Skip header and navigation

22 records – page 1 of 2.

Other Name
QSL CARD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180010004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QSL CARD
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
14
Width
9
Description
WHITE PAPER CARD WITH BLUE IMAGE IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF ALBERTA AND SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA WITH LABELLED CITIES “EDMONTON, CALGARY, LETHBRIDGE, VANCOUVER” AND LETHBRIDGE, SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA SHADED. CARD HAS RED LINES BORDER RUNNING DOWN LEFT SIDE; FRONT OF CARD HAS RED TEXT “LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA, 825-6TH STREET SOUTH, VE6ZS, “THE HEART OF THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY”, RADIO CONFIRMING QSO OF 19, AT P.M., A.M., M.S.T., UR. MC. CW. PHONE, SIGS RST, XMTR, PWR, W.INP. RCVR., QSL. VY 73, EDWARD K. REDEKOPP, OPR”. BACK OF CARD HAS BLUE BLEED IN UPPER LEFT CORNER AND SMALL STAINS; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE QSL CODE, REDEKOPP NOTED, “MY CALL WAS VE6ZS. IT’S ONE OF THE OLDER CALLS-–JUST TWO-LETTER CALLS. LATER ON, THEY RAN OUT OF TWO-LETTER CALLS AND YOU COULD GO INTO THREE-LETTER CALLS…I WAS ONE OF THE EARLY ONES AND IT WAS A NICE, SHORT CALL AND YOU WANT TO KEEP IT. NOW, WHEN YOU FORFEIT IT, SOMEONE ELSE GETS THAT CALL. IT’S BEEN GOING AROUND THE THING MORE THAN ONCE ALREADY. SEVERAL OTHERS HAVE HAD IT SINCE. BUT IF I’D HAVE KEPT MY FEE UP, I WOULD STILL BE VE6ZS.” “[THE CARDS CAN BE MADE AT SHOPS WHERE THEY] PRINT WHATEVER YOU WANT. YOU JUST GIVE [PRINTERS] AN IDEA, AND TELL THEM WHAT YOU WANT ON, ALL THE DETAILS YOU HAVE TO GIVE THEM, AND THEN THEY’LL PRINT [A CARD] UP FOR YOU IN THEIR FANCIFUL WAY, NOT MINE. THEY DID A GOOD JOB. IT’S ACCEPTABLE. BUT IF YOU LOOK AT OTHER ACKNOWLEDGMENT CARDS YOU CAN SEE THAT [IT’S] ABSOLUTELY WILD WHAT SOME PEOPLE HAVE. SOME ARE HILARIOUS; THEY’RE COMICAL. OTHERS ARE DIFFERENT.” “[I WOULDN’T MAIL CARDS OUT] EVERY DAY, NECESSARILY, BUT EVERY WEEK [I WOULD] SEND SOME. THERE’S TWO DIFFERENT WAYS OF SENDING THEM, TOO. PEOPLE WILL SEND TO [A DISTRIBUTOR] LIKE BILL SAVAGE [WHO]…RECEIVED THE CARDS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD AND HE WAS A DISTRIBUTOR OF LETHBRIDGE TO ALL THE AMATEURS WHEN THEY GET THEM IN. YOU’D PICK THEM UP EVERY SO OFTEN. LIKE THE RUSSIANS. THEY WENT TO MOSCOW-–BOX 88, WAS IT? EVERYTHING WENT THROUGH MOSCOW. YOU COULD TALK DIRECTLY TO SOMEBODY BUT YOU NEVER COULD GET A CARD DIRECTLY FROM THEM. ALWAYS THROUGH MOSCOW ’CAUSE MOSCOW CENSORED EVERYTHING.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010004
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WWII ARTILLERY CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20160038001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WWII ARTILLERY CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
BRASS
No. Pieces
2
Height
4.9
Length
7
Description
A: BRASS SECOND WORLD WAR ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY CAP BADGE. BADGE DEPICTS THE ARTILLERY’S CREST WITH A FIELD GUN IN THE CENTER. UNDERNEATH A CROWN AT THE TOP OF THE BADGE IS THE WORD “UBIQUE” EMBOSSED IN BANNER IN BRASS. BELOW THE FIELD GUN IS A BANNER THAT READS “QUO PAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT”. BACKSIDE HAS TWO PARALLEL RINGS HORIZONTALLY IN THE BOTTOM HALF FOR THE PIN. B: BRASS CAP BADGE PIN WITH TWO PRONGS MEETING AT ONE END WITH A LOOP AND THEN EXTENDING OUTWARD. OUTER ENDS ARE BENT AWAY FROM EACH OTHER TO FORM A WIDER V. PIN DIMENSIONS: 6.1 X 1.7 CM CONDITION: FINISH HAS DARKENED WITH MINOR WEAR TO SURFACE.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED TWO CAP BADGES AND A WORLD WAR II DEFENSE MEDAL TO THE GALT MUSEUM. VAN DEN BROEKE’S FATHER, GEORGE JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE, AND HIS UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE BOTH SERVED FOR CANADA DURING THE WAR. VAN DEN BROEKE’S UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION WHILE OVERSEAS. IT IS CLAIMED THE ARTIFACTS BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S FATHER AND UNCLE. THIS BADGE IS PRESUMED TO HAVE BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S FATHER. TO ACQUIRE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ARTIFACTS’ HISTORY, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE AT THE MUSEUM ON 6 NOVEMBER 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. VAN DEN BROEKE EXPLAINED, “MY FATHER WAS...A GUNNER [WITH THE 44 A.A. BATTERY]. HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT. MY UNCLE – I’M NOT TOO SURE IF ANY OF THESE [ITEMS] DEAL WITH HIM – IS ON THE CENOTAPH AT LETHBRIDGE. HE DIED IN VILLANOVA ITALY IN DECEMBER ’44, 1943... THE WAR IS JUST ABOUT OVER WHEN HE GOT KILLED.” “[THESE BADGES AND THE MEDAL REMIND ME OF] THE WAR EFFORT,” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “[ALONG WITH] MY UNCLE AND MY FATHER [WHO WERE A PART OF THAT EFFORT]. [WHILE] MY UNCLE DIED IN ’44, MY FATHER [DIDN’T GO] INTO THE ARMY UNTIL ABOUT ’43. HE WAS DRAFTED OUT TO PRINCE RUPERT FOR THE JAPANESE INVASION, IF IT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. IT’S [PART OF THE] HISTORY OF OUR FAMILY.” ALONG WITH THE DONATION OF THE BADGES AND THE MEDAL, VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED SOME OF HIS FAMILY’S ARCHIVAL MATERIAL CONNECTED TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR TO THE GALT ARCHIVES (PLEASE SEE ARCHIVAL ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102). ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE [THE DONOR] WAS BORN IN 1947 AND HIS DAD RETURNED HOME FOLLOWING THE WAR. HE STATED, “[I KNEW THAT THESE MATERIALS EXISTED] FROM WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWENTY, OR MAYBE EVEN YOUNGER. MY GRANDMOTHER WAS MOTHER OF THE YEAR OR WHATEVER THEY CALL, SILVER MOTHER OR SOMETHING, HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1967.” “[MOST OF THE VETERANS] DIDN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE REPLIED WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF HIS FATHER SPEAKING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE OF THE WAR, “PROBABLY THE FIRST REAL TIME I GOT INTO THIS WAS WHEN HE WENT AND TOOK GRAMMA TO THE GRAVE TO LAY THE WREATH. HE ESCORTED HER AS HER SON, AND SHE LAID THE WREATH ON BEHALF OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I WAS THERE FOR THAT CEREMONY, AND [I RECALL BEING] QUITE TAKEN BACK BY THE WAY THOSE GUYS COULD SALUTE. IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN MY FATHER DO IT, AND IT ALMOST RAISED THE HAIR ON YOUR NECK BECAUSE IT WAS SO PRECISE. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TAKING AN INTEREST IN THIS STUFF.” “[EVEN AFTER I TOOK AN INTEREST IN THAT HISTORY, MY DAD DID NOT REALLY SPEAK MUCH ABOUT IT.] THERE WASN’T A LOT HAPPENED ON THE WEST COAST [WHERE HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT]. THEY WERE SITTING UP THERE WAITING F0R THE JAPANESE TO INVADE AND THEY HAD ALL THE GUNS OUT ON THE WEST COAST, BUT IT NEVER CAME TO BE,” VAN DEN BROEKE STATED.” WHEN ASKED WHY HIS FATHER DID NOT GO OVERSEAS, VAN DEN BROEKE SPECULATED, “PROBABLY BECAUSE HE WASN’T CONSCRIPTED UNTIL ’43. AT THAT POINT THEY THOUGHT THE JAPANESE WERE [A LARGE THREAT]. THEY PROBABLY ATTACKED PEARL HARBOR BY THEN, I WOULD IMAGINE. THAT’S WHEN THEY SET UP THE TROOPS ON THE WEST COAST. MY UNCLE WENT IN THE WAR PROBABLY IN ’39 WHEN IT STARTED, SO HE WAS PROBABLY CONSCRIPTED AND SENT OVERSEAS, AND THAT’S HOW HE ENDED UP IN ITALY.” “[ON THE OTHER HAND] I THINK MY FATHER WAS ACTUALLY CONSCRIPTED [TO JOIN THE WAR], BECAUSE HE WAS QUITE A BIT OLDER AND WHEN HE GOT INTO THE ARMY HE WOULD HAVE BEEN [AROUND HIS MID TO LATE THIRTIES].” “I WOULD SAY MY MOTHER [WAS THE PERSON MOST AWARE OF THESE ARTIFACTS OTHER THAN MY FATHER],” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “PROBABLY THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN IT [WAS AFTER] MY DAD PASSED AWAY IN ’67. [WHEN] I WAS ONLY NINETEEN, HE WAS IN A FIRE AT PARK LAKE. HE WAS THE WARDEN AT THE PARK LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK AND A GARAGE BLEW UP AND HE DIED JANUARY 1ST, 1968. SO AT THAT POINT MY MOTHER AND I MOVED FROM PARK LAKE TO PICTURE BUTTE. [I RECEIVED THE ITEMS] WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY IN ABOUT 1992.” SPEAKING ABOUT HIS FATHER’S EARLIER LIFE, VAN DEN BROEKE SAID, “HE WAS BORN IN HELLENDOORN, HOLLAND IN 1905 ON JANUARY 30TH. HE EMIGRATED TO MONARCH WITH HIS FATHER IN 1911. HIS FATHER WAS A BLACKSMITH IN MONARCH. PROBABLY ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE OR THIRTY [DUTCH IMMIGRANTS WERE HERE WHEN MY DAD’S FAMILY ARRIVED] AND THEY ALL SETTLED IN MONARCH. THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE THAT LITTLE CHURCH OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE AT MONARCH. THAT WAS PART OF THEIR CHURCH, ALL MY AUNTS AND UNCLES, AND THEY’RE BURIED IN THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD CEMETERY.” AS HIS UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, VAN DEN BROEKE HAS SPECIFIC MEMORIES OF HIS FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE OF THE REMEMBRANCE DAYS AFTER THE WAR. HE SAID, “YEARS AGO I SENT THEIR PICTURES BOTH INTO THE HERALD WHEN THEY FIRST STARTED THAT REMEMBRANCE DAY [PUBLICATION]. I SENT BOTH THEIR PICTURES AND THEY’VE BEEN IN THE HERALD. [AND THAT’S WHY I WAS REMINDED TO DONATE THESE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM] RIGHT NOW, AS WE JUST HAVE A WEEK TO GO [UNTIL REMEMBRANCE DAY].” A NOTICE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD STATES, “SON OF GEO. VAN DEN BROEKE OF MONARCH, GUNNER A. J. VAN DEN BROEKE, WHO IS SERVING WITH A BATTERY STATIONED AT THE WEST COAST. HE HAS A WIFE AND AN INFANT DAUGHTER, CHRISTINE LOUISE, RESIDED AT MONARCH, ALTA., ALSO A BROTHER OVERSEAS…” THE OBITUARY OF THE DONOR’S FATHER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READS, “PASSED AWAY IN SUDDENLY IN THE CITY ON MONDAY, JAN. 1, [1968], GEORGE JOHN “GERRIT”, AGED 62 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. CHRISTINA VAN DEN BROEKE OF COALHURST. BESIDES HIS LOVING WIFE, SURVIVORS INCLUDE TWO SONS, GEORGE JOHN OF COALHURST, AND HENRY MARTIN OF RED DEER; ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. WALTER CHRISTINE LOUISE DUNN OF TURIN; ONE SISTER, RIKA NILSON… HIS STEPMOTHER MRS. JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. THE LATE MR. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1905 AND WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH.” ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, OBTAINED FROM THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED ON NOVEMBER 6, 1942 UNDER THE NATIONAL RESOURCES MOBILIZATION ACT OF 1940. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS LISTED AS BEING A TRUCK DRIVER AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS STATIONED AS A GUNNER FIRST AT ESQUIMALT, BRITISH COLUMBIA, THEN AT VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA IN 1943 WITH THE 27, 28, AND 29TH REGIMENTS OF THE 44 AA BATTERY. GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE WAS DISCHARGED ON MARCH 7, 1946 ON DEMOBILIZATION. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE'S SERVICE RECORD, AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH (UOFL ARCHIVES RECORD, COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION LETTER, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES).
Catalogue Number
P20160038001
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WWII CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRONZE, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160038002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WWII CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
BRONZE, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
5.5
Length
4.8
Description
A: BRONZE SECOND WORLD WAR CALGARY HIGHLANDERS CAP BADGE. WREATH OF THISTLE IN BRONZE WITH ST. ANDREW’S CROSS (AN "X") MAKES UP OVERALL SHAPE OF BADGE. ON THE CENTRE OF THE CROSS, THERE IS A BEAVER ON A LOG ENCIRCLED BY A WREATH OF MAPLE LEAVES. BEAVER AND LOG ARE IN A DARKER METAL THAN REST OF BRONZE DESIGN. ON THE WREATH, BELOW THE BEAVER, IS A SCROLL OF THISTLES AND BELOW THAT IS A WHITE METAL SCROLL INSCRIBED WITH “CALGARY HIGHLANDERS”. THE CROWN IN AT THE TOP CENTER OF THE BADGE. BACK SIDE HAS A LOOP ON EITHER SIDE OF THE BADGE, PARALLEL FROM EACH OTHER, FOR THE PIN. B: BRASS-COLOURED PIN WITH TWO PRONGS MEETING ON ONE END IN A LOOP AND COMING OUT FROM THAT, AWAY FROM EACH OTHER, LIKE A “V”. PIN DIMENSIONS: 5.2 X 1.1 CM. CONDITION: SLIGHT TARNISHING OF METAL OVERALL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED TWO CAP BADGES AND A WORLD WAR II DEFENSE MEDAL TO THE GALT MUSEUM. VAN DEN BROEKE’S FATHER, GEORGE JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE, AND HIS UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE BOTH SERVED FOR CANADA DURING THE WAR. VAN DEN BROEKE’S UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION WHILE OVERSEAS. IT IS CLAIMED THE ARTIFACTS BELONGED TO THE DONOR’S FATHER AND UNCLE. THIS BADGE IS PRESUMED TO HAVE BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S UNCLE. TO ACQUIRE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ARTIFACTS’ HISTORY, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE AT THE MUSEUM ON 6 NOVEMBER 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. VAN DEN BROEKE EXPLAINED, “MY FATHER WAS...A GUNNER [WITH THE 44 A.A. BATTERY]. HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT. MY UNCLE – I’M NOT TOO SURE IF ANY OF THESE [ITEMS] DEAL WITH HIM – IS ON THE CENOTAPH AT LETHBRIDGE. HE DIED IN VILLANOVA ITALY IN DECEMBER ’44, 1943... THE WAR IS JUST ABOUT OVER WHEN HE GOT KILLED.” “[THESE BADGES AND THE MEDAL REMIND ME OF] THE WAR EFFORT,” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “[ALONG WITH] MY UNCLE AND MY FATHER [WHO WERE A PART OF THAT EFFORT]. [WHILE] MY UNCLE DIED IN ’44, MY FATHER [DIDN’T GO] INTO THE ARMY UNTIL ABOUT ’43. HE WAS DRAFTED OUT TO PRINCE RUPERT FOR THE JAPANESE INVASION, IF IT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. IT’S [PART OF THE] HISTORY OF OUR FAMILY.” ALONG WITH THE DONATION OF THE BADGES AND THE MEDAL, VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED SOME OF HIS FAMILY’S ARCHIVAL MATERIAL CONNECTED TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR TO THE GALT ARCHIVES (PLEASE SEE ARCHIVAL ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102). OF THAT SEGMENT OF THE DONATION, VAN DEN BROEKE DESCRIBED, “THERE’S A LETTER THERE FROM THE LIEUTENANT WHO WITNESSED MY UNCLE GETTING SHOT IN VILLANOVA, ITALY AND [SAW] WHAT HAPPENED… IT EXPLAINS THAT HE WAS A SERGEANT AND HIS PLATOON WAS TO TAKE A STRATEGIC AREA. THEY WERE PINNED DOWN UNDER HEAVY MACHINE GUN FIRE, AND HE WAS MORTALLY WOUNDED. HE DIED INSTANTLY OF HIS WOUNDS. THE LIEUTENANT SAID HE WAS A VERY GOOD SERGEANT AND THAT HE WAS THERE HELPING TO FIGHT THE NAZI MONSTER, SO THE LETTER IS QUITE INTERESTING AND IT’S IN VERY GOOD SHAPE.” ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN 1947 AND HIS DAD RETURNED HOME FOLLOWING THE WAR. HE STATED, “[I KNEW THAT THESE MATERIALS EXISTED] FROM WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWENTY, OR MAYBE EVEN YOUNGER. MY GRANDMOTHER WAS MOTHER OF THE YEAR OR WHATEVER THEY CALL, SILVER MOTHER OR SOMETHING, HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1967.” “[MOST OF THE VETERANS] DIDN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE REPLIED WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF HIS FATHER SPEAKING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE OF THE WAR, “PROBABLY THE FIRST REAL TIME I GOT INTO THIS WAS WHEN HE WENT AND TOOK GRAMMA TO THE GRAVE TO LAY THE WREATH. HE ESCORTED HER AS HER SON, AND SHE LAID THE WREATH ON BEHALF OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I WAS THERE FOR THAT CEREMONY, AND [I RECALL BEING] QUITE TAKEN BACK BY THE WAY THOSE GUYS COULD SALUTE. IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN MY FATHER DO IT, AND IT ALMOST RAISED THE HAIR ON YOUR NECK BECAUSE IT WAS SO PRECISE. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TAKING AN INTEREST IN THIS STUFF.” "MY UNCLE WENT IN THE WAR PROBABLY IN ’39 WHEN IT STARTED, SO HE WAS PROBABLY CONSCRIPTED AND SENT OVERSEAS, AND THAT’S HOW HE ENDED UP IN ITALY.” “[MY UNCLE] HE WASN’T [MARRIED WHEN HE WENT OVERSEAS]. HE WAS 23 [WHEN HE DIED]. SO HE WAS YOUNG, PROBABLY JOINED WHEN HE WAS NINETEEN. THERE WAS A LOT OF PEOPLE AT THAT TIME SAYING, ‘COME ON, JOIN AND LET’S GO FIGHT,’ SO THAT’S WHAT THEY DID,” SAID VAN DEN BROEKE, “HE HAD A SISTER THAT USED TO LIVE IN CUTBANK, MONTANA NAMED RIKA NELSON. SHE HAD TWO OR THREE OR FOUR KIDS, AND THERE IS A PICTURE OF [MY UNCLE] WITH TWO OF HER SONS (ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102).” “I WOULD SAY MY MOTHER [WAS THE PERSON MOST AWARE OF THESE ARTIFACTS OTHER THAN MY FATHER],” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “PROBABLY THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN IT [WAS AFTER] MY DAD PASSED AWAY IN ’67. [WHEN] I WAS ONLY NINETEEN, HE WAS IN A FIRE AT PARK LAKE. HE WAS THE WARDEN AT THE PARK LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK AND A GARAGE BLEW UP AND HE DIED JANUARY 1ST, 1968. SO AT THAT POINT MY MOTHER AND I MOVED FROM PARK LAKE TO PICTURE BUTTE. [I RECEIVED THE ITEMS] WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY IN ABOUT 1992.” SPEAKING ABOUT HIS FATHER’S EARLIER LIFE, VAN DEN BROEKE SAID, “HE WAS BORN IN HELLENDOORN, HOLLAND IN 1905 ON JANUARY 30TH. HE EMIGRATED TO MONARCH WITH HIS FATHER IN 1911. HIS FATHER WAS A BLACKSMITH IN MONARCH. PROBABLY ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE OR THIRTY [DUTCH IMMIGRANTS WERE HERE WHEN MY DAD’S FAMILY ARRIVED] AND THEY ALL SETTLED IN MONARCH. THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE THAT LITTLE CHURCH OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE AT MONARCH. THAT WAS PART OF THEIR CHURCH, ALL MY AUNTS AND UNCLES, AND THEY’RE BURIED IN THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD CEMETERY.” “[THE DUTCH CONNECTION IS] VERY INTERESTING BECAUSE ROELOF HEINEN USED TO BE REEVE FOR THE COUNTY OF LETHBRIDGE WHEN THEY HAD THAT DUTCH, THEY HAD SOME KIND OF A DUTCH APPRECIATION DAY IN PICTURE BUTTE ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. ROELOF TOOK THAT LETTER THAT I GOT FROM THE LIEUTENANT AND HE WAS GOING TO READ IT AT THAT APPRECIATION DAY, BUT THE PROGRAM GOT TOO LONG AND HE NEVER GOT TO IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE RECALLED AS HE SPOKE OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HIS FAMILY’S DUTCH BACKGROUND IN CONNECTION TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR, “[MY UNCLE BEING A DUTCH IMMIGRANT FIGHTING WITH THE CANADIAN MILITARY] WAS QUITE UNIQUE. HE WAS FIGHTING FOR CANADA, [AND HE WAS] BORN IN CANADA, BUT WITH A DUTCH NAME AND HE WAS KILLED IN ITALY. HE’S THE ONLY ONE THAT DIED FROM THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD AREA THAT WENT TO FIGHT, ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY BOOKS FROM THE AREA. AS HIS UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, VAN DEN BROEKE HAS SPECIFIC MEMORIES OF HIS FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE OF THE REMEMBRANCE DAYS AFTER THE WAR. HE SAID, “YEARS AGO I SENT THEIR PICTURES BOTH INTO THE HERALD WHEN THEY FIRST STARTED THAT REMEMBRANCE DAY [PUBLICATION]. I SENT BOTH THEIR PICTURES AND THEY’VE BEEN IN THE HERALD. [AND THAT’S WHY I WAS REMINDED TO DONATE THESE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM] RIGHT NOW, AS WE JUST HAVE A WEEK TO GO [UNTIL REMEMBRANCE DAY].” AN ONLINE RECORD FOR THE DONOR’S UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ARCHIVES DATABASE TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH,” READS, “MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN ON JULY 12, 1921 IN MONARCH, ALBERTA TO PARENTS GERHARD AND JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. HE WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH WITH SIBLINGS, GERRIT AND RIKA… AT THE TIME OF ENLISTMENT, HE WAS SINGLE AND WORKING FOR HIS FATHER AS AN APPRENTICE BLACKSMITH. ON DECEMBER 22, 1942, MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED FOR SERVICE WITH THE CANADIAN ARMY AT CALGARY. HE SPENT THE NEXT NINE MONTHS TRAINING AT CALGARY, CAMROSE, AND WINDSOR, NOVA SCOTIA. ON SEPTEMBER 1, 1943, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. JUST TWO MONTHS LATER, HE WAS SENT TO ITALY WHERE HE WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH BY THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS. SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS INCLUDED IN COMBAT OPERATIONS WITH THIS UNIT AS THE ALLIED FORCES MADE THEIR MARCH ACROSS ITALY. ON DECEMBER 13, 1944, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE BREAKING OF THE GOTHIC LINE. HE WAS LAID TO REST AT VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY. FOR HIS WARTIME SERVICE, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS AWARDED THE 1939-45 STAR, ITALY STAR, WAR MEDAL AND CANADIAN VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL WITH CLASP. HIS MOTHER RECEIVED A MEMORIAL CROSS IN HONOUR OF HER SON.” A LETTER PROVIDED BY THE DONOR FROM THE COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION STATES, “M 105808 SERGEANT MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE OF THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS, CANADIAN INFANTRY CORPS DIED ON 13 DECEMBER 1944 AT AGE 23. HE IS BURIED IN THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY, ITALY IN PLOT 7, ROW B, GRAVE 5.” ACCODING TO THE WEBSITE OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CANADA ON THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY IN ITALY, THE CANADIAN 5TH ARMOURED DIVISION, WHICH INCLUDED THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS AND NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, ESTABLISHED A BRIDGEHEAD OVER THE LAMONE RIVER ON DECEMBER 10-11, 1944. THE 5TH CANADIAN ARMOURED DIVISION PARTICIPATED IN LIBERATING THE ITALIAN PROVINCE OF RAVENNA, INCLUDING THE VILLAGE OF VILLANOVA, IN DECEMBER 1944. AS STATED ON THE VETERANS AFFAIRS WEBSITE ON THE VILLANOVA CEMETERY, “THE ADVANCE ACROSS THE LAMONE NEAR VILLANOVA WENT WELL. THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS WERE QUICKLY OVER THE DYKE AND IN THE VILLAGE, WITH 43 PRISONERS CAPTURED…THE NAVIGLIO CANAL WAS THE NEXT CANADIAN OBJECTIVE, AND THE ASSAULT BEGAN THE NIGHT OF DECEMBER 12…ENEMY FIRE PREVENTED THE RESERVE SQUADRONS FROM EVEN APPROACHING THE CANAL. TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE, AIR SUPPORT WAS UNAVAILABLE DUE TO POOR VISIBILITY AND THE TANKS WERE UNABLE TO REACH THIS SECTION. IN THAT ONE NIGHT'S ACTION, 21 OF THE REGIMENT WERE KILLED AND 46 CAPTURED…THE SITUATION WOULD IMPROVE IN A MATTER OF DAYS, WHEN AIR AND TANK SUPPORT BECAME AVAILABLE.” A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED ABOUT THE DEATH OF MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE. IT STATES, “HE IS THE FIRST SERVICEMAN FROM MONARCH TO MAKE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE.” ARTICLES WERE ALSO PUBLISHED IN THE NEWSPAPER ABOUT PREVIOUS INJURIES MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE SUSTAINED IN COMBAT. THE OBITUARY OF THE DONOR’S FATHER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READS, “PASSED AWAY IN SUDDENLY IN THE CITY ON MONDAY, JAN. 1, [1968], GEORGE JOHN “GERRIT”, AGED 62 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. CHRISTINA VAN DEN BROEKE OF COALHURST. BESIDES HIS LOVING WIFE, SURVIVORS INCLUDE TWO SONS, GEORGE JOHN OF COALHURST, AND HENRY MARTIN OF RED DEER; ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. WALTER CHRISTINE LOUISE DUNN OF TURIN; ONE SISTER, RIKA NILSON… HIS STEPMOTHER MRS. JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. THE LATE MR. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1905 AND WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE'S SERVICE FILE, AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH (UOFL ARCHIVES RECORD, COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION LETTER, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES).
