESENT ON SILVER METAL IN A COUPLE OF SPOTS. SLIGHT LOSS OF VARNISH IN SOME PLACES ON FRONT OF BROOCH.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THE ANDERSON SISTERS HAD MATCHING UNIFORMS THEY WOULD OFTEN WEAR FOR PERFORMANCES, WHICH INCLUDED PIECES SUCH AS THIS BROOCH. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. RUTH EXPLAINED, “IF THEY WERE DRESSED ALIKE, THEY USUALLY HAD THE SAME JEWELRY AS WELL.” BOTH RUTH AND ELEANOR RECALLED THE BROOCH BEING WORN BY THEIR MOTHER UP UNTIL THE 1980S. THE JEWELRY THE SISTERS WORE DURING THE PERFORMANCES “SHOWED A LOT OF USE,” RUTH EXPLAINED. “OTHER ONES REPLACED [OLDER PAIRS AS THEY WORE OUT] AND THEY WERE JUST SET ASIDE.” “ALL [THE SISTERS] LOVED TO DRESS UP. THERE WERE SOME OUTFITS THEY HAD THAT ACTUALLY HAVE GONE DOWN THROUGH FAMILY MEMBERS. HER GRANDDAUGHTER HAS A BEAUTIFUL FORMAL THAT [EACH SISTER] HAD. WHEN THEY DRESSED UP, THEY [REALLY] DRESSED UP. IT WAS WITH BRILLIANT, SHINY, BEAUTIFUL JEWELRY,” RUTH REMEMBERED. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044006
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail