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Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170028000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1920
Date Range To
1930
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
73
Diameter
27
Description
SILVER STANDING FLOOR ASHTRAY WITH ROUND DISH AT TOP SECURED TO SILVER METAL POLE AND ROUND SILVER BASE; TOP DISH HAS SILER ORNATE HANDLE WITH LEAF AND BEADS PATTERN AND RAISED POINT IN CENTER. ROUND BASE HAS FOUR FEET; BASE ORNATELY ENGRAVED WITH FLUTED PATTERN; METAL STAND POLE FIXED TO TOP DISH WITH METAL BRACKET AND TWO SCREWS. SILVER HANDLE TARNISHED; INSIDE DISH IS TARNISHED AND WORN; UNDERSIDE OF BASE IS SOILED; EDGES OF PATTERN ON BASE ARE TARNISHED. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 23, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ANDY AND JO KOCSIS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF A STANDING, FLOOR-MODEL ASHTRAY. THE ASHTRAY WAS USED IN ANDY KOCSIS’S FATHER’S HOME, AND WAS TAKEN BY ANDY AND JO KOCSIS FOR USE IN THEIR HOME WHEN THEY MOVED. ON THE ORIGINS OF THE ASHTRAY, JO NOTED, “ALL THAT I KNOW ABOUT THEM IS THAT THEY WERE [IN MY PARENTS' HOME AT 109-7TH AVE. SOUTH] WHEN I GOT MARRIED, WHICH WAS 53-54 YEARS AGO. [WE KEPT THEM] IN THE FRONT ROOM.” ANDY ELABORATED, “THEY WERE THERE [IN THE HOME ALREADY]. MY DAD WAS THE OWNER [OF THE HOUSE]. I ALWAYS THOUGHT THEY COME WITH THE HOUSE…[THE ASHTRAY] GOT TIPPED OVER SOMEHOW, IT USED TO HAVE A [DARK BOWL].” ANDY NOTED, “I QUIT [SMOKING] WHEN I WAS THIRTY … YEARS OLD. [JO] SMOKED EVER SINCE SHE WAS SIXTEEN.” ANDY RECALLED HIS FAMILY’S HOME, STATING, “MY DAD [STEVE KOCSIS] BROUGHT US OUT FROM HUNGARY. HE OWNED THE MAYOR [CHARLES A.] MAGRATH HOUSE [AT 109-7TH AVE. SOUTH]…THAT’S HOW WE ENDED UP THERE.” “MIKE ANGYAL [THE OWNER BEFORE MY DAD] WAS A GOOD FRIEND OF HIS, ANOTHER HUNGARIAN, BIG FARMER, SO I GUESS HE HELPED THEM GET INVOLVED. WHEN [DAD] BOUGHT THE HOUSE…THE HUNGARIANS USED TO HAVE BUSINESS THERE. IT WAS A BIG EMPTY LOT AND HE SUB-DIVIDED, SO HE GOT SOME MONEY AND SOLD A BUNCH OF LOTS.” “[MY DAD MADE THEM INTO APARTMENTS BECAUSE] HE COULDN’T LIVE IN ALL OF IT SO HE GOT A BUNCH OF HUNGARIAN COAL MINERS DOWN IN THE BASEMENT. THERE [WERE] SIX OR SEVEN OF THEM. THEY ALL LIVED DOWNSTAIRS. SOME, THEIR WIVES KICKED THEM OUT.” “[IT WAS MADE INTO] FOUR SUITES. WE WERE RENTING FOR A WHILE, WE HAD GOOD TENANTS. THEN THERE WAS ONE COUPLE…THEY STOLE THE LAMP. … SO FINALLY, WE RENTED NO MORE. IT GOT SO BAD. I SAID I CAN’T TAKE THIS ANYMORE.” JO ADDED, “[THERE WERE SUITES] TWO UPSTAIRS, AND THEN THERE WAS ONE ON THE SIDE AND ONE ON THE LOWER FLOORS… MY MOTHER-IN-LAW, WHEN WE GOT MARRIED, MOM KOCSIS, SHE SAID “THIS PLACE I’M IN [IS] TOO BIG” SO SHE MOVED INTO THE SMALLER SUITE ON THE GROUND FLOOR AND WE GOT THE BIGGER SUITE. THEN IT WAS RENTED OUT, THE TOP, UNTIL, THEN THE KIDS GOT BIGGER, BECAUSE WE HAD TWO CHILDREN. THEN WE TOOK OVER THE SUITE AT THE TOP, CLOSED OFF THE KITCHEN, PUT A DOOR THERE. THEN WE HAD HALF OF THE HOUSE…THE OTHER SUITE STAYED EMPTY ‘TIL IT WAS SOLD.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR MOTIVATIONS TO DONATE THE ASHTRAY, ANDY NOTED, “[IT’S] A KIND OF REMINDER OF…THE OLD TIMES…THE OLD HUNGARIANS USED TO COME AND PLAY POKER IN THE FRONT ROOM…A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THEIR ‘50S.” JO ADDED, “WE’RE HAVING TO SELL OUR [CURRENT] HOME AND WE HAVE NO MORE USE FOR IT…WE WANT IT TO GO…[IT’S] OLD, SO WE’D LIKE [IT] TO GO SOMEWHERE. MY KIDS ARE NOT INTERESTED IN THEM, NOR ARE MY GRANDKIDS. THEY DON’T WANT THIS OLD STUFF.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170028000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170028000
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WEDGE CAP
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170009001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WEDGE CAP
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Materials
COTTON, SILK, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
29
Width
11.4
Description
BLUE WEDGE CAP WITH FOLDED EDGE SEWN AROUND CAP; FRONT OF CAP HAS TWO BRASS BUTTONS EMBOSSED WITH CROWN OVER EAGLE IN FLIGHT AND TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF CAP HAS METAL SEAL ON BLACK BACKGROUND; SEAL SHOWS BRASS, RED, AND SILVER CROWN OVER A BRASS FLYING EAGLE OVER FOUR BRASS LEAF FRONDS TIED IN THE CENTER. INSIDE OF CAP IS LINED WITH RED SILK AND DISCOLOURED VELVET EDGING; TOP OF INSIDE HAS FOLD IN SILK WITH “MATHESON” WRITTEN ON EITHER SIDE IN BLACK MARKER. INSIDE CAP HAS DISCOLOURED GREY TAG WITH BLUE STITCHED EDGING AND BLUE AND RED EMBROIDERED TEXT “THE MUIR BRAND, EST. 1875, MUIR CAP & REGALIA LTD., SI SIMCOE ST. TORONTO”. INSIDE LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF CAP HAS HOLE IN VELVET LINING; INSIDE BACK OF CAP HAS FRAYING ALONG VELVET EDGING; CAP IS FADED ON OUTSIDE AND HAS SOILING ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE WEDGE CAP, MATHESON RECALLED, “[THIS IS THE ORIGINAL] FROM THE R.C.A.F. RIGHT FROM DAY ONE.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE CAP, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY..." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009001
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
R.C.A.F. DRESS JACKET
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170009002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.C.A.F. DRESS JACKET
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Materials
COTTON, SILK, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
79
Width
47
Description
BLUE COTTON JACKET WITH BLUE SILK LINING; JACKET HAS FIVE POCKETS ON FRONT WITH TWO UPPER POCKETS WITH BRASS “R.C.A.F.” BUTTONS ON COVER FLAPS, TWO LOWER POCKETS WITH BRASS “R.C.A.F.” BUTTONS ON COVER FLAPS, AND ADDITION POCKET ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE WITH NO COVER FLAP. JACKET HAS FOUR ADDITIONAL BUTTONS FOR FASTENING RUNNING DOWN RIGHT-WEARING SIDE WITH BUTTON HOLES OF LEFT-WEARING SIDE; ALL BUTTONS ON JACKET ARE BRASS WITH EMBOSSED CROWN OVER FLYING EAGLE, OVER TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. JACKET SLEEVES HAVE DOUBLE BLACK STRIPES AROUND CENTER BLUE STRIPE ABOVE CUFFS [SECOND LIEUTENANT BARS]; SHOULDERS HAVE BLUE PATCHES SEWN ON WITH WHITE TEXT “CANADA”. FRONT LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF JACKET HAS BADGE WITH BLUE BACKGROUND SEWN ON; BADGE SHOWS RED AND BRASS CROWN OVER WHITE AND BLACK GLOBE WITH RED LIGHTING BOLT ACROSS FRONT, WITH BRASS WINGS OUTSTRETCHED AND LAUREL LEAVES AROUND GLOBE AT INSIDE OF WINGS [AIRBORNE INTERCEPTOR BADGE]. BACK OF JACKET HAS TWO BLACK BELT LOOPS AT SIDES. INSIDE RIGHT-WEARING SIDE IS POCKET SEWN INTO LINING; OUTSIDE OF POCKET HAS WHITE LABEL WITH STITCHED TEXT “HANFORD-DREWITT LTD., WINNIPEG”. INSIDE LINING HAS RIP AT TOP OF SPLIT AT BACK; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE JACKET, MATHESON RECALLED, “THIS IS JUST THE WINTER DRESS. THERE WAS THE TUNIC AND THEN THE SUMMER ONES.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE JACKET, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY, ESPECIALLY THIS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009002
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, SILK, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20170009003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Materials
WOOL, SILK, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
119
Width
48
Description
BLUE WOOL COAT WITH TWO POCKETS ON FRONT AND TWO BRASS BUTTONS ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE AND THREE BRASS BUTTONS ON LEFT-WEARING SIDE; BRASS BUTTONS ALL HAVE EMBOSSED CROWN AT TOP WITH FLYING EAGLE UNDER, AND LOWER TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. COAT SLEEVES HAVE THREE BRASS BUTTONS DOWN CUFFS WITH EMBOSSED CROWN OVER FLYING EAGLE AND TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. COAT SHOULDERS HAVE BLUE BADGES SEWN ON WITH WHITE TEXT “CANADA” AND EPAULETS ATTACHED DISPLAYING TWO BLACK STRIPES AND MIDDLE BLUE STRIPE [SECOND LIEUTENANT STRIPES]. INSIDE OF JACKET HAS BLUE SILK LINING; LEFT-WEARING SIDE ON INSIDE HAS A POCKET AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTON; TAG SEWN ONTO INSIDE POCKET IS WHITE WITH RED TEXT “HANFORD-DREWITT LTD., WINNIPEG”. INSIDE LINING IS STAINED GREEN AT COLLAR AND ON LEFT-WEARING SIDE; OUTSIDE OF COAT HAS SOILING AND STAINING ON FRONT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE COAT, MATHESON RECALLED, “THIS IS JUST THE WINTER DRESS. THERE WAS THE TUNIC AND THEN THE SUMMER ONES.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE COAT, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY..." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009003
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CHILD'S HARNESS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170018001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CHILD'S HARNESS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
27.6
Width
33.4
Description
BROWN LEATHER CHILD HARNESS WITH SILVER BUCKLES AND LEATHER NAILS; HARNESS HAS BELT WITH TWO SUEDE LEATHER BUCKLED STRAPS RUNNING FRONT TO BACK, AND TWO SUEDE LEATHER STRAPS WITH BUCKLES HANGING DOWN SIDES. FRONT OF BELT HAS WHITE RESIDUE AND STAINING ON LEATHER; BELT IS DISCOLOURED AT ENDS; LEATHER BELT IS CRACKED ON FRONT LEFT. INSIDE OF BELT IS SUEDE; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MAY 3, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GARY HAMILTON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. HAMILTON WAS RAISED IN MAGRATH, ALBERTA, AND RECALLS THE OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ON THE LEATHER CHILD HARNESS, HAMILTON RECALLED, “[IT]S] MINE. MY MOTHER AND MY DAD USED TO TIE ME, WELL HOOK ME UP IN THE HARNESS, TIE ME TO THE CLOTHESLINE, GIVE ME SOME ROPE TO GO FROM ONE END TO THE OTHER, SO THAT THEY KNEW WHERE I WAS. I GUESS I [WAS ANGRY] ONE DAY AND BURNT THE BACKYARD DOWN [IN MAGRATH], AND THAT’S MY HARNESS.” “THE HARNESS [WAS] PART OF MY GROWING UP THAT’S ALL. I DO REMEMBER…WEARING IT.” HAMILTON ELABORATED ON HIS CHILDHOOD, NOTING, “WHEN I WAS GROWING UP IT WAS WAY DIFFERENT THAN IT IS NOW. IF YOU NEEDED A SPANKING YOU GOT A SPANKING…NOW YOU CAN’T TOUCH ANYBODY. THAT’S PART OF MY GROWING UP SO I WOULD IMAGINE EVERYBODY ELSE WAS DOING IT TOO. THEY DIDN’T THINK OF IT BY THEMSELVES.” “I WAS GONE ALL THE TIME. MY AUNT LIVED DOWN THE STREET AND I GUESS I WOULD GO VISIT HER, PUT MY HAT ON WHETHER I HAD CLOTHES ON OR NOT, GO VISIT HER. MY DAD WORKED A BLOCK AWAY. EVERYBODY KNEW ME. IT WASN’T A BIG TOWN, AND MY UNCLE WAS A SCHOOL TEACHER THERE, PRINCIPAL AT THE SCHOOL. I’VE GOT LOTS OF RELATIVES OUT THERE.” “THEY’D SEND ME TO SCHOOL AND I WOULDN’T GO. RECESS I’D GO PLAY WITH THE GUYS AT RECESS AND THEN I’D TAKE OFF AGAIN, I’D GO FISHING.” “MY MOTHER [CORRINE HAMILTON] NEVER THREW ANYTHING AWAY. GAMES FROM WHEN WE WERE KIDS…JACKETS, SHOES, SKATES, SHE KEPT IT.” “MY BROTHER AND MY SISTER [WENT THROUGH MY MOTHER’S THINGS WHEN SHE PASSED AWAY TEN YEARS AGO]…[MY BROTHER CALLED] HE SAID, “DO YOU WANT YOUR JACKET BACK? AT THE TIME I THOUGHT I WAS GOING TO MAKE A FRAME FOR ALL THIS STUFF AND THEN PUT IT ON MY WALL. ONE THING LED TO ANOTHER AND WE SOLD MY HOUSE, MOVED TO AN APARTMENT, [AND I] DIDN’T WANT TO DO IT.” “IT’S PART OF MY CHILDHOOD.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170018001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170018001