Catalogue Number
P20160038002
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DEFENSE / 1939-1945 WAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
NICKLE, RIBBON
Catalogue Number
P20160038003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DEFENSE / 1939-1945 WAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1939
Date Range To
1945
Materials
NICKLE, RIBBON
No. Pieces
1
Length
12.7
Width
3.2
Diameter
3
Description
A. CIRCULAR, SILVER MEDAL. THE BRITISH ISSUE MEDALS WERE MADE OF CUPRO-NICKEL. A PLAIN, STRAIGHT NON-SWIVELING SUSPENDER WITH A SINGLE-TOED CLAW. THE OBVERSE OF THE MEDAL SHOWS THE CROWNED COINAGE EFFIGY OF KING GEORGE VI, FACING LEFT, AND THE LEGEND GEORGIVS VI D : BR : OMN : REX ET INDIAE IMP : THE REVERSE SHOWS A LION STANDING ON THE BODY OF A DOUBLE-HEADED DRAGON. THE DRAGON’S HEADS ARE THOSE OF AN EAGLE AND A DRAGON TO SIGNIFY THE PRINCIPAL OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL ENEMIES. AT THE TOP, RIGHT OF CENTRE ARE THE DATES 1939/1945 IN TWO LINES. B. ATTACHED RIBBON IS 3.2 CM WIDE WITH GREEN, BLACK, ORANGE BANDS OF COLOUR. CONDITION: RIBBON SLIGHTLY DIRTY AND ENDS HAVE FRAYED; DIRT AND SEVERE TARNISH OF THE METAL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
IN 2016, JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED TWO CAP BADGES AND A WORLD WAR II DEFENSE MEDAL TO THE GALT MUSEUM. VAN DEN BROEKE’S FATHER, GEORGE JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE, AND HIS UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE BOTH SERVED FOR CANADA DURING THE WAR. VAN DEN BROEKE’S UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION WHILE OVERSEAS. IT IS UNCLEAR IF THE COMPOSITE MEDAL AND RIBBON BELONGED TO THE DONOR’S FATHER OR UNCLE. THE MISMATCHED RIBBON AND MEDAL ARE CATALOGUED AS RECEIVED FROM THE DONOR. TO ACQUIRE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ARTIFACTS’ HISTORY, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DONOR JOHN VAN DEN BROEKE AT THE MUSEUM ON 6 NOVEMBER 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. VAN DEN BROEKE EXPLAINED, “MY FATHER WAS...A GUNNER [WITH THE 44 A.A. BATTERY]. HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT. MY UNCLE – I’M NOT TOO SURE IF ANY OF THESE [ITEMS] DEAL WITH HIM – IS ON THE CENOTAPH AT LETHBRIDGE. HE DIED IN VILLANOVA ITALY IN DECEMBER ’44, 1943... THE WAR IS JUST ABOUT OVER WHEN HE GOT KILLED.” “[THESE BADGES AND THE MEDAL REMIND ME OF] THE WAR EFFORT,” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “[ALONG WITH] MY UNCLE AND MY FATHER [WHO WERE A PART OF THAT EFFORT]. [WHILE] MY UNCLE DIED IN ’44, MY FATHER [DIDN’T GO] INTO THE ARMY UNTIL ABOUT ’43. HE WAS DRAFTED OUT TO PRINCE RUPERT FOR THE JAPANESE INVASION, IF IT WAS GOING TO HAPPEN. IT’S [PART OF THE] HISTORY OF OUR FAMILY.” ALONG WITH THE DONATION OF THE BADGES AND THE MEDAL, VAN DEN BROEKE DONATED SOME OF HIS FAMILY’S ARCHIVAL MATERIAL CONNECTED TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR TO THE GALT ARCHIVES (PLEASE SEE ARCHIVAL ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102). OF THAT SEGMENT OF THE DONATION, VAN DEN BROEKE DESCRIBED, “THERE’S A LETTER THERE FROM THE LIEUTENANT WHO WITNESSED MY UNCLE GETTING SHOT IN VILLANOVA, ITALY AND [SAW] WHAT HAPPENED… IT EXPLAINS THAT HE WAS A SERGEANT AND HIS PLATOON WAS TO TAKE A STRATEGIC AREA. THEY WERE PINNED DOWN UNDER HEAVY MACHINE GUN FIRE, AND HE WAS MORTALLY WOUNDED. HE DIED INSTANTLY OF HIS WOUNDS. THE LIEUTENANT SAID HE WAS A VERY GOOD SERGEANT AND THAT HE WAS THERE HELPING TO FIGHT THE NAZI MONSTER, SO THE LETTER IS QUITE INTERESTING AND IT’S IN VERY GOOD SHAPE.” ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN 1947 AND HIS DAD RETURNED HOME FOLLOWING THE WAR. HE STATED, “[I KNEW THAT THESE MATERIALS EXISTED] FROM WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWENTY, OR MAYBE EVEN YOUNGER. MY GRANDMOTHER WAS MOTHER OF THE YEAR OR WHATEVER THEY CALL, SILVER MOTHER OR SOMETHING, HERE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1967.” “[MOST OF THE VETERANS] DIDN’T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE REPLIED WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MEMORIES OF HIS FATHER SPEAKING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE OF THE WAR, “PROBABLY THE FIRST REAL TIME I GOT INTO THIS WAS WHEN HE WENT AND TOOK GRAMMA TO THE GRAVE TO LAY THE WREATH. HE ESCORTED HER AS HER SON, AND SHE LAID THE WREATH ON BEHALF OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I WAS THERE FOR THAT CEREMONY, AND [I RECALL BEING] QUITE TAKEN BACK BY THE WAY THOSE GUYS COULD SALUTE. IT WAS THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN MY FATHER DO IT, AND IT ALMOST RAISED THE HAIR ON YOUR NECK BECAUSE IT WAS SO PRECISE. SO THAT’S WHEN I STARTED TAKING AN INTEREST IN THIS STUFF.” “[EVEN AFTER I TOOK AN INTEREST IN THAT HISTORY, MY DAD DID NOT REALLY SPEAK MUCH ABOUT IT.] THERE WASN’T A LOT HAPPENED ON THE WEST COAST [WHERE HE WAS STATIONED AT PRINCE RUPERT]. THEY WERE SITTING UP THERE WAITING F0R THE JAPANESE TO INVADE AND THEY HAD ALL THE GUNS OUT ON THE WEST COAST, BUT IT NEVER CAME TO BE,” VAN DEN BROEKE STATED.” WHEN ASKED WHY HIS FATHER DID NOT GO OVERSEAS, VAN DEN BROEKE SPECULATED, “PROBABLY BECAUSE HE WASN’T CONSCRIPTED UNTIL ’43. AT THAT POINT THEY THOUGHT THE JAPANESE WERE [A LARGE THREAT]. THEY PROBABLY ATTACKED PEARL HARBOR BY THEN, I WOULD IMAGINE. THAT’S WHEN THEY SET UP THE TROOPS ON THE WEST COAST. MY UNCLE WENT IN THE WAR PROBABLY IN ’39 WHEN IT STARTED, SO HE WAS PROBABLY CONSCRIPTED AND SENT OVERSEAS, AND THAT’S HOW HE ENDED UP IN ITALY.” “[MY UNCLE] HE WASN’T [MARRIED WHEN HE WENT OVERSEAS]. HE WAS 23 [WHEN HE DIED]. SO HE WAS YOUNG, PROBABLY JOINED WHEN HE WAS NINETEEN. THERE WAS A LOT OF PEOPLE AT THAT TIME SAYING, ‘COME ON, JOIN AND LET’S GO FIGHT,’ SO THAT’S WHAT THEY DID,” SAID VAN DEN BROEKE, “HE HAD A SISTER THAT USED TO LIVE IN CUTBANK, MONTANA NAMED RIKA NELSON. SHE HAD TWO OR THREE OR FOUR KIDS, AND THERE IS A PICTURE OF [MY UNCLE] WITH TWO OF HER SONS (ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 20161102).” “[ON THE OTHER HAND] I THINK MY FATHER WAS ACTUALLY CONSCRIPTED [TO JOIN THE WAR], BECAUSE HE WAS QUITE A BIT OLDER AND WHEN HE GOT INTO THE ARMY HE WOULD HAVE BEEN [AROUND HIS MID TO LATE THIRTIES].” “I WOULD SAY MY MOTHER [WAS THE PERSON MOST AWARE OF THESE ARTIFACTS OTHER THAN MY FATHER],” VAN DEN BROEKE CONTINUED, “PROBABLY THE FIRST TIME I’D SEEN IT [WAS AFTER] MY DAD PASSED AWAY IN ’67. [WHEN] I WAS ONLY NINETEEN, HE WAS IN A FIRE AT PARK LAKE. HE WAS THE WARDEN AT THE PARK LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK AND A GARAGE BLEW UP AND HE DIED JANUARY 1ST, 1968. SO AT THAT POINT MY MOTHER AND I MOVED FROM PARK LAKE TO PICTURE BUTTE. [I RECEIVED THE ITEMS] WHEN MY MOTHER PASSED AWAY IN ABOUT 1992.” SPEAKING ABOUT HIS FATHER’S EARLIER LIFE, VAN DEN BROEKE SAID, “HE WAS BORN IN HELLENDOORN, HOLLAND IN 1905 ON JANUARY 30TH. HE EMIGRATED TO MONARCH WITH HIS FATHER IN 1911. HIS FATHER WAS A BLACKSMITH IN MONARCH. PROBABLY ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE OR THIRTY [DUTCH IMMIGRANTS WERE HERE WHEN MY DAD’S FAMILY ARRIVED] AND THEY ALL SETTLED IN MONARCH. THAT’S WHY YOU HAVE THAT LITTLE CHURCH OUT THERE IN THE COUNTRYSIDE AT MONARCH. THAT WAS PART OF THEIR CHURCH, ALL MY AUNTS AND UNCLES, AND THEY’RE BURIED IN THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD CEMETERY.” “[THE DUTCH CONNECTION IS] VERY INTERESTING BECAUSE ROELOF HEINEN USED TO BE REEVE FOR THE COUNTY OF LETHBRIDGE WHEN THEY HAD THAT DUTCH, THEY HAD SOME KIND OF A DUTCH APPRECIATION DAY IN PICTURE BUTTE ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. ROELOF TOOK THAT LETTER THAT I GOT FROM THE LIEUTENANT AND HE WAS GOING TO READ IT AT THAT APPRECIATION DAY, BUT THE PROGRAM GOT TOO LONG AND HE NEVER GOT TO IT,” VAN DEN BROEKE RECALLED AS HE SPOKE OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HIS FAMILY’S DUTCH BACKGROUND IN CONNECTION TO THE SECOND WORLD WAR, “[MY UNCLE BEING A DUTCH IMMIGRANT FIGHTING WITH THE CANADIAN MILITARY] WAS QUITE UNIQUE. HE WAS FIGHTING FOR CANADA, [AND HE WAS] BORN IN CANADA, BUT WITH A DUTCH NAME AND HE WAS KILLED IN ITALY. HE’S THE ONLY ONE THAT DIED FROM THE MONARCH/NOBLEFORD AREA THAT WENT TO FIGHT, ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY BOOKS FROM THE AREA. AS HIS UNCLE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, VAN DEN BROEKE HAS SPECIFIC MEMORIES OF HIS FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE OF THE REMEMBRANCE DAYS AFTER THE WAR. HE SAID, “YEARS AGO I SENT THEIR PICTURES BOTH INTO THE HERALD WHEN THEY FIRST STARTED THAT REMEMBRANCE DAY [PUBLICATION]. I SENT BOTH THEIR PICTURES AND THEY’VE BEEN IN THE HERALD. [AND THAT’S WHY I WAS REMINDED TO DONATE THESE ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM] RIGHT NOW, AS WE JUST HAVE A WEEK TO GO [UNTIL REMEMBRANCE DAY].” AN ONLINE RECORD FOR THE DONOR’S UNCLE, MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE ARCHIVES DATABASE TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH,” READS, “MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN ON JULY 12, 1921 IN MONARCH, ALBERTA TO PARENTS GERHARD AND JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. HE WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH WITH SIBLINGS, GERRIT AND RIKA… AT THE TIME OF ENLISTMENT, HE WAS SINGLE AND WORKING FOR HIS FATHER AS AN APPRENTICE BLACKSMITH. ON DECEMBER 22, 1942, MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED FOR SERVICE WITH THE CANADIAN ARMY AT CALGARY. HE SPENT THE NEXT NINE MONTHS TRAINING AT CALGARY, CAMROSE, AND WINDSOR, NOVA SCOTIA. ON SEPTEMBER 1, 1943, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. JUST TWO MONTHS LATER, HE WAS SENT TO ITALY WHERE HE WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH BY THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS. SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS INCLUDED IN COMBAT OPERATIONS WITH THIS UNIT AS THE ALLIED FORCES MADE THEIR MARCH ACROSS ITALY. ON DECEMBER 13, 1944, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS KILLED IN ACTION DURING THE BREAKING OF THE GOTHIC LINE. HE WAS LAID TO REST AT VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY. FOR HIS WARTIME SERVICE, SERGEANT VAN DEN BROEKE WAS AWARDED THE 1939-45 STAR, ITALY STAR, WAR MEDAL AND CANADIAN VOLUNTEER SERVICE MEDAL WITH CLASP. HIS MOTHER RECEIVED A MEMORIAL CROSS IN HONOUR OF HER SON.” A LETTER PROVIDED BY THE DONOR FROM THE COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION STATES, “M 105808 SERGEANT MARTIN CORNELIUS VAN DEN BROEKE OF THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS, CANADIAN INFANTRY CORPS DIED ON 13 DECEMBER 1944 AT AGE 23. HE IS BURIED IN THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY, ITALY IN PLOT 7, ROW B, GRAVE 5.” ACCODING TO THE WEBSITE OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CANADA ON THE VILLANOVA CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY IN ITALY, THE CANADIAN 5TH ARMOURED DIVISION, WHICH INCLUDED THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS AND NOVA SCOTIA HIGHLANDERS, ESTABLISHED A BRIDGEHEAD OVER THE LAMONE RIVER ON DECEMBER 10-11, 1944. THE 5TH CANADIAN ARMOURED DIVISION PARTICIPATED IN LIBERATING THE ITALIAN PROVINCE OF RAVENNA, INCLUDING THE VILLAGE OF VILLANOVA, IN DECEMBER 1944. AS STATED ON THE VETERANS AFFAIRS WEBSITE ON THE VILLANOVA CEMETERY, “THE ADVANCE ACROSS THE LAMONE NEAR VILLANOVA WENT WELL. THE CAPE BRETON HIGHLANDERS WERE QUICKLY OVER THE DYKE AND IN THE VILLAGE, WITH 43 PRISONERS CAPTURED…THE NAVIGLIO CANAL WAS THE NEXT CANADIAN OBJECTIVE, AND THE ASSAULT BEGAN THE NIGHT OF DECEMBER 12…ENEMY FIRE PREVENTED THE RESERVE SQUADRONS FROM EVEN APPROACHING THE CANAL. TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE, AIR SUPPORT WAS UNAVAILABLE DUE TO POOR VISIBILITY AND THE TANKS WERE UNABLE TO REACH THIS SECTION. IN THAT ONE NIGHT'S ACTION, 21 OF THE REGIMENT WERE KILLED AND 46 CAPTURED…THE SITUATION WOULD IMPROVE IN A MATTER OF DAYS, WHEN AIR AND TANK SUPPORT BECAME AVAILABLE.” A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED ABOUT THE DEATH OF THE YOUNGER VAN DEN BROEKE. IT STATES, “HE IS THE FIRST SERVICEMAN FROM MONARCH TO MAKE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE.” ARTICLES WERE ALSO PUBLISHED IN THE NEWSPAPER ABOUT PREVIOUS INJURIES MARTIN VAN DEN BROEKE SUSTAINED IN COMBAT. A NOTICE PUBLISHED IN THE HERALD STATES, “SON OF GEO. VAN DEN BROEKE OF MONARCH, GUNNER A. J. VAN DEN BROEKE, WHO IS SERVING WITH A BATTERY STATIONED AT THE WEST COAST. HE HAS A WIFE AND AN INFANT DAUGHTER, CHRISTINE LOUISE, RESIDED AT MONARCH, ALTA., ALSO A BROTHER OVERSEAS…” THE OBITUARY OF THE DONOR’S FATHER WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. IT READS, “PASSED AWAY IN SUDDENLY IN THE CITY ON MONDAY, JAN. 1, [1968], GEORGE JOHN “GERRIT”, AGED 62 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. CHRISTINA VAN DEN BROEKE OF COALHURST. BESIDES HIS LOVING WIFE, SURVIVORS INCLUDE TWO SONS, GEORGE JOHN OF COALHURST, AND HENRY MARTIN OF RED DEER; ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. WALTER CHRISTINE LOUISE DUNN OF TURIN; ONE SISTER, RIKA NILSON… HIS STEPMOTHER MRS. JOHANNA VAN DEN BROEKE. THE LATE MR. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS BORN IN HOLLAND IN 1905 AND WAS RAISED AND EDUCATED IN MONARCH.” ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE FILE, OBTAINED FROM THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE ENLISTED ON NOVEMBER 6, 1942 UNDER THE NATIONAL RESOURCES MOBILIZATION ACT OF 1940. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS LISTED AS BEING A TRUCK DRIVER AT THE TIME OF HIS ENLISTMENT. VAN DEN BROEKE WAS STATIONED AS A GUNNER FIRST AT ESQUIMALT, BRITISH COLUMBIA, THEN AT VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA IN 1943 WITH THE 27, 28, AND 29TH REGIMENTS OF THE 44 AA BATTERY. GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE WAS DISCHARGED ON MARCH 7, 1946 ON DEMOBILIZATION. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, GEORGE VAN DEN BROEKE'S SERVICE FILE, AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH (UOFL ARCHIVES RECORD, COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION LETTER, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES).
