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Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20180022000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
175
Width
61.5
Description
GOBELIN TAPESTRY, MACHINE-STITCHED AND WOVEN; SCENE WOVEN DEPICTS FOUR FIGURES IN A HOUSE AROUND A TABLE, THREE ADULTS AND A CHILD; INTERIOR OF HOUSE DEPICTED SHOWS CABINET AND VASES ON CARPET IN FOREGROUND ON LEFT SIDE; BACKGROUND HAS TWO CHAIRS AND A LANDSCAPE PAINTING ON WALL AT LEFT, CENTER OF ROOM HAS A FIREPLACE AND COOKING POT WITH SIX PLATES ON MATLEPIECE, RIGHT SIDE OF FIREPLACE SHOWS PODIUM WITH BOOKS STACKED AND CABINET; RIGHT SIDE SHOWS FIGURES IN FOREGROUND AROUND A TABLE SEWING, AND WINDOW ON RIGHT WALL OPEN. SCENE IS WOVEN USING GOLD AND BROWN HUES PRIMARILY, WITH PINK AND GOLD FOR FLOOR. FRONT HAS ORANGE STAINING ALONG UPPER EDGE ON RIGHT, CENTER, AND LEFT SIDES; TAPESTRY SHOWS SIGNS OF FADING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARY WITDOUCK REGARDING HER DONATION OF A GOBELIN TAPESTRY. WITDOUCK IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM HOLLAND IN 1955 WITH HER FAMILY, THE BOUWS, AND HAD BEEN GIFTED THE TAPESTRY BY HER MOTHER PRIOR TO IMMIGRATING, HAVING PURCHASED THE TAPESTRY FROM A BELGIAN SALESMAN. ON THE TAPESTRY, WITDOUCK ELABORATED, “THERE WERE A FEW TAPESTRIES [IN THE FAMILY] BUT THEY WERE NOT GOLDEN. THEY WERE TAPESTRIES [OF] TULIP FIELDS AND THEY WERE MORE VELVETY TYPES WITH BRIGHT COLOURED TULIP FIELDS…IN DIFFERENT COLOURS HERE, DIFFERENT COLOURS THERE. TO ME, THEY WERE NICE AT THE TIME BUT THEY FADED MORE AND THEY WERE JUST NOT LIKE THIS ONE.” WITDOUCK TOLD THE STORY OF HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE TAPESTRY, RECALLING, “IT WAS AROUND THE END OF FEBRUARY IN 1955. I WAS SEVENTEEN YEARS OLD AND WORKED ON MY FATHER’S FARM. OUR FARM WAS SITUATED NEAR THE SMALL TOWN OF ERP IN THE PROVINCE OF NORTH BRABANT, NETHERLANDS. THE ECONOMY IN EUROPE AT THE TIME, DUE TO THE AFTERMATH OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR WAS NOT GOOD AND THAT WAS EXPECTED TO LAST FOR MANY MORE YEARS. LIFE FOR US, MYSELF AND OUR WHOLE FAMILY, WAS ABOUT TO CHANGE IN A BIG WAY AS MY PARENTS HAD MADE PLANS TO IMMIGRATE TO CANADA. THE DAY THAT WE WOULD LEAVE WAS ONLY ABOUT THREE WEEKS AWAY ON MARCH 25TH TO BE EXACT AND LOTS HAD TO BE DONE TO PREPARE FOR THAT DAY. JUST AROUND THAT TIME, A MAN RIDING A TRANSPORT BICYCLE STOPPED BY OUR HOUSE. THE MAN SAID THAT HE WAS SELLING TAPESTRIES AND ASKED MY MOTHER IF HE COULD SHOW THEM TO HER. THE TAPESTRIES WERE GOBELINS AND WERE MADE IN BELGIUM. SEVERAL OF US GIRLS, ALONG WITH MY MOTHER STOOD AROUND THE SALESMAN AS HE SHOWED US THE DIFFERENT ONES. MY MOTHER THEN SAID TO US OLDER GIRLS, 'IF YOU LIKE TO HAVE ONE YOU MAY ALL PICK ONE.' WE WERE HAPPY WITH THAT TO GET THESE TAPESTRIES. I DON’T KNOW WHAT MY MOM PAID FOR THEM. WE CAREFULLY WRAPPED THEM AS SOON THESE TAPESTRIES WOULD COME ALONG TO CANADA. AFTER ARRIVING IN CANADA, I WAS NOT ABLE TO SHOW OFF MY TAPESTRY ON THE WALL UNTIL 1965 ABOUT 10 YEARS LATER. RALPH [WITDOUCK] AND I MET AND MARRIED IN 1960, AND CAME TO LIVE ON A FARM IN A SMALL TWO-ROOM HOUSE. [WE] DID NOT HAVE A WALL LARGE ENOUGH TO HANG THIS BEAUTIFUL TAPESTRY. OUR FAMILY GREW AND FIVE YEARS AND THREE LITTLE ONES LATER, WE MOVED INTO A MUCH LARGER HOME. EVER SINCE THEN, NEARLY FIFTY YEARS, WE HAVE BEEN ABLE TO SHOW OFF THIS BEAUTIFUL TAPESTRY. THE REASON WHY THE TAPESTRY ALSO MEANT A LOT TO US IS BECAUSE BELGIUM WAS THE PLACE WHERE RALPH WAS BORN…I STILL REMEMBER MANY OF THE OLDER HOMES IN HOLLAND, THAT HAD THE SAME TYPE OF FURNITURE, FIREPLACE WITH PLATES ON TOP, WINDOWS THAT OPENED FROM THE TOP…AND A DOOR WHERE YOU COULD LEAVE THE TOP HALF OPEN, AND ALSO A BIBLE STAND WITH BIBLE. I ALSO REMEMBER MY GRANDMOTHER BEING DRESSED LIKE THE MOTHER IN THE TAPESTRY. ALSO SEWING AND KNITTING WAS ALL DONE BY HAND.” “IT’S IMPORTANT BECAUSE I’VE ALWAYS LIKED OLD PLACES IN EARLIER DAYS. I REALLY LIKED GOING TO MY GRANDPARENTS BECAUSE THINGS WERE SO DIFFERENT THEN. ALREADY [BEFORE 1955]…OUR PLACE WAS A BIT MORE MODERN. I CAN CONNECT WITH LOTS OF THOSE THINGS [IN THE TAPESTRY] BECAUSE I SAT ON THOSE CHAIRS AND I KNOW MY GRANDMA WAS DRESSED SOMETHING LIKE THE LADY IN THERE.” “BELGIUM WOULD HAVE HAD THOSE SAME SCENES IN THOSE DAYS. THEY WERE OLD FARM HOMES…THEY WERE AN AWFUL LOT ALIKE.” “I’VE ALWAYS ENJOYED HAVING THIS ON THE WALL. MOST OF THE TIME IT WAS EITHER IN THE DINING ROOM OR IN THE LIVING ROOM, EITHER ABOVE THE CHESTERFIELD OR [IN FAIRMONT SUBDIVISION] WE HAD IT IN THE DINING ROOM, THERE WAS A NICE BIG WALL THERE.” “THE FARM THAT WE WERE LIVING ON WHEN I LIVED IN THE TWO-ROOMED HOUSE WAS SE 10-11-20. THEN WE MOVED TO SW 15-11-20 AND THERE WAS A TWO-STORY HOUSE ON THERE THAT WAS BUILT IN 1906. IT WAS OLD AND IT WAS COLD. IT WAS ONLY INSULATED WITH NEWSPAPERS BUT WE HAD MUCH MORE ROOM...WE LIVED THERE UNTIL WE WERE ABLE TO BUILD A NEW HOME ON THAT PLACE [IN 1975]. BUT AS SOON AS WE MOVED TO SW 15-11-20, I WAS ABLE TO PUT [THE TAPESTRY] UP.” “AT THAT TIME, IT WAS HANGING ON A ROD. THERE WERE ALSO TASSELS ON THERE…I THINK MY KIDS HAD PROBABLY PULLED ON IT TOO MUCH. THEY WERE ALL LITTLE ONES [AND] BECAUSE IT WAS ALWAYS HANGING ABOVE THE CHESTERFIELD AND THE KIDS ARE ON THE CHESTERFIELD [IT WAS DAMAGED]. AFTER THAT, PROBABLY TWENTY YEARS AFTER THAT, WE DECIDED TO FRAME IT. I HAD IT, WE LIVED IN FAIRMONT FOR ABOUT TWELVE YEARS…MAYBE FIFTEEN YEARS…I HAD IT HANGING IN THE DINING ROOM ON A NICE BIG WALL. IT’S ALWAYS BEEN ON THE WALL UNTIL WE GOT [IN THIS LETHBRIDGE HOUSE], BECAUSE I KNEW THAT THIS WAS THE LAST PLACE UNTIL WE HAVE TO GO TO…ONE OF THOSE PLACES [SENIORS’ HOMES]. YOU DON’T KNOW WHERE YOU’LL END UP, BUT NOW WE DECIDED THAT WE SHOULD DECIDE WHAT TO DO WITH IT.” WITDOUCK RECALLED THE MOVE HER FAMILY MADE TO CANADA IN 1955, STATING, “WE [THE BOUW FAMILY] LEFT MARCH 25TH, AND WE ARRIVED IN CANADA…AT PIER 21 IN HALIFAX ON APRIL 2ND. WE ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE ON APRIL 6TH. MY BIRTHDAY WAS ON JULY 6TH SO I WAS NEARLY 18.” “[MY PARENTS] THOUGHT, WELL ‘MAYBE THIS [TAPESTRY] IS A NICE MEMORY’ AND [MY MOTHER] WANTED TO MAKE US HAPPY BECAUSE WE WERE IMMIGRATING AND WE LEFT OUR FRIENDS BEHIND, FAMILY. MY OLDER SISTER WAS ALREADY IN CANADA BECAUSE SHE GOT MARRIED THE YEAR BEFORE. [THAT WAS] ONE MORE REASON WHY MY PARENTS WANTED TO IMMIGRATE TOO, BECAUSE THEY KNEW THAT THE FAMILY WOULD BE DIVIDED FOREVER IF WE DIDN’T GO. LOTS OF TIMES WITH FAMILIES, SOME WOULD LIKE TO GET MARRIED BUT THERE WAS NO CHANCE IN HOLLAND. AFTER THE WAR, THE ECONOMY WAS REALLY BAD AND PEOPLE COULD NOT BUILD ANY HOMES FOR THEIR CHILDREN WHO [GOT] MARRIED.” “THERE WERE NINE CHILDREN, TEN WITH THE ONE THAT IMMIGRATED TO [CANADA] BEFORE…THE YOUNGEST ONE WAS FIVE, AND MY SISTER WAS 22 BY THEN AND THE NEXT ONE WAS 21. WE SLEPT WITH THREE IN A BED. ON THE FARM, WHEN WE ARRIVED, [THERE WAS] NO RUNNING WATER AND THAT WAS THE NORM FOR ALL NEW IMMIGRANTS.” “MY OLDER SISTER ENDED UP IN SPRING COULEE [WITH] HER HUSBAND, AND NATURALLY WE WANTED TO BE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TOO. BUT IN SPRING COULEE THERE’S NO SUGAR BEETS [AND] WE WANTED TO BE SOMEWHERE WHERE A FARMER WAS GOING TO GIVE US A JOB. THAT’S THE ONLY WAY YOU COULD COME IS IF YOU HAD A JOB LINED UP FOR A FAMILY LIKE THAT.” “I MISSED MY FRIENDS THE MOST BUT, IN THE MEANTIME, YOU END UP WITH NEW FRIENDS, SLOWLY…WE WERE ONLY [HERE] FOUR DAYS AND I HAD A JOB IN MILK RIVER ALREADY. IN THE MEANTIME, I GOT TO KNOW RALPH. I ONLY GOT TO COME HOME ONCE IN TWO WEEKS FROM MILK RIVER TO PICTURE BUTTE AND WE WENT TO CHURCH. RALPH WAS CATHOLIC TOO AND THIS IS HOW WE GOT TO SEE EACH OTHER AND HE FLIPPED MY HAT OFF. HE WAS KIND OF A FUNNY GUY. WE BECAME FRIENDS AND THEN IF YOU HAVE FRIENDS HERE, YOU DON’T REALLY FORGET THE ONES IN HOLLAND BUT IT BECOMES EASIER.” “I WAS NEVER AGAINST [IMMIGRATING]…WE [SAW] THAT THERE WAS GOING TO BE A FUTURE HERE IN CANADA FOR US. WHEN WE FIRST ARRIVED IN CANADA WE COULD SEE THAT ALL THE FARMERS WERE NOT ALL THAT RICH EITHER. THEY WERE WILLING TO GIVE US A JOB BECAUSE THEY NEEDED PEOPLE TO HELP IN THE SUGAR BEETS AND THAT. BUT AT THE SAME TIME WE COULD SEE THAT THEY WERE NOT ALL THAT RICH YET EITHER. THERE WAS THE ODD ONE THAT WAS VERY WELL OFF BUT LOTS OF THEM WERE NOT. BUT THEY WERE WILLING TO GIVE US A JOB. WE ARRIVED IN APRIL [WITH] THE FARMER, BUT WHEN THE BEETS WERE READY TO BE THINNED AND HOED AND HARVESTED…[AFTER THAT] MY DAD WAS OUT OF A JOB. WE COULD STILL LIVE IN THE HOUSE AS LONG AS WE WANTED BUT OF COURSE MY DAD WANTED A JOB AND HE LOOKED AROUND. HE ENDED UP [AT LOURDES FARM].” [MY DAD] WORKED THERE FOR TWO YEARS, BUT HE WANTED TO FARM FOR HIMSELF. THEN HE CAME AND WORKED FOR TIFFIN BUT NOT