Skip header and navigation

120 records – page 1 of 6.

Date Range From
1961
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, BRASS, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190011002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1961
Date Range To
1965
Materials
METAL, BRASS, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
5
Width
1.5
Description
BRASS METAL BROOCH WITH BAR-PIN CLASP; BROOCH HAS GOLD-COLOURED RECTANGULAR BAR FOR FRONT, WITH BLUE CROSS IN CENTER. CROSS HAS GOLD BANNER RUNNING ACROSS THE FRONT WITH BLUE TEXT “S M H”. BACK OF BROOCH HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “STER 3 OF G, G.F.”. BROOCH HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND POSTS OF BAR-PIN AND ON BACK OF CROSS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE BROOCH, KIMERY RECALLED, “YOU [GOT THE BROOCH] AFTER YOUR FIRST YEAR. IT’S CALLED A BANDING BARRING CEREMONY AND IT FASTENED AT THE TOP OF YOUR COLLAR OF YOUR UNIFORM. AND THAT JUST SHOWED THAT YOU MADE IT THROUGH THE FIRST YEAR AND THAT YOU HAVE A BAND AND A BROOCH NOW…YOU WORE IT UNTIL YOU GRADUATED.” “[IT SIGNIFIED RANK AND SENIORITY] BECAUSE YOUR FIRST YEAR YOU DON’T HAVE ANYTHING, YOU DON’T HAVE A BAND ON THE CAP, YOU DON’T HAVE ANYTHING. AFTER FIRST YEAR YOU GET THIS AND A YELLOW BAND AND THEN A BLUE ONE AND THEN A BLACK.” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011002
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1967
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD
Catalogue Number
P20190011005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1967
Materials
GOLD
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.5
Length
1.8
Width
1.9
Description
GOLD RING WITH TAPERED BANDS AND OVAL FACE; THE RING FACE HAS AN OVAL WITH THE EMBOSSED PROFILE OF A NURSE, AND WIDE BANDS THAT TAPER FROM SIDES OF THE RING FACE. BAND HAS TWO SMALL, ENGRAVED LEAVES ON SIDES OF THE RING FACE. INSIDE RING BAND HAS MINOR STAINING AND WEAR; RING FACE HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND THE EMBOSSED PROFILE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE O.R. NURSE’S RING, KIMERY RECALLED, “IT WAS JUST MADE BECAUSE WE JUST WANTED PEOPLE TO KNOW THAT WE WERE O.R. NURSES, A SELECT BRAND OF NURSES THAT HAD CHOSEN THIS PATH. AND WE WANTED IT NOT TO BE FOR EVERYONE SO SOMEONE SAID, ‘WELL, LET’S GET SOMETHING DESIGNED.’ SO WE THOUGHT THE BEST DESIGN WOULD BE AN O.R. HEAD WITH THE MASK AND THE TURBAN. SO WE TOOK IT TO FOSTER’S JEWELRY AND THEY MADE THIS UP FOR US. NOW I KNOW THAT PROBABLY EVERY O.R. NURSE AT ST. MIKE’S AT THAT TIME BOUGHT ONE. I’M NOT SO SURE THAT IT WENT TO THE GALT OR ANYWHERE ELSE. I CAN’T VOUCH FOR THAT. I JUST KNOW THAT THE STAFF, AT THAT TIME, WE ALL GOT ONE JUST BECAUSE IT WAS A SIGNATURE OF WHAT WE WERE AND WHAT WE DID.” “[THERE WERE] 15, APPROXIMATELY [MADE]…[THE RING IS] 10 CARAT [GOLD]…I THINK ONE PERSON DESIGNED IT AND SAID, ‘WHAT DO YOU THINK?’ AND WE SAID, ‘GOOD, PERFECT.’ SO SHE WENT AHEAD WITH IT.” “[I WORE THE RING] ALL THE TIME…SOCIALLY, WEAR IT TO WORK, PUT IT ON THE SHELF, PUT IT BACK ON WHEN YOU LEFT WORK, 24-7…WHEN YOU’RE OUT AND ABOUT…WE WORE THEM ALL THE TIME.” “I DON’T KNOW WHEN I STOPPED [WEARING THE RING]. I PRESUME WHEN I WENT TO MONTREAL I STOPPED. AND I PROBABLY WORE IT WHEN I CAME BACK…IT WAS IN A BOX WITH THE OTHER [PIECES FROM MY TIME AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING].” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011005
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20130012001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
23
Height
8.3
Length
13.4
Width
3
Description
A. CARDBOARD BOX, BROWN PRINTED WITH YELLOW BACKGROUND, BLUE BORDERS AND IMAGES, AND BLUE TEXT, 13.4CM LONG X 3CM WIDE X 8.3CM TALL. FRONT OF BOX HAS FRONT HAS TEXT “ “SUPER-CLEAN, SMOKELESS, MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA” PRINTED WITH “C-I-L” LOGO. LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES OF BOX HAS WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BLUE BACKGROUND “TWENTY “DOMINION” .303 BRITISH COPPER POINT” AND BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “SMOKELESS, HIGH VELOCITY, 180 GRAIN BULLET, “SUPER-CLEAN””. BACK OF BOX HAS IMAGE OF BULLET WITH TEXT “DOMINION .303 BRITISH COPPER POINT” PRINTED ON IMAGE IN BLUE AND WHITE. FRONT OF BOX HAS TEXT “TWENTY .303 BRITISH, COPPER POINT, HIGH VELOCITY” IN WHITE ON BLUE BACKGROUND AROUND BULLET. BACK HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “”SUPER-CLEAN”, SMOKELESS, THESE “SUPER-CLEAN” CARTRIDGES ARE GUARANTEED TO BE OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY, POWERFUL, ACCURATE TO EXTREME RANGES AND “ALWAYS DEPENDABLE.” ALL “DOMINION” CARTRIDGES HAVE “SUPER-CLEAN” NON-MERCURIC PRIMING AND NON-FOULING BULLETS, WHICH KEEP THE RIFLE BORE IN PERFECT CONDITION. “MADE IN CANADA””. TOP OF BOX HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND, BESIDE “C-I-L” LOGO, “SUPER-CLEAN, ADAPTED TO, B.S.A., ROSS, LEE-METFORD, GIBBS, GREENER, REMINGTON, LEE-ENFIELD, AND WINCHESTER RIFLES., (WILL NOT INTERCHANGE WITH .303 SAVAGE)”. TOP HAS BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON INSIDE FLAP, “NOTE, BE SURE TO RETURN THIS CARTON WITH SAMPLE CARTRIDGE IF COMMUNICATING WITH US ON THE CONTENTS OF THIS PACKAGE. A SPECIAL TREATMENT OF THE NECK OF THESE CARTRIDGES PROTECTS THEM FROM DETERIORATION, ENSURES UNIFORM CRIMPING, GREATER ACCURACY AND LONGER LIFE.” INSIDE OF TOP FLAP HAS BLACK STAMPED TEXT “A.A.H.H.S., IP 51”. INSIDE OF TOP FLAP HAS BLACK RESIDUE FROM CARTRIDGES IN ROWS OF CIRCLES. INSIDE OF BOX IS BROWN CARDBOARD AND IS STAINED. OUTSIDE OF BOX IS STAINED WITH GREY; EDGES OF BOX ARE WORN AND FRAYED. BASE OF BOX HAS TEARS IN CARDBOARD AND CREASES AT CORNERS. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. C. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. D. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET HAS MINOR DARK STAINING WITH FINGERPRINT IMPRESSIONS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET IS TARNISHED; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. F. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. G. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. H. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. I. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET SHOWS MINOR CORROSION AND TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. J. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET HAS MINOR DARK STAINING WITH FINGERPRINT IMPRESSIONS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. K. BULLET, 7.8CM LONG X 1.4CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS SILVER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS COPPER CIRCLE IN CENTER WITH ENGRAVED TEXT AROUND “DA, 1941, VII”. JACKET HAS THREE NARROW LINES ENGRAVED BELOW POINT. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. L. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING AND CORROSION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. M. BULLET, 8CM LONG X 1.3CM DIAMETER. BRASS JACKET WITH COPPER POINT; POINT HAS COPPER FINISHING. BASE OF CARTRIDGE HAS CIRCLE CUT IN BASE THAT HAS RED AROUND EDGES; BASE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED “DOMINION .303 BRITISH”. POINT HAS LINE CUT AROUND TIP, AND POINT HAS GROOVES AROUND BASE ABOVE JACKET. JACKET SHOWS MINOR TARNISHING AND CORROSION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. N. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. O. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. P. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. Q. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. R. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. S. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. T. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. U. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; BASE OF SLIT HAS CREASE THAT RUNS DOWN FRONT OF CARDBOARD. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. V. CARDBOARD INSERT, 4.1CM LONG X 2.5CM WIDE. CARDBOARD PIECE WITH SLIT DOWN THE CENTER TO THE MIDDLE, WITH TWO ROUNDED POINTS ON EITHER SIDE OF SLIT. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK; EDGES ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. W. CARDBOARD INSERT, 14CM LONG X 7.4CM WIDE. TOP OF INSERT HAS 9 SLITS WITH ROUNDED POINTS BETWEEN SLITS. CARDBOARD IS STAINED BLACK AND GREY ALONG POINTS ON FRONT AND BACK. FRONT HAS CREASE RUNNING FROM SLIT TO LOWER EDGE ON LEFT SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FROM MARCH 20-31, 2018, THE AMMUNITION WAS LOANED TO DUANE KING OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA TO BE DEACTIVATED. THE AMMUNITION WAS DEACTIVATED AND RETURNED. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE AND DOCUMENTATION OF THE LOAN FOR DEACTIVATION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012001
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20130012002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
2.6
Length
6.9
Width
3
Description
CARDBOARD AMMUNITION BOX WITH 49 CARTRIDGES INSIDE. BOX IS BROWN CARDBOARD ON THE INSIDE, WITH OUTSIDE PRINTED YELLOW WITH BLUE BORDERS AND TEXT. BOX LID HAS TEXT “.22 LONG, SMOKELESS, DRY LUBRICATED BULLETS” BESIDE IMAGE OF A BULLET WITH “.22 LONG” PRINTED ON IMAGE. TEXT BELOW IMAGE, “SUPER-CLEAN” IN WHITE ON BLUE BACKGROUND BESIDE “C-I-L” LOGO, WITH TEXT BELOW “MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES HAVE BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND, “SUPER-CLEAN, .22 LONG, 50 R.F., SMOKELESS” AND “C-I-L” LOGO. FRONT OF BOX HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “THESE CARTRIDGES ARE PRIMED WITH “SUPER-CLEAN” NON-RUSTING PRIMING. IF THE RIFLE HAS FIRST BEEN THOROUGHLY CLEANED AS “DOMINION” “SUPER-CLEAN” .22’S ARE USED EXCLUSIVELY, THEY WILL NOT RUST OR CORRODE THE BORE.” BACK HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “76, 305” AND BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. TOP FLAP HAS BLUE TEXT PRINTED ON INSIDE “DANGEROUS WITHIN ONE MILE”. BOX IS WORN AT EDGES AND FADED; TOP FLAP HAS TEARS ON RIGHT SIDE, AND HEAVY WEAR AT LOWER EDGE.TOP FLAP IS CREASED ALONG LOWER LEFT CORNER; FRONT OF BOX IS STAINED WITH BLACK. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. CARTRIDGES INSIDE BOX ARE COMPRISED OF BRASS JACKET AND GREY POINT. JACKET HAS ENGRAVED “D” ON BASE; POINT OF CARTRIDGES HAVE THREE RINGS ENGRAVED ABOVE JACKET. CARTRIDGES OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FROM MARCH 20-31, 2018, THE AMMUNITION WAS LOANED TO DUANE KING OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA TO BE DEACTIVATED. THE AMMUNITION WAS DEACTIVATED AND RETURNED. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE AND DOCUMENTATION OF THE LOAN FOR DEACTIVATION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012002
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20130012003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
CARDBOARD, BRASS, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
13
Height
11.6
Length
10.8
Width
6.6
Description
A. CARDOARD TOP, 10.3CM LONG X 6.3CM WIDE. TOP FLAP OF CARDBOARD BOX; BROWN INSIDE WITH RED, YELLOW, AND BLACK TEXT AND BACKGROUND PRINTED ON TOP. TOP HAS RED BORDER ALONG UPPER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT “CANUCK HEAVY LOAD” AND BLACK TEXT BELOW “12 GAUGE, 2 5/8 INCH, 25 SHOT SHELLS”. TOP HAS RED “C-I-L” LOGO PRINTED. TEXT BELOW PRINTED IN BOXES WITH BLACK BORDERS, FIRST BOX HAS RED BACKGROUND AND WHITE TEXT “HEAVY LOAD” AND BLACK TEXT INSIDE NEXT THREE BOXES, “OZ SHOT 1 1/8”, “SIZE OF SHOT, 5 HS”, “CODE DN, IA H6XX”. FRONT FLAP HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED “NOTE, BE SURE TO RETURN THIS BOX WITH SAMPLE CARTRIDGE IS COMMUNICATING WITH US CONCERNING THE CONTENTS OF THIS PACKAGE. 128 P63”. BACK OF CARDBOARD HAS LOSS IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER; FLAP IS CREASED FRONT AND BACK AND WORN AT EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CARDBOARD AMMUNITION BOX, 10.8CM LONG X 6.6CM WIDE X 11.6CM TALL. FRONT OF BOX PRINTED WITH RED AND BLACK IMAGE OF A SHOTGUN SHELL, AND RED BORDER ALOG TOP EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT “CANUCK HEAVY LOAD”; FRONT HAS BLACK TEXT BESIDE IMAGE “2 5/8 12 GAUGE, “SUPER-CLEAN”, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION” WITH RED “C-I-L- PRINTED; LOWER EDGE OF FRONT HAS RED BORDER WITH WHITE TEXT “WATERPROOFED, FINISHED IN “DUCO””. LEFT SIDE OF BOX HAS RED BORDERS AT TOP AND LOWER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BORDERS, AND BLACK TEXT PRINTED BETWEEN BORDERS, TEXT “”DOMINION”, BACKED BY MORE THAN HALF A CENTURY OF EXPERIENCE IN MANUFACTURING AMMUNITION FOR CANADIAN SPORTSMEN…” WITH COMPANY STATEMENT ON QUALITY. RIGHT SIDE OF BOX HAS RED BORDERS AT TOP AND LOWER EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED ON BORDERS, AND BLACK TEXT PRINTED BETWEEN BORDERS; TEXT “”CANUCK”, 12 GAUGE, 2 5/8 INCH, HEAVY LOAD SHOT SHELLS, CHOICE OF SHOT SIZES 2,4,5,6, 7 1/2, BB…” WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SHOT SIZES AND PURPOSES, AND “CAUTION, DO NOT USE THESE SHELLS EXCEPT IN GUNS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH MODERN HEAVY LOAD SMOKELESS POWDER SHOT SHELLS…” AND STORING INSTRUCTIONS. BACK OF BOX HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED IN BOX WITH RED BORDERS; TEXT “”CANUCK”, CANADA’S MOST POPULAR SHOT SHELL, IDEAL FOR THE SPORTSMAN WHO DESIRES A MODERATELY-PRICED “ALL-PURPOSE” SHOT SHELL, THE “CANUCK” HAS BEEN CANADA’S FAVOURITE FOR MORE THAN TWENTY-FIVE YEARS…” WITH DETAILS ON FEATURES OF THE SHELLS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR USE WITH FIREARMS. BASE OF BOX HAS RED BORDER ALONG TOP WITH WHITE TEXT PRINTED “CNUCK HEAVY LOAD”; BASE HAS BLACK TEXT PRINTED “12 GAUGE 2 5/8 INCH, 25 SHELL SHOTS, MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA”. TOP FLAPS OVER BOX OPENING PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT; LEFT FLAP HAS TEXT “WARNING: IT IS DANGEROUS TO PLACE: 16 GAUGE SHELLS IN 10 GAUGE GUNS, 20 GAUGE SHELLS IN 12 GAUGE GUNS, 28 GAUGE SHELLS IN 16 OR 20 GAUGE GUNS.”; RIGHT FLAP HAS TEXT “BECAUSE: THE SMALLER SHELL WILL PASS THROUGH THE CHAMBER AND LODGE IN THE BARREL. IF, WITH THE BARREL THUS OBSTRUCTED, ANOTHER SHELL IS FIRED IN IT, THE BARREL MAY BURST WITH POSSIBLE SERIOUS INJURY TO THE SHOOTER AND BY-STANDERS. BEFORE LOADING YOUR GUN MAKE SURE THE BARREL IS NOT OBSTRUCTED.” INSIDE OF BOX IS STAINED BLACK AND GREY; FRONT OF BOX HAS GREY SQUARE PENCIL DRAWINGS; RIGHT SIDE OF BOX HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLUE INK “20347.5, 20230, 117”. BOX IS WORN AT EDGES AND CREASED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS SCRATCHED AND TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. E. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS SCRATCHED AND TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. F. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. G. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. H. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE IS TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. I. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. J. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. K. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. L. SHOTGUN SHELL, 6CM LONG X 2.2CM DIAMETER. SHELL HAS MARBLED RED CASING WITH BRASS BASE; BASE HAS CIRCLE ENGRAVED IN MIDDLE; BASE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT ALONG EDGES “DOMINION NO 12 CANUCK, MADE IN CANADA”. TOP OF SHELL IS OPEN TO SHOW WOODEN COVER; COVER PRINTED WITH BLACK TEXT “HEAVY LOAD, 5, SMOKELESS”. CASING IS WORN; BASE HAS MINOR SCRATCHING; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION. M. CARDBOARD FLAP, 3.4CM LONG X 2CM WIDE. FLAP DETACHED FROM BOX; FLAP HAS FLAT EDGE AT BASE AND ROUNDED TOP. EDGES ARE WORN AND FLAP HAS CREASE ACROSS THE MIDDLE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-AMMUNITION