Catalogue Number
P20160038003
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
COURT WINDY WEST
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20120045008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
COURT WINDY WEST
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Diameter
10
Description
ROUND PATCH WITH WHITE BACKGROUND AND RED EMBROIDERED EDGING; PATCH HAS RED TEXT ALONG TOP EDGE READING “COURT WINDY WEST 562” AND RED EMBROIDERED TEXT ALONG BOTTOM EDGE “LETHBRIDGE ALTA.” PATCH HAS SCENE EMBROIDERED IN BLACK OF A CLOUD WEARING A FEATHERED CAP BLOWING BEHIND THE HIGH LEVEL BRIDGE. BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER OF PATCH HAS THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS SEAL EMBROIDERED IN GOLD, RED AND BLUE THREAD. PATCH IN EXCELLENT CONDITION WITH VERY LITTLE SIGN OF WEAR.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE PURPOSE AND HISTORY OF THE PATCH, CAREFOOT NOTED, “THIS WAS SOMETHING WE HAD DESIGNED [TO PUT] ON YOUR JACKET. YOU WERE KNOWN AS A FORESTER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045008
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ORATOR COLLAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20120045010
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ORATOR COLLAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
53.6
Width
17.7
Description
COLLAR MEDAL; RED RIBBON WITH GOLD-FINISHED MEDAL AT THE END. MEDAL IS COMPRISED ON TOP GOLD BAR WITH INDIGO BACKGROUND AND GOLD TEXT “ORATOR” AND GOLD, RED, INDIGO AND WHITE CROSS OF INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS ATTACHED TO BAR WITH TWO METAL CHAINS. CROSS SHOWS, CLOCKWISE: AT TOP A WHITE BACKGROUND WITH AN OPEN GOLD EYE, A RED BACKGROUND WITH A GOLD FEMININE SILHOUETTE ON PEDESTAL, AT BOTTOM A WHITE BACKGROUND WITH GOLD TEXT “L.B.C.”, A RED BACKGROUND WITH GOLD FEMININE SILHOUETTE HOLDING SKIRT HEM ON PEDESTAL, AND IN CENTER ON INDIGO BACKGROUND GOLD TEXT “IOF”. RED RIBBON COLLAR HAS STITCHED SEAMS ACROSS TOP RIGHT AND LEFT SIDES, AND AT BOTTOM ABOVE MEDAL TO CENTER OF COLLAR LOOP. RIBBON IS CREASED ON BACK. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE PURPOSE AND HISTORY OF THE MEDAL, CAREFOOT NOTED, “[THE MEDALS INDICATED] THAT WAS YOUR STATUS. THIS ONE WAS A TRUSTEE. A TRUSTEE WAS…A BOARD OF DIRECTORS; IT WAS ONE OF THE DIRECTORS.” “WHEN THEY SET UP THEIR ROOM, FOR THE RITUAL, THEY HAD LITTLE TABLES AND [A] COVER FOR THAT LITTLE TABLE…THIS WAS THE ORATOR…THERE WOULD BE FOUR TABLES.” “THERE’S THE PAST CHIEF RANGER [PAST PRESIDENT]. VICE CHIEF RANGER…THEY USED THEM AS DEEMED DEPENDENT ON WHO WAS DOING WHAT…THE ORATOR…[WOULD BE SIMILAR TO] THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE…THAT’S THE BEST WAY FOR ME TO DESCRIBE IT.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045010
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20120045014
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
9.6
Width
5.5
Description
GREEN PAPER MEMBER CARD FOR THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CARD HAS PRINTED SEAL OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS AND TEXT “INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS, COURT WINDY WEST NO. 562, LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA.” BELOW SEAL IS GREEN PRINTED TEXT “THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT RUTH HUFF [NAME TYPED IN BLACK] IS A MEMBER OF THE I.O.F. AND WHILE IN GOOD STANDING IS ENTITLED TO ALL RIGHTS, PRIVILEGES AND BENEFITS PROVIDED BY THIS MEMBERSHIP.” CARD HAS LINES FOR “MEMBER’S SIGNATURE” AND “CHIEF RANGER” SIGNATURES’ BOTH ARE SIGNED IN BLUE INK. BACK OF CARD HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE INK “POLICY NO. 1164932, 11/30, 1953”. BACK RIGHT AND FRONT LEFT EDGES HAS BLACK SOILING ALONG EDGES; BACK HAS PINK STAIN LEFT OF CENTER, AND BLACK STAINING ALONG LEFT EDGE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE PURPOSE AND HISTORY OF THE MEMBER CARD, CAREFOOT NOTED, “[THIS IS A] MEMBERSHIP CERTIFICATE. RUTH’S IS ONE.” “THE FORESTERS HAD DEVELOPED A VERY STRONG BACKGROUND OF LIFE INSURANCE. THAT WAS ONE OF THE MOTIVATIONS FOR ME TAKING IT OUT. IT WAS A WAY OF – I DIDN’T HAVE TO BUY FROM SUN LIFE. THERE WERE SOME EXTRA PERKS THAT CAME WITH THIS THAT DIDN’T COME WITH SUN LIFE AND THAT STILL EXISTS.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045014
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20120045015
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
FELT, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
16.3
Width
27.7
Description
BLUE FELT PATCH WITH EMBROIDERED COTTON SEAL; WHITE BACKGROUND WITH RED TEXT AT THE TOP “LETHBRIDGE” OVER BLACK, YELLOW, WHITE AND RED SCENE OF A WINGED BOWLING BALL KNOCKING INTO BOWLING PINS, RED BANNER BELOW WITH YELLOW TEXT “COURT WINDY WEST NO. 562”. BACK IS BLUE FELT WITH WHITE STITCHING ALONG EDGES AND YELLOW LABEL WITH BLACK TEXT “CREST CRAFT LTD., THE BEST IN CRESTS, SASKATOON, SASK.” PATCH HAS LOSS ALONG EDGES OF BLUE FELT; EMBROIDERED SEAL IS DISCOLORED AND FADED, AND HAS LOOSE BACK THREAD ATTACHED TO BACK. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE HISTORY OF THE BOWLING PATCH, CAREFOOT NOTED, “THIS WAS…[A] BOWLING CREST…I DIDN’T WEAR THIS ONE. THE BOWLING…WAS DEAN LOW AND HE WAS THE PRESIDENT HERE BUT HE WAS ALSO THE PROVINCIAL PRESIDENT LATER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045015
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
COLLAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20120045016
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
COLLAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
50.7
Width
12
Description
COLLAR MEDAL WITH RED RIBBON WITH BLUE STRIPES ALONG EDGES; MEDAL CROSS HAS COPPER FINISH WITH EMBOSSED RAISED IMAGES, CLOCKWISE: AT TOP, EMBOSSED OPEN EYE, EMBOSSED WOMAN HOLDING A SPEAR, EMBOSSED HANDS EXTENDED IN HANDSHAKE, EMBOSSED WOMAN HOLDING A BASKET, AND IN CENTER AN EMBOSSED ELK WITH TEXT “I.O.F., L.B.C.”. MEDAL IS SECURED TO RIBBON WITH METAL RING AND HOOK-FASTENER. ON LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF RIBBON IS GOLD-FINISHED METAL PIN; FRONT OF PIN HAS INDIGO BACKGROUND WITH LETTER “O” IN GOLD. RIBBON HAS CREASING ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE OF RIBBON AND ON BACK. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE PURPOSE AND HISTORY OF THE MEDAL, CAREFOOT NOTED, “[THE MEDALS INDICATED] THAT WAS YOUR STATUS. THIS ONE WAS A TRUSTEE. A TRUSTEE WAS…A BOARD OF DIRECTORS; IT WAS ONE OF THE DIRECTORS.” “WHEN THEY SET UP THEIR ROOM, FOR THE RITUAL, THEY HAD LITTLE TABLES AND [A] COVER FOR THAT LITTLE TABLE…THIS WAS THE ORATOR…THERE WOULD BE FOUR TABLES.” “THERE’S THE PAST CHIEF RANGER [PAST PRESIDENT]. VICE CHIEF RANGER…THEY USED THEM AS DEEMED DEPENDENT ON WHO WAS DOING WHAT…THE ORATOR…[WOULD BE SIMILAR TO] THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE…THAT’S THE BEST WAY FOR ME TO DESCRIBE IT.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045016
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
H.V.C.R. COLLAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20120045017
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
H.V.C.R. COLLAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
28
Width
21.7
Description
RED AND BLUE COLLAR MEDAL; RIBBON IS RED WITH BLUE TRIM ALONG EDGES; BRONZE MEDAL AT END IS CROSS-SHAPED AND DISPLAYS THE SEAL OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS WITH SYMBOLS EMBOSSED ON FRONT, ARRANGED CLOCKWISE: OPEN EYE AT TOP, FEMALE FIGURE HOLDING SPEAR, TWO HANDS EXTENDED IN A HANDSHAKE AT BOTTOM, A FEMALE FIGURE HOLDING A BASKET, AND IN CENTER CIRCLE AN ELK TEXT ABOVE “I.O.F.” AND TEXT BELOW “L.B.C”. RIGHT-WEARING SIDE OF RIBBON HAS GOLD-FINISHED PIN OF LAUREL BRANCHES FORMING A BORDER AROUND GOLD LETTERS “H.V.C.R.” ON TEAL CLOTH BACKGROUND. COLLAR RIBBON HAS PUNCTURED HOLES FROM BEING STAPLED TO PAPER; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON AUGUST 21, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN INTERVIEWED LLOYD CAREFOOT REGARDING HIS DONATION OF MEMORABILIA RELATED TO COURT WINDY WEST (#562) LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS. CAREFOOT WAS ACTIVELY INVOLVED WITH THE FORESTERS WHILE HE LIVED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, AND CONTINUED HIS INVOLVEMENT FOLLOWING HIS MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1963. ON THE COLLAR MEDAL, CAREFOOT NOTED, “THIS [BELONGED TO] DEAN LOW…HIGH VICE CHIEF RANGER. THIS ONE WAS 1970-71 AND IT WAS A BIG ONE. I WOULD NOT HAVE [WORN] IT. DEAN WOULD HAVE [WORN] IT.” “[IT WAS FOR] THE PROVINCIAL PEOPLE…DEAN LOW WAS…THE STRONGEST LEADER WE HAD IN LETHBRIDGE AND THAT’S WHY HE ALSO REPRESENTED US TO PROVINCE.” “HE WAS THERE AND IF YOU NEEDED TO KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT FORESTERS, CALL DEAN AND HE’D HELP YOU OUT. HE BECAME THE PROVINCIAL TOP DOG.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS TIME SPENT IN THE FORESTERS, CAREFOOT RECALLED, “WE [WIFE RUTH AND LLOYD] WERE INVITED TO [AN] ACTIVITY. [IN THOSE] DAYS THERE [WERE] SOCIAL PARTIES…SOMEBODY THAT I KNEW INVITED ME TO COME AND I HEARD WHAT THEY WERE DOING. IT WAS SOMETHING THAT RUTH AND I THOUGHT…WOULD BE SOMETHING WE’D LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN…MY FATHER WAS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ORDER OF FORESTERS WHICH WAS A STAGE BEFORE THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS.” “I BECAME A MEMBER IN EDMONTON… I WAS ONLY AS ASSOCIATE AT THAT TIME. WHEN WE MOVED DOWN HERE, WE BECAME MEMBERS HERE…MY FIRST WORKDAY WAS THE SECOND OF JANUARY, 1963 [IN LETHBRIDGE]. I WAS A FULL-BLOWN MEMBER IN 1966.” “[I JOINED BECAUSE OF] THE SATISFACTION THAT IT’S A STRONG CHARITABLE WAY OF DOING THINGS TO GIVE BACK. THAT’S PART OF MY PHILOSOPHY; JUST GIVE A LITTLE BACK FOR THE GOOD LIFE I’VE HAD.” “I WAS THE PRESIDENT OF THE LEAGUE…OF [THE] LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER. AND [I] WOUND UP WITH [THE TRUNK] AND IN IT [WERE] THESE THINGS. IT PRE-DATES ME.” “MOST OF THOSE THINGS WERE FOR MY PERSONAL USE…EITHER IN EVENTS OR A POSITION I HELD IN THE FORESTERS. I LOOK AT [THE OBJECTS] AND I SMILE.” REGARDING HIS DONATION, CAREFOOT ELABPRATED, “THE FORESTERS IN THE COMMUNITY DID A LOT OF CHARITY WORK AND I THOUGHT IT WAS A WAY OF COVERING FOR THE FUTURE [ABOUT] THE THINGS THAT WE DID, OR STILL DO. THAT WAS, MORE THAN ANYTHING ELSE, MY REASON FOR [DONATING IT] – A WAY OF PASSING IT ALONG SO IT JUST DIDN’T GET SHOVED IN THE JUNK…TO SOMEBODY IN THE FUTURE, IT INDICATES SOMETHING OF WHAT WE DID AND SOME ILLUSTRATION OF THINGS THAT WE DID. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20120045001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20120045017
Acquisition Date
2012-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
A. P. P SHOULDER TITLE
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ALUMINUM, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20180014001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
A. P. P SHOULDER TITLE
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Materials
ALUMINUM, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.9
Length
6.0
Width
2.6
Description
SILVER SHOULDER TITLE. HAS THE LETTERS "A.P." CENTERED ABOVE THE WORD "POLICE". BACK OF TITLE HAS 2 BRASS LOOPS FOR HOLDING BRASS SPLIT PIN. THERE IS NO PIN.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS BADGE BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN. ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY PROVIDED WITH A BUCHANAN A. P. P.