ON THE DAIRY. HE HAD ANOTHER PLACE, AND TIFFINS WERE VERY GOOD FOR US. THEY GAVE US A MILK COW AND THAT MEANT A LOT. WE HAD A YARD AND A LITTLE GARDEN, AND MY DAD RENTED LAND FOR SUGAR BEETS FROM TIFFIN FOR A FEW YEARS THEN HE BOUGHT A FARM IN BOW ISLAND. MY PARENTS MOVED TO BOW ISLAND BUT I NEVER MOVED WITH THEM BECAUSE I HAD A GOOD JOB HERE. THEN RALPH AND I WERE GOING TOGETHER ALREADY AND HE WAS TALKING SOMETIMES ABOUT GETTING MARRIED.” “I THINK [IMMIGRATING] WAS HARDEST ON MY MOTHER, YET SHE WAS THE BIGGEST PUSH BEHIND IMMIGRATING. I THINK IT WAS THE HARDEST ON HER MAINLY BECAUSE, DURING THE DAY WE WERE ALL OUT WORKING IN THE BEETS. IF WE WEREN’T WORKING IN THE BEETS, THE CHILDREN WERE GOING TO SCHOOL. LUCKILY THE YOUNGEST ONE WAS NOT IN SCHOOL YET AND THAT HELPED MY MOM. BUT SHE DIDN’T KNOW MUCH ENGLISH YET, MAYBE A LITTLE BIT, BUT NOT ENOUGH TO UNDERSTAND WHAT THE RADIO WAS SAYING. THEN HER PARENTS IN HOLLAND HAD A GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY...SHE WENT BACK. THAT WAS TWO AND A HALF YEARS AFTER SHE WAS HERE, SHE WENT BACK TO CELEBRATE HER PARENTS’ ANNIVERSARY. MY DAD DIDN’T GO, MAINLY BECAUSE IT WAS EXPENSIVE AND HE PROBABLY NEEDED THE MONEY HERE TO KEEP GOING. WHEN SHE CAME BACK SHE WAS A DIFFERENT PERSON. SHE WAS SO HAPPY TO BE BACK.” ON HER MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE TAPESTRY, WITDOUCK NOTED, “I WANT TO SCALE DOWN. I’M 81 NOW, YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN SUDDENLY YOUR LIFE TAKES A TURN...THIS IS WHY I WANT TO TAKE CARE OF [THE TAPESTRY] NOW BEFORE IT HAS TO BE DONE IN A HURRY.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INLCUDING MARY WITDOUCK’S TYPED STORY, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180022000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180022000
Acquisition Date
2018-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
203
Width
262
Description
FINISHED QUILT WITH BLUE BACKING AND TRIM ALONG EDGES; QUILT TOP HAND-STITCHED, BACKING AND TRIM MACHINE STITCHED. QUILT TOP IS WHITE WITH MULTI-COLOURED FLOWERS ARRANGED IN RINGS; FLOWERS HAVE GREEN LEAVES SURROUNDING PETALS AND LEAVES CONNECT TO FORM THE RINGS. QUILT TOP HAS TWO WHITE FABRICS STITCHED TOGETHER AS BACKGROUND FOR FLOWERS. FRONT HAS MINOR STAINING; BACK HAS SMALL HOLE WITH FRAYED EDGES AND LOSS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE APPLIQUE QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” “THIS BLUE AND WHITE [APPLIQUE] ONE WAS MADE FOR MY [OLDER] SISTER MARY AND SHE WAS AWAY FROM HOME SO IT NEVER GOT HANDED OFF…THE [APPLIQUE] QUILT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC AND THE REST OF THEM, I THINK, WERE JUST IN STORAGE IN THE [ATTIC].” “[MARY] WAS THE SECOND IN LINE…[SHE WAS BORN] IN 1935. I THINK [MY MOM] THOUGHT THAT MARY WAS ONE OF THE ONES THAT WAS OUT OF THE FAMILY. SHE WAS THE BLACK SHEEP, I THINK.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “MARY HAD GONE TO THE CONVENT AND THAT’S PROBABLY WHILE SHE WAS GONE WHEN IT WAS MADE.” “[MARY WAS BORN IN] ’35, SO IN ‘55 SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN 20 YEARS OLD AND WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE CONVENT. [THE QUILT WAS MADE] PROBABLY MID ‘50S.” ED BETTS NOTED, “IT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC , IT WAS SEWN…HOW THE OLD 100-POUND FLOUR SACKS USED TO COME, WHITE, IT WAS ALL SEWN UP AND HER NAME WAS PUT ON IT IN INDELIBLE PENCIL.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, ON THE QUILT'S INVOLVEMENT IN THE "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT", “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN. I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “[SHE MADE QUILTS THAT] WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED CRAZY [QUILTS] BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. THE BLUE APPLIQUE QUILT WAS DISPLAYED AS PART OF THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM'S "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT" WITH THE NUMBER "AQP 2-0284." THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT DOCUMENTED QUILTS REFLECTING QUILTING TRENDS OF THE 20TH CENTURY IN ALBERTA, ACCORDING TO A CALL FOR QUILTS PUBLISHED BY LUCCIE HEINS, CURATOR FOR THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM MANAGING THE PROJECT. THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT'S SECOND PHASE BEGAN IN 2014 TO EXAMINE QUILTS IN PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, WITH THE EARLIER FIRST PHASE EXAMINING QUILTS PRIVATELY OWNED. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DOUBLE WEDDING RING