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
THE AMMUNITION, COLLECTED DIRECTLY FROM THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE, WAS OWNED AND DONATED BY LEON SALLENBACK OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA. SALLENBACK MADE HIS CAREER IN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, BUT IN THE EARLY 1950S HAD DREAMS OF BEING “THE GREAT WHITE HUNTER”. SALLENBACK REALIZED, UPON PURCHASE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, THAT HE COULD NOT “HIT THE BROAD SIDE OF A BARN”. THE AMMUNITION WAS NOT USED. IN AN EMAIL WITH CATHY FLEXHAUG OF THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN LEARNED THAT SALLENBACK AND HIS WIFE WERE DOWNSIZING AT THE TIME OF DONATION. SALLENBACK HAD THE AMMUNITION FOR 40 YEARS AND HAD NOT TOUCHED IT, AND TODAY COULD NOT USE IT EVEN IF HE WANTED TO. FROM MARCH 20-31, 2018, THE AMMUNITION WAS LOANED TO DUANE KING OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA TO BE DEACTIVATED. THE AMMUNITION WAS DEACTIVATED AND RETURNED. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF THE EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE AND DOCUMENTATION OF THE LOAN FOR DEACTIVATION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20130012001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20130012003
Acquisition Date
2013-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"VICTORY" SMITH AND WESSON
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180013000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"VICTORY" SMITH AND WESSON
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1965
Materials
STEEL, WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
20.5
Width
3.3
Diameter
1
Description
REVOLVER WITH BLACK STEEL SHORT BARREL, CYLINDER AND FRAME. BARREL HAS FRONT SIGHT PIN AT END; HANDLE IS BROWN WOOD WITH STEEL PLATE RUNNING DOWN THE SIDES AND ACROSS THE BASE. HANDLE HAS METAL PIN ON FRONT THAT RUNS THROUGH THE SIDES OF THE HANDLE. REVOLVER HAS INSCRIPTION STAMPED BESIDE CYLINDER ON RIGHT SIDE, “TRADEMARK S W, REG. U.S. PAT. OFF.”; INSCRIPTION STAMPED BELOW CYLINDER“MADE IN U.S.A.”; INSCRIPTION ON BASE OF HANDLE “611407”; INSCRIPTION ON RIGHT SIDE OF BARREL “.38 767 E.38 S&W CT6, 3.5 IONS”. REVOLVER HAS SILVER TRIGGER AND HAMMER; REVOLVER HAS STEEL CYLINDER RELEASE ON LEFT SIDE; REVOLVER HAS SIX CYLINDERS. STEEL BARREL AND CYLINDER HAVE MINOR WEAR TO FINISH; HANDLE HAS WEAR AROUND BASE; FRAME HAS MINOR SCRATCHES ON LEFT SIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-FIREARM
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON MAY 29, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DUANE KING REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A REVOLVER. THE REVOLVER WAS USED BY POLICE OFFICERS IN PICTURE BUTTE, ALBERTA, AND WAS ACQUIRED BY KING FROM THE TOWN OF PICTURE BUTTE. ON THE REVOLVER, KING ELABORATED, “[THIS HANDGUN] BELONGED TO THE TOWN OF PICTURE BUTTE. I WAS HAVING COFFEE ONE DAY, IN FEBRUARY OF 1980, IN THE COFFEE SHOP IN PICTURE BUTTE, AND THE TOWN SECRETARY WAS THERE, AS USUAL, A WHOLE BUNCH OF US. HE SAID, “I HEAR YOU LIKE GUNS.” ONE THING LED TO ANOTHER, AND I PUT A BID IN [FOR THE HANDGUN], TO THE TOWN COUNCIL, AND THEY ACCEPTED IT. I ENDED UP WITH THE TWO GUNS. THE TOWN SECRETARY’S NAME WAS PIUS RIES. HE’S SINCE PASSED AWAY, BUT HE WAS A WELL-KNOWN MAN IN PICTURE BUTTE.” “THE [THE HANDGUN WAS ONE OF THE ONLY TWO GUNS] THAT THEY HAD. THEY ONLY HAD THE ONE POLICEMAN, AND I KNEW THE MAN WHEN I WAS A BOY GOING TO SCHOOL, GROWING UP. HIS NAME WAS BUCK GELDERT, AND, AS IT TURNS OUT, MY BROTHER-IN-LAW BOUGHT THE POLICE CAR, ONCE THEY GOT RID OF EVERYTHING. I BOUGHT THE GUNS MAINLY BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TOWN OF PICTURE BUTTE POLICE GUNS. NOT TOO MANY PEOPLE REALIZE THAT PICTURE BUTTE DID HAVE A POLICEMAN.” “[THE SMITH AND WESSON WAS A GUN] THAT POLICE FORCES WOULD HAVE USED. I WOULD IMAGINE THAT SMITH AND WESSON IS PROBABLY A VERY POPULAR POLICE GUN.” “THEY KNEW THAT I WAS INTERESTED IN GUNS. I HAD ALWAYS BEEN, SINCE A LITTLE BOY, HAD GUNS. [RIES] APPROACHED ME THAT DAY, AND I WENT TO LOOK AT THE GUNS. I MADE AN OFFER, TO TOWN COUNCIL, AND THEY ACCEPTED IT.” “I MADE A WRITTEN OFFER TO THE TOWN OF PICTURE BUTTE, AND THEY TOOK IT UP AT THEIR NEXT COUNCIL MEETING. THEN IT WAS ADVERTISED IN THE ‘SUNNY SOUTH NEWS’, THAT I HAD DONE THIS, THAT THEY HAD ACCEPTED MY OFFER, AND WHAT THE OFFER WAS. I WENT AND PICKED THE GUNS UP, GAVE THEM THEIR MONEY, AND I’VE HAD THEM EVER SINCE. I’VE NEVER SHOT THEM. THAT’S NOT WHY I BOUGHT THEM…I’VE JUST ALWAYS HAD THEM, AND LOVED THEM.” “[THE TOWN POLICE] MUST HAVE BEEN OUT OF THE TOWN HALL. I WENT TO SCHOOL WITH THE POLICEMAN’S SON, AND I KNEW HIS DAUGHTER. WE ALL WENT TO THE SAME SCHOOL, THE SAME CHURCH, THE SAME SUNDAY SCHOOL. I REMEMBER THE POLICEMAN, BUCK GELDERT. HE WAS A HUGE MAN, AND WHEN HE LEFT PICTURE BUTTE, HE WENT TO COALDALE, AND HE WORKED FOR THE COALDALE POLICE.” KING RECALLED GELDERT, NOTING, “HE HAD A UNIFORM, AND A POLICE CAR WITH A BIG RED SIREN, FLASHING LIGHT, ON THE ROOF…I DON’T REMEMBER HIM WALKING, BUT I REMEMBER HIM DRIVING AROUND TOWN, ESPECIALLY IN THE EVENINGS AND AT NIGHT. ONE NIGHT I WAS GOING HOME IN THE DARK, AND I HIT A HORSE, GRAVEL ROAD, AND I WRECKED THE TRUCK THAT I WAS DRIVING. [BUCK GELDERT] CAME AND HE GAVE ME A RIDE HOME. MY FOLKS WEREN’T ALL THAT HAPPY, BUT HE WAS THERE.” “I REMEMBER HIM PASSING OUT SPEEDING TICKETS. THEY HAD A COURTROOM, AND THEY HAD A JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, OR A MAGISTRATE. YOU WENT THERE TO PAY YOUR TRAFFIC TICKETS, BUT, OTHER THAN THAT, I DON’T REMEMBER ANY BIG CRIME.” “I DON’T KNOW HOW LONG HE WAS THERE IN PICTURE BUTTE. I HAVE NO WAY OF KNOWING THAT. I ONLY REMEMBER HIM BEING IN CHURCH ON SUNDAYS…I REMEMBER HIM BEING IN COALDALE, AND I DON’T KNOW WHEN THAT WAS, BUT IT HAD TO BE AROUND 1960.” KING ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE REVOLVER, STATING, “BECAUSE I’M GETTING OLDER, I WANT [THE REVOLVER] TO BE PRESERVED, AND THERE’S NO BETTER PLACE THAN A MUSEUM. I LIKE THE GALT, SO THAT’S WHY I CHOSE TO DO THIS RIGHT NOW. I JUST WANT THEM PRESERVED. THEY’RE IMPORTANT TO ME, AND I THINK THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA.” “I WAS BORN, AND GREW UP [IN PICTURE BUTTE]; LIVED AND FARMED. MY FAMILY CAME TO PICTURE BUTTE IN 1929, AND I STILL HAVE FAMILY IN PICTURE BUTTE. PICTURE BUTTE IS WHY THEY ARE SO IMPORTANT TO ME.” “I HAD A LOT OF HANDGUNS [WHEN I LIVED ON THE FARM] AND I’VE GOTTEN RID OF MOST OF THEM…ONCE I MOVED TO THE CITY, I DIDN’T FEEL SAFE WITH THEM IN THE HOUSE. YOU GET BROKE INTO, SOMEBODY STEALS YOUR GUNS AND COMMITS A CRIME, AND IT GOES FROM THERE. I’M GETTING RID OF THE THINGS THAT I WORRY ABOUT, AND [THE] HANDGUN [IS] PART OF THAT. FOR [THIS REVOLVER] TO GO WHERE [IT’S] GOING IS VERY IMPORTANT TO ME.” ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, WARREN “BUCK” GELDERT BEGAN HIS CAREER IN POLICING WITH THE R.C.M.P. AT THE AGE OF 19. GELDERT SERVED WITH THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE SERVICE BEFORE BEING NAMED CHIEF CONSTABLE FOR THE TOWN OF PICTURE BUTTE IN 1955. GELDERT REMAINED CHIEF CONSTABLE UNTIL 1967, WHEN HE ACCEPTED A POSITION AS RECREATION DIRECTOR IN COALDALE, ALBERTA. KING PURCHASED THE SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVER, AND A .38 COLT IN FEBRUARY, 1980 FROM THE TOWN OF PICTURE BUTTE FOR $175, AND HAD BOTH REVOLVERS REGISTERED IN 1980. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180013000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180013000
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
N.T. (VILLAGE VIEW FROM PORCH)
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1964
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20190006002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
N.T. (VILLAGE VIEW FROM PORCH)
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1964
Materials
WOOD, PAINT, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Height
34.2
Length
49.3
Description
OIL ON WOOD PANEL PAINTING IN WHITE WOODEN FRAME. IMAGE OF TREES AND HOUSES IN SNOW, WITH SIDE OF BUILDING AT LEFT EDGE AND HOUSE PILLAR AT RIGHT EDGE; HOUSES WHITE WITH RED-BROWN ROOFS IN BACKGROUND, AND TREES IN FOREGROUND. SNOW COMPRISED OF BLUE AND WHITE PAINT; TREES COMPLETED IN BLACK, GREEN, BROWN AND ORANGE TONES; HOUSE PILLAR AND SIDING IN BROWN AND GREEN. PAINTING SIGNED IN RED IN LOWER LEFT CORNER “E.E. RIETHMAN”. MID-GROUND HAS BROWN FENCE BETWEEN TREES AND BUILDINGS IN BACKGROUND. FRONT OF FRAME HAS WHITE TRIM ALONG FRONT OF CANVAS, WITH GOLD TRIM ABOVE WHITE TRIM; FRAME PAINTED OFF-WHITE. BACK OF PAINTING HAS BROWN PAPER BACKING WITH TWO BLACK METAL SCREW ON UPPER LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES, WITH WHITE CORD FASTENED TO SCREWS. LEFT EDGE OF BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER “OWNED BY H. FLAIG 3279791, NF5”; BACKING HAS STAMPED TEXT IN FADED INK ALONG LOWER EDGE “GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, 310 – 7TH ST. SOUTH – LETHBRIDGE”. BACKING HAS WHITE PAPER LABEL AT UPPER EDGE WITH HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK “$20.00 /1970”; BACKING HAS PRINTED ARTICLE IN CENTER ON WHITE PAPER WITH BLACK TEXT “ERNEST E. RIETHMAN, EXHIBITION APRIL 25 – MAY 31 ORGANIZED BY THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA ART GALLERY WITH FUNDING ASSISTANCE FROM THE ALBERTA ART FOUNDATION…” WITH BIOGRAPHY ON ERNEST E. RIETHMAN BY “BRENT LAYCOCK, GUEST CURATOR” AND BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO “WATERTON LAKE, C.1958, OIL ON PANEL, 56 X 86 CM, COLLECTION OF MR. AND MRS. DON AND JUDY NILSSON, PHOTO: DON CORMAN”. PAPER BACKING HAS TEARS BESIDE SCREWS; BACKING HAS YELLOWED MASKING TAPE ALONG LOWER EDGE OF PAPER ARTICLE; ARTICLE EDGES STAINED YELLOW FROM ADHESIVE RESIDUE. BACK OF FRAME HAS PAIRS OF METAL NAILS IN UPPER AND LOWER LEFT AND RIGHT CORNERS, WITH NAILS HEADS COVERED WITH BROWN PAINT. BACK OF FRAME IS STAINED AND CHIPPED AT EDGES AND CORNERS; FRONT OF FRAME HAS BROWN AND WHITE STAINING ALONG EDGES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE PAINTING BY MIKE PISKO, FLAIG RECALLED, “ “VIEW FROM THE PORCH” WOULD HAVE BEEN UP IN THE HOUSE FOR QUITE A WHILE. THAT’S VERY FAMILIAR TO ME. IT’S CERTAINLY THE STYLE OF [ART] THAT THEY WOULD DO. MOM WAS ALWAYS MENTIONING THE OIL. IT’S THE KIND OF [ART] THEY WOULD HAVE DONE, THAT THEY WOULD HAVE LIKED.” “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING RIETHMAN OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD...AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN, WAS DEVELOPED BY JANE EDMUNDSON IN 2014, USING A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 24, 1964 AND RECORD P20120030007.ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN (1895 - 1964) WAS BORN IN SWITZERLAND IN 1895 AND WENT ON TO STUDY ART AT AN ACADEMY IN BASIL, THEN AT THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF INTERIOR DECORATING AND PAINTING. IN 1919 HE CAME TO CANADA SETTLING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1947. HE WORKED AS AN INTERIOR DECORATOR IN THE CITY, AND HIS WORK WAS HIGHLY SOUGHT. HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED LANDSCAPE ARTIST AND WOULD FREQUENTLY JOIN TRIPS ORGANIZED BY A.Y.JACKSON, WHOSE STYLE IS SAID TO HAVE HEAVILY INFLUENCED RIETHMAN’S. DURING HIS TIME WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, HE SERVED AS BOTH HEAD OF COMMITTEES AND TAUGHT LESSONS IN FIGURE DRAWING. RIETHMAN WAS SUCCESSFUL IN WHAT HE DID, AS CRITICS ENJOYED HIS WORK AND HE WAS ABLE TO FREQUENTLY DISPLAY IN EXHIBITIONS. ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES COMPILED IN 2019, RIETHMAN WAS EXHIBITED FREQUENTLY IN SOLO AND GROUP EXHIBITIONS IN LETHBRIDGE THROUGH THE 1950S-1960S. PRIOR TO HIS PAINTING CAREER, RIETHMAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THEATRE GROUPS AND PAGEANTS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, DESIGNING BACKGROUNDS AND CREATING FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERFORMANCES. IN 1955, RIETHMAN AND K.E. HUDSON BECAME PARTNERS IN RIETHMAN—HUDSON PAINTING AND DECORATING IN LETHBRIDGE. RIETHMAN’S ARTWORKS WERE OFTEN FRAMED, EXHIBITED AND SOLD AT GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, LETHBRIDGE BEGINNING IN 1958. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES OPERATED IN CALGARY AND OPENED A BRANCH IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, WITH HEINO DEEKEN AS MANAGER IN LETHBRIDGE. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES WERE KNOWN TO EXHIBIT ARTWORKS BY SOUTHERN ALBERTA ARTISTS AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN A STATEMENT TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1962, RIETHMAN STATED ABOUT HIS PRACTICE, “ALTHOUGH I PREFER LANDSCAPES AND OCCASIONAL PORTRAITS, NOW AND THEN I EXPERIMENT A LITTLE FROM NATURALISTIC INTO MODERN STYLE…ONCE IN A WHILE IT IS GOOD [TO] CHANGE STYLE TO KEEP FROM GETTING IN A RUT…I PAINT AS I FEEL AND TO HECK WITH THE PUBLIC. POSSIBLY I’M NOT COMMERCIAL ENOUGH, BUT I PREFER HAVING THE FREEDOM TO EXPRESS MYSELF AS I WISH…I AM GRADUALLY RETIRING FROM BUSINESS…AND PLAN TO PAINT AND PAINT AND PAINT. I MAY NOT BE THE BEST, BUT I CERTAINLY HAVE FUN.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA. UPDATE: ON 24 OCTOBER 2019, ERNEST E. RIETHMAN’S GRANDDAUGHTER LINDA BAINES SHARED A “PERSONAL RECORD” WITH MUSEUM STAFF. THE LATTER DAY SAINT DOCUMENT WAS COMPLETED BY HER GRANDMOTHER CLARA S. RIETHMAN--ERNEST’S WIFE. IT IS A HANDWRITTEN CHRONOLOGY OF CLARA’S LIFE IN SWITZERLAND AND ALBERTA. PERSONAL INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN THE DOCUMENT EXTENDS TO ERNEST’S LIFE . TO SEE THIS RECORD, PLEASE SEE P19705197000’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20190006002
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"SLEEPING TODDLER WITH REVOLVER"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, GLASS, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20190006003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SLEEPING TODDLER WITH REVOLVER"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL, GLASS, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
42.7
Width
51.3
Description