-RELATED DONATION MADE BY JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN 2002 (P20020090). IT STATES, "BORN IN GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, WHERE BUCHANAN BEGAN REGULAR SCHOOLING AT THE AGE OF 4, WHICH ENABLED HIM TO COMPLETE HIS HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HIS PARENTS MOVED THE FAMILY TO CANADA IN MAY 1914. THE FAMILY SETTLED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WHERE EDWARD FOUND A JOB PLUS ENROLLED IN NIGHT CLASSES AT THE EDMONTON TECHNICAL SCHOOL TAKING ENGLISH, CANADIAN HISTORY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MANUAL TRAINING IN WOODWORKING. IN FEBRUARY 1917, THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS ORGANIZED. ED JOINED IN MAY OF 1920." THESE BADGES WERE A PART OF HIS UNIFORM IN THIS ROLE. AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. DESCRIBING HER FATHER’S CAREER, BUCHANAN BEGAN, “[MY DAD] JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL…AS A ROOKIE – RIGHT AT THE START – HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. AND IT WASN’T LONG UNTIL HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE REAL POLICING. WHEN THE CRAZY PROHIBITION WAS BROUGHT IN, THAT WAS A REAL PAIN FOR THE POLICE. IT WAS [A MOVEMENT] PUSHED BY THESE DO-GOODERS, WHO DIDN’T REALIZE WHAT THEY WERE DOING. DAD WAS VERY UPSET TALKING ABOUT THAT. EVEN WHEN HE WAS JUST A YOUNG FELLOW, [HE WAS] FINDING YOUNG, GOOD FARM BOYS BLIND OR DEAD OVER A FENCE, BECAUSE THEY HAD A PROBLEM WITH THE PROHIBITION AND GETTING MOONSHINE THAT WASN’T MATURE OR SOMETHING, [WHICH] WAS POISONOUS.” “IN 1921 HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON,” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL. HE THEN GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE AND HE WAS GOING TO GO THERE, BUT THEN IN 1922 THEY GOT MARRIED [SO HE DID NOT GO TO GRAND PRAIRIE] FORTUNATELY, THE A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. DID, SO HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED. [AFTER MY PARENTS’ MARRIAGE] THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD, WHERE HE WAS ON HIS OWN [AT THE POSTING]. FROM THERE, HE DID A LOT OF WORK GOING BACK AND FORTH.” “BRAINARD [WAS] A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION… THEY BUILT DAD A LOG CABIN DOWN THERE FOR THE HOUSE WITH HIS NEW WIFE AND [SOON AFTER THEY WERE] EXPECTING THEIR FIRST CHILD. [THE CABIN HAD] ONE BIG ROOM WITH CURTAINS HERE AND THERE, AND HE DIDN’T HAVE A PRISON THERE. WHEN HE TOOK IN A PRISONER, THAT’S WHEN HE NEEDED THE OREGON BOOT AND THE BALL AND CHAIN BECAUSE HE HAD A BIG BOLT ON THE FLOOR NEAR HIS OFFICE. THAT’S WHERE THE GUY HAD TO SIT, CHAINED, UNTIL [MY FATHER] COULD TAKE HIM ON INTO EDMONTON…EVEN IN THE A.P.P. TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON. [HE WOULD BE] BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE],” BUCHANAN EXPLAINED EXPANDING ON HOW HER FATHER’S WORK TOOK HIM “BACK AND FORTH.” “THEN THEY CLOSED THAT [BRAINAR POST] DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY – A LITTLE VILLAGE – AND HE WAS THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. [HE WAS THERE] WHEN 1932 CAME ALONG AND THEN HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P… AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. [FROM THERE] HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT, WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO [COVER]. AND THERE AGAIN, WE HAD A NICE, BIG WHITE HOUSE AND A JAIL THIS TIME… THE JAIL OFFICE AND THE COURTROOM AND EVERYTHING WAS CONNECTED [TO THE HOUSE]. YOU JUST GO DOWN THE HALL AND OPEN THE DOOR AND THERE YOU GO, AND THERE’S TWO JAILS IN THERE. [THERE] HE WAS GETTING ROOKIES COMING OUT FROM EDMONTON TO TRAIN UNDER HIM… [I WAS BORN IN] ’30 [AND] NOW IN ’34, I REMEMBER GOING THERE [TO WESTLOCK].” SPEAKING ABOUT THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P. IN 1932 AND THE ABSORPTION OF SOME OF ITS MEMBERS INTO THE R. C. M P., BUCHANAN EXPLAINED, “[A. P. P. OFFICERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY [WERE RANKED] INTO THREE CATEGORIES. [FIRST, THERE WERE THE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE; THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P. THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEN THERE WERE THE ONES THAT COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY [INTO THE FORCE FOR THE TRIAL PERIOD]. THEY COULD [BE ACCEPTED] FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY AGAIN [FOR FULL-TIME]. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE, [WHO] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE…IT IS IMPORTANT [TO REMEMBER], THOSE A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT. THEY WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” WHEN ANSWERING HOW HER FATHER ENDED UP WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE, BUCHANAN SAID, “[AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P.], ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER [OF THE R. C. M. P.] HANCOCK (WILLIAM FREDERICK WATKINS “BILL” HANCOCK) KNEW DAD REALLY WELL. [PREVIOUSLY, HANCOCK] WAS THE [ACTING COMMISSIONER] FOR THE ALBERTA [PROVINCIAL POLICE]. [HANCOCK] CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, ‘BUCK – DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’A LOT – I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT, BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT. YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?’” AS A RESULT, EDWARD BUCHANAN WAS RELOCATED TO THE R. C. M. P.’S LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT IN 1944. JEAN BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “DAD’S PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, VERY FIRMLY. AND THE STAFF [IN LETHBRIDGE] ENDED UP LOVING HIM. THE SECRETARIES AND EVERYTHING, THEY WERE CRYING WHEN HE LEFT. AND I GOT LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON… BUT [IN TERMS OF] THE SITUATION [WHICH ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK WAS REFERRING TO], NO, HE WAS FINE. HE NEVER HAD ANY TROUBLE. HE JUST FIRMLY, QUIETLY DEALT WITH EVERYTHING AND EVERYTHING WAS FINE. I NEVER SAW HIM STRESSED OUT. ALWAYS COOL, LAID BACK.” “[WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE], WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET SOUTH. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. BUT WE HAD [SOME] TROUBLE BECAUSE DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US. HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE [THAT WAS] READY, SO WHEN WE CAME DOWN [WE] STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. AND THEN I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE – LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS. ANYWAY, I GOT THROUGH GRADE TWELVE AND THAT’S ALRIGHT.” “[ANOTHER THING HE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR HERE IN LETHBRIDGE] WAS TO OVERSEE THE PRISONER OF WAR (POW) CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POWS IN THE RESPECT THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. THEY WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY, BUT THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY. THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. [MY DAD] RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT… AND THEN THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK ON THE [FARMS], BECAUSE THERE WAS A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS… BUT, OF COURSE, I KNEW ABOUT THE CRUELTY OF SOME OF THE HARD-CORE NAZIS THAT WERE IN THERE. THE TROUBLE WAS THERE WASN’T ENOUGH FORCE POLICE TO GO IN THERE SAFELY. THEY COULDN’T EVEN GET IN THE POW CAMP AND THE CIVIL GUARDS WERE THE ONLY ONES THAT WERE AVAILABLE, BUT THEY DIDN’T EVEN DARE GO IN HALF THE TIME. IT WAS REALLY SOMETHING. THERE WERE SOME GUYS IN THERE THAT WERE REALLY, REALLY MEAN…” “AND OH YES, A FEW [MEN DID TRY TO ESCAPE THE CAMP],” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT THEY DIDN’T GET VERY FAR. THEY NEVER GOT AWAY. I’VE GOT RECORDS OF ONES THAT WERE CAUGHT. THEY STOLE SOMEBODY’S CAR. SOME OF THEM GOT A REGULAR SENTENCE FOR BREAKING ONE OF OUR LAWS.” BUCHANAN CONFIRMS THAT HER FATHER RETIRED FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN 1950 WHILE IN LETHBRIDGE. AFTER RETIREMENT, SHE EXPLAINED, “[HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON, HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS… BUT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE WITH HIS RECORD, SO THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA…HE THEN WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN OR SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS…” EDWARD BUCHANAN “SORT OF” RETIRED FROM THAT ROLE IN THE 1970S, HIS DAUGHTER EXPLAINED. HE CONTINUED WORKING IN SOME CAPACITIES UNTIL HIS PASSING IN 1998. “[I RECEIVED MY DAD’S R. C. M. P. POSSESSIONS, BECAUSE HE] KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER IT AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM… HE LIVED TO BE NINETY-EIGHT AND I DON’T THINK HE EVER THREW ANYTHING OUT SINCE HE WAS IN HIS TWENTIES.” ACCORDING TO EDWARD E. “BUCK” BUCHANAN’S OBITUARY, HE PASSED AWAY IN IN EDMONTON IN 1998. HIS WIFE’S NAME WAS CHRISTENE BUCHANAN AND TOGETHER THEY HAD FIVE CHILDREN – EDWARD, ROBERT, JEAN, WILLIAM, AND ROSE-MARIE. THE OBITUARY STATES HE SERVED 31 YEARS IN THE R.C.M.P, AND 15 YEARS AS THE SUPERINTENDENT OF CORRECTIONS FOR ALBERTA. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20180014001
Acquisition Date
2018-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BLANKET
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1990
Materials
RAW FLAX YARN
No. Pieces
1
Length
139
Width
99.5
Description
HAND-WOVEN BLANKET MADE FROM RAW FLAX. THE BLANKET IS COMPOSED OF 2 SECTIONS OF THE SAME SIZE OF MATERIAL THAT ARE JOINED TOGETHER WITH A SEAM AT THE CENTER. ON THE FRONT SIDE (WITH NEAT SIDE OF THE STITCHING AND PATCHES), THERE ARE THREE PATCHES ON THE BLANKET MADE FROM LIGHTER, RAW-COLOURED MATERIAL. ONE SECTION OF THE FABRIC HAS TWO OF THE PATCHES ALIGNED VERTICALLY NEAR THE CENTER SEAM. THE AREA SHOWING ON ONE PATCH IS 3 CM X 5 CM AND THE OTHER IS SHOWING 5 CM X 6 CM. ON THE OPPOSITE SECTION THERE IS ONE PATCH THAT IS 16 CM X 8.5 CM SEWN AT THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET. THE BLANKET IS HEMMED ON BOTH SHORT SIDES. ON THE OPPOSING/BACK SIDE OF THE BLANKET, THE FULL PIECES OF THE FABRIC FOR THE PATCHES ARE SHOWING. THE SMALLER PATCH OF THE TWO ON THE ONE HALF-SECTION OF THE BLANKET IS 8CM X 10 CM AND THE OTHER PATCH ON THAT SIDE IS 14CM X 15CM. THE PATCH ON THE OTHER HALF-SECTION IS THE SAME SIZE AS WHEN VIEWED FROM THE FRONT. THERE IS A SEVERELY FADED BLUE STAMP ON THIS PATCH’S FABRIC. FAIR CONDITION. THERE IS RED STAINING THAT CAN BE SEEN FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BLANKET AT THE CENTER SEAM, NEAR THE EDGE OF THE BLANKET AT THE SIDE WITH 2 PATCHES (CLOSER TO THE LARGER PATCH), AND NEAR THE SMALL PATCH AT THE END FURTHER FROM THE CENTER. THERE IS A HOLE WITH MANY LOOSE THREADS SURROUNDING NEAR THE CENTER OF THE HALF SECTION WITH ONE PATCH. THERE ARE VARIOUS THREADS COMING LOOSE AT MULTIPLE POINTS OF THE BLANKET.
Subjects
AGRICULTURAL T&E
BEDDING
Historical Association
AGRICULTURE
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. ACCORDING TO A NOTE THAT WAS ATTACHED TO THIS LIGHTWEIGHT BLANKET AT THE TIME OF ACQUISITION THE BLANKET IS BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN MADE C. 1920S. MORRIS SAYS HER MEMORY OF THE BLANKET DATES AS FAR BACK AS SHE CAN REMEMBER: “RIGHT INTO THE ‘30S, ‘40S AND ‘50S BECAUSE MY MOTHER DID THAT RIGHT UP UNTIL NEAR THE END. I USE THAT EVEN IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I HAD A GARDEN. [THIS TYPE OF BLANKET] WAS USED FOR TWO PURPOSES. IT WAS EITHER PUT ON THE BED UNDERNEATH THE MATTRESS THE LADIES MADE OUT OF WOOL AND OR ELSE IT WAS USED, A DIFFERENT PIECE OF CLOTH WOULD BE USED FOR FLAILING THINGS. [THE] FLAIL ACTUALLY GOES WITH IT AND THEY BANG ON THE SEEDS AND IT WOULD TAKE THE HULLS OFF… IT’S HAND WOVEN AND IT’S MADE OUT OF POOR QUALITY FLAX… IT’S UNBLEACHED, DEFINITELY… RAW LINEN." THIS SPECIFIC BLANKET WAS USED FOR SEEDS MORRIS RECALLS: “…IT HAD TO BE A WINDY DAY… WE WOULD PICK DRIED PEAS OR BEANS OR WHATEVER BEET SEEDS AND WE WOULD BEAT AWAY AND THEN WE WOULD STAND UP, HOLD IT UP AND THE BREEZE WOULD BLOW THE HULLS OFF AND THE SEEDS WOULD GO STRAIGHT DOWN [ONTO THE BLANKET.” THE SEEDS WOULD THEN BE CARRIED ON THE BLANKET AND THEN PUT INTO A PAIL. OF THE BLANKET’S CLEAN STATE, MORRIS EXPLAINS, “THEY’RE ALWAYS WASHED AFTER THEY’RE FINISHED USING THEM.” WHEN SHE LOOKS AT THIS ARTIFACT, MORRIS SAYS: “I FEEL LIKE I’M OUT ON THE FARM, I SEE FIELDS AND FIELDS OF FLAX, BLUE FLAX. BUT THAT’S NOT WHAT SHE USED IT FOR. SHE DID USE IT IF SHE WANTED A LITTLE BIT OF THE FLAX THEN SHE’D POUND THE FLAX, BUT THAT WASN’T OFTEN. IT WAS MOSTLY BEANS AND PEAS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO WOVE THIS BLANKET. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003007
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1907
Date Range To
1995
Materials
WOOD, METAL, VARNISH
No. Pieces
1
Height
107
Diameter
54.5
Description
WOODEN SPINNING WHEEL COATED WITH RED WOOD VARNISH. THE BOBBIN IS APPROX. 11.5CM IN LENGTH AND APPROX. 9CM IN DIAMETER. THERE IS SOME HANDSPUN, WHITE YARN REMAINING ON THE BOBBIN, IN ADDITION TO A SMALL AMOUNT OF GREEN YARN. THE SPINNING WHEEL IS FULLY ASSEMBLED. ON EITHER SIDE OF THE FLYER THERE ARE 10 METAL HOOKS. ON THE LEFT SIDE ONE OF THE 10 HOOKS IS PARTIALLY BROKEN OFF. ON THE FRONT MAIDEN, A WHITE STRING IS TIED AROUND A FRONT KNOB WITH A METAL WIRE BENT LIKE A HOOK (POSSIBLY TO PULL YARN THROUGH THE METAL ORIFICE ATTACHED TO FLYER). LONG SECTION OF RED YARN LOOPED AROUND THE SPINNING WHEEL (MAY BE DRIVE BAND). TREADLE IS TIED TO THE FOOTMAN WITH A DARK GREY, FLAT STRING THAT IS 5MM IN WIDTH. GOOD CONDITION. TREADLE IS WELL WORN WITH VARNISH WORN OFF AND METAL NAIL HEADS EXPOSED.
Subjects
TEXTILEWORKING T&E