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170026002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DOUBLE WEDDING RING
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
202
Width
260
Description
PURPLE QUILT WITH DOUBLE WEDDING RING PATTERN ON FRONT; QUILT HAS MACHINE-STITCHED GRID OF 80 SQUARES. RINGS ARE INTERLOCKED AND MULTI-COLOURED AND MULTI-PATTERNED WITH YELLOW, BLUE, PINK, AND RED PRIMARY COLOURS IN RINGS. QUILT TOP IS HAND-STITCHED AND SEAMS ALONG EDGES ARE MACHINE-STITCHED. BACK OF QUILT HAS LIGHTER PURPLE SECTIONS IN LOWER LEFT CORNER. EDGES ARE FRAYED; LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS LOOSE STUFFING EXPOSED FROM INSIDE, STUFFING IS WOOL. UPPER RIGHT CORNER HAS INTERIOR FABRIC EXPOSED AND IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” “[MOM] WAS ALWAYS DOING SOMETHING, ’CAUSE SHE COULDN’T SIT DOWN IDLY. SHE HAD TO BE CROCHETING, OR EMBROIDERING OR MAKING QUILTS.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “[IT WAS MADE IN THE] ‘60S, MAYBE EVEN THE ‘70S.” “WHEN I FIRST MET [KATHERINE], I CAN REMEMBER COMING INTO THE HOUSE AND SHE WAS SITTING AT THE OLD TREADLE SEWING MACHINE. THAT THING WAS JUST [GOING] AND THAT’S WHAT SHE WAS DOING, WAS JUST PIECING PIECES OF MATERIAL TOGETHER.” “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” “I THINK THE REASON [WE CHOSE THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING] IS BECAUSE THE PURPLE DOUBLE WEDDING RING IS PROBABLY NEWER THAN WHAT THE OTHER ONES WERE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026002
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
197
Width
154.5
Description
QUILT TOP WITH MULTI-COLOURED AND MULTI-FABRIC CRAZY QUILT DESIGN IN A TWENTY SQUARE GRID; EACH GRID SQUARE HAS AN EIGHT-POINT STAR SEWN TOGETHER WITH MIXED-PATTERNED FABRICS. GRID SQUARES ARE DIVIDED BY EXTRA FABRIC TO FORM BORDERS. QUILT HAS ONE GRID BORDER OF DENIM EXTENDED PAST QUILT EDGE. QUILT IS HANDSTITCHED WITH STITCHES VISIBLE ON BACK; EDGES ARE UNFINISHED AND FRAYING; SMALL, FRAYED TEAR IN MIDDLE OF QUILT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE CRAZY QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
187.5
Width
147
Description
QUILT TOP WITH GRID OF 20 SQUARES; EACH SQUARE HAS A PATCHWORK FAN BLOCK MADE OF ASSORTED PATTERNED FABRICS. QUILT TOP IS HANDSTICHED WITH UNFINISHED EDGES. QUILT BACKING IS PATCHWORK WITH BLACK AND WHITE SQUARES; BACKING SQUARE IN THE SECOND COLUMN AND THE 12TH SQUARE DOWN HAS BLACK TEXT ON WHITE FABRIC, “CRANE LIMITED; AT POINT OF MAILING; VALVES, FITTINGS, PUMPS, FABRICATED PIPE, HEATING AND PLUMBING MATERIALS”. QUILT HAS MINOR STAINING ON FRONT AND ALONG TOP EGDE; EDGES ARE FRAYING; QUILT HAS RIP BELOW CENTER SQUARE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’S MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE FAN BLOCK QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “[THE QUILT BACKING IS] FLOUR SACKS…OR SUGAR SACKS, THEY ALL [CAME] IN WHITE SACKS.” GLORIA BETTS ADDED, “[SHE PROBABLY PUT A BACKING ON THIS QUILT TOP] BECAUSE USUALLY, EVEN TODAY IN QUILTING, THE FANS ARE DONE ON A BACKING BECAUSE EVERYTHING ON THE PIECES IS ON A BIAS SO IT STRETCHES. SO IT’S PUT ONTO A BACKING. BUT THE BACKING ON THAT PARTICULAR ONE BEING EITHER THE FLOUR SACKS OR THE SUGAR SACKS, TO ME, MADE IT UNIQUE.” “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” “I THINK THE REASON [WE CHOSE THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING] IS BECAUSE THE PURPLE DOUBLE WEDDING RING IS PROBABLY NEWER THAN WHAT THE OTHER ONES WERE. [WE CHOSE THE FAN QUILT TOP] PROBABLY BECAUSE OF THE BACKING ON IT. A LOT OF THE TIME, IN THE OLD DAYS, THAT’S WHAT THEY DID, THEY PUT [QUILT TOPS] ON A BACKING.” “ON THE FAN [QUILT], [LUCY WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] IDENTIFIED FABRICS THAT WERE BACK TO THE EARLY 1900S. ONE SHE THINKS MIGHT BE BACK INTO THE LATE 1800S WHICH WAS PROBABLY A DRESS THAT [KATHERINE] GOT SOMEWHERE. THE BLUE BACKED ONE, THEY FOUND THERE WERE STILL PINS LEFT INSIDE THE QUILT AND THEY LEFT THEM THERE BECAUSE THEY SAID TO TAKE THEM OUT WOULD DAMAGE THE FABRIC. THEY WERE IMPRESSED WITH THE WORKMANSHIP ON THAT…ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY FOUND OUT THAT IT WAS PUT TOGETHER FROM A DESIGN DRAWN ON NEWSPAPER.