PENCIL SKETCH ON PAPER INSIDE FRAME WITH METAL EDGES AND GLASS COVERING. SKETCH OF A SMALL CHILD ASLEEP HOLDING A DOLL, WITH A REVOLVER BESIDE THE DOLL. SKETCH UNSIGNED, ATTRIBUTED TO E.E. RIETHMAN. SKETCH INSIDE WHITE MATTE WITH BLACK INNER TRIM, WITH GLASS FRONT TO FRAME. FRAME SILVER METAL WITH FLORAL PATTERNED TRIM AROUND INSIDE. BACK OF FRAME HAS BROWN PAPER BACKING WITH SILVER LOOP-SCREW AT LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES, WITH SILVER METAL WIRES ATTACTED TO SCREWS. BACKING HAS HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER AT UPPER LEFT CORNER “BY E. RIETHMAN” AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK MARKER AT LOWER-MIDDLE “OWNED BY H. FLAIG, 3279791, NF5.”. LOWER EDGE OF BACKING HAS WHITE LABEL WITH BLACK PRINTED TEXT “M.G.M. WALL DÉCOR, 317 – 4TH ST. SOUTH, LETHBRIDGE, AB, 328-0923” AND HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN BLACK INK ON LABEL “$120.00”. BACKING HAS FOLDED CORNER IN UPPER LEFT CORNER, AND TEAR IN PAPER AT LOWER RIGHT CORNER. FRONT OF SKETCH HAS GREEN STAINING AT RIGHT EDGE, BLUE-GREY STAIN AT LOWER LEFT EDGE, AND GREY STAINS ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES OF IMAGE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 5, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DON FLAIG REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ARTWORKS. THE ARTWORKS WERE COLLECTED BY FLAIG’S PARENTS, HELEN AND LLOYD FLAIG. ON THE SKETCH BY ERNEST RIETHMAN, FLAIG RECALLED, ““THE BOY AND THE TEDDY BEAR”, I WONDER IF MOM DIDN’T HAVE THAT BECAUSE SHE WAS THINKING OF ME. IT LOOKS A LITTLE BIT LIKE I MIGHT HAVE LOOKED, AS A KID, AND I WOULD HAVE BEEN VERY YOUNG AT THAT TIME I THINK THIS ONE WAS DONE.” “I HAVE NO MEMORY OF [KNOWING RIETHMAN OR OTHER SKETCH CLUB MEMBERS]. OCCASIONALLY [MY PARENTS] WOULD MENTION THEIR NAMES, AS YOU MIGHT SPEAK OF FRIENDS. I KNOW THEY WOULD GO OUT, AND DO THE ART ELSEWHERE, OR SOME AT HOME. IT JUST SEEMED NATURAL THAT THEY WOULD DEAL WITH THEIR ARTIST FRIENDS…THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG.” FLAIG ELABORATED ON HIS PARENTS’ AVID INTEREST IN LOCAL ART, NOTING, “MOM AND DAD ALWAYS HAD ART IN THE HOUSE. THEY WERE ALWAYS DOING ART. I REMEMBER DAD DOING LARGE PLASTER SCULPTURES, IN THE BASEMENT, IN THE CITY, AND MOM WAS ALWAYS PAINTING AND THROWING POTS, AND DOING SOMETHING FUNNY OUT IN THE BACK YARD, ART-WISE. GROWING UP, I ASSUMED EVERYBODY HAD ART IN THE HOUSE, BUT I’VE REALIZED THAT’S NOT THE CASE. NOT EVERYBODY LIKES HAVING ART AROUND, ALTHOUGH [THERE IS EFFORT IN] FINDING ART THAT YOU LIKE, AND ACQUIRING IT, OR CREATING IT, AND KEEPING IT. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMETHING DIFFERENT HANGING ON THE WALLS IN THE HOUSE. [MOM AND DAD] WERE ALWAYS MOVING IT AROUND. THESE THREE PAINTINGS [BY MIKE PISKO AND ERNEST RIETHMAN], I’M AWARE THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE FRIENDS OF MOM AND DAD. THEY WERE …ARTISTS. I DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THEM OTHER THAN THAT THEY WOULD OFTEN GO OUT TO SKETCH, AND PAINT, AND THEIR NAMES ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. [THE ARTWORKS] MEANT SOMETHING TO [MY PARENTS], WHETHER THEY BOUGHT THEM OR THEY WERE JUST GIFTS FROM OTHER ARTISTS, I’LL NEVER KNOW, BUT THERE HAS OBVIOUSLY BEEN A LOT OF CARE AND EFFORT PUT INTO THE WORKS BY THE ARTISTS. I HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF MY MOTHER’S PAINTINGS, BUT THERE ARE LOTS OF THOSE AROUND THE CITY, AND HER WORK IS WELL PRESERVED. THESE ONES…I KNOW THEY ARE LOCAL ARTISTS SOMEWHERE NOW.” FLAIG RECALLED HIS PARENTS AND THEIR HOME IN LETHBRIDGE, “I GREW UP IN TOWN, ON HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD. [MY PARENTS] MOVED OUT IN THE EARLY 1970S TO BROXBURN ROAD. SOME OF [THE PAINTINGS] I’D HAVE SEEN THERE AT HENDERSON LAKE BOULEVARD, AND THE REST WOULD HAVE BEEN ON THE FARM. THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN UP ON THE WALLS, OR DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THINGS WERE ALWAYS MOVING AROUND, BUT THESE ARE PAINTINGS THAT ARE FAMILIAR TO ME. NOT THAT I PAID THAT MUCH ATTENTION TO THEM, BECAUSE THERE WERE ALWAYS PAINTINGS AROUND, AND I NEVER THOUGHT TO ASK.” “MIKE PISKO IS THE NAME THAT COMES [TO MIND ON ARTISTS MY MOM SPENT MORE TIME WITH]; HAS MORE PAINTINGS, MEMORY-WISE, FOR SURE. OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD, THAT’S WHEN THEY MET THE MALKAS’. MOM SPOKE FREQUENTLY OF MELISSA, AND I PROBABLY MET THEM IN PASSING, BECAUSE I WAS ON TO OTHER STUFF. BUT I THINK THAT, WHEREVER THEY WERE, THEY WOULD HAVE REACHED OUT AND GOT IN TOUCH WITH OTHER ARTISTS. PLUS, WHERE THEY WERE ON BROXBURN ROAD, IT WAS A PLACE WHERE WE COULD DO JUST ABOUT ANYTHING—BUILDING THINGS, TEARING THINGS DOWN, MAKING ART, BLOWING STUFF UP, AS KIDS DO. THERE WERE ALWAYS ANIMALS, SOME HORSES, AND ONE DISASTROUS ATTEMPT AT RAISING SHEEP BY MY FATHER. THEY WERE ALWAYS INTO SOMETHING.” ON HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING, FLAIG ELABORATED, “AS TIME GOES BY, WE FIND THE NEED TO TIDY UP AND GET READY FOR THE NEXT STAGE OF LIFE. PART OF IT IS FINDING ROOM FOR SOME OF THESE WORKS OF ART THAT HAVE BEEN IN MY HOUSE AND HAVE SURVIVED, SOMEWHAT MIRACULOUSLY, SINCE MOM AND DAD LEFT A LITTLE FAR AND I TOOK THEM OVER, AS WE WERE EMPTYING OUT THE PLACE. THEY’VE BEEN IN MY BASEMENT, UNAPPRECIATED, AND I SUPPOSE AT SOME RISK OF BEING FORGOTTEN, OR LOST, OR THROWN OUT. THEY DO HAVE SOME SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR ME, AND I CAN APPRECIATE THE ARTWORK THAT IS IN THE PIECES, MYSELF, TO A LIMITED DEGREE.” “MOM AND DAD HAD REACHED THE END OF THE ROAD...AS BEING ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF THEIR FIVE ACRES…OUT ON BROXBURN ROAD. THESE WORKS WERE IN THEIR PLACE, AND, AS WE CLEANED THE PLACE OUT, I TOOK THEM AND PROTECTED THEM, AND SAVED THEM FROM THE BINS…I’M PUTTING THAT AT 2011.” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN, WAS DEVELOPED BY JANE EDMUNDSON IN 2014, USING A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 24, 1964 AND RECORD P20120030007.ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN (1895 - 1964) WAS BORN IN SWITZERLAND IN 1895 AND WENT ON TO STUDY ART AT AN ACADEMY IN BASIL, THEN AT THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF INTERIOR DECORATING AND PAINTING. IN 1919 HE CAME TO CANADA SETTLING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1947. HE WORKED AS AN INTERIOR DECORATOR IN THE CITY, AND HIS WORK WAS HIGHLY SOUGHT. HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED LANDSCAPE ARTIST AND WOULD FREQUENTLY JOIN TRIPS ORGANIZED BY A.Y.JACKSON, WHOSE STYLE IS SAID TO HAVE HEAVILY INFLUENCED RIETHMAN’S. DURING HIS TIME WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, HE SERVED AS BOTH HEAD OF COMMITTEES AND TAUGHT LESSONS IN FIGURE DRAWING. RIETHMAN WAS SUCCESSFUL IN WHAT HE DID, AS CRITICS ENJOYED HIS WORK AND HE WAS ABLE TO FREQUENTLY DISPLAY IN EXHIBITIONS. ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES COMPILED IN 2019, RIETHMAN WAS EXHIBITED FREQUENTLY IN SOLO AND GROUP EXHIBITIONS IN LETHBRIDGE THROUGH THE 1950S-1960S. PRIOR TO HIS PAINTING CAREER, RIETHMAN WAS INVOLVED WITH THEATRE GROUPS AND PAGEANTS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, DESIGNING BACKGROUNDS AND CREATING FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERFORMANCES. IN 1955, RIETHMAN AND K.E. HUDSON BECAME PARTNERS IN RIETHMAN—HUDSON PAINTING AND DECORATING IN LETHBRIDGE. RIETHMAN’S ARTWORKS WERE OFTEN FRAMED, EXHIBITED AND SOLD AT GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES, LETHBRIDGE BEGINNING IN 1958. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES OPERATED IN CALGARY AND OPENED A BRANCH IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1958, WITH HEINO DEEKEN AS MANAGER IN LETHBRIDGE. GAINSBOROUGH GALLERIES WERE KNOWN TO EXHIBIT ARTWORKS BY SOUTHERN ALBERTA ARTISTS AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN A STATEMENT TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1962, RIETHMAN STATED ABOUT HIS PRACTICE, “ALTHOUGH I PREFER LANDSCAPES AND OCCASIONAL PORTRAITS, NOW AND THEN I EXPERIMENT A LITTLE FROM NATURALISTIC INTO MODERN STYLE…ONCE IN A WHILE IT IS GOOD [TO] CHANGE STYLE TO KEEP FROM GETTING IN A RUT…I PAINT AS I FEEL AND TO HECK WITH THE PUBLIC. POSSIBLY I’M NOT COMMERCIAL ENOUGH, BUT I PREFER HAVING THE FREEDOM TO EXPRESS MYSELF AS I WISH…I AM GRADUALLY RETIRING FROM BUSINESS…AND PLAN TO PAINT AND PAINT AND PAINT. I MAY NOT BE THE BEST, BUT I CERTAINLY HAVE FUN.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190006001-GA. UPDATE: ON 24 OCTOBER 2019, ERNEST E. RIETHMAN’S GRANDDAUGHTER LINDA BAINES SHARED A “PERSONAL RECORD” WITH MUSEUM STAFF. THE LATTER DAY SAINT DOCUMENT WAS COMPLETED BY HER GRANDMOTHER CLARA S. RIETHMAN--ERNEST’S WIFE. IT IS A HANDWRITTEN CHRONOLOGY OF CLARA’S LIFE IN SWITZERLAND AND ALBERTA. PERSONAL INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN THE DOCUMENT EXTENDS TO ERNEST’S LIFE . TO SEE THIS RECORD, PLEASE SEE P19705197000’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20190006003
Acquisition Date
2019-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
12
Height
55.5
Length
28.5
Width
10
Description
A: RIGHT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN METAL NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. N…ON CO. SYRACCUSE N.Y. U.S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN ON THE TOE AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. A CUT IN THE LEATHER SITS ABOVE THE TOE. THE STITCHING AT THE BACK OF THE BOOT HAS TORN OPEN AND AT THE TOP OF THE BOOT, NEXT TO THE LEATHER PULL, THE BOOT IS SPLIT NEXT TO THE SEAM. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.5CM, W: 10 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. B: THE TOE-SHAPED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT-SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R”. THE VARNISH IS CHIPPED AND DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. C: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “R” AND “6 R…”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, JUST AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. D: THE BACK PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “R”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. E: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, MINIMALLY SCRATCHED BUT DENTED AND DIMPLED. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.2 CM, L: 2.2 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. F: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 55 CM, L: 1.6 CM, W: 8.5 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. G: THE LEFT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN SILVER NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. NETTLET… CO. S…SE N.Y. ...S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN OVER THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE SIDE OF THE HEEL, AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.8 CM, W: 9.7 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. H: THE TOE SHAPED PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. I: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “L” AND “6 LEFT”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, MOSTLY AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. DIMENSIONS: H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. J: THE BACK PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. K: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, SCRATCHED AND WORN IN PLACES. A KNOT IN THE WOOD HAS FALLEN OUT AND LEFT A HOLE IN THE TOP OF THE INSERT. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.3 CM, L: 2.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. L: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R” WITH TWO LINES DRAWN OVER IT. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE INSERT IS A NAIL, THE TOP GRINDED DOWN. DIMENSIONS: H: 55.5 CM, L: 1.9 CM, W: 8.6 CM. CONDITION: GOOD.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
MILITARY
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
THIS PAIR OF RIDING BOOTS BELONGED TO MURRAY NELSON, THE BROTHER DONOR KATHRYN HINMAN. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THESE BOOTS AND THEIR OWNER, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HINMAN AT THE MUSEUM ON MARCH 20, 2017. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “THE PREVIOUS OWNER OF THESE BOOTS WAS MY BROTHER, MURRAY [NELSON],” HINMAN BEGAN, “HE PASSED AWAY AT THE END OF NOVEMBER 2015… HE WAS A LOCAL MUSICIAN. HE CAME INTO THE POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS FROM MY GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, WHO WAS LIEUTENANT COLONEL GEORGE S. BROWN. MY GRANDDAD WAS A GREAT FRIEND OF BRIGADIER GENERAL STEWART. GRANDDAD CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS AT SOME POINT FROM DR. STEWART AND WHEN MY BROTHER WAS ABOUT EIGHTEEN, MY GRANDFATHER PASSED THEM ON TO HIM.” “[MURRAY DID] TELL ME THAT HE WAS IN THE GARAGE OUT AT THE FARM, WHICH IS ACTUALLY BROWN ROAD JUST OFF THE COUTTS’ HIGHWAY AND THAT WAS WHERE MY GRANDFATHER’S ACREAGE WAS. ON THAT ACREAGE, THERE WAS A GARAGE [AMONG] MANY BUILDINGS. MURRAY HAD SAID GRANDDAD HAD TAKEN HIM INTO THE GARAGE AND WHEN MURRAY EXPRESSED AN INTEREST IN [THE BOOTS THERE] GRANDDAD SAID, ‘YUP, YOU CAN HAVE THEM. THEY WERE GENERAL STEWART’S FROM THE BOER WAR. TAKE GOOD CARE OF THEM.’” “[MY BROTHER] USED TO WEAR THEM PLAYING IN BANDS WHEN HE WAS EIGHTEEN AND UP,” HINMAN CONTINUED, “[THEY WERE] PART OF HIS DRESS CODE… THEY’RE LOVELY BOOTS. THE STORY WAS THAT THEY WERE FROM THE BOER WAR, WHICH PUTS THEM OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS OLD… [MY BROTHER] PROBABLY ACQUIRED [THESE BOOTS WHEN] MY GRANDFATHER PASSED AWAY IN 1968. MURRAY WOULD HAVE BEEN EIGHTEEN [THAT YEAR]. HE WAS IN HIS ELEMENT PLAYING WITH THE BANDS, EXPERIMENTING WITH ALL DIFFERENT KINDS OF MUSIC [AT THAT TIME]. I REMEMBER HIM LOOKING VERY COOL WEARING THEM. ALTHOUGH THESE ARE A VERY SMALL SIZE, RIGHT? SO I’M SURE THEY WERE A LITTLE PINCHEY.” “[MY BROTHER HAD] LONG HAIR – WELL EVERYBODY HAD LONG HAIR IN THE 60’S AND 70’S. [HE WAS] VERY COOL AND AT THAT POINT TOO MY DAD (BILL NELSON) HAD ACQUIRED A SMALL MGA, BURGUNDY-COLOURED, AND [MY BROTHER] USED TO BOMB AROUND AND GO TO BAND PRACTICE IN THAT. OH YEAH, HE WAS NOTORIOUS,” HINMAN LAUGHED, REMEMBERING. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER BROTHER, HINMAN REPLIED, “MY BROTHER WAS BORN IN 1950. HE WAS JUST A LITTLE OVER SIXTY-FIVE WHEN HE PASSED AWAY. HE WAS AN ACTIVE MUSIC TEACHER AND LOCAL GUITAR TEACHER IN TOWN. YOU COULD SEE HIM BUSKING ON THE STREETS IN FRONT OF THE PENNY COFFEE HOUSE AND IN FRONT OF ESQUIRE’S COFFEE HOUSE. EVERYBODY KNEW HIM. HE USED TO BUSK AT THE FARMER’S MARKET ON FIFTH STREET ON FIRST FRIDAYS. HE PLAYED IN BANDS FOREVER.” “[HE WAS IN A] ROCK’N ROLL BAND. HE WAS IN SO MANY BANDS OVER THE YEARS AND I DON’T KNOW THE NAMES OF THE EARLY BANDS. ONE OF [THE BANDS HE PLAYED WITH] WAS KRANDEL’S KLOUD MACHINE, ONE OF THEM WAS THE SHAMAN, AND THEN HE MOVED TO VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AND PLAYED IN VANCOUVER – UP AND DOWN THE WEST COAST. WHEN HE CAME BACK FROM THE COAST, HE JUST PLAYED EVERYWHERE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH VARIOUS PEOPLE… ANYWAY HE WAS VERY WELL KNOWN IN THE BAND SCENE AND HE HAD A RECORDING STUDIO. THAT WAS A PASSION. HE CALLED HIS RECORDING STUDIO, AARDVARK RECORDINGS. HE HAD HIS FIRST RECORDING STUDIO IN THE BASEMENT OF KRUEGER’S MUSIC, WHERE HE TAUGHT MUSIC FOR BILL KRUEGER. THEN HE MOVED ALL HIS STUFF OVER AND HE WAS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE TRIANON FOR YEARS TEACHING RECORDING AND THEN HE GOT INVOLVED IN TECHNOLOGY, SO HE STARTED FIXING COMPUTERS AND DID COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. HE KIND OF USED TECHNOLOGY IN THE RECORDING STUDIO. HE HAD THIS HUGE SOUND BOARD WITH ALL THE SWITCHES AND WHATEVER AND HE HAD TONS OF LIKE STACKS OF MACHINES [FOR RECORDING],” HINMAN REMEMBERED. “[MY BROTHER] HAD A REPUTATION,” HINMAN WENT ON, “[PEOPLE WOULD SAY TO ME], ‘OH YOUR MURRAY’S SISTER.’ IT WAS GREAT AND ACTUALLY MY HUSBAND WAS BORN IN CARDSTON AND HE HAD A BAND THAT HE USED TO PLAY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH. WE HAVE AN ACTUAL RECORDING FROM THE BASEMENT RECORDING STUDIO AT KRUEGER’S, WHEN [MY BROTHER] RECORDED WITH MY HUSBAND’S BAND. IT WAS GREAT.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE MUSICAL INFLUENCE WITHIN HER FAMILY, HINMAN EXPLAINED, “MY MOM (MARGARET NELSON) WAS A LOCAL MUSIC TEACHER. SHE WAS A PIANO TEACHER. MY DAD’S MOTHER WAS KATE MARQUIS NELSON, WHO WAS A LOCAL PIANO TEACHER SO [WE HAD INFLUENCE] FROM BOTH ENDS. WE ALL GREW UP IN OUR HOUSEHOLD WITH MUSIC. I HAVE A DEGREE IN MUSIC AND I’M A MUSIC TEACHER AND MY YOUNGER BROTHER, MARK, PLAYS CLASSICAL GUITAR. WE HAD MUSIC EVERYWHERE. I HAVE SOME PICTURES AT HOME OF THE THREE KIDS WITH A DRUM SET AND I’M ON THE KEYBOARD AND MURRAY IS PLAYING GUITAR AND, EVEN A PICTURE OF MY MOM SITTING AT THE DRUMS TAKING PART IN THE MERRIMENT IN OUR BASEMENT.” “MY DAD PLAYED IN THE SYMPHONY. IN FACT, MY MOM AND DAD REVIVED THE SYMPHONY IN THE EARLY ‘60S. SO IT WAS JUST NATURAL FOR MURRAY TO [BE MUSICAL]. HE PLAYED EVERYTHING. HE PLAYED BANJO WITH MUSICAL THEATRE ONE YEAR, AND TAUGHT BANJO. HE THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ‘ONLY’ BANJO TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. HE [ALSO] THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ONLY REAL GOOD GUITARIST TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE TOO,” HINMAN LAUGHED. “SO ANYWAY,” SHE CONTINUED, “IT WAS A STRUGGLE FINANCIALLY. MUSIC IS NOT AN EASY, AN EASY PROFESSION TO BE IN, A PERFORMING MUSICIAN. HE QUIT HIGH SCHOOL WHEN HE WAS PROBABLY SIXTEEN, BUT IN HIS MID TO LATE TWENTIES, HE FINISHED HIS DIPLOMA AND HE STARTED NURSING AT THE COLLEGE. HE DID PRETTY WELL [THERE], BUT HE DIDN’T DEAL WELL WITH AUTHORITY, SO HE DIDN’T FINISH IT. BUT [THROUGH THAT HE] GOT A LOT OF GOOD PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE. [AFTERWARDS] PROCEEDED TO PURSUE HIS PASSION, WHICH WAS MUSIC. IN THE LAST FEW YEARS OF HIS LIFE HE FIXED THOSE COMPUTER SIGNS THAT SIT ON THE SIDE OF THE ROAD. HE WOULD FIX THE MOTHER BOARD… HE JUST DID WHAT HE WANTED. HE LIVED IS LIFE HIS WAY.” TO THE QUESTION OF WHY HER GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, RECEIVED THE BOOTS FROM GENERAL JOHN SMITH STEWART, HINMAN ANSWERED, “THE ONLY REASON I CAN THINK OF IS THAT BECAUSE THEY WERE GREAT FRIENDS… [IF GENERAL STEWART PASSED AWAY IN THE 1970S], THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN AFTER MY GRANDFATHER [DIED]. I KNOW THAT THEY WERE INVOLVED IN THE MILITARY STUFF LOCALLY. ELLA STEWART AND MY GRANDMOTHER WERE GREAT FRIENDS. SOMEHOW [THESE BOOTS WERE] JUST PASSED ALONG TO GRANDDAD.” “WHEN MURRAY WAS DIAGNOSED WITH THE CANCER IN JUNE OF 2015, I KNEW THAT THERE WAS SOME ITEMS THAT HE HAD THAT I NEEDED TO RETRIEVE BECAUSE THEY WERE FAMILY HISTORY,” HINMAN REMEMBERED, “[AMONG THOSE TREASURED THINGS WERE] GENERAL STEWART’S BOOTS, SO I RETRIEVED THEM IN JULY… [MURRAY SAID], ‘TAKE THEM. DO WHAT YOU NEED TO DO WITH THEM.’” “[ONE REASON MY BROTHER HELD ON TO THE BOOTS WAS] HE WAS VERY CLOSE TO MY GRANDPARENTS, BECAUSE HE USED TO SPEND A LOT OF TIME OUT AT THE FARM,” HINMAN EXPLAINED, “I THINK THAT HE JUST COULDN’T BRING HIMSELF TO PART WITH THEM, BECAUSE THEY WERE PART OF HIS FAMILY HISTORY. IT WAS A SPECIAL KIND OF THING BECAUSE GRANDDAD HAD ACTUALLY PASSED THEM TO HIM.” MURRAY NELSON’S OBITUARY WAS PUBLISHED ON THE MARTIN BROTHERS FUNERAL CHAPELS WEBSITE. IT STATES, “WILLIAM MURRAY NELSON, AGE 65, PASSED AWAY PEACEFULLY AT THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL HOSPITAL ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2015, AFTER A VALIANT BATTLE WITH CANCER. MUSICIAN, PERFORMER, TEACHER, MENTOR, SOUND GUY, RECORDING GUY, VIDEO GUY, COMPUTER GUY, SIGN GUY; HE WAS A MAN WHO LIVED LIFE HIS WAY, ON HIS TERMS, DOING WHAT HE LOVED.” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON DECEMBER 9, 2015, SHORTLY AFTER THE MUSICIAN’S DEATH STATES THAT AT A LOCAL MUSIC SHOW, PROMINENT LEHTBRIDGE SONGWRITER, LEEROY STAGGER, BEGAN THE SHOW WITH A TRIBUTE TO NELSON. TO FURTHER UNDERSCORE NELSON’S REPUTATION IN THE CITY, A DECEMBER 23, 2015 ARTICLE TITLED, “2015 WAS A MEMORABLE YEAR FOR CITY MUSIC SCENE,” WRITTEN FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD BY RICHARD AMERY STATED, “LETHBRIDGE SAID GOODBYE TO MURRAY NELSON, WHO PASSED AWAY FROM CANCER THIS YEAR. NELSON WAS ONE OF THE SCENE’S MORE PROMINENT PERFORMERS ON STAGE PERFORMING SOLO AND WITH A VARIETY OF BANDS AS WELL AS BUSKING ON THE STREETS ALL OVER LETHBRIDGE…HIS MEMORY WILL LIVE ON IN THE STUDENTS HE TAUGHT AND THE SOULS HE TOUCHED ON STAGE OR JUST CHATTING AT VARIOUS WATER HOLES.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND THE COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REFERENCED.
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2018
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180016001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
2018
Materials
METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
127
Length
40.8
Width
11.5
Description
SINGLE-SPACE DUPLEX PARKING METER WITH AN ELECTRONIC MECHANISM. THE METER CASING IS GREY FEATURING TWO GREEN DOMES IN THE SHAPE OF MICKEY MOUSE EARS. THE METERS ARE LABELED “30-61” AND “30-62” ON THE FRONT AND ATTACH TO A HOLLOW, METAL POLE. A STICKER NEAR THE BOTTOM OF THE CASING READS “THIS CAR – INSERT VALID COINS ONLY – DISPLAY INDICATES TIME PURCHASED – CITY OF LETHBRIDGE – THIS CAR.” BOTH METERS HAVE A COIN SLOT AND A LABEL WHICH SAYS “FREE PARKING – WEEKDAYS AFTER 5:30 PM – ALL DAY WEEKENDS AND HOLIDAYS.” THE DIGITAL METERS ARE VISIBLE AT THE TOP OF THE HOUSING, BEHIND SEMI-TRANSPARENT PLASTIC. ON EITHER SIDE OF THE METER'S TIME DISPLAY, THE WORDS “MACKAY" AND "GUARDIAN” ARE INSCRIBED VERTICALLY. A METAL PLATE FASTENS TO THE REAR, AND TWO KEYHOLES PROTRUDE ABOVE IT. THROUGHOUT, THERE ARE MANY SCRATCHES AND PAINT CHIPS. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
REGULATIVE & PROTECTIVE T&E
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON JULY 4TH, 2018, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE REMOVED THIS PARKING METER FROM THE 300 BLOCK OF 3RD STREET SOUTH AND DONATED IT TO THE GALT MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES. ALL OF THE COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS IN LETHBRIDGE’S DOWNTOWN CORE HAVE SINCE BEEN REMOVED AND REPLACED WITH MULTI-SPACE PARKING KIOSKS. IN DECEMBER 2015, THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE HOSTED AN INFORMATIONAL SESSION INFORMING LETHBRIDGE RESIDENTS ABOUT AN IMPENDING UPGRADE TO THE DOWNTOWN PARKING SYSTEM. VAL FELLGER WAS THE 2015 INITIATIVE’S PARKING COORDINATOR. FELLGER OUTLINED REASONS FOR UPDATING THE EXISTING PARKING SYSTEM IN A 2018 CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASE. THE ANNOUNCEMENT SAYS, “THE PRIMARY OBJECTIVE OF PAID AND TIME ZONED PARKING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE IS TO ACHIEVE PARKING TURNOVER WHICH RESULTS IN EQUITABLE AVAILABILITY OF PARKING TO SHOPPERS AND VISITORS TO DOWNTOWN…THERE ARE CURRENTLY A LITTLE OVER 1500 PARKING METERS IN THE DOWNTOWN. APPROXIMATELY 95 PERCENT OF THE PARKING METER INFRASTRUCTURE, PARKING METER HOUSINGS AND SUPPORT POLES ARE GREATER THAN 25 YEARS OLD. THESE HOUSINGS AND POLES ARE STARTING TO SHOW SIGNS OF WEAR AND LOOK UNKEMPT. MANY OF THE METERS CANNOT BE REPROGRAMMED TO ACCEPT NEW COINS OR OTHER PAYMENT OPTIONS.” THE CITY PONDERED THREE OPTIONS FOR THE IMPROVED SYSTEM: 100 PERCENT SINGLE-SPACE METERS WITH FOOT PATROL ENFORCEMENT, 100 PERCENT PAY-BY-PLATE MULTI-SPACE SMART MACHINES WITH MOBILE LICENSE PLATE RECOGNITION ENFORCEMENT, AND A HYBRID SYSTEM COMPRISED OF PAY-BY-PLATE MACHINES WITH MOBILE LICENSE PLATE RECOGNITION ENFORCEMENT AND IN ISOLATED LOCATIONS, INCLUDING BARRIER-FREE PARKING STALLS, SINGLE-SPACE SMART METERS WITH FOOT PATROL ENFORCEMENT. IN THE DOWNTOWN PARKING METER REPLACEMENT PROJECT STAKEHOLDER & PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT REPORT, 80 PERCENT OF THE PUBLIC SELECTED THE HYBRID SYSTEM. IN AUGUST 2017, THE CITY CHOSE A VENDOR, AND BY JUNE 2018 THE NEW SYSTEM WAS UP AND RUNNING. AS A RESULT, 1526 COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS WERE REMOVED FROM DOWNTOWN STREETS AND 170 MULTI-SPACE KIOSKS WERE INSTALLED. IN A CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASE FROM MAY 28, 2018, MAYOR CHRIS SPEARMAN SAYS, “THIS IS ANOTHER SIGN OF HOW OUR CITY IS GROWING UP. WE TALK A LOT ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING A “SMART CITY” AND USING TECHNOLOGY TO MAKE US MORE EFFICIENT. THAT’S WHAT THIS NEW SYSTEM DOES.” FELLGER ADDED, “THE KIOSKS ARE SOLAR POWERED MAKING THEM MORE COST EFFECTIVE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY TO OPERATE THAN THE PREVIOUS PARKING METERS THAT USED AA BATTERIES.” ON DECEMBER 12, 2018, KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S ACTING PARKING COORDINATOR PHILLIP BERG. BERG ASSISTED FELLGER WITH THE PLANNING OF THE NEW PARKING SYSTEM. CONCERNING THE ROLLOUT OF THE METER REPLACEMENT PROJECT, BERG SAID, “IT WAS PRETTY HECTIC. PEOPLE WERE STILL A LITTLE RESISTANT TO CHANGE. WE HAD CONDITIONED PEOPLE TO A PARKING STYLE FOR THE LAST 50 TO 60 YEARS, AND IN ONE NIGHT WE CHANGED EVERYTHING OVER. SO THERE WAS A LOT OF RESISTANCE.” TO DEAL WITH THE RESISTANCE, BERG KEPT AN OPEN DIALOGUE WITH THE PUBLIC. “THERE WERE TIMES THAT MY PHONE DIDN’T STOP RINGING FOR DAYS, BUT WE’VE MADE A LOT OF CHANGES TO SCREEN DISPLAY AND SIGNAGE. [WE’VE DONE] EVERYTHING WE CAN POSSIBLY DO TO FACILITATE THE BEST PARKING MANAGEMENT STRATEGY WE CAN.” PRIOR TO THE PROJECT, BERG WORKED CLOSELY WITH THE COIN-OPERATED PARKING METERS AS LETHBRIDGE’S PARKING AND TRAFFIC TECHNICIAN. HE SAID, “I DID ALL THE REPAIRS, MAINTENANCE, AND PROGRAMMING THAT HAPPENED WITH THESE SINGLE-SPACE METERS FOR THE LAST EIGHT YEARS. ANYTHING FROM RE-BUILDING HOUSINGS [TO] PUTTING THEM TOGETHER FROM DIFFERENT PIECES TO RE-PROGRAMMING THEM…THEY WERE BROKEN. THERE WAS A LOT OF PIECES THAT WERE ‘FRANKENSTEINED’ TOGETHER TO ALLOW THE METERS TO FUNCTION. THERE WERE TIMES THAT I WAS TAKING AND GRINDING DOWN PARTS TO MAKE THEM WORK. WHEN I FIRST STARTED, I CALLED THE MANUFACTURER OF THE HOUSINGS [AND ASKED TO ORDER PARTS]. THEY LAUGHED AT ME AND [SENT ME EVERYTHING THEY HAD LEFT FOR FREE]. I GOT ALL THESE OLD DUSTY BOXES WITH PIECES WRAPPED IN NEWSPAPER, AND I WOULD BUILD WHATEVER I COULD TO GET THEM OUT ON THE STREET.” BEFORE BERG, LARRY WYROSTOK WAS THE PARKING AND TRAFFIC TECHNICIAN FOR SEVEN YEARS, AND MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HIM ON DECEMBER 20, 2018. WYROSTOK SUGGESTED THAT THE TWO MAIN REASONS THAT THE PARKING METERS BROKE DOWN WERE THEIR AGE AND VANDALISM. REGARDING VANDALISM, HE SAID, “WE USED TO HAVE QUITE A BIT. [ONE TIME I WAS DRIVING BY THE COURT HOUSE] AND SOMEONE USED A ROLL OF DUCK-TAPE ON A METER, [AND] THEY JUST COVERED UP THE WHOLE THING. IT WAS PROBABLY TWO OR THREE INCHES THICK, JUST SO THAT THEY DIDN’T HAVE TO PLUG IT. I TOOK ALL THE DUCK-TAPE OFF, AND THE METER SEEMED TO WORK FINE. YOU SEE ALL KINDS OF STUFF [ON THE STREET.]” WYROSTOK SUGGESTED THAT ANOTHER ASPECT OF THE JOB WAS COLLECTING THE COINS FROM THE METERS. HE SAID, “[I SPENT] A COUPLE OF DAYS A WEEK COLLECTING IN ALL KINDS OF WEATHER; RAIN, SLEET, AND SNOW. I CAN REMEMBER [DAYS THAT WERE] 35 DEGREES BELOW. [I WOULD PUT MY] METER KEY IN THE VAULT DOOR, AND IT WOULDN’T OPEN. IT WAS FROZEN SHUT. [SO I WOULD TAKE] A RUBBER MALLET AND GIVE THE [VAULT DOOR] A LITTLE TAP AND THEN [I WOULD] SPRAY SOME ETHER ON IT. IT COULD BE QUITE TEDIOUS BECAUSE [I HAD] 1500 METERS TO COLLECT FROM.” LIKE PARKING AND TRAFFIC TECHNICIANS, PARKING COMMISSIONAIRES ALSO HAD TO WORK IN ALL KINDS OF CONDITIONS. ON DECEMBER 18, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RETIRED PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE, MAVIS BASTIE ABOUT HER TIME WORKING WITH THE PARKING METERS IN LETHBRIDGE’S DOWNTOWN CORE. BASTIE MOVED FROM HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA IN 1993. SHE SAID, “WHEN I ARRIVED HERE THE VERY FIRST THING I DID THAT WEEK WAS GO OVER TO THE CORPS OF COMMISSIONAIRES HERE IN LETHBRIDGE AND SAID THAT I WANTED TO BECOME A COMMISSIONAIRE. I WAS IMMEDIATELY GIVEN A JOB, AND THAT JOB HAPPENED TO BE GOING OUT AND DOING PARKING, WHICH MEANT WALKING THE STREETS…WALKING THE STREETS WAS DOING THE METERS AND CHECKING VEHICLES.” BASTIE WORKED AS A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE FOR APPROXIMATELY TEN YEARS. DURING HER INTERVIEW, SHE EXPLAINED THAT THERE WERE FOUR PARKING BEATS WITHIN LETHBRIDGE, “THE FIRST ROUTE WAS MAINLY WALKING AROUND AND DOING THE TICKETING OF THE CARS THAT WERE AT METERS THAT WERE EXPIRED...BEAT ONE WAS DOWNTOWN, AND IT CAME OUT OF THE OLD POLICE STATION [TO THIRD AVENUE]…THIRD AVENUE BECAME BEAT TWO AND THEN BEAT THREE WAS A DRIVING [AND WALKING] AREA…BEAT THREE WOULD BE MORE OVER TOWARDS THE HOSPITAL…BEAT FOUR WAS JUST THE DRIVING, THAT MEANT DRIVING AROUND THE HOSPITAL.” BASTIE SUGGESTED THAT ONE OF THE BUSIEST TIMES OF YEAR TO BE A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE WAS DURING THE WHOOP-UP DAYS PARADE, “YOU’RE JOB IS TO MAKE SURE THAT PEOPLE REALIZE THAT JUST BECAUSE IT’S WHOOP-UP DAYS DOESN’T MEAN THAT THEY CAN GET AWAY WITH [PARKING ILLEGALLY]. YOU STILL HAVE TO PLUG THE METERS. IF THAT METER EXPIRES AND YOU DON’T MOVE YOUR VEHICLE YOU GET A TICKET.” BASTIE WAS THE ONLY FEMALE PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE IN LETHBRIDGE DURING THE 1990S. SHE SUGGESTED THAT DUE TO THIS SHE RECEIVED SUPPORT FROM HER COLLEAGUES AND THE LETHBRIDGE POLICE DEPARTMENT, “[IF SOMEONE WAS HARASSING ME] I JUST HAD TO PICK UP THE RADIO… THEY WERE THERE FOR YOU, AND I KNEW THAT NOBODY WOULD EVER HURT ME. THEY WOULDN’T DARE. IT WASN’T BECAUSE I COULDN’T TAKE THEM ON, BUT IT WAS BECAUSE THESE GUYS [WERE LOOKING OUT FOR ME]…YOU’VE ALWAYS GOT THE POLICE DEPARTMENT THERE BEHIND YOU, AND I HONESTLY HAVE TO SAY THAT WHEN I WORKED FOR THE CORP BACK IN THOSE YEARS, WE HAD THE MOST SENSATIONAL POLICE OFFICERS THAT I HAVE EVER HAD ANYTHING TO DO WITH.” FOR BASTIE THE BEST PART OF BEING A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE WAS WORKING WITH THE PUBLIC. SHE SAID, “[WORKING PARKING WAS] A GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO GET TO KNOW PEOPLE...[IT] WAS SOMETHING THAT I NEVER EXPECTED AND I DON’T THINK PEOPLE THINK OF WHEN THEY THINK OF PARKING… [I GOT TO] ASSOCIATE WITH SO MANY PEOPLE, AND IF [I SHOWED] THEM RESPECT THEY [SHOWED ME] RESPECT BACK…I FOUND YOU HAD TO HAVE A GOOD RAPPORT WITH THE BUSINESS OWNERS BECAUSE THE BUSINESS OWNERS APPRECIATED YOU. IF YOU NEEDED HELP, THEY WERE THERE FOR YOU. IF THEY NEEDED HELP, YOU WERE THERE FOR THEM.” OVERALL, BASTIE ENJOYED HER TIME WORKING AS A PARKING COMMISSIONAIRE. SHE SAID, “WHEN I WORKED THE METERS, I LOVED IT. I ENJOYED WORKING PARKING AND EVERYTHING [THAT] IT INCLUDED…IF I HAD MY LIFE TO LIVE OVER, WOULD I DO IT [AGAIN]? DARN RIGHTS I WOULD.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, CITY OF LETHBRIDGE MEDIA RELEASES, AND FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS.