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CHILD'S JACKET
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, RAYON
Catalogue Number
P20170018002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CHILD'S JACKET
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, RAYON
No. Pieces
1
Length
46
Width
30.2
Description
CHILD’S BROWN LEATHER SUEDE JACKET WITH FRINGED SLEEVES, BOTTOM, AND CHEST DECORATION. FRONT OF JACKET HAS TWO POCKETS AT SIDES AND SILVER ZIPPER RUNNING DOWN; JACKET LINING IS BROWN COTTON. INSIDE COLLAR OF JACKET IS YELLOW TAG WITH BLACK AND BROWN STITCHED BILINGUAL (ENGLISH AND FRENCH) TEXT “ALL WEATHER, SUEDINE JACKET, SEE SAW, COTTON COATED VINYL, DO NOT DRY CLEAN, TAIWAN”. INSIDE RIGHT WEARING SIDE IS WHITE TAG WITH BLACK TEXT “SHELL EXPANDED…COTTON BACKING, LINING: 100% RAYON”. JACKET SEAMS AND EDGING ON POCKETS AND FRINGING IS MACHINE-STITCHED WITH CREAM THREAD. JACKET HAS SCUFFS AND STAINING FROM WEAR ON FRONT, SLEEVES, AND BACK; LOOSE THREAD AT LOWER LEFT-WEARING SIDE EDGE ALONG FRINGE AND STITCHING MISSING IN PLACES ALONG LOWER LEFT WEARING EDGE; JACKET HAS SINGLE PUNCTURE HOLES AT TOPS OF BOTH SHOULDERS AND GO THROUGH BOTH SIDES OF JACKET AND LINING. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MAY 3, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GARY HAMILTON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. HAMILTON WAS RAISED IN MAGRATH, ALBERTA, AND RECALLS THE OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ON THE SUEDE JACKET, HAMILTON RECALLED, “MY PARENTS GAVE IT TO ME…SIXTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. [I REMEMBER] PLAYING IN IT… PLAYING IN THE DIRT. [THE JACKET WAS] PROBABLY MY FAVOURITE [GROWING UP].” “I LIVED IN THE COUNTRY AND EVERYBODY ELSE DRESSED THE SAME WAY, OR CLOSE TO THE SAME. [I CAME] FROM THE FARM MOVED INTO TOWN.” “[WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE] WHEN I WAS IN GRADE FOUR.” HAMILTON ELABORATED ON HIS CHILDHOOD, NOTING, “WHEN I WAS GROWING UP IT WAS WAY DIFFERENT THAN IT IS NOW. IF YOU NEEDED A SPANKING YOU GOT A SPANKING…NOW YOU CAN’T TOUCH ANYBODY. THAT’S PART OF MY GROWING UP SO I WOULD IMAGINE EVERYBODY ELSE WAS DOING IT TOO. THEY DIDN’T THINK OF IT BY THEMSELVES.” “I WAS GONE ALL THE TIME. MY AUNT LIVED DOWN THE STREET AND I GUESS I WOULD GO VISIT HER, PUT MY HAT ON WHETHER I HAD CLOTHES ON OR NOT, GO VISIT HER. MY DAD WORKED A BLOCK AWAY. EVERYBODY KNEW ME. IT WASN’T A BIG TOWN, AND MY UNCLE WAS A SCHOOL TEACHER THERE, PRINCIPAL AT THE SCHOOL. I’VE GOT LOTS OF RELATIVES OUT THERE.” “THEY’D SEND ME TO SCHOOL AND I WOULDN’T GO. RECESS I’D GO PLAY WITH THE GUYS AT RECESS AND THEN I’D TAKE OFF AGAIN, I’D GO FISHING.” “MY MOTHER [CORRINE HAMILTON] NEVER THREW ANYTHING AWAY. GAMES FROM WHEN WE WERE KIDS…JACKETS, SHOES, SKATES, SHE KEPT IT.” “MY BROTHER AND MY SISTER [WENT THROUGH MY MOTHER’S THINGS WHEN SHE PASSED AWAY TEN YEARS AGO]…[MY BROTHER CALLED] HE SAID, “DO YOU WANT YOUR JACKET BACK? AT THE TIME I THOUGHT I WAS GOING TO MAKE A FRAME FOR ALL THIS STUFF AND THEN PUT IT ON MY WALL. ONE THING LED TO ANOTHER AND WE SOLD MY HOUSE, MOVED TO AN APARTMENT, [AND I] DIDN’T WANT TO DO IT.” “IT’S PART OF MY CHILDHOOD.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170018001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170018002
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WEDDING DRESS & CAPE SET
Date Range From
1958
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, NYLON
Catalogue Number
P20160041001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WEDDING DRESS & CAPE SET
Date Range From
1958
Date Range To
1965
Materials
COTTON, NYLON
No. Pieces
3
Length
106
Width
36.5
Description
A. SLEEVELESS, CREAM, TEXTURED COTTON-BLEND DRESS. DRESS HAS STITCHED SEAMS RUNNING DOWN SIDES, FRONT, AND BACK. DRESS HAS A ZIPPER RUNNING MIDWAY DOWN BACK, WITH A STITCHED SEAM EXTENDING FROM END OF ZIPPER. DRESS HAS TRIANGLE CUT OUT OF BACK AT THE END OF THE SEAM. DRESS HAS SLIGHT RED-BROWN CIRCULAR STAIN ON FRONT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. REVERSIBLE CAPE, 120CM WIDE X 66CM LONG. PALE YELLOW, TEXTURED COTTON-BLEND FABRIC ON ONE SIDE AND BLACK WITH CREAM-SPECKLED PATTERN ON THE OTHER SIDE. BOTH SIDES OF THE CAPE INCLUDE TWO BUTTONS COVERED IN THE PATTERNED FABRIC OF THE OPPOSITE SIDE (FOR SECURING A BELT/STRAP). CAPE HAS TWO ARM-HOLES ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES, AND ONE SLIT RUNNING 15.5 CM UP THE CENTER OF THE BACK FROM THE HEM. CAPE SHOWS LITTLE SIGNS OF WEAR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. BELT FOR CAPE, 28.5CM LONG X 6.5CM WIDE. SMALL REVERSIBLE BELT FOR CAPE, ATTACHING WITH BUTTONS TO THE CAPE. FABRIC MATCHES THE PATTERNS OF THE CAPE AS CREAM AND BLACK WITH CREAM-SPECKLED PATTERN. ENDS OF THE STRAP ARE TAPERED INTO ARROW-POINTS. BELT SHOWS LITTLE SIGN OF WEAR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS LOGAN GARMENT COMPANY DRESS WAS PURCHASED BY JOAN HAIG IN THE LATE 1950S IN HER HOMETOWN OF LIPTON, SASKATCHEWAN. THE DRESS CAME WITH HER WHEN SHE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN THE EARLY 1960S. JOAN AND HER HUSBAND, BRUCE HAIG, DONATED THIS ITEM TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: ABOUT THE DRESS, JOAN BEGAN, “I BOUGHT IT IN 1958 IN THE FALL. THE SALESPERSON [FROM LETHBRIDGE’S LOGAN GARMENT COMPANY] CAME TO MY LITTLE [HOMETOWN] OF LIPTON, SASKATCHEWAN WHERE I WAS TEACHING, AND I THOUGHT IT WAS KIND OF NEAT… I WAS TEACHING [IN LIPTON] AT THE TIME [AFTER GRADUATION], WHILE LIVING WITH MY PARENTS. THAT’S WHEN I BOUGHT IT… THE SALESPERSON CAME TO THE HOUSE AND JUST KNOCKED ON THE DOOR. MY MOTHER HAD A REPUTATION FOR REALLY HAVING VERY NICE CLOTHES AND WEARING THEM WELL, SO SOMEBODY IN TOWN LIKELY SUGGESTED, ‘YOU KNOW, YOU MIGHT WANT TO GO AND TALK TO MRS. ROBERTSON,’ BUT SHE DIDN’T BUY ANYTHING, I DID... I LOVE CLOTHES, AND [THE DRESS] WAS DIFFERENT. I KNEW THERE WOULDN’T BE A BUNCH OF THEM WALKING AROUND, SO I ORDERED ONE… THEY MEASURED YOU, YOU PICKED YOUR CLOTH SAMPLES, COLOURS, AND STYLE. THEN THEY TOOK ALL YOUR MEASUREMENTS AND AFTER A CERTAIN NUMBER OF WEEKS THE GARMENTS ARRIVED IN THE MAIL. IT WAS COOL… [I SELECTED THIS ONE BECAUSE] I THOUGHT THE NECKLINE WAS JUST THE BEST OF THE BEST. IT HAD THESE LITTLE POINTY DEALIES, SO YOU COULD WEAR YOUR JEWELRY AND IT WOULD SHOW THAT KIND OF THING. IT WAS DIFFERENT THAN MOST OF THE THINGS WE WOULD SEE, [BECAUSE] WE USUALLY BOUGHT OUR CLOTHES IN REGINA.” “I WORE IT A FEW TIMES,” JOAN CONTINUED, “[SPECIFICALLY WHEN] WE GOT MARRIED IN MAY OF 1960… WE GOT MARRIED [IN] THE CHURCH IN FORT QU’APPELLE, SASKATCHEWAN. WE HAD OUR RECEPTION IN LIPTON… IT WAS A BEAUTIFUL SPRING DAY, SO I DECIDED THAT THIS WOULD BE AN APPROPRIATE OUTFIT TO CHANGE INTO TO GO AWAY… WHEN WE DROVE OFF IN BRUCE’S LITTLE VOLKSWAGEN. I THOUGHT I LOOKED PRETTY SWISHY [IN THE DRESS] TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH.… THE CAPE HAS A LITTLE BELT ON THE BACK, THEN INSIDE THERE ARE BUTTONS, SO THAT YOU COULD SWITCH THE LITTLE BELT TO THE INSIDE TO MATCH THAT PARTICULAR LOOK...I ALWAYS WORE IT WITH THE BLACK SIDE OUT.” IN ADDITION TO WEARING ON HER WEDDING DAY, JOAN EXPLAINED, “I PROBABLY WORE IT [GOING TO WORK AS A TEACHER, BECAUSE] PEOPLE DRESSED UP IN THOSE DAYS. [YOU] DIDN’T GO ANYWHERE IN JEANS OR SLACKS... IT WAS NICE TO DRESS UP. YOU WOULDN’T GO OUT NOT LOOKING WELL PUT OUT. WOMEN WORE DRESSES OR SUITS, AND GENTLEMEN WORE NICELY PRESSED TROUSERS, SHIRTS, AND TIES. EVEN STUDENTS - I WENT TO TEACHERS' COLLEGE AND YOU ALWAYS WENT TO SCHOOL IN A DRESS...THE ONLY ONES WHO WORE UNIFORMS WERE THE SISTERS, THE NUNS. IT WAS OLD-FASHIONED, BUT IT WAS NICE… [THAT CHANGED IN THE] LATE ‘60’S, MAYBE EVEN EARLY ‘70’S.” PRIOR TO MEETING HER HUSBAND, BRUCE HAIG, JOAN HAD NO PRIOR CONNECTION TO LETHBRIDGE. SHE JUST KNEW THAT IS WHERE THE YELLOW DRESS CAME FROM. SHE EXPLAINED, “I DIDN’T EVEN KNOW FOR SURE WHERE [LETHBRIDGE] WAS [WHEN I PURCHASED THE DRESS FROM THE COMPANY]. I MET BRUCE IN 1959 AT UNIVERSITY.” SPEAKING ABOUT THE COMPANY WHERE THIS DRESS WAS MADE, BRUCE HAIG EXPLAINED, “IT WAS A BIG COMPANY… [IT] CAME OUT OF LOGAN, UTAH… THEY WENT ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA SELLING DOOR-TO-DOOR [WITH] DOOR-TO-DOOR SALESMEN. I REMEMBER SEEING THE NEW BUILDING HERE WHEN I WAS A KID. I THINK IT WAS UP NEAR 9TH STREET AND STAFFORD DRIVE, JUST CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN AS I RECALL. I DIDN’T REALIZE THEY HAD SALESMEN UNTIL I MET HER, AND SHE SAID, ‘OH, I KNOW YOU. I HAVE A DRESS FROM YOUR PLACE.’” “A LOT OF PEOPLE DID A LOT OF THINGS WITH SALESPEOPLE IN THOSE DAYS, ESPECIALLY IN RURAL AREAS. IT WAS NOT UNCOMMON TO HAVE SOMEBODY COME TO THE DOOR AND BUY STUFF FROM THEM. IT WASN’T A BIG LEAP OF FAITH, AND I BELIEVE THAT THEY SENT IT C. O. D. (COLLECT ON DELIVERY), SO THAT YOU DIDN’T FEEL LIKE YOU WERE GETTING GYPPED OUT OF YOUR MONEY. THEY WOULDN’T GET THEIR MONEY UNTIL YOU GOT YOUR GOODS,” JOAN CONTINUED, “[THE DRESS] WAS QUITE EXPENSIVE IN THOSE DAYS AS A YOUNG TEACHER, WHO DIDN’T MAKE MUCH MONEY AT ALL. IT WAS FAIRLY EXPENSIVE FOR ME, BUT IT SEEMS TO ME THAT I THOUGHT, YOU KNOW, I’D BLOW THE BANK AND GO FOR IT. WE HAD IT CLEANED AT LOGAN GARMENTS (THE COMPANY THAT MADE IT) WHEN WE CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE,” JOAN HAIG RECALLED. JOAN EXPLAINED THAT SHE BEGAN TO PERMANENTLY RESIDE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1961 FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO BRUCE HAIG, WHO GREW UP IN THE CITY. SHE EXPLAINED, “I DON’T THINK I WORE [THE DRESS MUCH AFTER MOVING TO LETHBRIDGE. AT FIRST] I DID WEAR IT… I WORKED AT THE UNIVERSITY AND I GOT TO BE PRETTY THIN… I LOST A LOT OF WEIGHT, SO IT WAS TOO BIG FOR ME. I TOOK IN ONE SIDE, AND IT WAS A HECK OF A LOT OF WORK, SO I NEVER DID DO THE OTHER SIDE. I PUT IT BACK THE WAY IT USED TO BE BEFORE I BROUGHT IT [TO THE MUSEUM]. … I MAY HAVE WORN IT A FEW TIMES… BRUCE’S MOTHER USED TO HAVE A LOT OF LADIES IN AND THINGS LIKE THAT, SO YOU’D SPIFF UP TO GO TO THOSE.” “I THOUGHT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS MADE IN LETHBRIDGE IT WOULD BE KIND OF NEAT TO HAVE IT AT THE LETHBRIDGE MUSEUM,” JOAN HAIG ELABORATED ON WHY SHE KEPT AND DONATED THE DRESS TO THE MUSEUM FOR PRESERVATION, “IT’S NEVER GOING TO GO OUT OF STYLE. IT DOESN’T SCREAM 1950... I THINK THAT’S WHY I KEPT IT, BECAUSE IT’S KIND OF AGELESS… YOU COULD STILL WEAR THE CAPE [TODAY]. I DID WEAR THE CAPE A LOT, BECAUSE IT’S LIKE A SPRING JACKET. THEN I GOT SO THAT I DROVE EVERYWHERE, AND CAPES ARE NOT CONDUCIVE TO DRIVING, SO THAT STOPPED THAT. BUT IT’S HAD A LOT OF WEAR. I HAVE A SPECIAL PLACE IN MY HEART FOR IT.” RESEARCH WAS CONDUCTED USING THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARCHIVES TO DETERMINE FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE LOGAN GARMENT CO., THE MAKER OF THIS DRESS. DOCUMENTATION ABOUT THE COMPANY’S ESTABLISHMENT IN LETHBRIDGE WAS PRINTED IN THE DECEMBER 7, 1936 EDITION OF THE HERALD. IT STATED, “OTTO MEHR, HEAD OF THE LOGAN GARMENT CO., TOLD THE HERALD ON MONDAY THAT MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT OF THE COMPANY’S NEW PLANT IN LETHBRIDGE IS NOW BEING INSTALLED AND IT IS HOPED THAT THE FACTORY WILL COMMENCE OPERATIONS NEXT MONDAY…” “AT A DIRECTORS’ MEETING OF THE LOGAN GARMENT CO. ON FRIDAY, JULY 2, HEBER K. MERRILL, SON OF DR. H. K. MERRILL, PRESIDENT OF THE COMPANY, WAS APPOINTED MANAGER OF THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH… [HE] WILL RESIDE IN LETHBRIDGE… HEBER MERRILL IS A GRADUATE OF THE LOGAN (UTAH) AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE...,” IT READS IN THE JULY 10, 1937 PUBLICATION. AN ARTICLE FROM JUNE 30, 1937 ACCOUNTING DETAILS OF THE CEREMONIAL CROWNING OF “QUEEN OF CARDSTON JUBILEE” DESCRIBES, “THE LOGAN GARMENT CO. BAND FROM LOGAN, UTAH WILL ARRIVE THIS EVENING… THIS IS LOGAN’S SALUTE TO CARDSTON, THE ORIGINAL TEMPLE CITY PIONEERS COMING FROM LOGAN.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041001