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS' QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” THE BLUE APPLIQUE QUILT WAS DISPLAYED AS PART OF THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM'S "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT" WITH THE NUMBER "AQP 2-0286." THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT DOCUMENTED QUILTS REFLECTING QUILTING TRENDS OF THE 20TH CENTURY IN ALBERTA, ACCORDING TO A CALL FOR QUILTS PUBLISHED BY LUCCIE HEINS, CURATOR FOR THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM MANAGING THE PROJECT. THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT'S SECOND PHASE BEGAN IN 2014 TO EXAMINE QUILTS IN PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, WITH THE EARLIER FIRST PHASE EXAMINING QUILTS PRIVATELY OWNED. KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026004
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
215.4
Width
165
Description
QUILT TOP WITH EIGHT POINT STAR PATTERN IN 48 SQUARE GRID; QUILT TOP HAS BLUE TRIM ALONG EDGES AND BETWEEN SQUARES; EIGHT POINT STARS FASHIONED FROM MULTICOLOURED AND PATTERNED FABRICS. RIGHT EDGE HAS TWO SQUARES MISSING BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE AND ONE SQUARE WITH RIPPED BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE; LEFT EDGE HAS SQUARE MISSING BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE. UPPER LEFT CORNER HAS THREE SEAMS SEWN IN BLUE TRIM. STARS IN SQUARES HANDSTITCHED; SQUARES ATTACHED WITH MACHINE STITCHED SEAMS; MACHINE STITCHED SEAMS ATTACHING SQUARES TO BLUE TRIM AND EDGES. EDGES ARE FRAYING; QUILT TOP HAS NO BACKING AND THREADS ARE EXPOSED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE EIGHT-POINT STAR QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” “I THINK IN THE OLD COUNTRY…THINGS WERE PRETTY TOUGH THERE. SHE HAD QUITE A FEW BROTHERS AND SISTERS OVER THERE TOO AND HER MOTHER DIED QUITE YOUNG. SHE WAS THE CAREGIVER, AND I GUESS WHEN THEY GOT OLD ENOUGH, SHE PULLED THE PLUG.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026005
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
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Parties - "Mac" Tribute Skit: II - Eaton's

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96299
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191083249
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Parties - "Mac" Tribute Skit: II - Eaton's, Part 65/96. Eaton's store staff puts on a skit in tribute to "Mac", Alec McLennan, retiring after 19 years at Eaton's. The skit was part of the farewell party to Alec McLennan on his retirement from the company.
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Garry Allison
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Garry Allison was born in Lethbridge in 1940. During his career, he served as the Sports Editor of the Lethbridge Herald, as well as the District Editor, City Editor and finished his journalism career as the Outdoors Editor. He worked fulltime in the Herald's Sports department in 1974 after working in the Printing Department. Allison was an avid rodeo fan and spent much of his career covering local rodeos throughout Southern Alberta, beginning in the mid-1960s until his retirement in 2002. He received numerous awards for his coverage of rodeos, high school sports and the outdoors, including the Max Bell Memorial Award for outstanding coverage of amateur sports in Alberta. Because of his achievements in Southern Alberta sports, he was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame. Allison was heavily involved in the local community, including coaching the high school girls’ basketball in Coalhurst and Winston Churchill for ten years. Family was a central priority to Garry Allison: he and his wife, Mary, were married for 55 years and had cared for foster children for 32 years.
Scope and Content
Parties - "Mac" Tribute Skit: II - Eaton's, Part 65/96. Eaton's store staff puts on a skit in tribute to "Mac", Alec McLennan, retiring after 19 years at Eaton's. The skit was part of the farewell party to Alec McLennan on his retirement from the company.
Accession No.