Catalogue Number
P20180016001
Acquisition Date
2018-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"PRINCIPALS AND PRACTICE OF OBSTETRICS"
Date Range From
1938
Date Range To
1939
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, LINEN
Catalogue Number
P20140049002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"PRINCIPALS AND PRACTICE OF OBSTETRICS"
Date Range From
1938
Date Range To
1939
Materials
PAPER, CARDBOARD, LINEN
No. Pieces
1
Height
26
Length
19
Width
6
Description
A GREEN HARD COVERED BOOK WITH GOLD TEXT ON THE SPINE. THE TEXT READS “PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF OBSTETRICS”, “DE LEE”, “SEVENTH EDITION”, “SAUNDERS”. IN ADDITION TO THIS THERE IS A WHITE WRITTEN “440”. STAMPED ON THE TOP AND BOTTOM PAGES OF THE BOOK ARE THE WORDS “GALT HOSPITAL”, AND STAMPED ON ALL THREE SIDES OF THE PAGES ARE THE WORDS “GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING”. "REFERENCE FOR NURSES OCTOBER 5 1939" INSCRIBED ON INSIDE IN PENCIL. VERY GOOD CONDITION: THE COVER IS FADED AND WORN AT THE EDGES.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. NO INFORMATION WAS PROVIDED ABOUT THIS BOOK. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049002
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SPORTS SHIRT "GALT ROYALS"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1964
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, PAINT, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140049005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SPORTS SHIRT "GALT ROYALS"
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1964
Materials
FABRIC, PAINT, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
62
Length
68
Width
48
Description
A GREEN BASKETBALL T-SHIRT WITH WHITE TRIMMING AND WHITE PAINTED NUMBERS AND TEXT. THE FRONT OF THE SHIRT READS “55” AND “GALT ROYALS”. THE BACK READS “55”. THE WHITE TRIMMING FOLLOWS THE BOTTOM EDGE, THE SLEEVE EDGES AND THE COLLAR. THE COLLAR OPENS WITH A METAL ZIPPER, ENDING IN A SMALL SILVER CHAIN. A SMALL WHITE TAG IN THE BACK OF THE COLLAR READS “12” IN RED. EXCELLENT CONDITION: THE COLLAR IS CREASED ON ONE CORNER.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
SPORTS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS SHIRT WAS A PART OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BASKETBALL UNIFORM. WHILE THE SPECIFIC DATE OF THIS ARTIFACT IS UNKNOWN, IT WOULD HAVE MOST LIKELY BEEN IN USE EARLIER THAT 1965, AS THE NURSING SCHOOL HAD GALT ROYAL UNIFORMS IN THAT YEAR THAT WERE DIFFERENT TO THIS ONE. THE UNIFORM WOULD HAVE BEEN USED BY “STUDENTS WHO WERE ON THE TEAM. BETWEEN 1965-68 ST. MICHAEL STUDENTS WERE [ON THE] TEAM ALSO.” ACCORDING TO THE HISTORY ATTACHED TO THIS ARTIFACT, SPORTS ACTIVITIES FOR THE STUDENTS WERE AN IMPORTANT PART OF THEIR LIVES DURING TRAINING. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049005
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TRACHEOTOME SET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1988
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CLOTH, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20140049007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TRACHEOTOME SET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1988
Materials
CLOTH, METAL
No. Pieces
6
Height
16.2
Length
57.5
Width
0.5
Description
1: GREEN FABRIC CASE, EDGED WITH BEIGE FABRIC. DIVIDED INTO THREE POUCHES SEWED IN WITH BEIGE THREAD. TWO BEIGE FABRIC STRAPS ATTACHED TO ROLL AND TIE THE FABRIC CASE. A WHITE LABEL IS SEWN ON, READING IN GREEN TEXT “ SIERRA – SHELDEN”, “TRACHEOTOME CATALOG NO. 175-00”, AND “SIERRA ENGINEERING CO. SIERRA MADRE. CALIF.” 2: THE OBTURATOR THAT MATCHES THE LARGE TRACEOSTOMY TUBE. CURVED METAL WIRE WITH A METAL BOBBLE AT ONE END AND A METAL HANDLE AT THE OTHER END WITH A “7” ETCHED ON THE END. L: 11 CM, D: 1.5 CM 3: THE OBTURATOR THAT MATCHES THE SMALLER TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE. CURVED METAL WIRE WITH A METAL BOBBLE AT ONE END THAT EXPANDS INTO A SHARP CURVE BLADE WITH A BLUNTED TIP. A SMALL CIRCULAR BEAD OF METAL SITS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE WIRE AND AT THE OTHER END OF THE WIRE IS A CYLINDRICAL HANDLE WITH KNURLING TEXTURE. THE END OF THE HANDLE READS “ SIERRA ENG. CO CAT. NO. 287-00” AND “PATENT PEND”. METAL BOBBLE IS MISSING SOME OF ITS PATINA. L: 11 CM, D: 1.6 CM 4: A HOLLOW NEEDLE HEAD WITH A SMALL HANDLE WITH KNURLING TEXTURE. ETCHED INTO THE END OF THE HANDLE THE TEXT READS “287 SIERRA”. H: 6.1 CM, D: 1.7 CM 5: THE LARGE TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE MADE UP OF THREE PIECES; THE OUTER CANNULA, THE INNER CANNULA AND THE FLANGE. THE CANNULA’S SIT TOGETHER, THE INNER LOCKED IN WITH A ROTATING LATCH, BOTH CURVED AND HOLLOW TUBES. THE FLANGE SITS AT THE END OF THE CANNULAS, A METAL PLATE WITH TWO RECTANGULAR HOLES AND CURVING LIP. H: 2.5 CM, L: 10 CM, W: 4 CM 6: THE SMALL TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE MADE UP OF TWO PIECES; THE CANNULA, AND THE FLANGE. THE CANNULA IS A CURVED HOLLOW TUBE ATTACHED AT ONE END TO THE FLANGE, A METAL PLATE WITH TWO RECTANGULAR HOLES AND A CURVING LIP. H: 2.5 CM, L: 6.5 CM, W: 3.8 CM
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
HEALTH SERVICES
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS IS A TRACHEOTOMY SET THAT WAS USED IN DURING SURGERY, IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, AND IN THE EMERGENCY ROOM. BOTH DOCTORS AND NURSES WOULD HAVE USED THIS ARTIFACT DURING THE PROCEDURE OF TRACHEOTOMY, WHICH CREATES A DIRECT AIRWAY IN THROUGH AN INCISION IN THE TRACHEA (WINDPIPE). WHEN ANSWERING THE QUESTION OF THE ARTIFACT’S IMPORTANCE, THE INDIVIDUAL WRITING THE HISTORY STATED, “TRACHEOTOMIES HAVE BEEN LIFE-SAVERS EVEN TO THIS DAY.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049007
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
SKIN THERMOMETER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1988
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, FABRIC, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20140049009
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
SKIN THERMOMETER
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1988
Materials
WOOD, FABRIC, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
4
Height
3.1
Diameter
8.3
Description
1: WOOD CASING LID WRAPPED IN BROWN, CHERRY FAUX LEATHER FABRIC. THE TOP HAS A STRIPE OF CREAM CLOTH TAPE, LIFTING AT ONE CORNER AND WRITTEN ON IT IN BLUE PEN IS, “CSR SKIN THERMOMETER”. THE INSIDE OF THE LID IS PADDED AT THE TOP WITH GREY FABRIC. THE FAUX LEATHER IS FRAYING AWAY AT THE EDGES AND LIFTING AT THE SEAM AT THE SIDE OF THE LID, REVEALING THE WOOD UNDERNEATH. 2: A CIRCULAR SLIP OF CREAM PAPER TITLED “CORRECTING TABLE”. THE REST IS TYPED IN BLACK INK. HANDWRITTEN BLUE INK ADDITIONS FILL IN THE INSTRUMENT NUMBER AS “3878” AS WELL AS FILLING ADDITIONS TO THE CORRECTION CHART. THE SLIGHTEST WRINKLING LEAVES TWO SMALL CREASES ON THE SURFACE. DIAMETER: 6.3 CM 3: THE SKIN THERMOMETER. IT IS CIRCULAR IN A BLACK PLASTIC CASING WITH A SINGLE HALF CIRCLE PLASTIC WINDOW TO THE DIAL ON THE TOP SIDE. THE DIAL READS “FOREGGER”, “FAHRENHEIT HEIDENWOLF AUSTRIA”, AND “PATENT 3878”. THE BOTTOM SIDE HAS A 1.1 CM HIGH, 2.3 CM DIAMETER CYLINDRICAL ARM ON WHICH A ROUND SENSOR SITS. THE SENSOR IS MISSING ALMOST ALL ITS PATINA, ONLY A LITTLE BIT SURVIVING AT THE EDGES. H: 3.8 CM, D: 7 CM 4: THE BOTTOM OF THE CASE. AN OPEN WOOD CYLINDER WRAPPED ON THE OUTSIDE WITH FAUX LEATHER FABRIC WITH GREY FELT ON THE INSIDE. THE INSIDE LIP (ON WHICH THE THERMOMETER SITS) DOES NOT WRAP AROUND COMPLETELY, LEAVING SPACE FOR THE SENSOR ARM. THE BOTTOM EDGE IS UNCOVERED. THE FAUX LEATHER IS FRAYING AT THE EDGES AND PULLING AWAY FROM THE SEAM ON THE SIDE. H: 3.1 CM, D: 8.3 CM
Subjects
MEDICAL & DENTAL T&E
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. THIS SKIN THERMOMETER WAS USED IN THE OPERATING ROOM FROM 1955 TO 1988. ACCORDING TO ITS HISTORY, “OPERATING ROOM STAFF [USED THE THERMOMETER] TO ASSESS THE TEMPERATURE OF THE PATIENTS.” THIS ARTIFACT SHOWS “HOW THINGS HAVE ADVANCED. THEY USE SKIN TAPES NOW THAT ARE THERMOMETERS.” THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049009
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"HIRSCHE"
Date Range From
1913
Date Range To
1935
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20140049011
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"HIRSCHE"
Date Range From
1913
Date Range To
1935
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
44.5
Width
17.2
Description
A WHITE CLOTH, STARCHED NURSING CAP. THE BACK EDGE IS STAMPED WITH BLACK INK, READING “E1040” AND BELOW THAT “HIRSCHE” . THE WHITE STRING TIES AND THE OPENING ATTACHMENT THEY PULL THROUGH IS FRAYING. VERY GOOD CONDITION: THE HEAVILY STARCHED FRONT FOLD IS CREASED WITH FOLD LINES.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
HEALTH SERVICES
ASSOCIATIONS
History
UPON DONATION TO THE MUSEUM, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ASKED MEMBERS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING (GSN) ALUMNAE TO PROVIDE WRITTEN ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO EACH ARTIFACT DONATED IN THE COLLECTION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS COME FROM THOSE RESPONSES CORRESPONDING TO EACH INDIVIDUAL ARTIFACT. ACCORDING TO THIS NURSING CAP’S HISTORY, IT WOULD HAVE BEEN OF THE FIRST TYPES OF CAPS THAT THE STUDENT NURSES WOULD HAVE WORN. IT WAS WORN “ON THE WARDS” OF THE HOSPITAL FROM 1913 ONWARDS TO AN UNSPECIFIED DATE. THE INSIDE OF THE CAP IS LABELLED “HIRSCHE”. USING THE GSN HISTORY BOOK TITLED “WHITE CAPS AND RED ROSES” RECORDS ONE STUDENT FROM THE CLASS OF 1966 WITH THE MAIDEN NAME HIRSCHE AND THREE STUDENTS FROM CLASSES 1968 TO 1975 MARRIED MEN WITH THE HIRSCHE LAST NAME. THIS ARTIFACT IS AMONG A COLLECTION DONATED NEAR THE END OF 2014, BEING THE SECOND WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS ACQUIRED BY THE MUSEUM THAT YEAR. WITH THE FIRST WAVE OF GSN ARTIFACTS COLLECTED IN SUMMER 2014, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE PAST ARCHIVISTS OF THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING COLLECTION, SHIRLEY HIGA, ELAINE HAMILTON, AND SUE KYLLO, ABOUT THEIR INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION AND THE HISTORY OF ARTIFACTS DONATED. FOR THAT INFORMATION, PLEASE REFER TO P20140006001. ON 12 JULY 2018, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT ELISE PUNDYK MET WITH THREE MEMBERS OF GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING ALUMNI ASSOCIATION – SHARON DEJONG, DONNA KARL, AND SUE KYLLO – TO ESTABLISH FURTHER DETAILS ABOUT VARIOUS ARTIFACTS IN THIS WAVE OF GSN ACQUISITIONS. WHEN VIEWING THE CAP, KYLLO, KARL, AND DEJONG STATED THAT ALL STUDENTS HAD TO WRITE THEIR NAMES IN THEIR UNIFORMS – LIKE “HIRSCHE” IS LABELLED IN THIS CAP – BECAUSE THE UNIFORMS, INCLUDING CAPS, WOULD BE SENT TO THE LAUNDRY AND RETURNED BACK TO THE STUDENTS. ABOUT NURSING CAPS, THE THREE ALUMNI EXPLAINED THAT THEY ALWAYS WORE WHITE CAPS AS STUDENTS. UPON GRADUATION THEY RECEIVED A VELVET BLACK BAND THEY WOULD PIN ON THE CAPS FOR WORK AS GRADUATED NURSES. THIS WAS ONE OF THE INDICATORS USED TO IDENTIFY THE STUDENT NURSES VERSUS THE GRADUATED NURSES. THEY STATED THAT IN THEIR FIRST TWO YEARS OF SCHOOL, THEY WOULD WERE BLACK SHOES AND STOCKINGS (A PRACTICE THAT ENDED IN 1968) AND AFTER THAT THEY WOULD WEAR WHITE SHOES WITH WHITE STOCKINGS TO INDICATE SENIOR NURSES. THESE VARIANCES IN THE STUDENT UNIFORMS HAD IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR EXPERIENCES ON THE FLOOR. FOR EXAMPLE, THERE WAS ONE DOCTOR WHO HAD A STRICT RULE AGAINST STUDENT NURSES SCRUBBING IN FOR HIS OPERATIONS. THEY AGREED THAT THIS WAS AN EARLY EXAMPLE OF A NURSE’S CAP, USED FROM ESTIMATE DATES OF 1913 TO 1935. REFERENCING THE GSN HISTORY BOOK, “WHITE CAPS…,” THERE IS NO RECORD OF A STUDENT WITH THIS LAST NAME IN THE SPECULATED TIME PERIOD. AS AN ANSWER TO THIS, KYLLO ADDED TO THE CAP’S WRITTEN NOTES, “THIS HAT COULD HAVE BEEN A GALT HOSPITAL STAFF MEMBER AND MAY BE NOT A GALT HAT.” IT CAN ALSO BE NOTED THAT AN ACTIVE MEMBER OF THE GSN ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION INVOLVED IN THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS OF THE DONATION OF ITEMS TO THE MUSEUM WAS SHARON HIRSCHE (NEE TREIBER) OF THE CLASS OF 1968. PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Catalogue Number