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS ACQUIRED THIS SPINNING WHEEL FROM HER MOTHER AT THE SAME TIME SHE ACQUIRED THE RUG (P20160003006-GA). SHE EXPLAINS: “I ASKED HER IF I COULD USE THE SPINNING WHEEL – SHE TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN. AND SHE ALSO TAUGHT ME HOW TO WEAVE, ACTUALLY MY GRANDMOTHER DID THAT MORE SO THAN MY MOTHER. AND I BELONG TO THE WEAVERS’ GUILD, SO I THOUGHT THAT I BETTER DO SOME SPINNING. AND I DID SOME, SO THAT’S WHY I’VE GOT IT HERE AND MOTHER SAID NOT TO BOTHER BRINGING IT BECAUSE SHE WASN’T GOING TO DO ANYMORE SPINNING. SHE HAD LOTS AND LOTS OF YARN THAT SHE DID. SO IT’S BEEN SITTING HERE; IT WAS IN THE BASEMENT.” THE WHEEL WAS MADE FOR ELIZABETH KONKIN WHEN SHE WAS A CHILD IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. MORRIS EXPLAINED THAT: “… [THE SPINNING WHEEL] WAS MADE ESPECIALLY FOR HER. SHE WAS VERY YOUNG. AND THAT IS THE CADILLAC OF SPINNING WHEELS… BECAUSE SHE KNEW WHO THE SPINNERS WERE, WHO THE SPINNING WHEEL CARPENTERS WERE. AND THERE WAS ONE PARTICULAR MAN AND HER MOTHER SAID, ‘WE’LL GO TO THAT ONE.’ AND THEN IN TURN, IN PAYMENT, SHE WOVE HIM ENOUGH MATERIAL TO MAKE A SUIT – A LINEN ONE… [T]HEY DIDN’T LIVE IN CASTELLAR, THEY LIVED IN ANOTHER PLACE. IT’S CALLED - IN RUSSIAN IT IS CALLED OOTISCHENIA. IT’S WHERE THE BIG – ONE OF THE BIG DAMS IS. IF YOU EVER GO ON THAT ROAD, THERE’LL BE DAMS – I THINK ABOUT 3 HUGE ONES… NEAR CASTELLAR, YEAH.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE TIME THE WHEEL WAS BUILT FOR HER MOTHER, MORRIS ANSWERED: “… [S]HE GOT IT LONG BEFORE [HER MARRIAGE].” SHE EXPLAINED THAT PRIOR TO MARRYING, GIRLS WOULD PUT TOGETHER TROUSSEAUS “AND THEY MAKE ALL KINDS OF FANCY THINGS WHICH THEY NEVER USE.” MORRIS RECALLS THE SPINNING WHEEL BEING USED WITHIN HER FAMILY’S HOME IN SHOULDICE AND IN THE LEAN-TO AREA IN THEIR HOME AT VAUXHALL: ‘WELL I THINK [THE SKILL IS] IN THE GENES ACTUALLY. BECAUSE MOST FAMILIES WOVE, AND THEY CERTAINLY SPUN, AS FAR AS I REMEMBER. I KNOW EVERY FALL THE LOOM WOULD COME OUT AND WE WERE LIVING WITH MY GRANDPARENTS ON MY DAD’S [SIDE]. WE LIVED UPSTAIRS, AND EVERY WINTER THEY’D HAUL THAT HUGE LOOM INTO THE BATHHOUSE – THE STEAM BATHHOUSE – BECAUSE THERE WAS NO ROOM ANYWHERE ELSE. AND THEY – THE LADIES SET IT UP AND IN THE SUMMERTIME. THEY TORE THE RAGS FOR THE RUGS, OR SPUN THEM. [FOR] WHATEVER THEY WERE GOING TO MAKE. MY MOM WAS SPINNING WHEN I WAS OLD. [S]HE USED MAKE MITTENS AND SOCKS FOR THE KIDS FOR MY CHILDREN AND SO WHEN SHE DIED THERE WAS A WHOLE STACK OF THESE MITTENS AND SOCKS AND I’VE BEEN GIVING IT TO MY GRAND[KIDS AND] MY GREAT GRANDKIDS” MORRIS ALSO USED THIS SPINNING WHEEL MANY TIMES HERSELF. SHE SAID, “IT WAS VERY EASY TO SPIN AND WHEN YOU TRY SOMEBODY ELSE’S SPINNING WHEEL YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE RIGHT AWAY. IT’S LIKE DRIVING A CADILLAC AND THEN DRIVING AN OLD FORD. IT’S JUST, IT’S SMOOTH. OUR SON, I TOLD YOU HE WAS VERY CLEVER, HE TRIED SPINNING AND HE SAID IT WAS JUST A VERY, VERY GOOD SPINNING WHEEL. WHEN I WAS IN THE GUILD I TRIED DOING [WHAT] MY MOTHER TAUGHT ME HOW TO SPIN FINE THREAD AND I WANTED HEAVY THREAD BECAUSE NOW [THEY'RE] MAKING THESE WALL HANGINGS. THEY USE THREAD AS THICK AS TWO FINGERS SO I DID THAT AND I DYED IT. I WENT OUT AND CREATED MY OWN DYES. THAT WAS FUN AND THEN I HAVE A SAMPLER OF ALL THE DYES I MADE… I STOPPED SPINNING SHORTLY BEFORE I STOPPED WEAVING… I LOVED WEAVING. FIRST OF ALL I LEARNED HOW TO EMBROIDER. I LIKED THAT THEN I LEARNED HOW CROCHET, I LIKED THAT. THEN I LEARNED HOW TO KNIT AND THAT WAS TOPS. THEN ONE DAY I WAS VISITING MY FRIEND, FRANCES, AND SHE WAS GOING TO THE BOWMAN AND I SAID, 'WHERE ARE YOU GOING?' SHE SAID 'I’M GOING THERE TO WEAVE.' I SAID, 'I DIDN’T KNOW YOU COULD WEAVE?' SHE SAID, 'OH YES,' AND I SAID ‘IS IT HARD?' SHE SAID, ‘NO,” SO I WENT THERE AND I SAW THE THINGS SHE WOVE. THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL AND SO I JOINED THE GROUP AND THEN OF COURSE I WANTED TO HAVE SOME OF THE STUFF I HAD SPUN MYSELF AND DYED MYSELF AND NOBODY ELSE WANTED. THEN I DECIDED, ‘ALRIGHT, I’VE WOVEN ALL THESE THINGS, WOVE MYSELF A SUIT, LONG SKIRT YOU NAME IT. PLACE MATS GALORE. THIS LITTLE RUNNER,’ AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH THE REST BECAUSE NOBODY WANTS HOMESPUN STUFF. THEY WANT TO GO TO WALMART OR SOME PLACE AND BUY SOMETHING READYMADE,’ SO I GAVE UP SPINNING AND WEAVING… I STOPPED AFTER I MADE MY SUIT. THAT MUST HAVE BEEN ABOUT TWENTY YEARS AGO, EASILY.” MORRIS’ MOTHER WOULD WEAVE IN SHOULDICE, BUT “[I]N VAUXHALL, NO, SHE WASN’T [WEAVING]. SHE DIDN’T HAVE A LOOM.” MORRIS SAID IN SHOULDICE, “I LEARNED HOW TO THROW THE SHUTTLE BACK AND FORTH TO WEAVE RUGS BECAUSE I USED TO SIT THERE WATCHING MY GRANDMOTHER AND SHE LET ME DO THAT, AND THEN YOU SEE WHEN I GOT SO INTERESTED IN WEAVING THAT I BOUGHT A LOOM, SITTING DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. I’VE BEEN TRYING TO SELL IT EVER SINCE AND NOBODY WANTS IT. I OFFERED TO GIVE IT FOR FREE AND NOBODY WANTS IT BECAUSE THEY DON’T HAVE SPACE FOR IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003008
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
KNITTING BAG
Date Range From
1870
Date Range To
1999
Materials
CANVAS, FABRIC, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41
Width
36
Description
HANDMADE BAG MADE OF 3 SECTIONS OF STRIPS OF ABOUT 5 INCHES (APPROX. 13 CM) EACH. IT IS RED WITH BLUE, YELLOW, GREEN, AND RAW MATERIAL ACCENTS. THE TRIM AT THE TOP OF THE BAG IS BLUE WITH A HANDLE OF THE SAME FABRIC ON EITHER SIDE. THERE IS A STRIP OF RAW, NOT PATTERNED FABRIC AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BAG. BOTH SIDES OF THE BAG HAVE THE SAME ARRANGEMENT OF PATTERNED STRIPS. THERE IS ONE SEAM CONNECTING THE FRONT AND THE BACK OF THE BAG ON BOTH SIDES. THE INSIDE IS UNLINED. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. THERE IS SOME STITCHING COMING LOOSE AT VARIOUS POINTS OF THE PATTERNING.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928 THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. A STATEMENT WRITTEN BY MORRIS ATTACHED TO THE BAG STATES THAT THE MATERIAL OF THE BAG ORIGINATES FROM THE 1870S. THE STATEMENT READS: “THIS BAG WAS HAND WOVEN IN STRIPS [THAT WERE USED] TO SEW ON THE BOTTOM OF PETTICOATS. THE GIRLS AT THAT TIME HAD TO HAVE A TROUSEUA [SIC] TO LAST A LIFETIME BECAUSE AFTER MARRIAGE THERE WOULD BE NO TIME TO MAKE CLOTHES SO WHAT THEY MADE WAS STURDY. THEY STARTED ON THEIR TROUSEUS [SIC] AS SOON AS THEY COULD HOLD A NEEDLE. WHEN IT WAS HAYING TIME THE GIRLS WENT OUT INTO THE FIELD TO RAKE THE HAY. THEY WORE PETTICOATS OF LINEN TO WHICH THESE BANDS WERE SEWN. THE LONG SKIRTS WERE PICKED UP AT THE SIDES AND TUCKED INTO THE WAISTBANDS SO THAT THE BOTTOMS OF THE PETTICOATS WERE ON DISPLAY.” “THESE BANDS WERE ORIGINALLY MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER’S WHO CAME OUT OF RUSSIA WITH THE DOUKHOBOR SETTLEMENT IN 1899. THEY WERE PASSED ON TO MY MOTHER, ELIZABETH KONKIN, WHO MADE THEM INTO A BAG IN THE 1940S” THE STRIPS THAT MAKE UP THE BAG SERVED A UTILITARIAN PURPOSE WHEN SEWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PETTICOATS. IN THE INTERVIEW, MORRIS EXPLAINS: “… THESE STRIPS ARE VERY STRONG. THEY’RE LIKE CANVAS. THEY WERE SEWN ONTO THE BOTTOM OF THE LADY’S PETTICOATS AND THEY WORE A SKIRT ON TOP OF THE PETTICOATS. THESE STRIPS LASTED A LIFETIME, IN FACT MORE THAN ONE LIFETIME BECAUSE I’VE GOT THEM NOW. THEY WOULD TUCK THE SKIRTS INTO THEIR WAISTBAND ON THE SIDE SO THEIR PETTICOATS SHOWED AND THEY WERE TRYING TO PRESERVE THEIR SKIRTS NOT TO GET CAUGHT IN THE GRAIN. THE GIRLS LIKED TO WEAR THEM TO SHOW OFF BECAUSE THE BOYS WERE THERE AND THEY ALWAYS WORE THEIR VERY BEST SUNDAY CLOTHES WHEN THEY WENT CUTTING WHEAT OR GRAIN." “[THE FABRIC] CAME FROM RUSSIA. WITH THE AREA WHERE THEY CAME FROM IS NOW GEORGIA AND THEY LIVED ABOUT SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE TURKISH BORDER, THE PRESENT DAY TURKISH BORDER… [THE DOUKHOBORS] CAME TO CANADA IN 1897 AND 1899.” MORRIS EXPLAINS THAT SURPLUS FABRIC WOULD HAVE BEEN BROUGHT TO CANADA FROM RUSSIA BY HER MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER FOR FUTURE USE AND TO AID THE GIRLS IN MAKING THEIR TROUSSEAUS: “THE TROUSSEAU THE GIRLS MADE HAD TO LAST THEM A LIFETIME BECAUSE THEY WOULDN’T HAVE TIME BUT RAISING CHILDREN TO SEWING THINGS. SEWING MACHINES WERE UNKNOWN THEN.” THE BANDS OF FABRIC THAT MAKE UP THE BAG WOULD HAVE BEEN REMAINS NEVER USED FROM ELIZABETH KONKIN’S TROUSSEAU. SHE HAND WOVE THE BAG WHILE SHE WAS LIVING IN SHOULDICE. THE BAG WAS USED BY MORRIS’ MOTHER TO STORE HER KNITTING SUPPLIES. WHEN MORRIS ACQUIRED THE BAG IN THE 1990S, IT MAINTAINED A SIMILAR PURPOSE: “WELL I USED TO CARRY MY STUFF FOR THE WEAVER’S GUILD BUT NOW I DON’T USE IT FOR ANYTHING. IT’S VERY HANDY YOU KNOW IT DOESN’T WEAR OUT.” THERE WAS ONLY ONE BAG MADE OUT OF THESE REMNANTS BY MORRIS’ MOTHER. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003005
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CERAMIC
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
JAPANESE CERAMIC VASE
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1956
Materials
CERAMIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Length
17.5
Diameter
17.5
Description
BLACK AND SILVER GLAZED, CERAMIC VASE WITH RED AND GOLD DESIGNS PAINTED ON OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE VASE. ONE DESIGN SHOWCASES A CRANE FLYING TOWARDS A TREE BRANCH, WHILE THE OTHER SHOWCASES TWO CRANES PERCHED ON A LARGE TREE BRANCH BENEATH A RED DISC/MOON. “MADE IN JAPAN” IS STAMPED INTO BASE OF VASE. CONDITION: THE LIP OF THE VASE HAS A 4.3 CM CHIP AND IS MISSING 7.6 CM ALONG TOP EDGE. LOOSE OF PAINT AND OVERALL FINISH OF DESIGN. SLIGHT CHIPPING AROUND BASE.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
FURNISHINGS
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THAT THIS VASE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” THIS VASE WAS VISIBLE THROUGHOUT MRS. NISHIYAMA’S CHILDHOOD. SHE EXPLAINED, “[THE VASE] WAS MORE AN EVERYDAY THING.” IT WAS PLACED BY THE DOOR OF THE FARM HOUSE. AND “[THE] ONLY THING THAT WAS IN THERE WAS [MY MOTHER’S] UMBRELLA.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S HAIR ORNAMENTS AND COMB ALSO DONATED WITH THE VASE (P20160042002-004). THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042001
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WOUND STRIPE
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1969
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160017001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WOUND STRIPE
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1969
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
3
Length
7.5
Width
4.8
Description
A. COTTON PATCH, 7.5CM LONG X 4.8CM WIDE. GREEN FRONT WITH BLACK BACK, WITH BRASS STRIPE ATTACH IN CENTER. CORNERS OF PATCH ARE CURLING FRONT LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS STAINING; EDGES OF PATCH HAVE HOLES BETWEEN THREADS FROM BEING SEWN ON A UNIFORM. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BRASS STRIPE, 4.3CM LONG. BRASS STRIPE SECURED TO FRONT OF CLOTH PATCH; STRIPE HAS CHEVRON PATTERN ENGRAVED ON FRONT; BACK HAS HOOK FOR INSERTING INTO PATCH. STRIPE HAS MINOR TARNISHING ALONG EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. METAL BACKING, 5.5CM LONG X 1.2CM WIDE. SILVER METAL BACKING FOR BRASS STRIPE, WITH ROUNDED ENDS AND HOLES CUT THROUGH ENDS. HOOK ON BACK OF STRIPE IS FASTENED TO HOLE AT THE END OF THE BACKING. METAL SHOWS SIGNS OF WEAR AND MINOR TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (FIRST WORLD WAR) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (SECOND WORLD WAR AND POST-WAR). ON HIS FATHER’S, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH RECALLED, “I THINK THAT THE WAR WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE BEST THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO MY DAD. HE NEVER SPOKE ABOUT IT MUCH, BUT THE FRIENDSHIPS THAT HE DEVELOPED THROUGH HIS CONTACTS IN THE WAR WENT ON RIGHT UNTIL HIS DEATH…IT’S PROBABLY LIKE BEING ON A TEAM, YOU KNOW, AND I THINK IT’S THAT FELLOWSHIP YOU GET FROM RELYING ON PEOPLE, AND TRAINING WITH PEOPLE, AND GETTING THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING. I THINK THAT’S SORT OF A BIG PART OF IT.” “THE ONLY STORIES THAT I EVER REMEMBER HIM TELLING ME WAS, THEY WERE IN LONDON, AND THEY CLIMBED UP A CHURCH TOWER—IT WAS TWIN TOWERS ON THIS CHURCH…I WAS LOOKING AT A PICTURE OF IT IN A BOOK, AND HE SAYS, YES, THAT HE AND A COUPLE OF GUYS WERE ON LEAVE, AND THEY CLIMBED UP TO THE TOP OF THIS TOWER—THEY HAD TO SQUIRM THEIR WAY TO THE TOP, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, THE AIR RAID SIRENS WENT, AND THEY WERE HUSTLING TO GET DOWN, AND THEY GOT DOWN TO THE STREET, AND THE OTHER SPIRE WAS GONE. THERE’S THAT, AND I DID ASK HIM WHAT HAPPENED TO HIM WHEN HE GOT WOUNDED. HE DIDN’T GO INTO VERY MUCH DETAIL ON IT, BUT JUST SAID THAT THEY WERE OUT ON A SORTIE—HE WAS A FORWARD OBSERVATION OFFICER…THAT’S A WICKED JOB BECAUSE YOU’RE IN FRONT OF EVERYBODY, AND HE SAID, HE HEARD A BURST OF MACHINE-GUN. THEY STARTED RUNNING DOWN THIS ROAD, AND THEY USED TO SKIP THE BULLETS DOWN THIS ROAD, APPARENTLY, AND THOSE GERMAN MACHINE-GUNS WERE 10 SHOTS FOR EVERY BROWNING—AND HE SAID, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HAD A BURNING IN HIS LEG AND HE HOPPED ALONG, AND THAT WAS IT. IT DAMAGED HIS LEG SO BADLY THAT HE COULDN’T GO BACK, SO THOSE ARE THE TWO STORIES. OTHER THAN THAT, I THINK HE TALKED ABOUT, ONE [OTHER] DAY, BECAUSE I FOUND THESE PHOTOS. I THINK HE EITHER HID THEM OR GOT RID OF THEM LATER, AND IT WAS BLACK-AND-WHITE PHOTOS OF A CONCENTRATION CAMP, AND I THINK HE SAID IT WAS BERGEN-BELSEN, BECAUSE BERGEN-BELSEN WAS IN LOWER GERMANY…HE SAID THEY HAD TO DON GAS-MASKS WHEN THEY WERE ABOUT 5 MILES AWAY, BECAUSE THEY HAD EXHUMED EVERYTHING, AND THAT WAS IT. I WAS PROBABLY ABOUT 10 OR 12 WHEN HE TOLD ME THAT ONE. I HAD NIGHTMARES FOR A LONG TIME – LOOKING AT THAT.” “AFTER HIS FUNERAL SERVICE, EVERYBODY CAME BACK TO THE HOUSE AND MY UNCLE, HUGHIE CRAIG, [FROM] FORT MACLEOD, WE WERE SITTING IN THE LIVING