20191083249
Collection
Archive
Images
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Blairmore Senior Hockey Club

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95946
Date Range
1929-1930
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191055032
Physical Description
8 X 10 bw photographic print
Scope and Content
Blairmore Senior Hockey Club were Alberta Provincial Champions from 1929-1930. They were part of the Crows Nest Pass League. Front Row, Left to Right: Tony Vejprava LW, Jack Oakes C, Dave Kemp Goal, Idris Evans RW, James McVey LW. Middle Row: J. Dicken C, A. Vangodsinoven D, H.A. Manson D, W. Johns…
  1 image  
Date Range
1929-1930
Description Level
Item
Creator
ENMAX Centre
Physical Description
8 X 10 bw photographic print
History / Biographical
The ENMAX (formerly Sportsplex) Centre is a multipurpose facility operated by the City of Lethbridge. The complex was built in 1975 in preparation for the Canada Games.
Scope and Content
Blairmore Senior Hockey Club were Alberta Provincial Champions from 1929-1930. They were part of the Crows Nest Pass League. Front Row, Left to Right: Tony Vejprava LW, Jack Oakes C, Dave Kemp Goal, Idris Evans RW, James McVey LW. Middle Row: J. Dicken C, A. Vangodsinoven D, H.A. Manson D, W. Johnson D, F.H. McKay RW, J. Kemp RW. Back Row: J.V. McDougall Secy. Trs., Alex McVey Trainor, Gordon McPhail Sub. Goal, R. Gray President, W.W. Scott MGR. Coach.
Accession No.
20191055032
Collection
Archive
Images
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Coleman Canadians Hockey Club

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95947
Date Range
1933-1934
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191055033
Physical Description
10 X 8 bw photographic print
Scope and Content
The Coleman Canadians were a senior Amateur hockey team based in Coleman, AB. They were Western Canadian Intermediate Champions in 1933-34. The team played in the Alberta Senior Hockey League. Back Row: F. G. Creeggan, President; C.J. Devine, R.F. Barnes, Executive; Jack Kwasney, Coach; Dr. K. McLe…
  1 image  
Date Range
1933-1934
Description Level
Item
Creator
ENMAX Centre
Physical Description
10 X 8 bw photographic print
History / Biographical
The ENMAX (formerly Sportsplex) Centre is a multipurpose facility operated by the City of Lethbridge. The complex was built in 1975 in preparation for the Canada Games.
Scope and Content
The Coleman Canadians were a senior Amateur hockey team based in Coleman, AB. They were Western Canadian Intermediate Champions in 1933-34. The team played in the Alberta Senior Hockey League. Back Row: F. G. Creeggan, President; C.J. Devine, R.F. Barnes, Executive; Jack Kwasney, Coach; Dr. K. McLean, Rev. Roy C. Taylor, Executive Second Row: R. Pattinson, Secretary; Ivor Bolt, trainer; H. Gardner, defence; V. Lilya, r. wing; J. Joyce, centre; J. Oliva, l. wing; John Kapalka, forward; J. Atkinson, trainor Third Row: F. Brown, r. wing; R. Johnson, r. defence; V. Cologrosso, goal; W. Fraser, centre; C. Kanik, goal; R. Kwasney, l. defence; G. Jenkins, l. wing.
Accession No.
20191055033
Collection
Archive
Images
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Kimberley Dynamiters Hockey Club

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95948
Date Range
1935-1936
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191055034
Physical Description
9.5 X 5.5 bw photographic print
Scope and Content
The Kimberley Dynamiters were a senior Amateur ice hockey club that played prior to WWII in the West Kootenay Hockey League. In 1935-36, they won the Allan Cup and in 1937, they were the World Ice Hockey Champions. The 1935-36 Dynamiters team was inducted into the the BC Sports Hall of Fame in 1976…
  1 image  
Date Range
1935-1936
Description Level
Item
Creator
ENMAX Centre
Physical Description
9.5 X 5.5 bw photographic print
History / Biographical
The ENMAX (formerly Sportsplex) Centre is a multipurpose facility operated by the City of Lethbridge. The complex was built in 1975 in preparation for the Canada Games.
Scope and Content
The Kimberley Dynamiters were a senior Amateur ice hockey club that played prior to WWII in the West Kootenay Hockey League. In 1935-36, they won the Allan Cup and in 1937, they were the World Ice Hockey Champions. The 1935-36 Dynamiters team was inducted into the the BC Sports Hall of Fame in 1976. Left to Right: Joe Giegerich President, Duke Hyssop Trainer, Ken Campbell, Fred Botterill, Hary Brown, Paul Kozak, Bill Burnett, Jack Forsey, Puffy Kemp, Ken Moore, Hugo Mackie, Ralph Redding, Swede Hornquist, John Rehzener Manager-Coach, John Worth Mascot.
Accession No.
20191055034
Collection
Archive
Images
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Trail Smoke Eaters Hockey Club

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95949
Date Range
1938-1939
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191055035
Physical Description
8.5 X 6.5 bw photographic print
Scope and Content
The Trail Smoke Eaters were a junior A hockey team from Trail, B.C. and were a part of the British Columbia Hockey League. The team has existed since 1926 and have been a part of the British Columbia Hockey League since that time. They were World Champions 1938-39. Included in the photographic prin…
  1 image  
Date Range
1938-1939
Description Level
Item
Creator
ENMAX Centre
Physical Description
8.5 X 6.5 bw photographic print
History / Biographical
The ENMAX (formerly Sportsplex) Centre is a multipurpose facility operated by the City of Lethbridge. The complex was built in 1975 in preparation for the Canada Games.
Scope and Content
The Trail Smoke Eaters were a junior A hockey team from Trail, B.C. and were a part of the British Columbia Hockey League. The team has existed since 1926 and have been a part of the British Columbia Hockey League since that time. They were World Champions 1938-39. Included in the photographic print: Ben Hays, O.H. Neilson, Bunny Dame, Jim Morris, Mel Snowdon, Joe Benoit. The photographic print contains the signatures of members of the team.
Accession No.