P20140049011
Acquisition Date
2014-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, VELVET, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20180002000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
METAL, VELVET, WOOD
No. Pieces
6
Height
2
Length
18.2
Width
9.5
Description
A. CASE, 18.2 CM LONG X 9.5 CM WIDE; CASE IS COMPRISED OF WOODEN PANELS BOUND WITH CLOTH SPINE; BROWN SYNTHETIC-LEATHER OUTSIDE WITH BLUE VELVET LINING. TOP HAS WORN SILVER NUMBERS IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER “12 [ILLEGIBLE] 4”. INSIDE OF CASE HAS CLOTH TAG ADHERED TO LID WITH BLACK TEXT “L.E. SALKELD”. TOP OF CASE HAS BLUE STAIN AT RIGHT SIDE; CASE EXTERIOR IS SEVERELY WORN WITH FINISH PEELED AND SCUFFED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. DRAFTING COMPASS, 14.1CM LONG X 1.4CM WIDE. SILVER COMPASS WITH A POINTED STRAIGHT LEG AND ROUNDED, ADJUSTABLE DRAWING LEG. COMPASS HAS TURN-KNOB FOR ADJUSTING LEAD IN THE DRAWING LEG. MID-SECTION OF COMPASS IS TAPERED IN ON BOTH LEGS; FRONT OF COMPASS HINGE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “O.R.P”; COMPASS HAS HANDLE AT TOP OF HINGE. COMPASS STRAIGHT LEG IS BLACKENED ON THE TIP AND DRAWING LEG IS TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. DRARFTING DIVIDER, 14.2 CM LONG X 1.4 CM WIDE. SILVER DIVIDER WITH TWO POINTED LEGS; MID-SECTION OF DIVIDER IS TAPERED IN ON BOTH LEGS; FRONT OF DIVIDER HINGE HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “O.R.P”; COMPASS HAS HANDLE AT TOP OF HINGE. DIVIDER IS TARNISHED ON INSIDE OF LEGS AND HAS ADHERED SOILING ON BACK OF LEGS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. BOW COMPASS, 9.4 CM LONG X 2.9 CM WIDE. SILVER BOW COMPASS WITH ADJUSTABLE TURN KNOBS ON POINTED STRAIGHT LEG AND DRAWING LEG. COMPASS HINGE RUNS ACROSS MID-SECTION WITH RING ATTACHED TO TOP AS THE BASE FOR HANDLE. HINGE HAS ADJUSTABLE TURN-KNOB ON SIDE. LEGS ARE TARNISHED ON OUTSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. EXTENSION ROD, 10.5 CM LONG X 0.7 CM WIDE. SILVER EXTENSION ROD WITH NARROW LEG AND CUT-OUT UP CENTER OF ROD END. TOP OF ROD HAS ADJUSTABLE KNOB ND CUT-OUT DOWN CENTER OF ROD TOP. ROD HAS TARNISHING AROUND ADJUSTABLE KNOB; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. F. RULING PEN, 13 CM LONG X 1.2 CM WIDE. SILVER RULING PEN WITH DARKER ENGRAVED CROSS-HATCHED HANDLE. END TIP HAS ADJUSTABLE TURNING KNOB ACROSS POINTS. INSIDE OF RULING PEN END POINTS ARE TARNISHED; ADJUSTABLE TURNING KNOB IS TARNISHED AND RUSTED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DRAFTING T&E
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
History
ON FEBRUARY 18, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ELAINE MCENTEE REGARDING HER DONATION OF A DRAFTING SET. THE SET WAS USED BY HER FATHER, LEONARD E.SALKELD, THROUGHOUT HIS CAREER AS AN ENGINEER. ON HER MEMORIES OF THE DRAFTING SET, MCENTEE RECALLED, “[THE SET] WOULD HAVE BEEN HIS FOR HIS LIFETIME, THROUGH UNIVERSITY, AND ALL THE TIME.” “I DIDN’T SEE THEM TILL LATER. THEY ALSO HAD, GROWING UP [IN BRITISH COLUMBIA]…THEY DID THEIR DRAFTING AND THEIR MAPS/BLUEPRINTS, BUT HE DID MAPS THAT [WERE] ON LINEN, AND THEN IT WAS WAXED. WHEN THEY WERE DONE WITH THOSE MAPS, MOM WOULD WASH THEM, WASH THE WAX OUT, AND USE THE LINEN. I STILL HAVE SOME OF THAT LINEN. THE OTHER THING THAT I REMEMBER IS - OUR SCRAP PAPER THAT WE DREW ON, WAS OLD MAPS, (THE DRAFTING MAPS THEY DREW UP ALL BY HAND), AND MOM WOULD IRON THEM. SHE’D TAKE THESE ROLLS [OF PAPER], IRON THEM FLAT, CUT THEM IN SQUARES, AND THAT’S WHAT WE DREW ON AS KIDS.” “[MY FATHER, LEONARD SALKELD] HAD A CIVIL ENGINEERING DEGREE. HE FOUGHT IN WORLD WAR TWO, CAME HOME, AND GOT HIS UNIVERSITY DEGREE. HE DIDN’T WANT LAND, [HE WANTED] HIS UNIVERSITY DEGREE. INTERESTINGLY ENOUGH, HE HAD TO FIGHT FOR THAT, BECAUSE HE CAME HOME ‘SHELL-SHOCKED’, AND THEY DIDN’T KNOW ENOUGH ABOUT THAT THEN. BECAUSE HE WASN’T PHYSICALLY IMPAIRED, THEY THOUGHT HE DIDN’T DESERVE ANY VETERAN’S BENEFITS. ONE OF HIS FAMILY MEMBERS WAS A M.P., SO THEY WENT TO THE MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT, GOT HIM HIS VETERAN’S BENEFITS, AND, AT THAT POINT, HE DIDN’T WANT TO FARM. HE’D COME FROM A FARM, AND HE DIDN’T WANT LAND, SO HE CHOSE THE UNIVERSITY AND TOOK HIS DEGREE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING” MCENTEE ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S EXPERIENCES IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA, NOTING, “HE DID WORK FOR THE PFRA – A LOT OF WORK HERE, AND A LOT OF WORK ON THE ST. MARY’S IRRIGATION DISTRICT. WE LIVED IN ARROWWOOD FOR 4 OR 5 YEARS, TILL WE MOVED TO B.C. DAD WORKED ON A SIPHON OUT OF VAUXHALL. THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN IN [1951-1955]. IT WAS AFTER THE DROUGHT ON THE PRAIRIES, AND THEY WERE PUTTING IN THE IRRIGATION, AND REHABILITATING THE PRAIRIES. SO HE DID THAT, AND THEN HE WENT ON TO WORK ON THE COLUMBIA RIVER SYSTEM, IN ALL OF B.C. WE SPENT 5 YEARS HERE. [I REMEMBER] I WAS 2, AND HE TOOK ME TO WORK LOTS, BECAUSE MOM WOULD COME AND STAY IN A MOTEL NEAR THE CAMP, WHERE THE GUYS WERE ALL WORKING OR BOARDING AT HOMES.” “SHE TRAVELED WITH HIM UNTIL I STARTED SCHOOL. SO I KNEW THE NAMES OF ALL THE HEAVY EQUIPMENT THAT HE DROVE. BY THE TIME I WAS 3, I COULD SAY ALL THE NAMES OF ALL THE HEAVY EQUIPMENT THAT THEY USED TO MOVE THE LAND, AND DIG THE CANALS. I SAW DAMS BEING BUILT, AND WATERWAYS TURNED OFF, AND WATERWAYS TURNED ON, AND GREW UP KNOWING THAT, FOR 5 YEARS, UNTIL I WENT TO SCHOOL. LATER, I MET MY HUSBAND, AND HE IS FROM MONTREAL. HE TOLD ME THAT ONE YEAR THEY TURNED OFF NIAGARA FALLS TO REPAIR THEM. HE DID NOT KNOW MY DAD WAS A CIVIL ENGINEER, AND THAT I HAD SEEN DAMS BEING BUILT, AND WATER MOVING, AND TURBINES, AND TURBINES RUNNING, AND SOME NOT RUNNING. IT WAS TOTALLY WITHIN MY BRAIN POWER TO PERCEIVE THAT NIAGARA FALLS COULD BE TURNED OFF, AND HE JUST THOUGHT THAT WAS SUCH A HILARIOUS JOKE, UNTIL I TOLD HIM WHAT MY DAD DID, AND ALL THAT I HAD SEEN AS I WAS GROWING UP. JUST RECENTLY THEY HAD THE CELEBRATION OF THE ST. MARY’S IRRIGATION DISTRICT, AND I WAS GOING TO ASK MY MOM IF SHE WANTED TO COME OUT AND PARTICIPATE IN IT, IF DAD HAD WORKED ON IT OR NOT. SHE SAID, “OH, MAN, I WOULD HAVE COME…YOUR DAD DID WORK ON IT.”” “BECAUSE WE TRAVELED WITH DAD, AND MOVED AROUND WITH HIM ON HIS WORKSITES, UNTIL I WAS 5, I SAW HIS WORK, AND I KNEW WHAT HE WAS DOING, AT A YOUNG AGE. FOR THAT REASON [THE DRAFTING SET] WAS IMPORTANT TO ME.” “[NOW] I’M PACKING, AND MOVING – AND FOUND [THE DRAFTING SET] AGAIN. I HAD BROUGHT IT HOME FROM MY MOM’S PLACE, AFTER DAD’S FUNERAL. I NEVER REALLY KNEW WHAT I WAS GOING TO DO WITH IT, BUT I FOUND IT AGAIN, AND I THOUGHT, “MAN, HE WORKED IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA HERE.” SO I BROUGHT IT IN [TO THE MUSEUM]…I THINK THEY WOULD BE WELL-CARED-FOR, AND APPRECIATED [HERE]. TO DO ANYTHING ELSE WITH THEM – I DON’T KNOW. NOBODY’S GOING TO BUY THEM AT A GARAGE SALE…I DON’T KNOW THAT THEY’D EVEN KNOW HOW TO USE THEM ANYMORE. I WANT THEM TO GO SOMEWHERE THEY’RE APPRECIATED.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180002000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180002000
Acquisition Date
2018-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BUTTON ACCORDION
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
WOOD, METAL, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
2
Height
37
Length
36.4
Width
20
Description
A. BUTTON ACCORDION, 37 CM TALL X 36.4 CM LONG X 20 CM WIDE. ACCORDION IS BROWN POLISHED WOOD WITH BLACK AND LIGHT BROWN TRIM; ACCORDION HAS BLACK PLASTIC BELLOWS AND SILVER PLATE OVER THREE ROWS OF WHITE BUTTONS AT SIDE; OPOPSITE END OF ACCORDION HAS FOUR ROWS OF WHITE AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS SET IN SILVER PLATE ABOVE BLACK LEATHER STRAP. TOP OF ACCORDION HAS TWO SILVER BASS/TREBLE SWITCHES. BORDERS AROUND BELLOWS HAVE PEAL/TORTOISE SHELL INLAID. ACCORDION IS MISSING BUTTON FROM FOURTH ROW OF BUTTONS, AND HAS TWO WOODEN SUBSTITUTE BUTTONS IN SECOND AND FOURTH ROWS. FRONT OF ACCORDION HAS WINDOW ABOVE BELLOWS WITH GLASS PLATE OVER WHITE PAPER AND BLACK TEXT “C. DALLAPE, TRENTO (ITALIA)”. ACCORDION HAS FOUR BRASS FEET ON SIDE WITH FOUR ROWS OF BUTTONS. WOOD IS WORN AT HANDLES AND EDGES; METAL PLATES AND ACCENTS HAVE CORROSION. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BLUE COTTON BAG, 72 CM LONG X 53 CM WIDE. BAG HAS HANDLE ATTACHED TO COVER FLAP; COVER FLAP HAS THREE BUTTON HOLES. BAG HAS TWO BLACK PLASTIC BUTTONS ON FRONT ALONG TOP EDGE. BAG HAS PATCHES STITCHED WITH BLACK THREAD ON FRONT UPPER LEFT CORNER, ON BACK IN THE CENTER OF BAG, AND ON THE BACK BESIDE LEFT CORNER OF HANDLE. BAG IS TORN IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER AND FRAYED; BAG IS TORN ALONG LEFT AND RIGHT EDGES AND ON FRONT AT UPPER RIGHT EDGE; BACK HAS TORN HOLES AT BOTTOM. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
HOME ENTERTAINMENT
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LESLIE MORTON REGARDING HER DONATION OF A BUTTON ACCORDION. THE ACCORDION WAS OWNED AND PLAYED BY MORTON’S GRANDFATHER, GIUSEPPE (JOSEPH) "FABRO" BRIDAROLLI, AND WAS LATER OWNED BY HER UNCLE, SYLVIO "SYL" BRIDAROLLI, BEFORE BECOMING IN HER POSSESSION. MORTON DISCUSSED HER MEMORIES OF THE ACCORDION IN HER HOME, STATING, “IT’S A BUTTON ACCORDION…THERE’S BUTTON ACCORDIONS AND PIANO ACCORDIONS, AND I PLAY THE PIANO. IF I HAD A PIANO ACCORDION, I COULD AT LEAST PICK OUT THE NOTES BECAUSE I COULD READ THE MUSIC. THIS IS SOMETHING DIFFERENT. YOU HAVE TO BE A REAL MUSICIAN TO PLAY A BUTTON ACCORDION BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY BY EAR. THERE’S THE MELODY SIDE AND THE CHORD SIDE AND YOU JUST DO IT BY EAR. IF YOU LISTEN TO HIS TAPE [IN ARCHIVES]…HE WAS JUST TURNING 81 WHEN HE MADE THIS TAPE AND HE WAS TRYING TO REMEMBER SOME OF THE SONGS HE KNEW. ONE CAME OUT REALLY GOOD AND THEN HE GOT THE MELODY OF SOMETHING. HE WAS PICKING IT OUT AND HE WAS INTO THINGS HE WAS MORE FAMILIAR WITH. HE WAS VERY MUSICAL AND HAD A REAL EAR. IT’S SORT OF LIKE AN IRISH BUTTON ACCORDION BUT NOT QUITE. IT’S BIGGER.” “WHAT I REMEMBER [MY GRANDPARENTS] TELLING ME IS WHEN HE WAS HERE, HE HAD IT MADE FOR HIM IN ITALY AND IT WAS SENT OVER TO CANADA WHEN HE LIVED HERE. I ALSO UNDERSTOOD HE PLAYED IN ITALY BUT THIS ACCORDION WAS MADE FOR HIM THERE AND SENT OVER [IN THE 1920S].” “IT’S A TREASURE. I WOULD SAY OF ALL THE THINGS I FOUND IN MY PARENTS’ HOME AND ALL THE THINGS I’VE HAD TO FIND HOMES FOR, ALL THE THINGS THAT WOULD REMIND ME OF MY CHILDHOOD, THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING. EVER. IT EVOKES REALLY STRONG MEMORIES. THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT MUSIC IN A FAMILY. IF YOU CAN MEET TOGETHER AND YOU CAN SHARE MUSIC, WHICH OUR FAMILY DID, IT LEAVES AN IMPRESSION THAT YOU DON’T EVER FORGET.” “[THE ACCORDION] REALLY WAS FOR MY GRANDFATHER [GIUESEPPE “JOSEPH” BRIDAROLLI]. IT WAS FROM HIM. THAT’S WHERE THE [LOVE OF] MUSIC CAME FROM FOR ALL [MY FAMILY].” “WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL, WE WOULD GO OVER TO [MY GRANDPARENTS’] HOUSE AT 909 - 8TH STREET NORTH, [MY GRANDFATHER] ALWAYS PLAYED. HE’D JUST SIT IN HIS KITCHEN AND HE’D PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. HE WOULD SIT ON A BENCH BY THE BACK DOOR OUTSIDE AND HE WOULD PLAY SOMETHING FOR US. AT CHRISTMAS, MY GRANDPARENTS WOULD COME OVER [TO OUR HOME] AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. MY MOTHER WOULD PLAY THE VIOLIN, MY SISTER THE PIANO. SHE WAS BETTER THAN ME AND WE WOULD ALL SING CAROLS. FOR MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE THE SAME. HE ALWAYS WAS THERE PLAYING HIS ACCORDION. WHEN MY UNCLE AND AUNT CAME TO VISIT, IT WAS THE SAME THING. HE’D PLAY.” ON HER FAMILY’S HISTORY AND CONNECTION TO THE ACCORDION, MORTON ELABORTED, “[MY GRANDFATHER] STOPPED WORKING IN THE MINES IN THE FIFTIES. HE WAS STILL DOING IT IN THE FIFTIES. WHEN THEY CAME OVER FOR SUNDAY DINNER OR WE WENT OVER THERE [MY GRANDFATHER WOULD PLAY]. [WHEN] MY GRANDMOTHER WAS WELL ENOUGH, WE WOULD ALTERNATE [HOMES FOR DINNERS]. THEN WHEN IT GOT HARDER FOR HER [SUNDAY DINNER] WAS ALWAYS IN OUR HOME. I MADE A TAPE WHEN MY PARENTS WENT TO INDIA IN 1971, AND THAT’S WHEN MY UNCLE GOT MARRIED AS WELL. WE CORRESPONDED BY CASSETTE TAPE. THAT SOUNDS VERY ANTIQUATED