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DRESS PANTS
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160041003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DRESS PANTS
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
COTTON, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
72
Width
46
Description
MENS BLACK DRESS PANTS, FRONT WAISTBAND HAS COVERED SILVER HOOK CLASP AND SILVER ZIPPER. OUTSIDE HAS TWO BLACK VELVET STRIPS RUNING ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT OVER THE SIDE POCKETS, AND RUNNING DOWN THE LENGTH OF EACH LEG. INSIDE OF PANTS IS A BLACK PLASTIC BUTTON AND BLACK COTTON FABRIC WITH BUTTON-HOLE FOR SECURING THE PANTS. POCKETS ON RIGHT AND LEFT SIDES OF THE HIPS AND ON THE REAR ARE LINED WITH TAN FABRIC. PANTS ARE LINED WITH CREAM COTTON FABRIC. INSIDE THE PANTS ARE SIX WHITE PLASTIC BUTTONS POSITIONED AROUND THE WAIST. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041003
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TUXEDO VEST
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160041004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TUXEDO VEST
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
COTTON, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
56
Width
49.5
Description
MEN’S WHITE TUXEDO VEST MADE FROM COTTON. LEFT WEARING SIDE OF THE VEST HAS AN INTERIOR TAG MARKED WITH A RED “L” TO DISTINGUISH THE LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES. VEST HALVES ARE ATTACHED WITH A THIN, WHITE FABRIC TIE AT THE NECK. VEST SECURES ACROSS THE CHEST WITH SILVER BUCKLE CLASP ON THE LEFT SIDE, AND THREE WHITE PLASTIC (FAUX-PEARL) BUTTONS ON THE RIGHT SIDE. LEFT SIDE OF THE VEST HAS THREE BUTTON-HOLES SEWN. TWO SMALL POCKETS ARE POSITIONED ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT OUTER SIDES OF THE VEST. UPPER LEFT SIDE IS STAINED BROWN ON THE INSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041004
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, METAL, ELASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20160041005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
FABRIC, METAL, ELASTIC
No. Pieces
3
Height
2.5
Length
15.7
Width
7.3
Description
A: WHITE BOW TIE MADE FROM TEXTURED WHITE FABRIC. BOW SECURED IN THE CENTER OF A BAND (36.6 CM IN LENGTH) WITH A LOOP AROUND THE CENTER OF THE BOW. THE BACK HAS TWO METAL HOOKS ON THE TOP OF THE BAND ON EITHER SIDE OF THE BOW. A WHITE ELASTIC EXTENDS FROM ONE SIDE OF THE BOW WITH A LARGE (1.4 CM) LOOP FOR FASTENING. THE ELASTIC’S SIZE IS ADJUSTABLE. THE OTHER SIDE OF THE BAND HAS A HOOK ON THE END, WHICH FASTENS TO THE LOOP. MACHINE STITCHED. BOW TIE DIMENSIONS: 14.2 CM X 5.9 CM. CONDITION: WHITE IS SLIGHTLY DISCOLOURED. SEVERE TEAR IN ELASTIC BAND. SLIGHT FRAYING ON THE BAND. BROWN STAIN ON HOOK SIDE OF BAND. B-C: WHITE BOX FOR BOW TIE. HAS A REMOVABLE TOP WHICH READS “CURRIE DRESS CRAVATS” IN BLACK INK INSIDE OF A DESIGN. THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BOX READS IN BLACK IN “SIZE 14 TO 15 1/2” CONDITION: SLIGHT STAINING OVERALL. SLIGHT BLACK STAIN ON BOTTOM LEFT SIDE OF LID
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041005
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
VELVET, METAL, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20160041006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
VELVET, METAL, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
3
Length
14.4
Width
7.9
Description
BLACK VELVET BOW TIE. MACHINE STITCHED WITH 2 BOWS (2 LOOPS ON EITHER SIDE) WITH A PIECE OF FABRIC BRINGING IT IN TOGETHER. METAL HOOK PAINTED BLACK DOWN THE CENTER. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. SOME LINT ON THE VELVET WITH SLIGHT WEAR TO THE FABRIC. SOME BLACK METAL PAINT ON HOOK HAS WORN OFF. B-C: WHITE BOX FOR BOW TIE. LID READS “DRESS BOWS BY BERKLEY” WITH CREST IN BLACK INK. THE TOP OF LID HAS CUT OUT OVER MAJORITY OF THE SURFACE IN THE SHAPE OF A BOW TIE. REMNANTS OF CLEAR CELLOPHANE THAT FILLED THE CUTOUT REMAIN AROUND THE EDGES. THE SURFACE OF THE LID IS TEXTURED. OUTSIDE OF BOX IS COVERED WITH SHINY PAPER. CONDITION: MODERATE TO SEVERE BROWN STAINING ON THE BOTTOM OF BOX . TEARS AROUND THE BOX CUTOUT OVERALL DISCOLOURING
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041006
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ELASTIC, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160041007
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
ELASTIC, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
84
Width
2
Description
SUSPENDERS MADE FROM TWO PIECES OF WHITE ELASTIC THAT CROSS 61 CM DOWN. THERE IS A DIAMOND STITCHING IN THE CENTER TO FASTEN THE TWO ELASTICS TOGETHER WHERE THEY CROSS. ELASTIC IS ADJUSTABLE ON LONG ENDS. PEANUT-SHAPED METAL LOOPS ARE FASTENED TO ALL FOUR ENDS OF THE SUSPENDERS. MACHINE-STITCHED. CONDITION: OVERALL DISCOLOURING. SEVERE STAINING ON THE OUTSIDE EDGES OF LONG EDGE OF ELASTIC (STAINS ARE APPROX. 8 CM IN LENGTH CONCENTRATED AT THE EDGE).
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041007
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1961
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, BRASS, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20190011002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1961
Date Range To
1965
Materials
METAL, BRASS, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
5
Width
1.5
Description
BRASS METAL BROOCH WITH BAR-PIN CLASP; BROOCH HAS GOLD-COLOURED RECTANGULAR BAR FOR FRONT, WITH BLUE CROSS IN CENTER. CROSS HAS GOLD BANNER RUNNING ACROSS THE FRONT WITH BLUE TEXT “S M H”. BACK OF BROOCH HAS ENGRAVED TEXT “STER 3 OF G, G.F.”. BROOCH HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND POSTS OF BAR-PIN AND ON BACK OF CROSS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE BROOCH, KIMERY RECALLED, “YOU [GOT THE BROOCH] AFTER YOUR FIRST YEAR. IT’S CALLED A BANDING BARRING CEREMONY AND IT FASTENED AT THE TOP OF YOUR COLLAR OF YOUR UNIFORM. AND THAT JUST SHOWED THAT YOU MADE IT THROUGH THE FIRST YEAR AND THAT YOU HAVE A BAND AND A BROOCH NOW…YOU WORE IT UNTIL YOU GRADUATED.” “[IT SIGNIFIED RANK AND SENIORITY] BECAUSE YOUR FIRST YEAR YOU DON’T HAVE ANYTHING, YOU DON’T HAVE A BAND ON THE CAP, YOU DON’T HAVE ANYTHING. AFTER FIRST YEAR YOU GET THIS AND A YELLOW BAND AND THEN A BLUE ONE AND THEN A BLACK.” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011002
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1967
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GOLD
Catalogue Number
P20190011005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1965
Date Range To
1967
Materials
GOLD
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.5
Length
1.8
Width
1.9
Description
GOLD RING WITH TAPERED BANDS AND OVAL FACE; THE RING FACE HAS AN OVAL WITH THE EMBOSSED PROFILE OF A NURSE, AND WIDE BANDS THAT TAPER FROM SIDES OF THE RING FACE. BAND HAS TWO SMALL, ENGRAVED LEAVES ON SIDES OF THE RING FACE. INSIDE RING BAND HAS MINOR STAINING AND WEAR; RING FACE HAS MINOR TARNISHING AROUND THE EMBOSSED PROFILE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
HEALTH SERVICES
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON JUNE 20, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON KIMERY REGARDING HER DONATION OF MATERIALS FROM HER TIME STUDYING AT THE ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING. ON THE O.R. NURSE’S RING, KIMERY RECALLED, “IT WAS JUST MADE BECAUSE WE JUST WANTED PEOPLE TO KNOW THAT WE WERE O.R. NURSES, A SELECT BRAND OF NURSES THAT HAD CHOSEN THIS PATH. AND WE WANTED IT NOT TO BE FOR EVERYONE SO SOMEONE SAID, ‘WELL, LET’S GET SOMETHING DESIGNED.’ SO WE THOUGHT THE BEST DESIGN WOULD BE AN O.R. HEAD WITH THE MASK AND THE TURBAN. SO WE TOOK IT TO FOSTER’S JEWELRY AND THEY MADE THIS UP FOR US. NOW I KNOW THAT PROBABLY EVERY O.R. NURSE AT ST. MIKE’S AT THAT TIME BOUGHT ONE. I’M NOT SO SURE THAT IT WENT TO THE GALT OR ANYWHERE ELSE. I CAN’T VOUCH FOR THAT. I JUST KNOW THAT THE STAFF, AT THAT TIME, WE ALL GOT ONE JUST BECAUSE IT WAS A SIGNATURE OF WHAT WE WERE AND WHAT WE DID.” “[THERE WERE] 15, APPROXIMATELY [MADE]…[THE RING IS] 10 CARAT [GOLD]…I THINK ONE PERSON DESIGNED IT AND SAID, ‘WHAT DO YOU THINK?’ AND WE SAID, ‘GOOD, PERFECT.’ SO SHE WENT AHEAD WITH IT.” “[I WORE THE RING] ALL THE TIME…SOCIALLY, WEAR IT TO WORK, PUT IT ON THE SHELF, PUT IT BACK ON WHEN YOU LEFT WORK, 24-7…WHEN YOU’RE OUT AND ABOUT…WE WORE THEM ALL THE TIME.” “I DON’T KNOW WHEN I STOPPED [WEARING THE RING]. I PRESUME WHEN I WENT TO MONTREAL I STOPPED. AND I PROBABLY WORE IT WHEN I CAME BACK…IT WAS IN A BOX WITH THE OTHER [PIECES FROM MY TIME AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING].” KIMERY ELABORATED ON HER TIME STUDYING AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “THE TRUTH WAS TO GO INTO NURSING AT ST. MICHAEL’S WAS, THERE WAS MINIMAL CHARGE TO MY PARENTS. IT WAS JUST VERY SIMPLE TO GO, WE LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. MY PARENTS WERE LONG TERM RESIDENTS. INSTEAD OF GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL WAS BECAUSE OF THE PARENTS, I PRESUME. I JUST THOUGHT THE SISTERS WOULD TREAT ME WELL AND GIVE ME A REAL GOOD EDUCATION AS FAR AS LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE WAS CONCERNED WHICH, IN FACT, THEY DID. IT WAS NOT EASY, I’LL TELL YOU, BUT WELL WORTH THE THREE YEARS I SPENT THERE.” “[I CHOSE ST. MICHAEL’S OVER THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING BECAUSE] I JUST THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER. THEY WOULD TREAT ME AS I WANTED TO BE TREATED AS A NURSE-IN-TRAINING AND THEN I WOULD EVENTUALLY TREAT MY PATIENTS THE WAY THEY WANTED ME TO TREAT THEM…THERE’S NO REASON, I JUST KNEW. THERE WASN’T EVEN ANY DISCUSSION ABOUT THE GALT—THE GALT SCHOOL OF NURSING.” “[THE PROGRAM] WAS JUST A REAL STEP FOR ME…THERE WERE SO MANY THINGS THAT WERE NEW TO ME, THAT I NEVER IMAGINED, AND EVERYTHING FROM DAY ONE UNTIL PERHAPS THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, I WAS SORT OF IN AWE OF ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE GOING TO HAPPEN AND I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT, BUT YOU SETTLE IN, AND YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN DECIDE, THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT AND THIS IS WHAT I WANT. AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE YOUR PREFERENCES AS TO WHERE YOU ARE, AND I CERTAINLY DIDN’T LOVE ALL THE SECTIONS OF NURSING, BUT THE OPERATING ROOM WAS MY THING. I JUST THOUGHT IT’S SUCH CHALLENGE AND SO INTERESTING, EVERY DAY WAS DIFFERENT. I MEAN, LOOKING AFTER PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TUBES. IT WASN’T THE SAME DIFFERENT. THERE WERE DIFFERENT CONDITIONS, DIFFERENT WAYS AND DIFFERENT THINGS YOU HAD TO DO.” “[I WAS IN AWE OF] JUST THE WAY PEOPLE NEEDED CARE, AND NEEDED ATTENTION, AND NEEDED TO BE LOOKED AFTER. YOU HAD TO HAVE AN EAR AND TO LISTEN WHETHER IT WAS IMPORTANT OR NOT IMPORTANT TO YOU. YOU HAD TO REALIZE ALL THAT…[I WAS EXPOSED TO THE OPERATING ROOM] IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN IN THE…LATE FIRST OR SECOND YEAR FOR SURE…I WAS SO SCARED OF MAKING A MISTAKE. THINGS WERE SO SPECIAL AND THEY HAD TO BE SO PERFECT. EVERYBODY KNEW EXACTLY WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL THE TIME. THERE WERE NEVER ANY MISTAKES MADE…EVENTUALLY, I TURNED OUT THE SAME WAY. THERE WAS NO WAY I COULD MAKE A MISTAKE, OR WOULD MAKE A MISTAKE, AND DIDN’T MAKE A MISTAKE BECAUSE YOU CAN’T…[IN] NURSING SOMETIMES YOU MAKE A LITTLE MISTAKE IN CHARTING OR EVEN A LITTLE MISTAKE IN GIVING THE RIGHT CARE…IT’S OKAY, BUT IN THE O.R.