20191055035
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Coleman Canadians vs. Lethbridge Maple Leafs 1938-39

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95950
Date Range
1938-1939
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191055036
Physical Description
9 X 6 bw photographic print
Scope and Content
The Coleman Canadians were a Senior Amateur hockey club based in Coleman, AB. The Lethbridge Maple Leafs were also a hockey club based in Lethbridge. Both teams played in the Alberta Senior Hockey League from 1938-1940/41. The photographic print shows a game between Coleman and the Leafs. Present i…
  1 image  
Date Range
1938-1939
Description Level
Item
Creator
ENMAX Centre
Physical Description
9 X 6 bw photographic print
History / Biographical
The ENMAX (formerly Sportsplex) Centre is a multipurpose facility operated by the City of Lethbridge. The complex was built in 1975 in preparation for the Canada Games.
Scope and Content
The Coleman Canadians were a Senior Amateur hockey club based in Coleman, AB. The Lethbridge Maple Leafs were also a hockey club based in Lethbridge. Both teams played in the Alberta Senior Hockey League from 1938-1940/41. The photographic print shows a game between Coleman and the Leafs. Present in the photographic print: Squee Allen, Duke Kwansie, Bunny McKillop, Bull Landiak, Dave Kemp, Bunny Redisky, and Jake Milford.
Accession No.
20191055036
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Portrait of Walter Cuell, age 5

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95599
Date Range
1935-1936
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191031008
Physical Description
bw negative
Scope and Content
Portrait of Walter Langrish Cuell (1931 - 2017) when he was 5 years old.
  1 image  
Date Range
1935-1936
Description Level
Item
Creator
Cecil Cuell
Physical Description
bw negative
History / Biographical
Cecil Thomas Arthur Cuell (1899-1982) born Portsmouth England. Immigrated to Canada with family 1913. Settled first in Calgary where he apprenticed with the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) Ogden Shops as an electrician. Moved to Lethbridge in 1922 and married Violet Ann Beaton on September 2, 1925. They had 8 children including a set of twins. Cuell was an electrician at the Government Elevator in Lethbridge when it was built in 1930 until he retired in 1964. He was an amateur photographer who developed and processed his own film in his home darkroom. Cuell like to experiment with flash powder and various chemicals to produce different colours and special effects on his photos. Walter Langrish Cuell was the fourth child of Cecil and Violet Cuell. He was born June 13, 1931 and later married Suzanne Biron. Walter Cuell died in 2017.
Custodial History
Photographed by Cecil Cuell and kept in Cuell family.
Scope and Content
Portrait of Walter Langrish Cuell (1931 - 2017) when he was 5 years old.
Accession No.
20191031008
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Children playing in orange crate

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95600
Date Range
1930
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191031009
Physical Description
bw negative
Scope and Content
Robert (Bob) Frederick Cuell, 1 year old (Left) and Dorothy Cecile Cuell, 3 years old (right) playing in an orange crate in the backyard of 316 - 15 street south.
  1 image  
Date Range
1930
Description Level
Item
Creator
Cecil Cuell
Physical Description
bw negative
History / Biographical
Cecil Thomas Arthur Cuell (1899-1982) born Portsmouth England. Immigrated to Canada with family 1913. Settled first in Calgary where he apprenticed with the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) Ogden Shops as an electrician. Moved to Lethbridge in 1922 and married Violet Ann Beaton on September 2, 1925. They had 8 children including a set of twins. Cuell was an electrician at the Government Elevator in Lethbridge when it was built in 1930 until he retired in 1964. He was an amateur photographer who developed and processed his own film in his home darkroom. Cuell like to experiment with flash powder and various chemicals to produce different colours and special effects on his photos. Dorothy Cecile Cuell was the second child of Cecil and Violet Cuell. She was born November 8, 1927 and later married Donald Fox. Robert (Bob) Frederick Cuell was the third child of Cecil and Violet Cuell. He was born June 5, 1929 and later married Georgia Chugg.
Custodial History
Photographed by Cecil Cuell and kept in Cuell family.
Scope and Content
Robert (Bob) Frederick Cuell, 1 year old (Left) and Dorothy Cecile Cuell, 3 years old (right) playing in an orange crate in the backyard of 316 - 15 street south.
Accession No.
20191031009
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Date Range
1931
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191031012
Physical Description
bw negative
Scope and Content
Violet (Beaton) Cuell holding her son Walter Langrish Cuell in the backyard of 316 - 15 street south.
  1 image  
Date Range
1931
Description Level
Item
Creator
Cecil Cuell
Physical Description
bw negative
History / Biographical
Cecil Thomas Arthur Cuell (1899-1982) born Portsmouth England. Immigrated to Canada with family 1913. Settled first in Calgary where he apprenticed with the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) Ogden Shops as an electrician. Moved to Lethbridge in 1922 and married Violet Ann Beaton on September 2, 1925. They had 8 children including a set of twins. Cuell was an electrician at the Government Elevator in Lethbridge when it was built in 1930 until he retired in 1964. He was an amateur photographer who developed and processed his own film in his home darkroom. Cuell like to experiment with flash powder and various chemicals to produce different colours and special effects on his photos. Violet Ann (Beaton) Cuell (1900-1992) was born in Aberdeen, Scotland and immigrated to Lethbridge with her mother and siblings in 1912 to join her father who had come over in 1906. She worked a clerk with the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) in Lethbridge before her marriage to Cecil Cuell in 1925. Walter Langrish Cuell was the fourth child of Cecil and Violet Cuell. He was born June 13, 1931 and later married Suzanne Biron. Walter Cuell died in 2017
Custodial History
Photographed by Cecil Cuell and kept in Cuell family.
Scope and Content
Violet (Beaton) Cuell holding her son Walter Langrish Cuell in the backyard of 316 - 15 street south.
Accession No.
20191031012
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Date Range
1931
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191031013
Physical Description
bw negative
Scope and Content
Violet (Beaton) Cuell holding her son Walter Langrish Cuell in the backyard of 316 - 15 street south.