NOWADAYS. THERE WAS NO EMAIL. PHONES WERE DIFFICULT WHEN YOU TRIED TO PHONE INDIA AND [WE] HAD TO YELL INTO THE PHONE. SO WE DECIDED TO MAKE CASSETTE TAPES…I WENT DOWN SEPTEMBER THE 5TH, 1971…AND I HAD HIM PLAY THE ACCORDION SO THAT I COULD SEND THIS TAPE TO MY PARENTS. [THIS TAPE HAS] HIS VOICE A LITTLE BIT IN THE BACKGROUND AND MINE A TINY BIT BUT IT’S HIS MUSIC THAT’S IMPORTANT. IT WAS SENT OVER TO INDIA FOR THEM AND WE’VE KEPT IT EVER SINCE. HE DIED IN ’72 AND WE PLAYED THAT ACCORDION TAPE A HUNDRED MILLION TIMES. MY UNCLE ALSO HAD ONE OF COURSE. HE WAS ALWAYS PLAYING. MY MOTHER TELLS A STORY, ALTHOUGH IT’S NOT A FAMILY ONE BUT SHE SAID THAT FRIENDS OF HIS, WHEN IT WAS THEIR BIRTHDAY, HE WOULD GO OVER SIT UNDER THEIR WINDOW AND HE WOULD PLAY THE ACCORDION. HE WOULD PLAY AT GATHERINGS OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY. HE PLAYED AT DANCES.” “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN SEPTEMBER 7TH 1890 AND MY GRANDMOTHER [MARIA BERTE] WAS JANUARY 9TH, 1893. THEY WERE FROM CAVENDINE, ITALY, WHICH IS IN THE PROVINCE OF TRENTO AND THAT’S WHERE THIS ACCORDION WAS MANUFACTURED…THEY WERE VERY POOR OVER THERE…I FOUND A PAPER IN THE MIDDLE OF THE FAMILY DOCUMENTS THAT, I DON’T SPEAK ITALIAN, BUT IT LOOKED LIKE A POVERTY DOCUMENT THAT HAS MY GRANDFATHER—HIS FATHER’S NAME ON IT. THEY WERE VERY POOR AND THEY WOULD HAVE COME HERE TO MAKE A BETTER LIFE FOR HIS FAMILY.” “I UNDERSTAND THAT MY GRANDFATHER CAME OVER BY HIMSELF PRIOR TO 1920. HE WAS IN LETHBRIDGE AND SIZED THINGS UP. HE WENT BACK TO ITALY AND GOT MARRIED TO MY GRANDMOTHER IN 1920. MY MOTHER WAS BORN OVER THERE. IT WAS 1924, IN OCTOBER WHEN HE BROUGHT HIS WIFE AND HIS YOUNG DAUGHTER, ANN, OVER. THEY CAME ON A BOAT AND LANDED IN THE MARITIMES, AND THEY MADE THEIR WAY TO LETHBRIDGE. THEY STARTED IN COALHURST FOR A SHORT WHILE…AND THEN THEY MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. MY UNCLE WAS BORN HERE IN 1926.” “I CAN GUESS [MY GRANDPARENTS MOVED TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA] BECAUSE [OF] MILLIE LUCIANI—THERE WERE BERTE FAMILIES HERE AND MY GRANDMOTHER WAS A BERTE. MILLIE LUCICANI’S FATHER[WAS A BERTE AND HE WAS A COUSIN OF MY [GRAND]MOTHER] … THERE WAS COMMUNICATION THERE THAT THIS WAS THE PLACE TO COME BECAUSE THEY WERE ALREADY HERE.” “WHEN MY GRANDFATHER DIED IN 1972, I HAD THIS ACCORDION AND THEN, AT A CERTAIN POINT I GAVE IT TO MY UNCLE, HIS SON, SYL. HE HAD IT IN FERNIE THEN IN MERRITT. HE DIED IN 2011 AND MY AUNT SENT IT TO ME. WE TALKED ABOUT LEAVING IT TO THE MUSEUM BUT I DIDN’T WANT TO LET GO OF IT YET. WHAT HAS SPURRED IT ON IS THAT THERE IS NOBODY ELSE TO PASS IT ON TO.” “I WAS GIVEN THIS BECAUSE, WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL I JUST LOVED IT. HE PLAYED AND I LOVED IT. MY UNCLE LOVED IT TOO, HE DIDN’T LIVE HERE AND BECAUSE IT WAS EASY AND MY PARENTS HAD TO LEAVE FOR INDIA, I GOT IT TEMPORARILY. IT DID BELONG MORE TO MY MOM AND MY UNCLE THAN TO ME, BUT I HAD IT FIRST FOR QUITE A WHILE.” “MY SISTER AND I WERE TALKING AND WE THOUGHT, WELL REALLY IT WAS MORE [OUR UNCLE’S] THAN OURS. THAT’S WHY [I GAVE IT TO HIM]. BY GOING TO ME IT WENT TO MY MOM AND SHE WAS THE ELDEST. BUT WHEN MY MOTHER WAS GETTING REALLY SICK AND HE WAS COMING TO VISIT HER AND SHE WASN’T GOING TO LIVE, THEN IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IT GO TO THE NEXT PERSON WHICH REALLY WOULD BE MY UNCLE. WE THOUGHT IT WAS THE RIGHT THING AND HE WAS ENCHANTED. IT WAS REALLY HIS AT THAT POINT.” “I WANTED TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY IT SO I TRIED, BUT I HAD ARTHRITIS IN MY SHOULDERS SO I COULDN’T. I WOULD TAKE [IT] OUT EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE AND TRY TO PLAY “SILENT NIGHT”. I JUST TOOK IT WHEREVER I WENT AND TRIED TO LOOK AFTER IT.” “IT WOULD BE [ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN MY HOME] AND I’M SURE FOR MY UNCLE TOO. PICTURES ARE REALLY IMPORTANT TO OUR FAMILY AND TO ME. I KNOW TO MY UNCLE SYL AS WELL THIS WOULD BE [IMPORTANT] BECAUSE WE ALL REMEMBERED [MY GRANDFATHER] PLAYING ALL THE TIME. HE NEVER SAT DOWN WITHOUT IT ON HIS LAP. TO MY UNCLE IT WOULD BE EVEN STRONGER BECAUSE, OF COURSE, HE GREW UP WITH HIS FATHER PLAYING THE ACCORDION.” “MY GRANDPARENTS HAD TWO CHILDREN, MY MOTHER ANN, AND HER BROTHER SYL. SYL NEVER HAD ANY CHILDREN, THEY ADOPTED A GIRL ONCE BUT THAT WAS LONG AGO [AND] SHE’S OUT OF THE PICTURE. THERE’S MY AUNT, HIS WIFE, AND THERE’S ME. MY PARENTS HAVE PASSED AWAY AND MY SISTER, LAUREL, PASSED AWAY IN 2009 IN GENEVA. IF SOMETHING HAPPENS TO ME, THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO WAY THIS BRIDAROLLI FAMILY WILL CARRY ON. THE ANDERSON FAMILY [MY FATHER’S FAMILY] THERE WERE EIGHT OF THEM. THERE’S NOBODY ELSE. THERE’S ME AND I FEEL A LITTLE RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE IT’S POSSIBLE THAT THE JOSEPH BRIDAROLLI FAMILY IS IN SOME WAY REMEMBERED. MY GRANDFATHER WAS A COAL MINER IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE ALSO WAS A PART OF THE ITALIAN COMMUNITY AND THEY WEREN’T RICH; THEY WEREN’T POWERFUL. THEY DIDN’T HOLD POSITIONS BUT I THINK THEIR STORY IS VERY IMPORTANT AS IMMIGRANTS FROM ITALY AND I’D LIKE TO TELL THEIR STORY. THAT’S THE REASON I BROUGHT IT. I THINK IT WOULD BE REALLY IMPORTANT THAT IN SOME WAY IT IS PERPETUATED BOTH FOR MY UNCLE AND MY MOTHER AS WELL AS HER PARENTS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180011000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180011000
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"VETS" HOCKEY SWEATER
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20180015000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"VETS" HOCKEY SWEATER
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
68.2
Width
48
Description
BLACK TURTLENECK SWEATER WITH OCHRE TRIM AT SLEEVES, NECK, AND WAIST. SWEATER IS WOOL-BLEND KNIT; SWEATER HAS YELLOW FELT LETTERS SEWN ON CHEST “VETS”. BACK OF SWEATER HAS YELLOW OUTLINE FROM MISSING “4” PATCH. SWEATER HAS HOLES ON RIGHT-WEARING SLEEVE BELOW ELBOW AND AT ARMPIT; SWEATER HAS HOLES ON SIDES OF NECK AND AT SIDES OF WAIST; SWEATER HAS HOLES ON LEFT-WEARING SLEEVE BELOW ELBOW, AT CUFF, AND ON FRONT AT SHOULDER. BACK OF SWEATER HAS HOLES OF LEFT-WEARING SLEEVE AND RIGHT-WEARING SLEEVE. SWEATER IS SOILED AND STAINED; FRONT IS FADED ON CHEST. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
SPORTS
History
ON JUNE 14, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HAROLD PALMER REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A LETHBRIDGE VETS TEAM HOCKEY SWEATER. THE SWEATER BELONGED TO HAROLD PALMER’S FATHER, MURRAY YALE PALMER. ON HIS FATHER’S CONNECTION TO THE SWEATER, HAROLD PALMER RECALLED, “IT WAS IN MY DAD’S HOCKEY BAG AND HE DIED IN 1971. I NEVER REALLY WENT THROUGH STUFF UNTIL JUST RECENTLY…I’VE HAD IT SINCE 1971 IN MY POSSESSION BUT I’VE NEVER DONE ANYTHING WITH IT. [MY FATHER’S] DAD WAS A DOCTOR IN WW I, IN THE FIELD, SO HE WOULD BE VERY FAMILIAR WITH THE WAR EFFORT. HE WOULD BE IN THE HOME AS A YOUNG BOY AND HIS DAD WAS AWAY IN THE SERVICES. HE PLAYED HOCKEY ALL HIS LIFE. HE HAD TOLD ME [ABOUT] VARIOUS TEAMS THAT HE HAD PLAYED FOR AND WHEN HE DIED AT SIXTY-SEVEN YEARS OLD, HE DIED ON THURSDAY AND THEY HAD PLAYED HOCKEY ON MONDAY NIGHT WITH THE OLDTIMERS. WE GREW UP KNOWING THAT DAD PLAYED HOCKEY AND THAT HE ALWAYS HAD A RINK IN THE BACK YARD.” “[MY SON] GOT [THE CONNECTION] THAT THERE WAS A HOCKEY TEAM BY THE NAME OF “VETS” IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1919…THIS IS WHERE THE SWEATER ORIGINATED FROM THEN, BECAUSE THERE WOULDN’T BE MANY HOCKEY CLUBS CALLED “VETS”.” “[MY FATHER] LIVED IN CLARESHOLM AT ONE TIME BECAUSE HIS DAD WAS A MEDICAL DOCTOR AND HE WOULD BE A YOUNG MAN THEN…HE WAS A RURAL DOCTOR, HE WAS A COUNTRY DOCTOR. THEY DEFINITELY LIVED IN THAT AREA AT ONE TIME.” “MY DAD HAD A RINK IN OUR BACK YARD FROM THE POINT THAT HE BOUGHT THREE LOTS IN RED DEER. [THE] FIRST [LOT] WAS THE HOUSE, THE SECOND ONE WAS PLANED OFF FOR A BASEBALL FIELD AND THEN IT WAS HOCKEY RINK IN THE WINTER TIME.” “[MY FATHER] PASSED AWAY IN RED DEER, AND HE’D BEEN IN RED DEER FROM 1939 TIL HIS PASSING.” PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA NOTES THAT THE LETHBRIDGE VETS WAS CONSIDERED A SENIOR TEAM. THE VETS WON THE 1919-1920 ALBERTA SENIOR PLAYOFFS, HOWEVER LOST IN THE 1919-1920 WESTERN CANADA ALLAN CUP PLAYOFFS. THE VETS COMPETED IN THE 1922-23 ALBERTA SENIOR PLAYOFFS AGAIN. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES FROM 1923-1924 LIST PALMER AS A PLAYER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE VETS HOCKEY TEAM, AND IN 1926-1927 LIST MURRAY PALMER AS A PLAYER IN CLARESHOLM, ALBERTA. MURRAY YALE PALMER WAS THE SON OF SPRAGUE MURRAY PALMER AND ARLETTE PALMER. SPRAGUE PALMER WAS A DOCTOR IN LETHBRIDGE AND CLARESHOLM FOLLOWING HIS SERVICE IN WW1 AS A DOCTOR WITH THE 22ND CAVALRY FIELD AMBULANCE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA RECORDS PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180015000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180015000
Acquisition Date
2018-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
Catalogue Number
P20180010001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, RUBBER
No. Pieces
1
Height
38.9
Length
48.5
Width
31.5
Description
TRANSMITTER RADIO WITH SILVER STEEL FRONT AND METAL MESH BODY. FRONT PANEL HAS METER GAUGE IN UPPER LEFT CORNER WITH BLACK FRAMING AND CLEAR COVER, LABEL ABOVE IN WHITE “EXCITER BUFFER, MULT.—DRIVER GRID” AND BLACK LABEL ON METER “D.C. MILLIAMPERES, STARK, SERIAL MODEL 46”; METER GAUGE IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER HAS BLACK FRAMING AND CLEAR COVER, WITH WHITE LABEL ABOVE “R.F. FINAL, POWER AMPLIFIER PLATE” AND BLACK LABEL ON METER “D.C. MILLIAMPERES, TRIPLET, MODEL 327-T, PATENT 2,346,521, 2,364,724 OTHERS PENDING”. RED PLATE AT TOP EDGE WITH WHITE TEXT “ED REDEKOPP” ABOVE WHITE LABEL “TRANSMITTER, VAR. FREQ. OSC.”; CENTER METER GAUGE FRAMED IN BLACK WITH CLEAR COVER AND BLACK KNOB WITH SILVER TRIM BENEATH, METER HAS BLACK LABEL TEXT “NATIONAL CO. INC, MALDEN, MASS, NATIONAL VELVET VERNIER DIAL, TYPE LCN, PATENT [ILLEGIBLE], J475-3”. FRONT HAS BLACK DIAL WITH SILVER ENGRAVED PLATE AROUND ON LEFT SIDE WITH WHITE LABEL “EXCITATION CONTROL”; DIAL ON RIGHT SIDE HAS BLACK HANDLE AND SILVER ENGRAVED PLATE AROUND WITH WHITE LABEL “P.A. PLATE TUNING”. BOTTOM OF FRONT HAS SIX DIALS WITH GREY KNOBS AND SILVER PLATES AROUND, WITH WHITE LABELS ABOVE READING, LEFT TO RIGHT, “METER SWITCH, DR. PLATE TUNING, V.F.O., TEST—OPERATE C.W. A.M., BAND SWITCH HIGH LOW, ANT. COUPLING”. LOWER LEFT CORNER HAS BLACK DIAL WITH SILVER ENGRAVED PLATE AROUND AND WHITE LABEL ABOVE “DR. GRID TUNING”. BOTTOM CENTER OF FRONT HAS THREE SILVER SWITCHES WITH WHITE LABELS, LEFT TO RIGHT, “FILS./CEF, LOW/OFF, HIGH/OFF”. BACK LOWER EDGE HAS SILVER PLATE WITH THREE BLACK PLUGS-INS AND TWO FITTINGS; LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS WHITE PLASTIC MOUNT WITH FIVE SILVER SCREWS, HANDWRITTEN PENCIL TEXT WRITTEN BESIDE SCREWS ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES, LEFT FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, “GOD, B+, GRID” AND RIGHT “H.COV”. LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS TWO METAL FITTINGS WITH HANDWRITTEN PENCIL TEXT BELOW “KEYER, VFO” AND BRASS KNOB ABOVE. TRANSMITTER SHOWS MINOR SIGN OF WEAR AT BACK; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
TELECOMMUNICATION T&E