—NOT OKAY...” “YOU WENT IN THERE AND YOU WERE ASSIGNED TO CASES, AND YOU LOOKED IT UP IN THE EVENING WHAT YOU WERE GOING TO DO, AND YOU WENT IN THERE AND IF THEY SAID, ‘OKAY, YOU’RE GOING TO SCRUB YOUR HANDS AND HELP’, YOU DID. NOW, IF YOU WERE SCARED, TOO BAD, THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO DO TODAY. YOU ALWAYS HAD AN R.N. WITH YOU…YOUR COORDINATOR…ONCE I GOT IN THERE AND WAS DOING IT, I WAS FINE. IT WAS JUST GETTING IN THERE AND DOING IT THAT WAS HARD.” “AT TIMES [IT SEEMED QUASI-MILITARY]…WHEN YOU HAD TO STAND UP AND BE CHECKED BEFORE YOU WENT TO SHIFT; IF YOU HAD HAIR ON YOUR COLLAR, OR SCUFFS ON YOUR SHOES, OR WRINKLES IN YOUR COSTUME…YOU WENT BACK AND REMEDIED IT BEFORE YOU WENT TO BREAKFAST. THIS WAS EARLY, LIKE 6, BECAUSE YOU HAD A LITTLE PRAYER SESSION…AND IF YOU WEREN’T PERFECT, YOU WENT BACK TO YOUR ROOM BEFORE BREAKFAST AND YOU WERE CHECKED AGAIN BEFORE…RULES AND REGULATIONS OF RESIDENCES ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE, I PRESUME. THERE ARE TIMES FOR FUN TIMES, AND TIME FOR STUDY, AND TIME FOR SLEEP. THAT’S HOW IT WAS THERE.” ON HER FRIENDS AND CLASSMATES DURING HER STUDIES AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “[DURING SCHOOL] I’M LIVING IN THE RESIDENCE THAT ST. MIKE’S HAD ON 13TH STREET THERE AND 9TH AVENUE. FIRST YEAR, YOU SHARED A ROOM; SECOND YEAR, YOU HAD YOUR OWN ROOM; THIRD YEAR THEY MOVED YOU OUT AND THEY PAID FOR A BASEMENT SUITE SOMEWHERE; AND YOU USUALLY HAD A ROOMMATE OR TWO, OR HOWEVER MANY THE LANDLORD WOULD TAKE. I LIVED ON 13TH STREET WITH TWO OTHER GIRLS IN MY THIRD YEAR.” “JUST LIKE IN ANY SITUATION, THERE ARE GROUPS OF GIRLS…MY GROUP WAS A FEW OF US, 4 OR 5, THAT WERE VERY CLOSE AND DID THINGS TOGETHER…YOU NEVER ALL GET TOGETHER AND ENJOY, UNLESS IT’S A SITUATION WHERE YOU HAVE TO ALL BE TOGETHER. BUT THERE WERE SOME CLASSMATES I DIDN’T FANCY, AND I’M SURE THERE WERE SOME THAT DIDN’T FANCY ME…THAT’S THE WAY LIFE IS, YOU DON’T LIKE EVERYBODY THAT YOU’RE IN A GROUP WITH, FOR SURE. SO THERE WERE 4 OR 5 THAT WERE ALL RIGHT, THAT WE GOT ALONG WELL…WE NEVER BECAME REALLY GOOD FRIENDS. WE WERE TOGETHER FOR 3 YEARS, DOING WHATEVER IT WAS FOR 3 YEARS, BUT AFTER THAT YOU GO YOUR SEPARATE WAYS AND LIVE YOUR LIFE. AND BEING THAT I LEFT SHORTLY AFTER I GRADUATED, I LEFT IN ’66 TO GO TO MONTREAL. BY THE TIME I GOT BACK [THE FRIENDSHIP WAS] GONE.” KIMERY RECALLED THE NUNS AND INSTRUCTORS WHO TAUGHT AT ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, NOTING, “SISTER BEATRICE HAD TO BE THE TOUGHEST SISTER I THINK I‘LL EVER ENCOUNTER…SHE WAS HARD ON YOU ON EVERY PHASE OF YOUR NURSING, WHETHER IT MEANT STANDING IN LINE IN THE MORNING TO CHECK THE WAY YOU LOOKED BEFORE YOU WENT ON DUTY, OR WHETHER IT WAS 9 O’CLOCK AT NIGHT WHEN YOU WERE MAKING TOO DARN MUCH NOISE UPSTAIRS AND YOU SHOULD HAVE BEEN STUDYING. SHE WAS A TOUGH SISTER, BUT I WOULDN’T HAVE TRADED HER FOR ANYONE. AND THERE WAS ANOTHER LITTLE ONE, SISTER PETER MARIE AND SHE USED TO WANDER THE HALLS AND, OH DEAR, IF YOU WEREN’T BEHAVING, YOU WERE IN TROUBLE. NEVER SERIOUS TROUBLE, DON’T GET ME WRONG, BUT THOSE TWO REALLY STICK OUT IN MY MIND BECAUSE THEY WERE THE TWO THAT WERE REALLY LOOKING AFTER US…IN THE FIRST YEAR AND SECOND YEAR.” “[AS TEACHERS, THE SISTERS] WERE FUSSY. YOU HAD TO HAVE IT PERFECT…IF YOU MADE A DRUG ERROR…YOU HAD TO WRITE PAGES AND PAGES AND DO RESEARCH ON THE DRUG THAT YOU’D MADE A MISTAKE ON. THEY…MADE SURE THAT EVERYTHING WAS ‘PERFECT’, THE WAY IT SHOULD BE…IT HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. I MEAN, YOU HAD TO BE PERFORMING WELL, BUT YOU HAD TO BE PERFECT FOR THE PATIENT. THAT WAS THE WHOLE THING. YOU WERE LOOKING AFTER PEOPLE. YOU HAD TO MAKE SURE WHAT YOU WERE DOING WAS RIGHT. NO QUESTIONS ASKED ABOUT IT NOT BEING SO.” “[THE SISTERS WOULD] MAKE THE ROUNDS TO THOSE PATIENTS ON THE FLOOR, I DON’T KNOW IF IT WAS HOURLY, BUT OFTEN YOU WOULD SEE…THEY HAD THE LONG SKIRTS…AND YOU’D HEAR THE SWISH, SWISH, AND YOU’D KNOW THAT THEY WERE ABOUT SOMEWHERE—CHECKING…THEY WERE THERE ALL THE TIME—MORNING, EVENING AND EVEN ON NIGHT SHIFT. EVEN WHEN I WORKED THE NIGHT SHIFT AS A STUDENT, THERE WAS ALWAYS A SISTER SOMEWHERE. I PRESUME IF YOU NEEDED THEM OR WERE IN TROUBLE, THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN THERE IMMEDIATELY. IT NEVER HAPPENED BUT I’M SURE THAT’S PART OF THE REASON THERE WAS SOMEBODY AROUND 24-7 NOW THAT I THINK ABOUT IT.” “THE SENIOR NURSES TENDED TO BE A LITTLE TOUGH ON THE SECOND YEAR AND THE FIRST YEAR NURSES…THEY KNOW MORE. THEY’VE BEEN THERE LONGER. THEY DON’T WANT YOU MAKING MISTAKES BECAUSE IT REFLECTS ON THEM…BUT, THAT WAS OKAY TOO. I’D RATHER HAVE SOMEONE TOLD ME THAT SOMETHING WASN’T DONE VERY WELL AT THE TIME…ONE EXAMPLE HERE…[ONE] MORNING, THIRD YEAR NURSE, A PATIENT GOING TO THE O.R. I WENT IN, THOUGHT HE WAS READY. SHE CAME IN AND SAID, ‘DID YOU GIVE HIM MOUTH WASH?’ I SAID, ‘NO.’ [THE SENIOR NURSE ASKED] ‘WHY NOT?’ I DIDN’T HAVE AN ANSWER. I DID IT. I NEVER FORGOT AGAIN. PATIENT GOT MOUTH WASH EVERY DAY…EVERY PATIENT O.R…YOU MADE SURE THEY WERE CLEANED UP IN THE MORNING REGARDLESS…I WAS IN MY FIRST YEAR, I THINK, OR MAYBE SECOND…BUT I STILL REMEMBER THE NURSE…I CAN EVEN REMEMBER HER NAME SO THAT’S THE IMPRESSION IT MAKES ON A STUDENT NURSE TRYING TO LEARN THE HARD WAY. BUT THE HARD WAY’S BETTER THAN NOT AT ALL.” ON HER POST-GRADUATE STUDIES IN NURSING, KIMERY SHARED, “I WENT TO MONTREAL TO THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL AND DID A POST GRADUATE COURSE IN OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUE AND THEN STAYED ON AS STAFF MEMBER THERE…THEN I CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE [AND] I WENT BACK TO ST MIKE’S AFTER MY POST GRADUATE…THERE’S LOTS OF CHALLENGES [IN THE OPERATING ROOM]…RIGHT FROM WHEN YOU WENT IN THERE AS A STUDENT…SO MANY THINGS YOU HAD TO KNOW AND DO AND BE AWARE OF AND MAKE SURE YOU’RE RIGHT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T BE WRONG. AND I THOUGHT, ‘YEAH, I CAN DO THIS’. SO I CHOSE TO [WORK IN THE OPERATING ROOM].” “I JUST WANTED TO SEE BIG SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE HEART SURGERY. I WANTED TO SEE KIDNEY TRANSPLANTS. I WANTED TO SEE BIG STUFF AND I DID…I WAS ON THE KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TEAM. I REPLACED VALVES IN THE CARDIO-VASCULAR…THEY DID BIG SURGERIES, BIG ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES…BACK IN THE ‘60S TOTAL REPLACEMENTS WERE HUGE...[FOR PEOPLE WHO WANTED MORE, IT WAS] PROBABLY RARE. I MEAN, I WENT ON MY OWN TO MONTREAL. I’D NEVER BEEN OUT OF LETHBRIDGE. I HAD A FRIEND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO GO AND SHE CANCELLED SO I WENT BY MYSELF…[I WAS] 21.” “[I WAS CONFIDENT GOING TO MONTREAL] BECAUSE I KNEW I CAME FROM A SCHOOL THAT HAD A GOOD O.R., WE HAD ALL THE SPECIALTIES. WE HAD THE OPHTHALMOLOGY, EAR NOSE AND THROAT, PLASTICS AND ORTHOPEDICS, AND UROLOGY AND GENERAL SURGERY ALL HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. SO I KNEW ALL OF THOSE WHEN I WENT THERE. I JUST WANTED MORE. I WANTED BIGGER AND MORE, AND I GOT IT.” “THERE WAS SO MUCH I HAD TO LEARN AND HAD TO DO. [THE EXPERIENCE WORKING AT ST. MICHAEL’S IN LETHBRIDGE] DOESN’T PREPARE YOU WHEN YOU TAKE A JOURNEY LIKE THAT IN YOUR LIFE—A BIG STEP. IT DOESN’T PREPARE YOU. YOU GET THERE AND IT’S A HUGE CITY AND THE RESIDENCE IS HUGE…AND THE HOSPITAL’S HUGE AND THERE’S 15 O.R.’S AND THEY’RE BUSY 24-7 AND YOU’RE NOT PREPARED. YOU CAN’T BE. BUT YOU GET [PREPARED]…I WAS READY. AT FIRST [I WAS] MAYBE A LITTLE SKEPTICAL, I GUESS YOU MIGHT SAY…[THE SCHOOL] FIGURED IT WAS ALL RIGHT FOR ME TO BE THERE [COMING IN FROM A SMALL SCHOOL AND SMALL CITY]…THEY TREATED ME VERY WELL…I HAD SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES…IF IT WAS THERE AND YOU WANTED IT. TAKE IT. SO I DID.” “I DON’T KNOW [WHY THEY ACCEPTED ME INTO THE PROGRAM IN MONTREAL]. I HAVE NO IDEA. I WAS VERY SURPRISED THAT I WAS ACCEPTED ACTUALLY, BECAUSE IF I HADN’T BEEN…I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF I HAD ANOTHER OPTION IN MIND ACTUALLY…THE PROGRAM WAS FINISHED IN ’67 AND I STAYED UNTIL ’69. I CAME [BACK TO LETHBRIDGE] IN ‘70.” “[I FELT LIKE IT WAS A BIG DEAL TO ACCEPT A STUDENT FROM A SMALL CITY LIKE LETHBRIDGE] BASED ON THE OTHER GIRLS THAT WERE IN THE PROGRAM. ONE WAS FROM HALIFAX AND SHE’D BEEN IN NORFOLK, VIRGINIA. THERE WAS ANOTHER ONE THAT WAS FROM THE OTTAWA GENERAL OR SOMEWHERE, AND THERE WAS ONE FROM…SOMEWHERE ABROAD…THE LADIES THAT WERE THERE WERE FAR MORE EXPERIENCED, I GUESS, HAD BEEN IN BIGGER HOSPITALS, DONE BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS THAN I.” “I THINK [THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY] THOUGHT [THE ST. MICHAEL’S PROGRAM] WAS PRETTY…GOOD BECAUSE THE WAY I USED TO SET THE ROOM UP IN THE MORNING, THEY WOULD COME AND JUST SAY, ‘ARE YOU THE ONE FROM ALBERTA, FROM THE SMALL SCHOOL?’ ‘YES, I AM.’ THEY COULD JUST TELL…THAT I WAS FROM A PLACE THAT DID THINGS SPECIAL FOR EVERYBODY ON THE TEAM, FOR THE ANESTHETIST…WE TREATED THEM SPECIAL. SO I TREATED THEM SPECIAL THERE, AND THEY JUST, ‘WHAT IS THIS NOW?’ AND THE DOCTORS, THEY KNEW, THEY COULD TELL JUST BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY IT WAS IN ST. MICHAEL’S. THIS IS WHY YOU DID IT. THIS IS HOW YOU DID IT AND YOU DID IT EVERY DAY.” ON HER INTEREST IN NURSING AND DECISION TO PURSUE A CAREER IN NURSING, KIMERAY RECALLED, “[I WANTED TO BE A NURSE] BECAUSE I’M JUST REALLY GOOD WITH PEOPLE. PEOPLE ARE WHAT MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND. I JUST LIKE PEOPLE. I LIKE TO TALK TO THEM. I LIKE TO CARE FOR THEM…YOUNG, MEDIUM AGED OR OLD. ALL GOOD FOR ME. AND WHEN I FIRST WENT THERE, MY FIRST EXPERIENCES WEREN’T THAT EASY BECAUSE I’D REALLY NEVER BEEN LOOKING AFTER ANY KIND OF PEOPLE—[IT WAS] HARD, BUT I JUST LIKE PEOPLE AND I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE…EVEN IN THEIR WORST SITUATIONS, TO THIS DAY, I’M EASY WITH PEOPLE.” “I GUESS MEDICINE WAS FINE BECAUSE THOSE PEOPLE REALLY NEEDED CARE. SURGERY THEY WERE IN DISCOMFORT FOR A WHILE BUT THEN GOT BETTER. MATERNITY I DIDN’T FANCY. PEDIATRICS I DIDN’T FANCY BUT MEDICINE, THEY NEEDED CARE AND SO THAT’S WHY I LIKED IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ABOUT KIMERY AND ST. MICHAEL’S SCHOOL OF NURSING, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190011001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190011005
Acquisition Date
2019-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1899
Date Range To
1968
Materials
LEATHER, WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