ROOM, AND HE SAID, 'HAS ANYBODY GOT ANY STORIES ABOUT REED?' THIS WAS MY UNCLE, WHO WAS A COLD IRISH-ENGLISH GUY. NOBODY DID, AND HE SAID THAT THEY WERE IN BELGIUM SOMEWHERE, AND HUGHIE WAS AN ELECTRICIAN SO HE WAS WITH…THE CALGARY SIGNAL CORP…HE WAS AT AN INTERSECTION…THERE’S A CONVOY COMING THROUGH, CANADIAN CONVOY. HE’S SITTING IN THE JEEP WITH HIS DRIVER, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HEARS THIS 'HUGHIE, HUGHIE.' HE LOOKS UP, AND HERE’S MY DAD. HE BROKE OUT; CAME OVER TO HUGHIE AND SAID, 'WE’RE IN A HOTEL FIVE MILES UP THE ROAD HERE.' HE SAYS, 'WHY DON’T I COME BACK AND GET YOU FOR DINNER?' SO, HE DROVE BACK; PICKED UP HUGHIE; THEY WENT AND HAD DINNER. HUGHIE…WAS A CAPTAIN AT THAT TIME—SO HE HAD FIVE OR SIX GUYS WITH HIS GROUP. CAME BACK. THEY WERE ALL DEAD. SHOT UP BY THE GERMANS…[I] NEVER HEARD THAT ONE FROM MY DAD.” “WE MOVED [FROM FORT MACLEOD TO MEDICINE HAT] IN 1959…AND I THINK DAD WAS THE [COMMANDER OF THE SALLY HORSE IN MEDICINE HAT] FROM ’64 TO ’68. I’M PRETTY SURE THOSE WERE THE YEARS, SO IT WAS FIVE YEARS, WHERE YOU WAIT YOUR CHANCE/YOU WAIT YOUR OPPORTUNITY; PROVE YOURSELF; AND THEN UP YOU GO.” “[HIS SERVICE] DEFINITELY GOES INTO THE LATE ‘60S. HE WAS STILL SORT OF ACTIVE IN LETHBRIDGE. I’M NOT SURE EXACTLY IN WHAT FUNCTION MILITARILY, BUT HE DID GO TO EVENTS THAT OCCURRED.” “HE SAVED EVERYTHING THOUGH…[THE UNIFORM AND APPEARANCE ASPECT WAS] PROBABLY A BIG PART OF [HIS MILITARY EXPERIENCE].” “[DAD] HAD A PRETTY GOOD LIBRARY. HE WAS FAIRLY WELL-READ. HE KNEW A LOT ABOUT CANADIAN MILITARY HISTORY. I KNOW THAT FOR SURE. ONE THING I KNOW HE WAS PROUD OF WAS THAT TWICE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE WON THE WORTHINGTON TROPHY, WHICH WAS, I THINK, FOR THE BEST MILITIA IN CANADA….HE WAS THE…AIDE-DE-CAMP FOR [GRANT MACEWAN] FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS. I KNOW PRINCESS ALEXANDRA, WHO WAS THE QUEEN’S COUSIN, PRESENTED THE GUIDON TO THEM UP HERE, ACTUALLY, IT WAS…OVER AT THE CURRIE BARRACKS…IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1967 OR SOMETHING.” “I KNOW WE VERY SELDOM WENT ON FAMILY HOLIDAYS BECAUSE HE USUALLY TOOK THE HOLIDAYS THAT HE GOT, AND HE’D EITHER GO TO SHILO, OR HE’D GO UP HERE, AND THEY SPENT A LOT OF TIME OUT AT SUFFIELD, ON THE RANGE OUT THERE, SO HOLIDAYS WERE TIED INTO THAT. WHEN HE WAS LIEUTENANT-COLONEL, THAT WAS ALMOST LIKE A FULL-TIME JOB…WE NEVER SAW HIM. HE WOULD BE TRAVELING ON THE ROAD, AND THEN HE’D COME HOME, I THINK IT WAS THURSDAY NIGHT. THURSDAY NIGHT WAS…YOUNG SOLDIERS…AND THEN TUESDAY NIGHT WAS WHEN THE OFFICERS AND THE NCO’S WOULD DO SOMETHING, SO THOSE TWO NIGHTS WERE TAKEN UP. SATURDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE. SUNDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE…HE PUT IN 40 HOURS A WEEK OR MORE DOING THAT, AS A JOB, AS WELL AS HIS JOB AS AN INSURANCE SALESMAN.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “I THINK [THE OBJECTS ARE] A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS]…IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT.” THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, HE MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, HE WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO BRANCH MANAGER OF CANADA LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, IN 1969 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. HE WAS A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC LODGE, LODGE OF PERFECTION, ROSE CROIX, CONSISTORY, SHRINE, ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR, AND SERVED AS THE MASTER OF THE LODGE OF PERFECTION UNTIL 1977. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, REED AINSCOUGH WAS ALSO ACTIVE WITH THE FORT MACLEOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LIONS’ CLUB, HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND FORT MACLEOD MUSEUM DURING HIS TIME LIVING IN FORT MACLEOD. IN MEDICINE HAT, AISNCOUGH SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THE HEART AND STROKE ASSOCIATION, AND ACTED AS A SENATOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE UPON MOVING TO THE CITY. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FAMILY MILITARY SERVICE FILES, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017001
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PIN CARD W / ASSORTED PINS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1993
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, PAPER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160017004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PIN CARD W / ASSORTED PINS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1993
Materials
FELT, PAPER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
14.8
Width
13.4
Description
GREY CARDBOARD PIN CARD LINED WITH RED FELT ON FRONT, IN THE SHAPE OF A MAPLE LEAF. PIN CARD HAS PINS ATTACHED INCLUDING: “LIONS INTERNATIONAL” SERVICE PIN COMPRISED OF GOLD SHIELD WITH VIOLET CENTER AND GOLD “L”, WITH RED, WHITE, AND BLUE CHEVRON BELOW SHIELD AND THREE VIOLET CHEVRONS BELOW, WITH BRASS BACKING; BOY SCOUTS PIN COMPRISED OF UNPAINTED FLEUR DE LIS ON YELLOW BACKGROUND WITH GREEN BANNER BELOW AND TEXT “GROUP COMMITTEE”, WITH TARNISHED SILVER BACKING; SECOND DIVISION OFFICERS MILITARY PIN OF VIOLET WITH SYMBOL OF “C” WITH TWO LINES THROUGH IT ON FRONT, WITH BRASS BACKING; TARNISHED “GENERAL SERVICE” PIN COMPRISED OF SHIELD WITH THREE MAPLE LEAVES ON FRONT AND TEXT “GENERAL SERVICE” ALONG LOWER EDGE OF SHIELD, WITH BRASS BACKING; ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION 25 YEARS PIN COMPRISED OF GOLD SHIELD WITH WHITE CENTER AND RED MAPLE LEAF, WITH GOLD “25” ON MAPLE LEAF, AND VIOLET BANNER BELOW WITH GOLD TEXT “LEGION”, WITH BRASS BACKING; ROTARY CLUB PIN COMPRISED OF GOLD WHEEL WITH VIOLET RING AROUND OUTER EDGE OF WHEEL AND GOLD TEXT “ROTARY INTERNATIONAL”, WITH GOLD BACKING; CANADIAN HEART ASSOCIATION PIN COMPRISED OF GOLD HEART WITH RED FRONT, WHITE MAPLE LEAF IN CENTER, AND BLACK TORCH WITH YELLOW FLAME ON LEAF, WITH NO BACKING; ALBERTA CIVIEL DEFENSE PIN COMPRISED OF ALBERTA SHIELD BETWEEN GOLD LETTERS ON VIOLET BACKGROUNDS “C” AND “D”, WITH BRASS BACKING; TARNISHING DOMINION LEGION PIN COMPRISED OF ROUND SHIELD WITH BLUE AND RED BRITISH FLAG IN CENTER WITH MAPLE LEAF OVERLAID, AND TEXT AROUND EDGES “DOMINION GENERAL SERVICE LEAGUE, CANADIAN, LEGION”, WITH BRASS BACKING; SMALL MASONIC PIN COMPRISED OF MASONIC COMPASS WITH VIOLET CENTER AND EMBOSSED “G”, WITH SILVER BACKING; GOLD LIONS CLUB PAST PRESIDENT PIN COMPRISED OF GOLD SHIELD WITH VIOLET CENTER, EMBOSSED “L” AND GOLD BANNER ACROSS FRONT WITH TEXT “PAST PRES” AND TEXT EMBOSSED AT TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES OF SHIELD “LIONS CLUB”, PIN HAS ATTACHMENT OF GOLD BANNER WITH EMBOSSED TEXT “100% ATTENDANCE” AND SHIELD BELOW BANNER WITH WHITE BACKGROUND AND GOLD TEXT “20”, WITH SILVER BACKING. CARDBOARD BACKING ON CARD IS PEELING IN LOWER RIGHT CORNERS; BACK HAS CUTS DOWN RIGHT AND LEFT EDGES; STEM OF MAPLE LEAF IS SEVERELY CREASED AND BENT. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (FIRST WORLD WAR) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (SECOND WORLD WAR AND POST-WAR). THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, HE MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, HE WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO BRANCH MANAGER OF CANADA LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, IN 1969 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. REED AINSCOUGH WAS A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC LODGE, LODGE OF PERFECTION, ROSE CROIX, CONSISTORY, SHRINE, ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR, AND SERVED AS THE MASTER OF THE LODGE OF PERFECTION UNTIL 1977. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, REED AINSCOUGH WAS ALSO ACTIVE WITH THE FORT MACLEOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LIONS’ CLUB, HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND FORT MACLEOD MUSEUM DURING HIS TIME LIVING IN FORT MACLEOD. IN MEDICINE HAT, AISNCOUGH SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THE HEART AND STROKE ASSOCIATION, AND ACTED AS A SENATOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE UPON MOVING TO THE CITY. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “I THINK [THE OBJECTS ARE] A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS]…IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FAMILY MILITARY SERVICE FILES, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017004
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
32 DEGREE SCOTTSH RITE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1993
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD, COTTON, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20160017005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
32 DEGREE SCOTTSH RITE
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1993
Materials
GOLD, COTTON, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
39
Width
14.3
Description
GOLD MEDAL ATTACHED TO RED COLLAR RIBBON WITH GOLD BORDERS. MEDAL SHAPED AT GOLD CROSS WITH CROSS PAINTED RED. CENTER OF CROSS HAS FOUR GOLD TRIANGLES SURROUNDING CIRCULAR CENTER PIECE; CENTER PIECE HAS LAUREL BRANCHES AROUND A BLUE BACKGROUND WITH “32” IN PAINTED IN GOLD. MEDAL IS ATTACHED TO COLLAR RIBBON WITH BRASS RINGS. COLLAR RIBBON HAS SILVER RING AND HOOK FOR SECURING RIBBON; BACK OF RIBBON IS WHITE WITH GOLD BORDERS. BACK OF MEDAL IS GOLD. RIBBON HAS MINOR CREASING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (FIRST WORLD WAR) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (SECOND WORLD WAR AND POST-WAR). THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, HE MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, HE WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO BRANCH MANAGER OF CANADA LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, IN 1969 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. REED AINSCOUGH WAS A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC LODGE, LODGE OF PERFECTION, ROSE CROIX, CONSISTORY, SHRINE, ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR, AND SERVED AS THE MASTER OF THE LODGE OF PERFECTION UNTIL 1977. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, REED AINSCOUGH WAS ALSO ACTIVE WITH THE FORT MACLEOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LIONS’ CLUB, HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND FORT MACLEOD MUSEUM DURING HIS TIME LIVING IN FORT MACLEOD. IN MEDICINE HAT, AISNCOUGH SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THE HEART AND STROKE ASSOCIATION, AND ACTED AS A SENATOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE UPON MOVING TO THE CITY. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “I THINK [THE OBJECTS ARE] A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS]…IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FAMILY MILITARY SERVICE FILES, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017005
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1961
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, STONE, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20150016002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1961
Materials
METAL, STONE, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Height
32.5
Diameter
12.5
Description
AWARD TROPHY, “ALL-CANADA TV STATION SHOWMANSHIP AWARD BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING CJLH-TV LETHBRIDGE, ALTA. 1960-61”. CAST METAL PEBBLED, LAUREL LEAF BASE, FINISHED IN GOLD. PEDESTAL CONSTRUCTED OF WOOD AND POLISHED STONE. GREEN FELT BOTTOM. VERY GOOD CONDITION. GOLD FINISH SCUFFED IN SOME AREAS WITH SOME SCRATCHES ON THE BASE AND DUST BUILD UP. MINOR LOSS TO THE BLACK PAINT AROUND THE BASE AND SLIGHT WEAR TO THE FELT BOTTOM.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
PROFESSIONS
History