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE RADIO TRANSMITTER, REDEKOPP NOTED, “THE TRANSMITTER HAD TO BE SERVICED REGULARLY…I WOULD SAY PROBABLY ’53 [I BUILT THIS RADIO], MID TO LATE ‘50S.” “I WOULD SAY [I USED THIS] PROBABLY SIX YEARS, GIVE OR TAKE. IT’S SOMETHING THAT I COULD HAVE USED FOR A LONG TIME BUT HAD TO GIVE UP…” “THERE’S SEVERAL DIFFERENT REASONS FOR DIALS. [ONE DIAL] IS FOR TUNING THE PLATE. THERE’S A LIGHTBULB IN THERE THAT YOU THROW ON THAT REDUCES THE AC INPUT VOLTAGE TO A LOW VOLTAGE SO THAT YOU CAN TUNE THE PLATE OUTPUT. IF YOU DON’T GET THAT PLATE OUTPUT TUNED QUICKLY, THAT 813 FINAL TUBE WILL JUST GLOW RED HOT AND MELT AND COLLAPSE. HIGH POWER, HIGH WATTAGE. THAT’S THE KEY. I USUALLY KNOW WHERE IT HAS TO BE, AND THEN IT’LL GIVE ME THE READING [ON A METER]. [ONE DIAL] IS THE FREQUENCY. YOU GOTTA WORK FOUR DIFFERENT BANDS, AND THE CERTAIN FREQUENCIES THAT YOU COVER, YOU GOTTA BE RIGHT IN THERE, DEAD ON. YOU CAN’T BE OUT OF CERTAIN FREQUENCIES THAT ARE GOVERNMENT ALLOCATED FOR AMATEUR RADIO ONLY. EIGHTY METERS STARTS AT 3.5 MEGACYCLES AND YOU GOTTA WORK WITHIN THAT AND UP. IF YOU’RE BELOW OR ABOVE WHAT YOU’RE SUPPOSED TO BE, YOU CAN BE IN BIG TROUBLE.” “THERE’S A TUBE IN THE BOTTOM…YOU CAN’T SEE [IT]. THERE’S A FAN AT THE BOTTOM TO COOL THE THING ’CAUSE IT GETS HOT! THERE’S ALL THESE THINGS TO CONSIDER, BUT THAT’S ALL BEEN TAKEN CARE OF BY THE ENGINEER, AND I DESIGNED IT ACCORDING TO SPECIFICATIONS. THAT 813 IS CAPABLE OF 500 WATTS. IT’S A POWERFUL TUBE; IT’S A BIG BOTTLE. BUT, I DON’T HAVE A…POWER TO DRIVE IT. I’VE GOT OIL FILTER CAPACITORS WHICH ARE ALL WAR SURPLUS. I GOT [THEM] FOR CHEAP AND THEY’RE HIGH VOLTAGE-–HIGHER THAN YOUR STANDARD YOU CAN BUY FOR RADIOS; YOU COULD NEVER USE THEM. EVEN NOW, I DON’T KNOW WHETHER YOU COULD EVER BUY AN OIL FILTER CAPACITOR; THAT WAS ALL WAR SURPLUS STUFF.” “A LOT OF THE STUFF AT THE TIME WAS STILL WAR SURPLUS STUFF. THEY USED TO HAVE WAR SURPLUS STORES. YOU COULD BUY STUFF CHEAP! A DIAL SCALE LIKE [THOSE ON THE TRANSMITTER] OR METERS…YOU [WILL] PAY THE PRICE. THERE WERE SO MANY OTHER THINGS THAT WERE CHEAP. A PERSON TOOK ADVANTAGE OF IT AT THE TIME, BUT THAT’S PASSÉ. THAT’S FINISHED; NO MORE.” “[WHEN YOU’RE DIALING SOMEONE TO TALK] IT GOES THROUGH THE MODULATOR…THROUGH THE TRANSMITTER AND AT THAT FREQUENCY. THEY’LL HEAR YOU AT THAT FREQUENCY. YOU’LL HEAR AMATEUR RADIO STATIONS CALLING TO TALK TO SOMEBODY LIKE, “CQ, CQ” MEANS ‘CALLING,’ AND THEN YOU SIGN YOUR STATION. THESE CALLS, IN CANADA, GO NUMERICALLY. V7S ARE ALL [BRITISH COLUMBIA]; V6S ARE ALBERTANS; V5, SASKATCHEWAN; AND V4 AND SO ON DOWN THE LINE.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010001
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, ALUMINUM
Catalogue Number
P20180010002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1963
Materials
STEEL, PLASTIC, ALUMINUM
No. Pieces
1
Height
22.5
Diameter
12.8
Description
RADIO MICROPHONE FIXED TO BLACK PLASTIC CORD WITH SILVER STEEL FITTINGS. MICROPHONE BASE IS GREY METAL WITH FIXED WOODEN STAND PAINTED GREY. MICROPHONE HAS GREY METAL CASING WITH SILVER GRILL FITTED OVER MICROPHONE; PLATE AT BASE OF MICROPHONE HEAD IS SILVER AND BLACK METAL WITH SILVER TEXT “CANADIAN ASTATIC LIMITED, TORONTO, CANADA, MADE IN CANADA, JT 40, PATENT NOTICE INSIDE”. BLACK CORD IS ATTACHED TO BACK BASE OF MICROPHONE CASING WITH SCREW FITTING. WOODEN STAND HAS PAINT CHIPPED; GREY BASE IS SCUFFED AND STAINED; STEEL FITTING AT END OF CORD IS TARNISHED AND STEEL FITTING SECURED TO MICRORPHONE ON CORD IS CORRODED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
SOUND COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
History
ON MAY 10, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED REDEKOPP REGARDING HIS DONATION OF AN AMATEUR TRANSMITTER RADIO AND ACCESSORIES. REDEKOPP BEGAN PURSUING HIS INTEREST IN RADIO TRANSMISSION IN THE 1950S. ON THE MICROPHONE, REDEKOPP NOTED, “[IT WAS] JUST A CRYSTAL MICROPHONE. CHEAP MICROPHONE. CRYSTALS WERE CHEAP. A DYNAMIC MICROPHONE GETS A LITTLE BIT MORE INVOLVED. THIS IS THE CHEAPEST WAY OF GOING, AND IT’S A HIGH OUTPUT, AND IT’S NOT OF HIGH QUALITY. MICROPHONES-–THE HIGHS ARE A BIT PEAKISH. THERE ARE DIFFERENT LEVELS. IT’S A GOOD MICROPHONE FOR CONVERSATION.” REDEKOPP DISCUSSED HIS OWN INTEREST IN RADIO CONSTUCTION AND TRANSMISSION, AND HOW HE BEGAN WORKING WITH RADIOS, RECALLING, “I LIVED ON THE FARM IN VAUXHALL. MY DAD’S FARM. I WAS NEVER A FARMER; I’D HAVE STARVED TO DEATH IF I HAD FARMED. BUT, ANOTHER FARMER, WHO WAS TOTALLY ELECTRONICALLY ILLITERATE, HAD AN UNCLE, DORY MALENBERG, THE ASSISTANT ENGINEER AT CJOC. HE WANTED HIM TO GET ON AMATEUR RADIO SO THAT THEY COULD TALK BACK AND FORTH THAT WAY. THIS FARMER – GOT ME INTERESTED IN TALKING ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO WHICH I KNEW NOTHING ABOUT AT THE TIME. I WAS INTO ELECTRONICS BUT NOT AMATEUR RADIO; IT WAS RADIO SERVICING. HE SAYS, “YOU WANT TO GET ON THE AIR,” HE SAYS, “AND WE CAN TALK AND GET A TRANSMITTER GOING.” IT ALL SOUNDED VERY FASCINATING AND INTERESTING. BUT, I’M ON THE FARM, HERE. WE DON’T EVEN HAVE RURAL ELECTRIFICATION. I [SAID], “HOW CAN I EVER DO THAT?” THERE ARE METHODS AND WAYS…YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT. HE FINALLY CONVINCED ME. I [HAD TO] LOOK INTO IT. AND THAT’S WHAT I DID. HE WAS NO HELP BECAUSE HE KNEW NO ELECTRONICS AT ALL BUT I GOT INFORMATION THROUGH BOOKS…AND STARTED STUDYING THE SUBJECT OF AMATEUR RADIO AS A HOBBY. IT BECAME MORE AND MORE FASCINATING, AND MORE RIVETING THE MORE I READ ABOUT IT. [IT SOUNDED] LIKE SOMETHING I [WANTED] TO DO.” “I HAD PREVIOUS ELECTRONIC EXPERIENCE IN TAKING A COURSE WITH THE NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE TO BECOME A RADIO SERVICEMAN. I HAD THE BASICS, THE FUNDAMENTALS, AND I KNEW HOW TO DO IT. EVEN THE FIRST TRANSMITTER THAT I BUILT WAS PRETTY SIMPLE, AND THIS [TRANSMITTER] WAS MY FINAL. I HAVE THE MANUAL FOR IT…FROM THE W1AW, THE AMATEUR RADIO RELAY LEAGUE-–THE ENGINEER THAT DESIGNED IT-–AND I BUILT IT FROM THAT, FROM SCRATCH, GETTING ALL THE PARTS TOGETHER. IT WAS A CHALLENGE, VERY ENJOYABLE, BUT REWARDING IN THE END.” “I STARTED TO GET COMPONENTS AND PARTS TOGETHER TO BUILD MY FIRST TRANSMITTER AND MY FIRST RECEIVER. THE CRAZY THING WAS YOU COULD BUILD A POWER SUPPLY AND RUN IT OFF A SIX-VOLT CAR BATTERY. OR [A] TRACTOR BATTERY. THEY WERE ALL SIX-VOLT AT THE TIME; TWELVE VOLTS CAME LATER. I GOT MY VOLTAGES THAT I NEEDED THROUGH THE POWER SUPPLY OFF [THIS] BATTERY. THE NEXT THING I KNOW…I’M [GETTING] SOMEWHERE. THE NEXT THING I KNEW, I GOT INTO IT AND…NOW I GOT IT BUILT AND I CAN’T USE IT. I [HAVE TO] GET A LICENSE FIRST.” “ELMER JOHNSON, THE OTHER FARMER WHO GOT ME INTO IT, [SAID], “I’M GOING TO GO TO CALGARY [TO] WRITE MY EXAM.” SO HE [SAID], “DO YOU WANT TO COME ALONG?” I [SAID], “SURE, I’LL COME ALONG.” BUT, THE CODE…I CAN’T USE THE HAND KEY AT FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE AND I WANT TO GET MY FIRST CLASS, NOT MY SECOND CLASS, BECAUSE I COULDN’T USE THE [MICROPHONE]. I SAID, “WELL, I’LL GO WITH [YOU]. I’LL TAKE THE DOW KEY WITH ME, AND I’LL TAKE THE HAND KEY WITH ME, TOO, BUT I’M NOT GOING TO PASS WITH THAT.” I TOLD THE INSPECTOR, “LOOK, I’M HERE TO WRITE MY TEST, BUT I SEE THE REQUIREMENT IS FIFTEEN WORDS A MINUTE WITH THE HAND KEY.” I SAID, “MY CLUMSY HAND WON’T HANDLE THAT.” I [SAID], “AND IF I HAVE TO USE IT, I WON’T EVEN WRITE MY TEST,” I [SAID], “I’M FINISHED.” “WELL,” HE [SAID] TO ME, “I GUESS WE CAN MAKE AN EXCEPTION.” SO HE ALLOWED ME TO USE THE SEMI-AUTOMATIC KEY, WHICH WAS A PIECE OF CAKE. I WENT THROUGH THAT WITH FLYING COLOURS.” “THEN, HE QUESTIONED US ON TECHNOLOGY. HE STARTED WITH ELMER FIRST, UNFORTUNATELY. THE FIRST QUESTION HE ASKED HIM WAS ABOUT AS SIMPLE AN ELECTRONIC QUESTION AS YOU CAN ASK. I CAN’T REMEMBER THE QUESTION, AS A MATTER OF FACT; THAT’S THE BAD PART. BUT, HE COULDN’T ANSWER IT. THE INSPECTOR LOOKED AT HIM AND HE SAID, “YEAH, OKAY,” HE [SAID], “I UNDERSTAND.” HE NEVER GOT A SECOND [QUESTION]; HE FAILED RIGHT THERE. [ELMER] COULD PASS THE CODE, BUT THAT DIDN’T DO HIM ANY GOOD IF HE COULDN’T DO THE TECHNICAL. THEN HE GOT ASKING ME, AND OF COURSE I HAD NO PROBLEM ’CAUSE I WAS CONVERSANT IN ELECTRONICS. I GOT MY FIRST CLASS TICKET USING THE DOW KEY.” “WHEN WE MOVED HERE [AND] BOUGHT THIS HOUSE, I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER. I HAD A JOB DURING THE DAY, AND IT WAS TOO MUCH-–I SPENT TOO MUCH TIME ON THE AIR, ON THE RADIO. I’D BE UP SOMETIMES IN THE NIGHT, VERY RARELY, BUT UP TO FOUR IN THE MORNING SOMETIMES, TALKING TO AUSTRALIANS AND NEW ZEALANDERS. AS A WORKING STIFF…I HAD A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER; THEY NEEDED ATTENTION. I COULDN’T SIMPLY TAKE THE TIME AND BE ON THE AIR ALL THE TIME WITH MY HOBBY. WHEN WE MOVED HERE MY WIFE [SAID], “NO, YOU’RE NOT GONNA GO BACK ON AGAIN.” I HAD A TOWER I WAS GOING TO SET UP, AND SHE [SAID], “NO, YOU’VE GOT A FAMILY TO LOOK AFTER.” AND I [SAID], “YES, YOU ARE CORRECT. I SHALL GIVE IT UP.” THAT’S WHAT I DID, FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO.” “BEING ABLE TO CONTACT ANYONE IN THE WORLD, THAT IS OTHER AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS…WAS VERY INTRIGUING. YOU TALK TO VARIOUS PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS LANGUAGES. WE HAD A Q CODE…WHEN YOU DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THE LANGUAGE, YOU COULD USE THE Q CODE…IT WAS FASCINATING BECAUSE YOU CAN TALK TO PEOPLE IN GREENLAND. I TALK TO PEOPLE IN THE DEW LINE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. LATER ON I BUILT MY MODULATOR, AND THEN IT WAS BY PHONE, AND THOSE THAT SPOKE ENGLISH-–AND IN MOST CASES, I MUST SAY, MOST PEOPLE I CONTACTED, KNEW SOME ENGLISH--THAT’S THE AMAZING PART…YOU COULD UNDERSTAND THEM. BUT, IF YOU WERE ON CODE, YOU JUST USE THE MORSE CODE. IT WAS FASCINATING TO TALK TO DIFFERENT PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.” “I GOT MARRIED AND THEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE [IN 1953 TO 7 AVE. A.] AND OF COURSE THEN THAT OLD TRANSMITTER WAS OBSOLETE-–DIDN’T USE IT ON BATTERY ANYMORE [BECAUSE] WE [HAD] ELECTRICITY, SO I WENT ON A BIGGER ONE.” “I STARTED WORKING AT CJOC, BUT…I WAS IN THE STUDIO AND I DIDN’T LIKE THE STUDIO WORK. I WANTED TO GET INTO THE TRANSMITTER BUT THERE WAS NO OPENING. I WAS NOT PREPARED-–I WAS TAKING THE RADIO COURSE ON TRANSMITTERS AS WELL, [BECAUSE] I WANTED TO GET INTO THE STATION. THERE WAS NO OPENING, AND THERE WAS ONLY ONE STATION. TODAY I’M GLAD THAT I DIDN’T GET IN FOR A NUMBER OF REASONS.” “INITIALLY I DON’T THINK I WAS EVEN ON THE AIR. IT ALL TOOK TIME. YOU [HAVE TO] BUILD IT…BY THE TIME YOU GET THAT ALL DONE, THERE’S A LAPSE OF TIME WHERE YOU’RE NOT EVEN ON THE AIR. AS LONG AS YOU KEEP YOUR LICENSE UP…MY CERTIFICATE IS PERMANENT BUT MY STATION LICENSE HAD TO BE RENEWED EVERY YEAR, AT THAT TIME.” “THIS WAS [A] HOBBY, AND MY WIFE WOULD HAVE SAID IT WAS UNNECESSARY. IN A SENSE, SHE’S RIGHT. I [HAVE TO] ADMIT THAT…AND FOR GOOD REASON.” “KEEPING THE STATION LICENSE UP THERE, THAT WAS NOT A PROBLEM. YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STATION LICENSE UP, AND I DON’T THINK THEY WOULD CANCEL IT AS LONG AS YOU PAY THE FEE BECAUSE THAT WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM. BUT THEY HAD THEIR RULES, AND I KNOW THAT LATER ON YOU WOULD GET IT PERMANENTLY. WHETHER YOU WERE ON THE AIR OR NOT, I THINK YOU KEPT YOUR LICENSE.” WHEN ASKED HOW MANY PEOPLE IN THE CITY WORKED IN AMATEUR RADIO, REDEKOPP STATED,“TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH, TOO MANY OF THEM HAVE PASSED AWAY. I HAPPEN TO BE A LITTLE BIT OLDER THAN MOST OF THEM. [I’M] NINETY-THREE. THERE ARE STILL SOME AROUND. I HAVEN’T BEEN AT THE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB AT THE SENIORS’ CENTRE IN A NUMBER OF YEARS NOW. I USED TO GO THERE OCCASIONALLY.” “I THINK [THERE ARE] PROBABLY MORE [PEOPLE] THAN I WOULD REALIZE. THERE ARE TWO ENGINEERS THAT ARE RETIRED. THEY CAN FIX RADIOS.” ON DONATING HIS RADIO TO THE MUSEUM, REDEKOPP ELABORATED, “I’M GETTING TO BE OF AN AGE WHERE I WON’T BE AROUND MUCH LONGER. OF COURSE, I CAN’T DETERMINE MY DAYS BUT I’M NINETY-THREE YEARS OLD, AND I’VE GOT TO DISPOSE OF THIS BECAUSE NO ONE ELSE WILL EVER USE IT. IT WILL GO TO THE DUMP PROBABLY, OTHERWISE, AND THAT’S NO PLACE FOR A TRANSMITTER LIKE THIS. I’VE ENJOYED IT A LOT, AND HOPEFULLY SOMEONE ELSE CAN SEE SOME HISTORY OR PAST HISTORY OF AMATEUR RADIO AND THE TRANSMITTERS THAT WERE BUILT BY THE PEOPLE THAT USED IT. A LOT OF PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT CAPABLE OF BUILDING THEIR OWN PURCHASED COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT, WHICH IS FINE AND IT WAS LEGAL, BUT AMATEUR RADIO WAS MEANT TO BE JUST THAT-–FOR AMATEURS, BUILDING THEIR OWN AND ENJOYING IT.” “I THOUGHT PERHAPS SOMEONE WOULD APPRECIATE SEEING SOMETHING SOMEONE BUILT HIMSELF, AND USED, AND COMMUNICATED WITH WORLD-WIDE, A TRANSMITTER. THAT IS WHAT IT WAS ALL ABOUT DURING THE YEARS THAT I WAS ACTIVE ON THE AIR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND PHOTOGRAPHS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180010001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180010002
Acquisition Date
2018-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

120 records – page 1 of 6.