12
Height
55.5
Length
28.5
Width
10
Description
A: RIGHT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN METAL NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. N…ON CO. SYRACCUSE N.Y. U.S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN ON THE TOE AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. A CUT IN THE LEATHER SITS ABOVE THE TOE. THE STITCHING AT THE BACK OF THE BOOT HAS TORN OPEN AND AT THE TOP OF THE BOOT, NEXT TO THE LEATHER PULL, THE BOOT IS SPLIT NEXT TO THE SEAM. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.5CM, W: 10 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. B: THE TOE-SHAPED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT-SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R”. THE VARNISH IS CHIPPED AND DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. C: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “R” AND “6 R…”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, JUST AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. D: THE BACK PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “R”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. E: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, MINIMALLY SCRATCHED BUT DENTED AND DIMPLED. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.2 CM, L: 2.2 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. F: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “R”. DIMENSIONS: H: 55 CM, L: 1.6 CM, W: 8.5 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. G: THE LEFT BROWN LEATHER BOOT. THE LEATHER IS ABOUT 2CM THICK, MEASURED FROM THE TOP. WORN BLACK LEATHER SOLE, HEEL AFFIXED WITH WORN SILVER NAILS. TWO LACE LINES ARE ON THE BOOT, ONE MEASURES SEVEN HOLES LONG ABOVE THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE OTHER MEASURING FIVE HOLES LONG ON THE TOP OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE BOOT. THE LACE HOLES ARE RIMMED WITH RED METAL FRAMES. THE SOLE IS WORN, STAINED, AND FRAYED RED. TEXT STAMPED ON THE SOLE READS “A.E. NETTLET… CO. S…SE N.Y. ...S.A.” THE BOOTS LEATHER IS WORN OVER THE TOP OF THE FOOT, THE SIDE OF THE HEEL, AND SCRATCHED ALL OVER. THE LEATHER INSIDE THE BOOT IS FLAKING OFF IN THE HEEL AND THE INSIDE EDGE. WHITE FABRIC PULL LOOPS SIT ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT INSIDE OF THE BOOT. DIMENSIONS: H: 46 CM, L: 28.8 CM, W: 9.7 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. H: THE TOE SHAPED PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. MADE OUT OF THE FOOT SHAPED PIECE AND A HANDLE PIECE TO FIT INTO THE FRONT LEG INSERT PIECE, ATTACHED TO EACH OTHER WITH TWO LARGE SCREWS. WRITTEN ON TOP OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY DENTED. DIMENSIONS: H: 10 CM, L: 21 CM, W: 8 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. I: THE FRONT PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. ENDS IN TWO PRONGS TO SLOT OVER THE TOE INSERT OF THE BOOT, A TRACK RUNS ON THE BACK SIDE FOR THE INSERTION OF THE HANDLED INSERT PIECE. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. WRITTEN ON THE UNVARNISHED BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS “L” AND “6 LEFT”. THE VARNISH IS SCRATCHED AND DENTED, MOSTLY AT THE TOP FRONT EDGE. DIMENSIONS: H: 43 CM, L: 5 CM, W: 8.4 CM. CONDITION: GOOD. J: THE BACK PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. SHAPED LIKE THE BACK OF THE LEG, ENDING IN THE HEEL. THE FLAT FRONT HAS WRITTEN ON IT IN BLACK INK “L”. THE VARNISH IS MINIMALLY SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. STAMPED ONTO THE TOP OF THE WOOD INSERT ARE THE WORDS “ROBINBROS. MONTREAL” AND “MADE IN CANADA”. ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. DIMENSIONS: H: 42.5 CM, L: 5.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. K: THE MIDDLE PIECE OF THE LEFT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT. THIN, THE INSERT TAPERS FROM THE TOP TO THE HEEL. THE VARNISH IS DARK, SCRATCHED AND WORN IN PLACES. A KNOT IN THE WOOD HAS FALLEN OUT AND LEFT A HOLE IN THE TOP OF THE INSERT. DIMENSIONS: H: 44.3 CM, L: 2.5 CM, W: 9 CM. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. L: THE HANDLED PIECE OF THE RIGHT BOOT’S WOOD INSERT, MEANT TO FIT BETWEEN THE FRONT AND MIDDLE INSERT PIECE. THE FRONT OF THE PIECE FITS INTO THE FRONT WOOD INSERT’S TRACK. THE VARNISH IS MOSTLY WORN AWAY, SURVIVING ON THE HANDLE. THE WOOD IS SCRATCHED AND DIMPLED. ON THE BACK OF THE INSERT IN BLACK INK IS THE LETTER “R” WITH TWO LINES DRAWN OVER IT. STAMPED ON THE TOP LEFT SIDE IS A STAMPED “6” AND ON THE TOP RIGHT SIDE IS A STAMPED “L”. ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE INSERT IS A NAIL, THE TOP GRINDED DOWN. DIMENSIONS: H: 55.5 CM, L: 1.9 CM, W: 8.6 CM. CONDITION: GOOD.
Subjects
CLOTHING-FOOTWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
MILITARY
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
THIS PAIR OF RIDING BOOTS BELONGED TO MURRAY NELSON, THE BROTHER DONOR KATHRYN HINMAN. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THESE BOOTS AND THEIR OWNER, GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED HINMAN AT THE MUSEUM ON MARCH 20, 2017. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “THE PREVIOUS OWNER OF THESE BOOTS WAS MY BROTHER, MURRAY [NELSON],” HINMAN BEGAN, “HE PASSED AWAY AT THE END OF NOVEMBER 2015… HE WAS A LOCAL MUSICIAN. HE CAME INTO THE POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS FROM MY GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, WHO WAS LIEUTENANT COLONEL GEORGE S. BROWN. MY GRANDDAD WAS A GREAT FRIEND OF BRIGADIER GENERAL STEWART. GRANDDAD CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THESE BOOTS AT SOME POINT FROM DR. STEWART AND WHEN MY BROTHER WAS ABOUT EIGHTEEN, MY GRANDFATHER PASSED THEM ON TO HIM.” “[MURRAY DID] TELL ME THAT HE WAS IN THE GARAGE OUT AT THE FARM, WHICH IS ACTUALLY BROWN ROAD JUST OFF THE COUTTS’ HIGHWAY AND THAT WAS WHERE MY GRANDFATHER’S ACREAGE WAS. ON THAT ACREAGE, THERE WAS A GARAGE [AMONG] MANY BUILDINGS. MURRAY HAD SAID GRANDDAD HAD TAKEN HIM INTO THE GARAGE AND WHEN MURRAY EXPRESSED AN INTEREST IN [THE BOOTS THERE] GRANDDAD SAID, ‘YUP, YOU CAN HAVE THEM. THEY WERE GENERAL STEWART’S FROM THE BOER WAR. TAKE GOOD CARE OF THEM.’” “[MY BROTHER] USED TO WEAR THEM PLAYING IN BANDS WHEN HE WAS EIGHTEEN AND UP,” HINMAN CONTINUED, “[THEY WERE] PART OF HIS DRESS CODE… THEY’RE LOVELY BOOTS. THE STORY WAS THAT THEY WERE FROM THE BOER WAR, WHICH PUTS THEM OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS OLD… [MY BROTHER] PROBABLY ACQUIRED [THESE BOOTS WHEN] MY GRANDFATHER PASSED AWAY IN 1968. MURRAY WOULD HAVE BEEN EIGHTEEN [THAT YEAR]. HE WAS IN HIS ELEMENT PLAYING WITH THE BANDS, EXPERIMENTING WITH ALL DIFFERENT KINDS OF MUSIC [AT THAT TIME]. I REMEMBER HIM LOOKING VERY COOL WEARING THEM. ALTHOUGH THESE ARE A VERY SMALL SIZE, RIGHT? SO I’M SURE THEY WERE A LITTLE PINCHEY.” “[MY BROTHER HAD] LONG HAIR – WELL EVERYBODY HAD LONG HAIR IN THE 60’S AND 70’S. [HE WAS] VERY COOL AND AT THAT POINT TOO MY DAD (BILL NELSON) HAD ACQUIRED A SMALL MGA, BURGUNDY-COLOURED, AND [MY BROTHER] USED TO BOMB AROUND AND GO TO BAND PRACTICE IN THAT. OH YEAH, HE WAS NOTORIOUS,” HINMAN LAUGHED, REMEMBERING. WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER BROTHER, HINMAN REPLIED, “MY BROTHER WAS BORN IN 1950. HE WAS JUST A LITTLE OVER SIXTY-FIVE WHEN HE PASSED AWAY. HE WAS AN ACTIVE MUSIC TEACHER AND LOCAL GUITAR TEACHER IN TOWN. YOU COULD SEE HIM BUSKING ON THE STREETS IN FRONT OF THE PENNY COFFEE HOUSE AND IN FRONT OF ESQUIRE’S COFFEE HOUSE. EVERYBODY KNEW HIM. HE USED TO BUSK AT THE FARMER’S MARKET ON FIFTH STREET ON FIRST FRIDAYS. HE PLAYED IN BANDS FOREVER.” “[HE WAS IN A] ROCK’N ROLL BAND. HE WAS IN SO MANY BANDS OVER THE YEARS AND I DON’T KNOW THE NAMES OF THE EARLY BANDS. ONE OF [THE BANDS HE PLAYED WITH] WAS KRANDEL’S KLOUD MACHINE, ONE OF THEM WAS THE SHAMAN, AND THEN HE MOVED TO VANCOUVER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS AND PLAYED IN VANCOUVER – UP AND DOWN THE WEST COAST. WHEN HE CAME BACK FROM THE COAST, HE JUST PLAYED EVERYWHERE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH VARIOUS PEOPLE… ANYWAY HE WAS VERY WELL KNOWN IN THE BAND SCENE AND HE HAD A RECORDING STUDIO. THAT WAS A PASSION. HE CALLED HIS RECORDING STUDIO, AARDVARK RECORDINGS. HE HAD HIS FIRST RECORDING STUDIO IN THE BASEMENT OF KRUEGER’S MUSIC, WHERE HE TAUGHT MUSIC FOR BILL KRUEGER. THEN HE MOVED ALL HIS STUFF OVER AND HE WAS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE TRIANON FOR YEARS TEACHING RECORDING AND THEN HE GOT INVOLVED IN TECHNOLOGY, SO HE STARTED FIXING COMPUTERS AND DID COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. HE KIND OF USED TECHNOLOGY IN THE RECORDING STUDIO. HE HAD THIS HUGE SOUND BOARD WITH ALL THE SWITCHES AND WHATEVER AND HE HAD TONS OF LIKE STACKS OF MACHINES [FOR RECORDING],” HINMAN REMEMBERED. “[MY BROTHER] HAD A REPUTATION,” HINMAN WENT ON, “[PEOPLE WOULD SAY TO ME], ‘OH YOUR MURRAY’S SISTER.’ IT WAS GREAT AND ACTUALLY MY HUSBAND WAS BORN IN CARDSTON AND HE HAD A BAND THAT HE USED TO PLAY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WITH. WE HAVE AN ACTUAL RECORDING FROM THE BASEMENT RECORDING STUDIO AT KRUEGER’S, WHEN [MY BROTHER] RECORDED WITH MY HUSBAND’S BAND. IT WAS GREAT.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE MUSICAL INFLUENCE WITHIN HER FAMILY, HINMAN EXPLAINED, “MY MOM (MARGARET NELSON) WAS A LOCAL MUSIC TEACHER. SHE WAS A PIANO TEACHER. MY DAD’S MOTHER WAS KATE MARQUIS NELSON, WHO WAS A LOCAL PIANO TEACHER SO [WE HAD INFLUENCE] FROM BOTH ENDS. WE ALL GREW UP IN OUR HOUSEHOLD WITH MUSIC. I HAVE A DEGREE IN MUSIC AND I’M A MUSIC TEACHER AND MY YOUNGER BROTHER, MARK, PLAYS CLASSICAL GUITAR. WE HAD MUSIC EVERYWHERE. I HAVE SOME PICTURES AT HOME OF THE THREE KIDS WITH A DRUM SET AND I’M ON THE KEYBOARD AND MURRAY IS PLAYING GUITAR AND, EVEN A PICTURE OF MY MOM SITTING AT THE DRUMS TAKING PART IN THE MERRIMENT IN OUR BASEMENT.” “MY DAD PLAYED IN THE SYMPHONY. IN FACT, MY MOM AND DAD REVIVED THE SYMPHONY IN THE EARLY ‘60S. SO IT WAS JUST NATURAL FOR MURRAY TO [BE MUSICAL]. HE PLAYED EVERYTHING. HE PLAYED BANJO WITH MUSICAL THEATRE ONE YEAR, AND TAUGHT BANJO. HE THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ‘ONLY’ BANJO TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. HE [ALSO] THOUGHT THAT HE WAS THE ONLY REAL GOOD GUITARIST TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE TOO,” HINMAN LAUGHED. “SO ANYWAY,” SHE CONTINUED, “IT WAS A STRUGGLE FINANCIALLY. MUSIC IS NOT AN EASY, AN EASY PROFESSION TO BE IN, A PERFORMING MUSICIAN. HE QUIT HIGH SCHOOL WHEN HE WAS PROBABLY SIXTEEN, BUT IN HIS MID TO LATE TWENTIES, HE FINISHED HIS DIPLOMA AND HE STARTED NURSING AT THE COLLEGE. HE DID PRETTY WELL [THERE], BUT HE DIDN’T DEAL WELL WITH AUTHORITY, SO HE DIDN’T FINISH IT. BUT [THROUGH THAT HE] GOT A LOT OF GOOD PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE. [AFTERWARDS] PROCEEDED TO PURSUE HIS PASSION, WHICH WAS MUSIC. IN THE LAST FEW YEARS OF HIS LIFE HE FIXED THOSE COMPUTER SIGNS THAT SIT ON THE SIDE OF THE ROAD. HE WOULD FIX THE MOTHER BOARD… HE JUST DID WHAT HE WANTED. HE LIVED IS LIFE HIS WAY.” TO THE QUESTION OF WHY HER GRANDFATHER, GEORGE S. BROWN, RECEIVED THE BOOTS FROM GENERAL JOHN SMITH STEWART, HINMAN ANSWERED, “THE ONLY REASON I CAN THINK OF IS THAT BECAUSE THEY WERE GREAT FRIENDS… [IF GENERAL STEWART PASSED AWAY IN THE 1970S], THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN AFTER MY GRANDFATHER [DIED]. I KNOW THAT THEY WERE INVOLVED IN THE MILITARY STUFF LOCALLY. ELLA STEWART AND MY GRANDMOTHER WERE GREAT FRIENDS. SOMEHOW [THESE BOOTS WERE] JUST PASSED ALONG TO GRANDDAD.” “WHEN MURRAY WAS DIAGNOSED WITH THE CANCER IN JUNE OF 2015, I KNEW THAT THERE WAS SOME ITEMS THAT HE HAD THAT I NEEDED TO RETRIEVE BECAUSE THEY WERE FAMILY HISTORY,” HINMAN REMEMBERED, “[AMONG THOSE TREASURED THINGS WERE] GENERAL STEWART’S BOOTS, SO I RETRIEVED THEM IN JULY… [MURRAY SAID], ‘TAKE THEM. DO WHAT YOU NEED TO DO WITH THEM.’” “[ONE REASON MY BROTHER HELD ON TO THE BOOTS WAS] HE WAS VERY CLOSE TO MY GRANDPARENTS, BECAUSE HE USED TO SPEND A LOT OF TIME OUT AT THE FARM,” HINMAN EXPLAINED, “I THINK THAT HE JUST COULDN’T BRING HIMSELF TO PART WITH THEM, BECAUSE THEY WERE PART OF HIS FAMILY HISTORY. IT WAS A SPECIAL KIND OF THING BECAUSE GRANDDAD HAD ACTUALLY PASSED THEM TO HIM.” MURRAY NELSON’S OBITUARY WAS PUBLISHED ON THE MARTIN BROTHERS FUNERAL CHAPELS WEBSITE. IT STATES, “WILLIAM MURRAY NELSON, AGE 65, PASSED AWAY PEACEFULLY AT THE LETHBRIDGE REGIONAL HOSPITAL ON SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2015, AFTER A VALIANT BATTLE WITH CANCER. MUSICIAN, PERFORMER, TEACHER, MENTOR, SOUND GUY, RECORDING GUY, VIDEO GUY, COMPUTER GUY, SIGN GUY; HE WAS A MAN WHO LIVED LIFE HIS WAY, ON HIS TERMS, DOING WHAT HE LOVED.” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ON DECEMBER 9, 2015, SHORTLY AFTER THE MUSICIAN’S DEATH STATES THAT AT A LOCAL MUSIC SHOW, PROMINENT LEHTBRIDGE SONGWRITER, LEEROY STAGGER, BEGAN THE SHOW WITH A TRIBUTE TO NELSON. TO FURTHER UNDERSCORE NELSON’S REPUTATION IN THE CITY, A DECEMBER 23, 2015 ARTICLE TITLED, “2015 WAS A MEMORABLE YEAR FOR CITY MUSIC SCENE,” WRITTEN FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD BY RICHARD AMERY STATED, “LETHBRIDGE SAID GOODBYE TO MURRAY NELSON, WHO PASSED AWAY FROM CANCER THIS YEAR. NELSON WAS ONE OF THE SCENE’S MORE PROMINENT PERFORMERS ON STAGE PERFORMING SOLO AND WITH A VARIETY OF BANDS AS WELL AS BUSKING ON THE STREETS ALL OVER LETHBRIDGE…HIS MEMORY WILL LIVE ON IN THE STUDENTS HE TAUGHT AND THE SOULS HE TOUCHED ON STAGE OR JUST CHATTING AT VARIOUS WATER HOLES.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND THE COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REFERENCED.
Catalogue Number
P20170010000
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILK, COTTON, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190008006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Materials
SILK, COTTON, METAL
No. Pieces
5
Length
44
Width
43.5
Description
A. JACKET, 44 CM L X 43.5 CM W. GOLD SILK JACKET WITH BLACK AND GOLD LINES RUNNING DOWN THE FRONT, AROUND THE WAIST, AND AROUND CUFFS; JACKET OPENS AT THE FRONT. JACKET HAS WHITE CLOTH TAG PINNED TO THE INSIDE OF THE RIGHT-WEARING SHOULDER WITH BLACK TEXT, “W. CURRIE”. JACKET HAS MINOR FRAYING THREADS; JACKET HAS LIGHT RUB AND WEAR MARKS ON OUTSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. PANTS, 103.5 CM L X 27 CM W. MAROON SILK PANTS WITH ELASTIC WAIST AND ANKLES; PANTS HAVE WHITE COTTON TAG PINNED INSIDE WAIST WITH BLACK TEXT “W. CURRIE”. PANTS HAVE BLACK COTTON LOOP INSIDE ANKLES. PANTS HAVE MINOR FRAYING THREADS; PANTS HAVE CREASING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. SASH, 211 CM L X 16 CM W. CREAM SILK SASH WITH POINTED, DIAMOND ENDS; SASH HAS STITCHING ALONG EDGES. SASH HAS CREASING ON EDGES; SASH HAS MINOR STAINING; SASH HAS MINOR RUB AND WEAR MARKS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. D. TIE-CLIP, 18.3 CM L X 2 CM W. GOLD TIE-CLIP WITH TWO CURLED RIBBON-SHAPED END PIECES, WITH FASTENERS ON BACK; TIE-CLIP HAS GOLD CHAIN CONNECTING END PIECES. CURLED RIBBON PIECES HAVE TEXTURED FRONTS; FASTENERS HAVE TEETH ON UNDERSIDE; FASTENERS HAVE INDENTED, TEXTURED GRIPS. TIE-CLIP HAS MINOR TARNISHING ON FASTENERS AND END PIECES; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. E. TIE, 84 CM L X 11.5 CM W. GOLD SILK TIE WITH POINTED DIAMOND ENDS; TIE IS SOLID GOLD FABRIC WITH GOLD STITCHING ALONG EDGES. TIE HAS CREASING IN CENTER; TIE HAS RUB AND WEAR MARKS ON FRONT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MAY 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CARLA SAMUELS REGARDING HER DONATION OF KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS MATERIALS. SAMUELS’ FATHER, WALTER D. CURRIE, WAS A MEMBER WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS RECALLED, “WE’VE HAD ALL THESE OBJECTS, ARTIFACTS FOR OVER 40-50 YEARS AND IT IS TIME THAT THEY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE THAT WOULD BE INTERESTED IN KNOWING THE HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE AND ALL THE PAST MEMBERS OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, LODGE NUMBER [TWO]. MY FATHER WALTER CURRIE WAS ONE OF THE MEMBERS. HE WAS SECRETARY FOR THAT LODGE. HE KEPT…THE LETTERHEAD THAT I REMEMBER AS A CHILD HIM TYPING ON AN OLD TYPEWRITER WITH THAT LETTERHEAD…AS CHILDREN WE WERE ALWAYS INTERESTED IN HIS CEREMONIAL COSTUMES BUT NOTHING MUCH WAS SAID ABOUT THE LODGE.” “[THESE ITEMS HAVE] BEEN STORED IN A BOX FOR ALL THESE YEARS. A COUPLE [OF THE REGALIA SETS] HAVE BEEN USED FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…THE BLACK PRIEST COSTUME AND THE BURGUNDY AND GOLD SILK COSTUME…WE USED TO USE IT AS A MATADOR…IT’S SIMILAR TO THE SHRINERS COSTUMES IN A WAY—SOMETHING EGYPTIAN…THEY JUST LAID AROUND…” “THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT IN A CLOSET. JUST STORED THERE AND KEPT THERE AND US KIDS WE’D LOOK AT THEM FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…NOTHING WAS SAID ABOUT IT AFTER MY DAD PASSED AWAY THAT THEY WERE JUST KEPT IN A BOX…MY MOM HAD MENTIONED [THAT THESE WERE MY FATHER’S LODGE GARMENTS AND NOT JUST HALLOWEEN COSTUMES] WHEN SHE GAVE ME THE BOX. SHE SAID THAT THIS IS ALL THE STUFF FROM DAD’S LODGE, THE KP LODGE IS WHAT WE USED TO CALL IT.” SAMUELS ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S INVOLVEMENT WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHARING, “I REMEMBER DAD IN THAT [REGALIA SET] ONE TIME, THE BURGUNDY SATIN COSTUME AND I JUST REMEMBER THE LETTERHEAD. HE ALWAYS HAD A PILE OF THE LETTERHEAD BY THE TABLE UNDER THE TYPEWRITER. IT WAS HUGE OLD UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER ON A BIG OVAL-FOOTED DESK AND THE FILE BOX TOO WAS NEXT TO THE TYPEWRITER…I KNOW HE WAS IN THE PYTHIAN LODGE PROBABLY IN THE LATE 1950S. I REMEMBER IN 1960 ALL THESE COSTUMES…I KNOW THAT OVER THE YEARS THE MEMBERS PASSED AWAY AND IT JUST WAS HARDER TO GET ANYBODY TO JOIN AND IN THE EARLY 1970S THEY DISBANDED THE LODGE HERE IN LETHBRIDGE.” “[I REMEMBER] HIM WORKING, TYPING AWAY, GETTING LETTERS DONE UP…PUTTING AWAY STUFF IN HIS LITTLE FILE BOX. I GUESS, WE WERE SMALL AND…[THE LODGE] WASN’T SPOKEN OF TOO MUCH WHEN WE WERE LITTLE. I ASKED MY OLDER SISTER ABOUT ANYTHING THEY KNEW OF THE BOOKS OR PHOTOS, TOO BUT THEY COULDN’T FIND [ANYTHING]...” “MY DAD DIDN’T TALK MUCH ABOUT THIS LODGE. HE WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE ELKS HERE IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE KNEW MORE ABOUT THE ELKS…THAT CLUB…BEING A LITTLE MORE RESERVED.” “I THINK [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS] MET MAYBE ONCE A WEEK…I KNOW A COUPLE, TWO OR THREE MEMBERS, AS A KID, THAT WERE IN THE LODGE TOGETHER AND OUR FAMILIES USED TO CHUM TOGETHER BECAUSE OF THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH THE LODGE…ALL IN THOSE DAYS IT SEEMED LIKE THEY HAD THEIR SUIT AND TIE. THAT WAS MORE OR LESS YOUR DRESS…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS ADULTS THAT WOULD GET TOGETHER…” “I DON’T KNOW IF THIS TYPE OF LODGE WAS BASED ON CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS LIKE THE SHRINERS WOULD HAVE BEEN. TO ME IT WAS…I WOULD REFER TO IT LIKE MASONIC LODGE…IN THOSE DAYS IT WAS STRICTLY MEN’S CLUBS ALL THE TIME AND THE WOMEN STAYED HOME AND LOOKED AFTER THE FAMILY…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS THAT AND GRADUALLY, AS YOU CAN SEE, OVER THE YEARS A LOT OF THE ORGANIZATIONS AND LODGES HAVE CLOSED DOWN AND STOPPED FUNCTIONING. IT DOESN’T SEEM TO BE REASON…YEARS AGO.” SAMUELS RECALLED HER ACQUISITION OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, STATING, “IT HAPPENED THAT MY FATHER PASSED AWAY IN ’91 AND MY MOTHER HAD A STROKE 6 MONTHS LATER. SHE SOLD HER HOME AND MOVED INTO A LODGE…[THESE ITEMS ARE] ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE REMAINING IN THE HOME, IN HER HOUSE…EVERYTHING WAS DISPERSED…THE FOUR OF US SIBLINGS DECIDED TO TAKE THEM AND THIS IS WHAT I TOOK AT THE TIME…THEY LIVED BY GYRO PARK ON 10TH AVENUE AND 15TH STREET SOUTH AT THE TIME. THAT WAS THEIR HOME.” “I GUESS WE WERE JUST NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME JUST EVERYTHING WAS GIVEN AWAY. MY OLDER SISTER TOOK ALL FAMILY PHOTO ALBUMS AND I LOOKED THROUGH TO SEE IF THERE WERE ANY PICTURES OF MY DAD IN THAT GROUP. BUT THERE WEREN’T AT THE TIME…I JUST HAPPENED TO GET THESE [KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS] AND MY OTHER SISTERS, MY LITTLE SISTERS, THEY HAD YOUNG FAMILIES AT THE TIME SO THEY DIDN’T WANT THEM AT THEIR PLACE IN THEIR HOME. “ “WITH ALL THE NAME TAGS FROM THE LODGES AND STUFF LIKE THAT, I THOUGHT THAT [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS CONNECTION] WAS QUITE INTERESTING…AT THE TIME, I GUESS I SHOULD HAVE GIVEN THE CEREMONIAL COSTUMES [AWAY] AT THE SAME TIME [I GAVE AWAY THE NAME TAGS] BUT THEY WERE PUT AWAY IN A BOX AND [I WAS] NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME.” ON THE REASON FOR DONATING THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS NOTED, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING AND THERE’S A LOT OF STUFF THAT I JUST DON’T NEED ANY MORE AND I FEEL THAT THE REST OF MY FAMILY MEMBERS DO NOT WANT THIS AND AS I SAID, IT TIME TO GO. I DIDN’T WANT TO GIVE IT AWAY TO A CHARITY AND IT HAD A LITTLE MORE SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE, I FEEL.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MAY 7, 1960, THE LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS WAS FORMALLY STARTED ON APRIL 16, 1890. THE ARTICLE NOTED WALTER CURRIE SERVED AS CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS FROM 1959-1960, AND THAT “PRESENT EXECUTIVES” INCLUDED CURRIE AS THE PAST-CHANCELLOR AND TREASURER. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MARCH 28, 1968 REFERENCED WALTER CURRIE AS PAST GRAND CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190008001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190008006
Acquisition Date
2019-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
HAIR COMB
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CORAL
Catalogue Number
P20160042002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
HAIR COMB
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Materials
CORAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
10
Width
3.4
Description
STRAIGHT-EDGED COMB. AMBER-COLOURED, TRANSLUCENT MATERIAL SPECULATED CORAL BY DONOR. THE HANDLE EDGE IS CURVED AND THE COMB'S LENGTH TAPERS INWARD FROM THE HANDLE EDGE TO TEETH EDGE. TEETH WIDTH APPROX. 0.2 - 0.5 CM. THERE IS A 1.1 CM WIDE EDGE BETWEEN TEETH AND EDGE OF COMB ON EITHER SIDE. CONDITION: SMALL CHIP ON SIDE EDGE AND SLIGHT LOSS OF FINISH ON TEETH.