EVERAL HORHOZER (NÉE SUPINA) WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN THE YEAR OF 1927 TO HER PARENTS DONAH (NÉE HILL) AND NICHOLAS SUPINA. SUPINA WAS THE OWNER OF SUPINA’S MERCANTILE ON 13TH STREET NORTH, LETHBRIDGE. COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A SERIES OF INTERVIEWS (ON APRIL 2, APRIL 16, AND MAY 7, 2015) WITH HORHOZER REGARDING A GROUP OF ARTIFACTS SHE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE INFORMATION BELOW HAS COME FROM THESE INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE HORHOZER FAMILY AND THE COUNTRY CAPERS - TO WHOM THE TROPHY WAS AWARDED IN 1961. EVERAL MET JOE HORHOZER WHEN HE CAME TO SUPINA’S TO WORK. SHE REMEMBERS: “I WORKED IN THE LADIESWEAR. I LIKED THAT VERY MUCH. THE MEAT DEPARTMENT WAS RIGHT ACROSS FROM THE LADIESWEAR. THAT’S KIND OF HOW I MET JOE. HE WORKED IN THE BUTCHER DEPARTMENT. I REMEMBER THE DAY HE WALKED IN THE STORE, I’LL NEVER FORGET [IT], HE HAD THIS RED CARDIGAN SWEATER ON AND I JUST FELL, HEAD OVER RIGHT THEN. HE WAS JUST STARTING WORK AND I THOUGHT, ‘WELL, THAT’S THE GUY I’M GOING TO MARRY.” THIS TROPHY IS REPRESENTATIVE OF JOE HORHOZER’S TIME AS PART OF THE MUSICAL GROUP CALLED THE COUNTRY CAPERS. PRIOR TO THAT, HE WAS A PART OF THE MUSICAL GROUP, THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. THE GROUP FORMED IN 1937 AND HAD SEEN SUCCESS ON BOTH THE LOCAL AND NATIONAL LEVELS. AROUND 1955, THE GROUP HAD SLOWED DOWN FROM THEIR TOURING SCHEDULE, AS A RESULT HORHOZER AND A FELLOW BAND MEMBER, REMO BACEDA, WERE ABLE TO JOIN A GROUP FORMING IN LETHBRIDGE THAT CAME TO BE THE 'COUNTRY CAPERS.' THIS GROUP CONSISTED OF THE POTTS FAMILY ON VOCALS, EDDIE, BETTY (WAGGONTAIL), AND TWINS SHIRLEY ANN (PETRAK) AND SHARON (SCOVILLE), AS WELL AS DONN PETRAL ON VOCALS AND GUITAR, HERB URANO ON BASS, REMO BACEDA ON FIDDLE, AND HORHOZER WITH HIS ACCORDION. HORHOZER SAYS OF THAT TIME, “WELL, THE POTTS ALWAYS SIGNED TOGETHER. THERE WERE THREE SISTERS AND THEN EDDIE, THE BROTHER, AND THEY WERE VERY GOOD SINGERS, BUT THEY WANTED SOMEBODY THAT WAS PROFESSIONAL TO KIND OF TEACH THEM HOW TO SING IN HARMONY. REMO WAS GOOD AT THAT ‘CAUSE HE WAS THE HEAD OF A CHOIR AND [KNEW] HOW TO DO GROUP MUSIC, ‘CAUSE [THE POTTS] WERE GREEN. THEY DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING. THEN THEY WOULD PRACTICE AND PRACTICE TOGETHER, AND THEN DONN PETRAK, I GUESS, GOT THE RADIO STATION TO HIRE THEM. THEY’VE GOT TO -THEY’VE GOT TO HEAR YOU PLAY FIRST, SO THEY HAD THIS BAND CALLED THE COUNTRY CAPERS AND THEY ALL PLAYED TOGETHER FOR QUITE A LONG TIME ON THE RADIO. I THINK THEY WERE ON THE RADIO FOR MAYBE TWO YEARS OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT – CJOC.” HORHOZER’S DAUGHTER, MELODEE “MEL” MUTCH, WHO WAS ALSO IN THE ROOM FOR THE INTERVIEWS WITH MACLEAN, ADDED, “… IT WAS A TELEVISION SHOW. THAT’S WHAT THEY WERE KNOWN FOR.” ON MARCH 1, 1998, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD’S “THE WAY WE WERE” COLUMN FEATURED A HISTORY OF THE COUNTRY CAPERS WRITTEN BY GARRY ALLISON. THIS ARTICLE STATES, “THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE FEATURED ON CJOC RADIO WITH THEIR OWN SHOW AND ON CJLH-TV FOR FIVE YEARS. THEY ALSO TRAVELED TO CALGARY EACH WEEK FOR A CROSS-CANADA RADIO SHOW ON CBC IN 1958. THEIR LOCALLY-PRODUCED TV SHOW WAS SHOWN EACH TUESDAY NIGHT AT FIRST, THEN LATER ON THURSDAY NIGHT.” CJLH-TV WON SEVEN LIBERTY MAGAZINE AWARDS IN TOTAL DURING THE 1950S AND 1960S. THESE AWARDS INCLUDED THE 1960 – 1961 AWARD FOR BEST LOCAL PROGRAMMING, WHICH THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE A PART OF, AND IN 1962 THE COUNTRY CAPERS WERE PRESENTED WITH THE AWARD FOR BEST STATION MUSIC SHOW. HORHOZER REMEMBERS: “TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT [THE TROPHY], EXCEPT THIS IS WHEN THEY PLAYED ON TV, THEY ALWAYS GIVE AN AWARD FOR THE BEST MUSICAL BAND ON TV OR SOMETHING. THAT’S WHEN THEY GOT THAT." FOR AN ARTICLE WRITTEN ABOUT JOE HORHOZER IN 2002 FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, JOE STATED, “[MUSIC’S] MY LIFE – OUTSIDE OF MY FAMILY. [WITHOUT IT], I’D BE LOST.” MUTCH REAFFIRMS HER FATHER’S STATEMENT BY SAYING, “… HIS HANDS WERE ALWAYS TAPPING. HE WAS ALWAYS TAPPING. YOU COULD SEE THAT IN HIS HEAD. PLUS HE HELD DOWN A FULL TIME JOB. AND WHEN THEY NEEDED ENTERTAINMENT – LIKE GARY KIRK. GOSH, IT’S GOT TO BE 50 YEARS AGO, SAID TO MY DAD AND BUCK, 'WOULD YOU COME DOWN TO PLAY AT THIS CABIN?' – LONG LOST RANCH, OR WHEREVER THEY WERE HAVING A FAMILY REUNION – SO THEY WERE THE ENTERTAINMENT. HE WAS … SOUGHT-AFTER, LET’S PUT IT THAT WAY. AND WHEN HE WOULD PLAY MUSIC UNTIL YOU’D WANT TO THROW UP. HE’D COME HOME FROM A DANCE; POUR HIMSELF ANOTHER ONE; AND THEN THE RECORDS WOULD START TO COME OUT. THAT IS HOW THE NIGHT WENT. I’D EVEN COME HOME SOME NIGHTS AND MY MOM AND DAD WOULD BE DANCING. WHEN YOU ARE A TEENAGER, THAT’S HORRIFIC. SO, THERE IS THE HENDERSON LAKE HOTEL, WHATEVER – THE DANCE HALL. THAT WAS VERY MUCH A PART OF THEIR LIVES AS WELL.” JOE HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON OCTOBER 21, 2010 AT THE AGE OF 89 YEARS. HORHOZER WAS THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS. EVERAL HORHOZER PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE 6 YEARS LATER ON JUNE 6, 2016 AT THE AGE OF 88 YEARS. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE COUNTRY CAPERS, THE ALBERTA RANCH BOYS, AND THE LIFE OF EVERAL AND HER FAMILY, WHICH INCLUDES THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150016002
Acquisition Date
2015-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BOXING TROPHY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Catalogue Number
P20150015000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BOXING TROPHY
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
No. Pieces
1
Height
35.5
Length
32
Width
8.9
Description
BOXING TROPHY WITH A COPPER-FINISHED BOXER ON A WOODEN PEDESTAL FLANKED BY COPPER GLOVERS ON INDEPENDENT WOOD PEDESTALS. THE TROPHY IS MARKED “COMPETITION IN MEMORY OF F/O (FLIGHT OFFICER) SYD & JACK EMERY RCAF SOUTH ALBERTA ELIMINATIONS”. THERE IS A WOOD BASE WITH FIVE COPPER-FINISHED BADGES ATTACHED IN A ROW ACROSS THE FRONT. THE FIRST TWO READ “1950” AND “1960”. THE LAST THREE ARE BLANK. GOOD – VERY GOOD CONDITION. SLIGHT LOSS OF COPPER FINISH ON THE BOXER AND BOXING GLOVES. SLIGHT LOSS OF WOOD FINISH IN VARIOUS AREAS OVERALL. THE LEFT PEDESTAL IS SLIGHTLY LOOSE AND THE RIGHT IS VERY LOOSE.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
SPORTS
ASSOCIATIONS
History
THIS BOXING TROPHY THAT WAS GIVEN IN HONOUR OF TWO BROTHERS, SYD AND JACK EMERY, WHO LOST THEIR LIVES IN WORLD WAR II. THE BOYS WERE COMPETITIVE BOXERS IN LETHBRIDGE PRIOR TO THE WAR AND THEIR FATHER, JOHN LIONEL “JACK” EMERY (C. 1890-1976) WAS A LARGE PART OF THE BOXING COMMUNITY IN LETHBRIDGE INCLUDING ACTING AS PRESIDENT OF THE LETHBRIDGE AMATEUR BOXING CLUB BEGINNING IN 1951. ON OCTOBER 9, 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH DONOR, DORINDA EMERY, WHO IS THE BIOLOGICAL DAUGHTER OF THE YOUNGER JACK EMERY AND THE STEP DAUGHTER OF THE YOUNGEST EMERY BROTHER, JAMES “JIM” EMERY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: WHEN ASKED ABOUT HOW SHE CAME TO POSSESS THE TROPHY, EMERY STATES: “WELL, IT’S BEEN IN MY PARENTS’ BASEMENT FOR SOME TIME AND WHEN MY LAST PARENT DIED – MY DAD - TWO YEARS AGO. WE WERE PACKING UP THE HOUSE [AND] I FOUND THE TROPHY IN THE BASEMENT… I WAS VERY AWARE [OF THE TROPHY GROWING UP]. IT USED TO BE GIVEN OUT EVERY YEAR, AND THEN I THINK THAT SORT OF DIED OUT IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THEN IT CAME BACK TO THE HOUSE. I DON’T KNOW [FOR SURE], ‘CAUSE I CAN’T REMEMBER. I GOT THE PICTURES OF MY GRANDFATHER AND HE IS THE ALBERTA SPORTS HALL OF FAME AND HE’S IN THE LETHBRIDGE SPORTS HALL OF FAME. DORINDA BELIEVES THIS TROPHY IS A REMINDER “THAT MY FAMILY DID CONTRIBUTE AND DID MAKE SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF LETHBRIDGE… MY GRANDFATHER (JOHN LIONEL “JACK” EMERY) WAS A GREAT PROPONENT OF AMATEUR SPORTS AND THOUGHT THAT THE SPORT ELEMENT WAS VERY IMPORTANT FOR KIDS TO PARTICIPATE IN REGARDLESS OF THEIR ATHLETIC LEVELS, BUT ALSO TO ACKNOWLEDGE THOSE WHO EXCELLED.” DORINDA DISCUSSES GROWING UP IN THE EMERY HOUSEHOLD: “I GREW UP WITH [MY GRANDFATHER]. I GREW UP IN A THREE GENERATIONAL HOUSE. SO MY MOTHER BROUGHT ME FROM ENGLAND AND WE LIVED WITH MY FATHER’S PARENTS AND THAT’S JACK… SO I CAME FROM ENGLAND IN 1946 AND WE STAYED IN LETHBRIDGE EVER AFTER… MY MOTHER MARRIED MY REAL FATHER’S BROTHER WHEN I WAS 7. SO JAMES IS ACTUALLY MY UNCLE AND MY DAD…WELL [MY GRANDFATHER] WAS A BIT OF A CURMUDGEON IN A LOT OF WAYS, EX-NAVY. HE HAD BEEN TORPEDOED IN WORLD WAR I, AND THEY CAME TO CANADA RIGHT IN THE DEPRESSION, AND SO THINGS WERE NOT ALWAYS EASY FOR THE FAMILY. MY OLDEST UNCLE, SID, WHO WAS THEIR OLDEST CHILD, WAS BORN IN ENGLAND, BUT THEN JACK OR JOHN – WHO WAS ALSO MY REAL FATHER – AND JIM AND DORIS WERE ALL BORN IN CANADA. THEY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, WHERE MY DAD WAS BORN AND RAISED. [MY DAD] REMEMBERS THE DAYS WHEN ANYTHING PAST 10TH AVENUE SOUTH IN LETHBRIDGE WAS BALD PRAIRIE AND SPENDING MUCH TIME AS CHILDREN ENTERTAINING THEMSELVES IN THE PRAIRIES AND COULEES.” EMERY GOES ON TO DESCRIBE HER GRANDFATHER’S COMMITMENT TO BOXING IN LETHBRIDGE: “HE FORMED THE ALBERTA AMATEUR SPORTS – AMATEUR BOXING ASSOCIATION. HE WAS VERY HIGH UP IN THE BOXING AND WRESTLING IN ALBERTA BACK IN THE ‘50S. HE WAS ON THE COMMISSION FOR BOXING AND WRESTLING IN ALBERTA. HE’S IN THE SPORTS HALL OF FAME… HE WAS VERY MUCH 'THE MAN’S MAN,' AND I THINK HE FELT IT WAS A GENTLEMEN’S SPORT RATHER THAN A ROUGHIAN’S SPORT. HE FELT THAT THERE WAS AN ART IN A WAY OF DEFENDING YOURSELF.” “KAI YIP WAS STILL ACTIVE IN BOXING WHEN I LEFT LETHBRIDGE 3 YEARS AGO. AND KAI KNEW MY GRANDFATHER EXCEPTIONALLY WELL. IN FACT, I THINK THAT IN LOTS OF CASES, GRANDAD HAD CLOSER RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE YOUNG ONES HE WAS FOSTERING IN BOXING THAN HE DID HIS OWN FAMILY… JUST THE NATURE OF HIM, YOU KNOW. VERY BRITISH, VERY UPRIGHT. IF SOMEONE DIDN’T SHARE HIS PASSION FOR BOXING, THEY WEREN’T QUITE THE SAME IN HIS ESTIMATION… HE ENCOURAGED A LOT OF RECREATIONAL ACTIVITY IN HIS KIDS. MY AUNT DORIS WAS A RUNNER. TO HIM THAT WAS AN IMPORTANT, SPORTS WERE IMPORTANT.” JACK EMERY’S INVOLVEMENT IN BOXING WAS AN ACT OF COMMUNITY SERVICE RATHER THAN PROFESSIONAL. THE TOPIC OF BOXING WAS PREVALENT IN THE EMERY HOUSEHOLD: “IT WOULD BE THE TOPIC OF CONVERSATION. WE ALWAYS HAD FAMILY DINNERS. THAT WAS WHEN FAMILIES ACTUALLY ATE TOGETHER 2 OR 3 TIMES A DAY. AND IT WAS ALWAYS A GREAT TOPIC, WHO WAS DOING WHAT AND WHO HE WAS DEVELOPING OR WHAT WAS GOING ON WITH THE BOXING AND WRESTLING COMMISSION. BUT HE WAS ALSO INTENSELY INTERESTED IN POLITICS. WE WERE A FAMILY WITH GREAT DISCUSSIONS DURING MEALTIMES. PLUS HE WOULD BE OFF AND HE’D END UP AT THE LEGION AND WE’D GO AND PULL HIM [OUT] - THE ARMY AND NAVY WAS HIS FAVORITE HANGOUT. HE [WAS] VERY INVOLVED IN THAT, AS WELL. HE LIKED HIS EX-MILITARY CONNECTIONS. HE LOST TWO SONS TO THE WAR, THE SECOND WORLD WAR. [HE] SAW THAT AS A PATRIOTIC DUTY IN LOTS OF WAYS. WHATEVER HE WAS INTERESTED IN, HE WAS INTENSELY DEVOTED TO IT, BUT HE NEVER EARNED MONEY FROM IT AT ALL.” FROM HER GRANDFATHER, EMERY HAS LEARNED: “WELL PROBABLY JUST MY WILLINGNESS TO TRY AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN A COMMUNITY AND CERTAINLY A WILLINGNESS TO DISCUSS ISSUES. TO ME, THE GREATEST THING I LEARNED FROM MY GRANDFATHER WAS DEBATE AND QUESTIONING, AND COMING TO YOUR OWN CONCLUSIONS ABOUT WHAT WAS RIGHT FOR YOU. ‘CAUSE I CAN REMEMBER THE FIRST TIME I EVER WON A REAL, ONE OF OUR LUNCH HOUR DEBATES AND I FELT EXTREMELY VIRTUOUS, AND THEN I FELT ALMOST SORRY BECAUSE HE WAS VERY, VERY GOOD AT HAVING DISCUSSIONS.” REFLECTING ON THE LIFE OF THE EMERY FAMILY, EMERY SAYS, “I THINK THAT, YOU KNOW, THE FAMILY WAS ONE THAT HAD A LOT OF VERY INCREDIBLE CHALLENGES AND A LOT OF GRIEF AND DISAPPOINTMENT, AND YET THEY STILL HAD THE SPIRIT TO TRY AND FIND A WAY TO MAKE THOSE LOSES SIGNIFICANT AND BRING SOME KIND OF LASTING CONTRIBUTION.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN TAKEN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S DIGITIZED COLLECTION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH.” JOHN LIONEL (JACK) EMERY WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE TO HIS FATHER BEARING THE SAME NAME AND MOTHER, CECILIA EMERY. HE WENT TO FLEETWOOD SCHOOL AND LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE. HE COMPETED IN BOXING AND WORKED AS A JUNIOR CLERK AT THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA PRIOR TO ENLISTING IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE (RCAF) IN 1941. HE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM IN 1943 WHERE HE WAS ATTACHED TO THE 405 SQUADRON RCAF. HE SERVED FOR SIXTEEN MONTHS ON A LANCASTER AS A NAVIGATOR AND A BOMB AIMER. ON JUNE 11, 1944, FLYING OFFICER EMERY WAS PART OF AN ALL-CANADIAN CREW IN A LANCASTER DETAILED TO BOMB THE VERSAILLES MARSHALLING YARD. THE AIRCRAFT WAS SHOT DOWN BY ENEMY AIRCRAFT AND HEAVY GROUND FIRE. SIX OF THE EIGHT MEN ON THE AIRCRAFT WERE KILLED, INCLUDING EMERY. HE WAS LAID TO REST IN A COLLECTIVE GRAVE AT AUNEAU COMMUNAL CEMETERY. FURTHER INFORMATION ON “LETHBRIDGE CENOTAPH” DISCUSSES JACK’S OLDER BROTHER, SYDNEY JAMES EMERY. HE WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE TO JACK (C.1890-1976) AND CECILIA EMERY, AND WENT TO THE SAME SCHOOLS AS HIS BROTHER, JACK. “HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED BOXER, HOLDING THREE ALBERTA CHAMPIONSHIPS AND TWICE CONTENDING FOR THE DOMINION TITLE. AT THE TIME OF ENLISTMENT, HE WAS SINGLE AND TRAINING AS A PILOT FOR TRANS-CANADA AIRLINES. HE ENLISTED FOR SERVICE IN THE RCAF IN 1941, AND AFTER TRAINING IN CANADA TO RECEIVE HIS PILOT’S WINGS AND A PROMOTION TO FLYING OFFICER, HE ARRIVED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM IN 1943. THERE, HE WAS ATTACHED TO THE 177 SQUADRON RCAF. THE SQUADRON WAS DEPLOYED TO A BASE IN INDIA IN NOVEMBER OF 1943... ON OCTOBER 17, 1944, EMERY AND HIS NAVIGATOR WERE FLYING A COMBAT MISSION OVER BURMA WHEN THEIR AIRCRAFT CRASHED INTO A HILLSIDE. THEIR SQUADRON WAS ABLE TO LOCATE THE WRECKAGE AND MARK THE MEN’S GRAVES, HOWEVER, FOLLOWING THE WAR THE GRAVES COULD NOT BE RE-LOCATED. THEY ARE REMEMBERED AT THE SINGAPORE MEMORIAL FOR THE MISSING. JACK (C.1890-1976) AND CECILIA HAD TWO OTHER CHILDREN, JAMES (JIM) FREDRICK AND DORIS EMERY. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150015000
Acquisition Date
2017-04
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

22 records – page 1 of 2.