  1 image  
Date Range
1931
Description Level
Item
Creator
Cecil Cuell
Physical Description
bw negative
History / Biographical
Cecil Thomas Arthur Cuell (1899-1982) born Portsmouth England. Immigrated to Canada with family 1913. Settled first in Calgary where he apprenticed with the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) Ogden Shops as an electrician. Moved to Lethbridge in 1922 and married Violet Ann Beaton on September 2, 1925. They had 8 children including a set of twins. Cuell was an electrician at the Government Elevator in Lethbridge when it was built in 1930 until he retired in 1964. He was an amateur photographer who developed and processed his own film in his home darkroom. Cuell like to experiment with flash powder and various chemicals to produce different colours and special effects on his photos. Violet Ann (Beaton) Cuell (1900-1992) was born in Aberdeen, Scotland and immigrated to Lethbridge with her mother and siblings in 1912 to join her father who had come over in 1906. She worked a clerk with the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) in Lethbridge before her marriage to Cecil Cuell in 1925. Walter Langrish Cuell was the fourth child of Cecil and Violet Cuell. He was born June 13, 1931 and later married Suzanne Biron. Walter Cuell died in 2017
Custodial History
Photographed by Cecil Cuell and kept in Cuell family.
Scope and Content
Violet (Beaton) Cuell holding her son Walter Langrish Cuell in the backyard of 316 - 15 street south.
Accession No.
20191031013
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Violet Cuell sitting at kitchen table

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95606
Date Range
1930
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191031014
Physical Description
bw negative
Scope and Content
Violet (Beaton) Cuell sitting at kitchen table in 316 - 15 street south. Cecil Cuell was experimenting with double exposure technique to create this image.
  1 image  
Date Range
1930
Description Level
Item
Creator
Cecil Cuell
Physical Description
bw negative
History / Biographical
Cecil Thomas Arthur Cuell (1899-1982) born Portsmouth England. Immigrated to Canada with family 1913. Settled first in Calgary where he apprenticed with the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) Ogden Shops as an electrician. Moved to Lethbridge in 1922 and married Violet Ann Beaton on September 2, 1925. They had 8 children including a set of twins. Cuell was an electrician at the Government Elevator in Lethbridge when it was built in 1930 until he retired in 1964. He was an amateur photographer who developed and processed his own film in his home darkroom. Cuell like to experiment with flash powder and various chemicals to produce different colours and special effects on his photos. Violet Ann (Beaton) Cuell (1900-1992) was born in Aberdeen, Scotland and immigrated to Lethbridge with her mother and siblings in 1912 to join her father who had come over in 1906. She worked a clerk with the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) in Lethbridge before her marriage to Cecil Cuell in 1925.
Custodial History
Photographed by Cecil Cuell and kept in Cuell family.
Scope and Content
Violet (Beaton) Cuell sitting at kitchen table in 316 - 15 street south. Cecil Cuell was experimenting with double exposure technique to create this image.
Accession No.
20191031014
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

George Cuell sitting in backyard of 316-15 street south

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95607
Date Range
1930s
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191031015
Physical Description
bw negative
Scope and Content
George Cuell, Cecil's father, sitting in the backyard of 316 - 15 street south while visiting from Calgary.
  1 image  
Date Range
1930s
Description Level
Item
Creator
Cecil Cuell
Physical Description
bw negative
History / Biographical
Cecil Thomas Arthur Cuell (1899-1982) born Portsmouth England. Immigrated to Canada with family 1913. Settled first in Calgary where he apprenticed with the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) Ogden Shops as an electrician. Moved to Lethbridge in 1922 and married Violet Ann Beaton on September 2, 1925. They had 8 children including a set of twins. Cuell was an electrician at the Government Elevator in Lethbridge when it was built in 1930 until he retired in 1964. He was an amateur photographer who developed and processed his own film in his home darkroom. Cuell like to experiment with flash powder and various chemicals to produce different colours and special effects on his photos.
Custodial History
Photographed by Cecil Cuell and kept in Cuell family.
Scope and Content
George Cuell, Cecil's father, sitting in the backyard of 316 - 15 street south while visiting from Calgary.
Accession No.
20191031015
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Portrait of Doreen Langille

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95610
Date Range
1935-1936
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191031018
Physical Description
bw negative
Scope and Content
Portrait of Doreen Langille, a cousin from Calgary, taken in Cuell family home at 316 - 15 street south.
  1 image  
Date Range
1935-1936
Description Level
Item
Creator
Cecil Cuell
Physical Description
bw negative
History / Biographical
Cecil Thomas Arthur Cuell (1899-1982) born Portsmouth England. Immigrated to Canada with family 1913. Settled first in Calgary where he apprenticed with the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) Ogden Shops as an electrician. Moved to Lethbridge in 1922 and married Violet Ann Beaton on September 2, 1925. They had 8 children including a set of twins. Cuell was an electrician at the Government Elevator in Lethbridge when it was built in 1930 until he retired in 1964. He was an amateur photographer who developed and processed his own film in his home darkroom. Cuell like to experiment with flash powder and various chemicals to produce different colours and special effects on his photos.
Custodial History
Photographed by Cecil Cuell and kept in Cuell family.
Scope and Content
Portrait of Doreen Langille, a cousin from Calgary, taken in Cuell family home at 316 - 15 street south.
Accession No.
20191031018
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Skating On Henderson Lake

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions97611
Date Range
Jan.32, 1972
Description Level
Item
Material Type
Photograph
Accession No.
1991107619617
Physical Description
Black and white negative
Scope and Content
No information available.
  1 image  
Material Type
Photograph
Date Range
Jan.32, 1972
Description Level
Item
Creator
The Lethbridge Herald
Physical Description
Black and white negative
Physical Condition
Excellent
Scope and Content
No information available.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
1991107619617
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

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