Subjects
TOILET ARTICLE
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THIS COMB CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK ALONG WITH THE COMB WERE HER MOTHER’S HAIR ORNAMENTS AND A VASE (P20160042001 & 003-004). MRS. NISHIYAMA REMEMBERED, “[MY MOTHER] EXPLAINED TO ME THAT SHE’D KEPT THESE BECAUSE THEY WERE HERS – GIVEN TO HER BY HER PARENTS – AND SHE WANTED ME TO SORT OF TAKE CARE OF THEM… [THEY WERE] NOT ANYTHING TO USE AROUND HERE, ANYWAY, SO WE JUST THOUGHT THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL, AND, ONCE IN A WHILE, WE GET TO SEE IT.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE REMEMBERED HER MOTHER USING THE COMB AND HAIR ACCESSORIES, MRS. NISHIYAMA STATED, “NO. BY THE TIME SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE REALIZED THERE’S NO DRESSING UP OR NOTHING. YOU KNOW THE HAIRDOS – THE FANCY HAIRDOS THAT THEY HAD IN JAPAN - THEY WERE LONG GONE, SO THEY JUST WENT BY. I KNOW SHE BRAIDED HER HAIR AND WORE A BUN ON THE BACK OF HER HEAD, FOR YEARS AND YEARS, BEFORE SHE CUT IT SHORT. SO, I JUST REMEMBERED A LITTLE TREASURE THAT SHE HAD IN THE DRAWER… IT WAS IN A SPECIAL SPOT IN THE DRESSER, AND WE ONLY GOT TO SEE IT ONCE IN A WHILE. IT WAS SPECIAL. IT WAS HER TREASURES THAT SHE KEPT.” MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THAT HER MOTHER PROBABLY DID NOT USE THE COMB ONCE SHE WAS IN ALBERTA. SHE SAID, “I DOUBT [THEY WERE USED]. IT DOESN’T LOOK SERVICEABLE REALLY, BUT IT’S DAYS BEFORE PLASTIC – AND I KNOW SHE TOLD ME IT WAS A SPECIAL MATERIAL. I MEAN, A SPECIAL NATURAL MATERIAL. WHETHER IT’S CORAL, I’M NOT SURE. I CAN’T SAY THAT. SPEAKING OF THE ITEMS’ USE ONCE THEY WERE IN HER POSSESSION, MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID, “[THEY WERE] NOT REALLY [USED]. I THINK I’VE HAD IT OUT WHEN THEY ASKED FOR IT AT JAPANESE GARDENS. I THINK WE HAD SOMETHING ELSE SOMEWHERE, WHERE WE HAD A DISPLAY… I THINK THAT’S THE ONLY TIMES THAT THEY CAME OUT… THIS (THE COMB) WAS SOMETHING THAT WE ONLY GOT TO SEE OCCASIONALLY.” THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042002
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONE
Catalogue Number
P20160042003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONE
No. Pieces
1
Height
16.3
Length
8.5
Description
FAN-SHAPED HAIR ORNAMENT WITH TWO LARGE PRONGS. CREAM-COLOURED WITH BROWN DAPPLING. 5 WHITE TULIP-SHAPED DESIGNS ON FANNED EDGE OF ORNAMENT WITH GREEN RHINESTONES INLAID IN THE WHITE SECTIONS OF DESIGN. TWO THIN LINES ARE ETCHED ON EITHER SIDE OF EACH WHITE TULIP SECTION. CONDITION: DESIGN FADED WITH ONE GREEN RHINESTONE MISSING ON AN INNER TULIP. SLIGHT LOSS OF FINISH ESPECIALLY AT THE WHITE PORTIONS OF DESIGN. SCUFFED SURFACE OVERALL.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THIS HAIR ORNAMENT AND A MATCHING ONE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S COMB AND A VASE ALSO DONATED WITH THE TWO HAIR ORNAMENTS (P20160042001 & 003-004). MRS. NISHIYAMA REMEMBERED, “[MY MOTHER] EXPLAINED TO ME THAT SHE’D KEPT THESE BECAUSE THEY WERE HERS – GIVEN TO HER BY HER PARENTS – AND SHE WANTED ME TO SORT OF TAKE CARE OF THEM… [THEY] CAME WITH HER WHEN SHE GOT MARRIED… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… [THESE] TWO PIECES ARE HER HAIR ORNAMENTS, AND I’M GUESSING THAT THEY ARE BONE… [THEY WERE] NOT ANYTHING TO USE AROUND HERE, ANYWAY, SO WE JUST THOUGHT THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL, AND, ONCE IN A WHILE, WE GET TO SEE IT.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE REMEMBERED HER MOTHER USING THE COMB AND HAIR ACCESSORIES, MRS. NISHIYAMA STATED, “NO. BY THE TIME SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE REALIZED THERE’S NO DRESSING UP OR NOTHING. YOU KNOW THE HAIRDOS – THE FANCY HAIRDOS THAT THEY HAD IN JAPAN - THEY WERE LONG GONE, SO THEY JUST WENT BY. I KNOW SHE BRAIDED HER HAIR AND WORE A BUN ON THE BACK OF HER HEAD, FOR YEARS AND YEARS, BEFORE SHE CUT IT SHORT. SO, I JUST REMEMBERED A LITTLE TREASURE THAT SHE HAD IN THE DRAWER… IT WAS IN A SPECIAL SPOT IN THE DRESSER, AND WE ONLY GOT TO SEE IT ONCE IN A WHILE. IT WAS SPECIAL. IT WAS HER TREASURES THAT SHE KEPT.” SPEAKING OF THE ITEMS’ USE ONCE THEY WERE IN HER POSSESSION, MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID, “[THEY WERE] NOT REALLY [USED]. I THINK I’VE HAD IT OUT WHEN THEY ASKED FOR IT AT JAPANESE GARDENS. I THINK WE HAD SOMETHING ELSE SOMEWHERE, WHERE WE HAD A DISPLAY… I THINK THAT’S THE ONLY TIMES THAT THEY CAME OUT…” THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042003
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONES
Catalogue Number
P20160042004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1923
Date Range To
1924
Materials
BONE, RHINESTONES
No. Pieces
1
Length
11
Width
6.5
Description
CROWN-SHAPED HAIR ORNAMENT. SHAPE IS MADE UP OF FOUR TULIP SHAPES. BONE COLOUR IS CREAM WITH BROWN DAPPLING. THE TULIPS ARE WHITE INLAID WITH GREEN RHINESTONES. LEAF-SHAPED DESIGNS ON THE BASE (TWO PER FLOWER) ARE BLACK INLAID WITH PALE BLUE RHINESTONES. FINE LINES ARE ETCHED INTO THE BLACK OF LEAVES AND AROUND THE FLOWER HEADS. CONDITION: DESIGNS ARE SLIGHTLY FADED WITH SLIGHT DIRT ACCUMULATION ON WHITE AREAS OF FLOWERS. TWO GREEN RHINESTONS AND ONE BLUE RHINESTONE MISSING. CLOSING MECHANISM AT BACK IS MISSING. SLIGHT SCUFFS ON OVERALL SURFACE.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON 2 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DONORS, MAKIO (MAC) AND REYKO NISHIYAMA, IN THEIR HOME TO DISCUSS ITEMS THEY WERE DONATING TO THE GALT. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED THIS HAIR ORNAMENT AND A MATCHING ONE CAME INTO HER CUSTODY AFTER ITS INITIAL OWNERS – HER PARENTS TAKASHI AND CHIAKI KARAKI – MOVED FROM THEIR RAYMOND HOME TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. SHE SAID, “… [AFTER THE] SIXTY YEARS OF FARMING, MY [PARENTS] DID IN RAYMOND… THEY SELL THE WHOLE THING AND MOVE! I’M LEFT BEHIND IN RAYMOND BY MYSELF, MARRIED… WHEN THEY MOVE TO QUESNEL, B.C [IN THE LATE 1950S], THEY HAD TO LEAVE BEHIND THEIR TRUNK AND IT HAD ALL THE TREASURES IN IT.” OTHER TREASURES FOUND IN THE TRUNK WERE HER MOTHER’S COMB AND A VASE ALSO DONATED WITH THE HAIR ORNAMENTS (P20160042001 & 003-004). MRS. NISHIYAMA REMEMBERED, “[MY MOTHER] EXPLAINED TO ME THAT SHE’D KEPT THESE BECAUSE THEY WERE HERS – GIVEN TO HER BY HER PARENTS – AND SHE WANTED ME TO SORT OF TAKE CARE OF THEM… [THEY] CAME WITH HER WHEN SHE GOT MARRIED… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… [THESE] TWO PIECES ARE HER HAIR ORNAMENTS, AND I’M GUESSING THAT THEY ARE BONE… [THEY WERE] NOT ANYTHING TO USE AROUND HERE, ANYWAY, SO WE JUST THOUGHT THEY WERE BEAUTIFUL, AND, ONCE IN A WHILE, WE GET TO SEE IT.” WHEN ASKED IF SHE REMEMBERED HER MOTHER USING THE COMB AND HAIR ACCESSORIES, MRS. NISHIYAMA STATED, “NO. BY THE TIME SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE REALIZED THERE’S NO DRESSING UP OR NOTHING. YOU KNOW THE HAIRDOS – THE FANCY HAIRDOS THAT THEY HAD IN JAPAN - THEY WERE LONG GONE, SO THEY JUST WENT BY. I KNOW SHE BRAIDED HER HAIR AND WORE A BUN ON THE BACK OF HER HEAD, FOR YEARS AND YEARS, BEFORE SHE CUT IT SHORT. SO, I JUST REMEMBERED A LITTLE TREASURE THAT SHE HAD IN THE DRAWER… IT WAS IN A SPECIAL SPOT IN THE DRESSER, AND WE ONLY GOT TO SEE IT ONCE IN A WHILE. IT WAS SPECIAL. IT WAS HER TREASURES THAT SHE KEPT.” SPEAKING OF THE ITEMS’ USE ONCE THEY WERE IN HER POSSESSION, MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID, “[THEY WERE] NOT REALLY [USED]. I THINK I’VE HAD IT OUT WHEN THEY ASKED FOR IT AT JAPANESE GARDENS. I THINK WE HAD SOMETHING ELSE SOMEWHERE, WHERE WE HAD A DISPLAY… I THINK THAT’S THE ONLY TIMES THAT THEY CAME OUT…” THE TRUNK, ALONG WITH ITS CONTENTS, WERE BROUGHT TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA FROM JAPAN BY HER MOTHER, CHIAKI KARAKI (NEE KUMAGAI), FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO TAKASHI KARAKI. MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED HER PARENTS’ MARRIAGE STORY: “… SHE CAME OVER AS A VERY YOUNG BRIDE… NOT QUITE EIGHTEEN… I OFTEN SAID TO MY MOTHER…, ‘HOW IN THE WORLD DID YOUR PARENTS EVER LET YOU GO TO CANADA? YOU DIDN’T KNOW THE LANGUAGE – IT’S A DIFFERENT COUNTRY.’ SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT MY DAD, EXCEPT THAT HE WAS A FARMER. HE’S SEVENTEEN YEARS OLDER THAN SHE WAS THEN. IT DOESN’T MAKE SENSE. SHE JUST SAID, ‘MY PARENTS SAID TO GO, SO I CAME’ … IT TOOK A LOT OF COURAGE…” MRS. NISHIYAMA WENT ON, “ALL JAPANESE MARRIAGES WERE DONE [BY] GO-BETWEENS. THERE WERE, I WOULD SAY, HARDLY ANY, IN FACT, I DON’T THINK THERE WAS ANY… FALLING-IN-LOVE KIND OF THING. THAT WAS JUST NOT EVEN THOUGHT ABOUT… MY DAD’S FOLKS WERE IN THE VILLAGE. THEY WERE FARMERS… THEY HAD A LARGE HOUSE AND THEY RAISED SILKWORMS. MY MOTHER’S FOLKS LIVED IN THE TOWN… SHE COMES FROM A VERY MODEST FAMILY, BUT HER DAD WAS A PAWN BROKER…” A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY MRS. NISHIYAMA AND HER BROTHER, SUSUMU KARAKI, IN THE BOOK TITLED "NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY: A HISTORY OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE CANADIANS" (PUBLISHED 2001), ELABORATES ON THE FAMILY’S STORY. IT STATES THEIR FATHER, TAKASHI KARAKI, WAS BORN ON 1 JULY 1889 IN NAGANO PREFECTURE, JAPAN. THE HISTORY READS, “AFTER GRADUATING FROM HIGH SCHOOL IN 1907… HE LEFT A COMFORTABLE HOME… TO VENTURE OUT FOR A NEW LIFE IN AMERICA.” IT EXPLAINS HE LANDED IN VANCOUVER, AND WAS LURED BY A HIGH SALARY JOB IN SKEENA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. AFTER WORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE HISTORY SAYS THAT “IN 1909, HE AND SEVERAL HUNDRED OTHER YOUNG JAPANESE MEN WERE RECRUITED BY AN AGENT OF THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY TO WORK IN THE SUGAR BEET FIELDS IN RAYMOND, [ALBERTA] WITH PROMISES OF GOOD PAY AND EASY WORK...” THE MEN SOON LEARNED THAT THE WORK WAS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT AND THE PAY SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN THEY HAD BEEN INITIALLY BEEN PROMISED, SO MANY RETURNED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AFTER THEIR CONTRACT YEAR. KARAKI WAS OF THE GROUP THAT DECIDED TO STAY ON WITH THE COMPANY UNTIL ITS CLOSURE IN 1914. AFTER THAT, HE BEGAN A FARMING OPERATION WITH TWO OF THE FRIENDS HE MADE IN THE COMPANY – LEASING LAND FROM FIRST THE KNIGHT SUGAR COMPANY, THEN FROM A LOCAL NAMED ROLLO KINSEY, AND FINALLY FROM THE MCINTYRE RANCH IN MAGRATH. EVEN THOUGH THE PARTNERSHIP DISSOLVED AFTER THE FIRST THREE YEARS, KARAKI PERSISTED UNDER THE TRYING CONDITIONS, AND BY 1918 HE MADE THE DECISION TO MAKE ALBERTA HIS PERMANENT HOME AND TO BECOME A CANADIAN CITIZEN. HE PURCHASED A DRY LAND FARM IN RAYMOND AND FARMED THAT FOR FIVE YEARS BEFORE DECIDING HE WANTED TO GET MARRIED AND RAISE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN. HE RETURNED TO JAPAN IN 1923, WHERE HE MET THROUGH FAMILY AND FRIENDS, CHIAKI KUMAGAI, WHO WAS ALSO FROM THE NAGANO PREFECTURE. THE COUPLE MARRIED IN DECEMBER 1923, AND THE NEWLYWEDS RETURNED TO RAYMOND IN SPRING 1924. IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW, MRS. NISHIYAMA ADDED, “THERE WAS SOMEBODY ELSE. GO-BETWEENS HAD PICKED OUT SOMEONE ELSE FOR HIM, SO SOMEONE ELSE LOOKED AT HIM AND SAID ‘NO, THANK YOU.’ YOU KNOW, SOMETIMES IT WORKS, AND SOMETIMES IT DIDN’T. SO, THEN THEY HAD TO SCROUNGE A LITTLE BIT, AND MY MOTHER’S TOWN WAS NOT SO FAR FROM WHERE DAD’S FAMILY LIVED, SO THEY SAID, ‘WELL, WE’RE NOT THAT FAR APART. WHEN YOU COME HOME FOR A VISIT, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO VISIT.’” WHEN DESCRIBING THE HOME THE COUPLE INTIALLY SETTLED IN, MRS. NISHIYAMA EXPLAINED, “WE [WERE] 8 MILES SOUTH OF RAYMOND, IN WHAT WE CALL THE MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT… THERE WERE QUITE A FEW JAPANESE FAMILIES IN AND AROUND THAT MAMMOTH SCHOOL DISTRICT, SO WE WERE SORT OF THE MAJORITY.” MRS. NISHIYAMA SAID THAT HER MOTHER SPOKE OFTEN OF HER EARLY DAYS IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. MRS. NISHIYAMA RECALLED, “IT WAS REALLY VERY LONELY [FOR MY MOTHER]. SHE’S YOUNG; THE CLOSEST NEIGHBOR WAS HALF A MILE AWAY… WHEN SHE GOT TO THE FARM, SHE SAID, ‘YOU SAID OUR NEIGHBORS ARE TAKAGUCHI’S. IS THAT HOUSE OVER THERE OUR NEIGHBORS?’ DAD SAID, ‘NO, THAT’S A CHICKEN COOP. THE NEIGHBOR’S HOUSE IS AWAY OVER THERE.’ FOR HER, THAT’S JUST APPALLING, COMING FROM A TOWN WHERE NEIGHBORS WERE CLOSE…DAD WOULD GET UP ONTO THE FIELD. NO ONE TO TALK TO EVEN. FORTUNATELY, SHE SAID, HER BROTHER-IN-LAW (DAD HAD A YOUNGER BROTHER HELPING HIM AT THAT TIME) – AND HE SAID, ‘GET ON THE BACK OF MY TRACTOR AND (IT WASN’T TRACTOR THEN – IT WAS HORSE AND BUGGY, BUT ANYWAY -) JUST COME AND RIDE THE FIELD WITH ME.’ AND, SHE DID JUST BECAUSE SHE COULDN’T STAND BEING BY HERSELF IN A LONELY OUTPOST, ON THE PRAIRIES, WITH NOTHING TO LOOK AT…” ACCORDING TO THE KARAKI FAMILY HISTORY IN THE NISHIKI BOOK, THE COUPLE RAISED A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN INCLUDING THE DONOR, REYKO NISHIYAMA. BY 1956, THEY SOLD THEIR FARM AND RELOCATED TO BRITISH COLUMBIA. TAKASHI PASSED AWAY IN THERE IN 1974 AT THE AGE OF 85 AND CHIAKI PASSED AWAY 14 YEARS LATER IN 1988. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS AND COPIES OF THE FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160042004
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20190008005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1979
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Length
82
Width
47
Description
A. UNIFORM, 82CM LONG X 47CM WIDE. YELLOW GARMENT WITH SHORT SLEEVES AND ROUNDED COLLAR; SLEEVES AND COLLAR HAVE RED AND YELLOW PATTERNED FABRIC STITCHED ON. GARMENT HAS ELASTIC WAIST WITH DISCOLORED WHITE ELASTIC LOOPS ON SIDES OF WAIST. TOPS OF SHOULDERS HAVE OPENINGS WITH BRASS BUTTONS AND BUTTON-HOLES, AND LEFT SHOULDER HAS A BRASS CLOSED LOOP ON TOP. INSIDE OF GARMENT IS YELLOW FABRIC; GARMENT IS MACHINE-STITCHED; GARMENT HAS STITCHED TAG INSIDE, “FRONT M.C. LILLEY”. GARMENT HAS STAINING ON FRONT, BACK, AND INSIDE; GARMENT HAS THREADS WORN AND TORN ON FRONT AND BACK OF RED COLLAR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BELT, 117.2CM LONG X 7.1CM WIDE. BELT HAS YELLOW AND RED LINEAR, SQUARE “U N” ALTERNATING PATTERN ON FRONT, WITH YELLOW BORDERS ALONG TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES; BELT HAS THREE ROWS OF DOUBLE SILVER SNAP-BUTTONS. BELT IS MACHINE-STITCHED; ENDS OF BELT TAPER TO POINTS. BACK OF BELT IS SOLID YELLOW WITH TWO SILVER BUTTON CLASPS AT END. BELT HAS MINOR FRAYING AND STAINING ON FRONT; BACK OF BELT HAS FADED RED IMPRINTS FROM THE FRONT TRANSFERRED THROUGH; BACK OF BELT IS CREASED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MAY 28, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CARLA SAMUELS REGARDING HER DONATION OF KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS MATERIALS. SAMUELS’ FATHER, WALTER D. CURRIE, WAS A MEMBER WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS RECALLED, “WE’VE HAD ALL THESE OBJECTS, ARTIFACTS FOR OVER 40-50 YEARS AND IT IS TIME THAT THEY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE THAT WOULD BE INTERESTED IN KNOWING THE HISTORY OF LETHBRIDGE AND ALL THE PAST MEMBERS OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, LODGE NUMBER [TWO]. MY FATHER WALTER CURRIE WAS ONE OF THE MEMBERS. HE WAS SECRETARY FOR THAT LODGE. HE KEPT…THE LETTERHEAD THAT I REMEMBER AS A CHILD HIM TYPING ON AN OLD TYPEWRITER WITH THAT LETTERHEAD…AS CHILDREN WE WERE ALWAYS INTERESTED IN HIS CEREMONIAL COSTUMES BUT NOTHING MUCH WAS SAID ABOUT THE LODGE.” “[THESE ITEMS HAVE] BEEN STORED IN A BOX FOR ALL THESE YEARS. A COUPLE [OF THE REGALIA SETS] HAVE BEEN USED FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…THE BLACK PRIEST COSTUME AND THE BURGUNDY AND GOLD SILK COSTUME…WE USED TO USE IT AS A MATADOR…IT’S SIMILAR TO THE SHRINERS COSTUMES IN A WAY—SOMETHING EGYPTIAN…THEY JUST LAID AROUND…” “THEY WERE IN THE BASEMENT IN A CLOSET. JUST STORED THERE AND KEPT THERE AND US KIDS WE’D LOOK AT THEM FOR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES…NOTHING WAS SAID ABOUT IT AFTER MY DAD PASSED AWAY THAT THEY WERE JUST KEPT IN A BOX…MY MOM HAD MENTIONED [THAT THESE WERE MY FATHER’S LODGE GARMENTS AND NOT JUST HALLOWEEN COSTUMES] WHEN SHE GAVE ME THE BOX. SHE SAID THAT THIS IS ALL THE STUFF FROM DAD’S LODGE, THE KP LODGE IS WHAT WE USED TO CALL IT.” SAMUELS ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S INVOLVEMENT WITH THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS IN LETHBRIDGE, SHARING, “I REMEMBER DAD IN THAT [REGALIA SET] ONE TIME, THE BURGUNDY SATIN COSTUME AND I JUST REMEMBER THE LETTERHEAD. HE ALWAYS HAD A PILE OF THE LETTERHEAD BY THE TABLE UNDER THE TYPEWRITER. IT WAS HUGE OLD UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER ON A BIG OVAL-FOOTED DESK AND THE FILE BOX TOO WAS NEXT TO THE TYPEWRITER…I KNOW HE WAS IN THE PYTHIAN LODGE PROBABLY IN THE LATE 1950S. I REMEMBER IN 1960 ALL THESE COSTUMES…I KNOW THAT OVER THE YEARS THE MEMBERS PASSED AWAY AND IT JUST WAS HARDER TO GET ANYBODY TO JOIN AND IN THE EARLY 1970S THEY DISBANDED THE LODGE HERE IN LETHBRIDGE.” “[I REMEMBER] HIM WORKING, TYPING AWAY, GETTING LETTERS DONE UP…PUTTING AWAY STUFF IN HIS LITTLE FILE BOX. I GUESS, WE WERE SMALL AND…[THE LODGE] WASN’T SPOKEN OF TOO MUCH WHEN WE WERE LITTLE. I ASKED MY OLDER SISTER ABOUT ANYTHING THEY KNEW OF THE BOOKS OR PHOTOS, TOO BUT THEY COULDN’T FIND [ANYTHING]...” “MY DAD DIDN’T TALK MUCH ABOUT THIS LODGE. HE WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE ELKS HERE IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE KNEW MORE ABOUT THE ELKS…THAT CLUB…BEING A LITTLE MORE RESERVED.” “I THINK [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS] MET MAYBE ONCE A WEEK…I KNOW A COUPLE, TWO OR THREE MEMBERS, AS A KID, THAT WERE IN THE LODGE TOGETHER AND OUR FAMILIES USED TO CHUM TOGETHER BECAUSE OF THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH THE LODGE…ALL IN THOSE DAYS IT SEEMED LIKE THEY HAD THEIR SUIT AND TIE. THAT WAS MORE OR LESS YOUR DRESS…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS ADULTS THAT WOULD GET TOGETHER…” “I DON’T KNOW IF THIS TYPE OF LODGE WAS BASED ON CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS LIKE THE SHRINERS WOULD HAVE BEEN. TO ME IT WAS…I WOULD REFER TO IT LIKE MASONIC LODGE…IN THOSE DAYS IT WAS STRICTLY MEN’S CLUBS ALL THE TIME AND THE WOMEN STAYED HOME AND LOOKED AFTER THE FAMILY…I THINK IT WAS MORE OR LESS THAT AND GRADUALLY, AS YOU CAN SEE, OVER THE YEARS A LOT OF THE ORGANIZATIONS AND LODGES HAVE CLOSED DOWN AND STOPPED FUNCTIONING. IT DOESN’T SEEM TO BE REASON…YEARS AGO.” SAMUELS RECALLED HER ACQUISITION OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, STATING, “IT HAPPENED THAT MY FATHER PASSED AWAY IN ’91 AND MY MOTHER HAD A STROKE 6 MONTHS LATER. SHE SOLD HER HOME AND MOVED INTO A LODGE…[THESE ITEMS ARE] ALL THE THINGS THAT WERE REMAINING IN THE HOME, IN HER HOUSE…EVERYTHING WAS DISPERSED…THE FOUR OF US SIBLINGS DECIDED TO TAKE THEM AND THIS IS WHAT I TOOK AT THE TIME…THEY LIVED BY GYRO PARK ON 10TH AVENUE AND 15TH STREET SOUTH AT THE TIME. THAT WAS THEIR HOME.” “I GUESS WE WERE JUST NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME JUST EVERYTHING WAS GIVEN AWAY. MY OLDER SISTER TOOK ALL FAMILY PHOTO ALBUMS AND I LOOKED THROUGH TO SEE IF THERE WERE ANY PICTURES OF MY DAD IN THAT GROUP. BUT THERE WEREN’T AT THE TIME…I JUST HAPPENED TO GET THESE [KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS] AND MY OTHER SISTERS, MY LITTLE SISTERS, THEY HAD YOUNG FAMILIES AT THE TIME SO THEY DIDN’T WANT THEM AT THEIR PLACE IN THEIR HOME. “ “WITH ALL THE NAME TAGS FROM THE LODGES AND STUFF LIKE THAT, I THOUGHT THAT [THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS CONNECTION] WAS QUITE INTERESTING…AT THE TIME, I GUESS I SHOULD HAVE GIVEN THE CEREMONIAL COSTUMES [AWAY] AT THE SAME TIME [I GAVE AWAY THE NAME TAGS] BUT THEY WERE PUT AWAY IN A BOX AND [I WAS] NOT THINKING OF IT AT THE TIME.” ON THE REASON FOR DONATING THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ITEMS, SAMUELS NOTED, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING AND THERE’S A LOT OF STUFF THAT I JUST DON’T NEED ANY MORE AND I FEEL THAT THE REST OF MY FAMILY MEMBERS DO NOT WANT THIS AND AS I SAID, IT TIME TO GO. I DIDN’T WANT TO GIVE IT AWAY TO A CHARITY AND IT HAD A LITTLE MORE SENTIMENTAL VALUE FOR THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE, I FEEL.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MAY 7, 1960, THE LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS WAS FORMALLY STARTED ON APRIL 16, 1890. THE ARTICLE NOTED WALTER CURRIE SERVED AS CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS FROM 1959-1960, AND THAT “PRESENT EXECUTIVES” INCLUDED CURRIE AS THE PAST-CHANCELLOR AND TREASURER. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MARCH 28, 1968 REFERENCED WALTER CURRIE AS PAST GRAND CHANCELLOR OF THE LETHBRIDGE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190008001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190008005
Acquisition Date
2019-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

42 records – page 1 of 3.