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Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1943
Date Range To
1973
Materials
SHEET METAL, GLASS, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
2
Height
13.7
Length
5.4
Width
1.8
Description
A: THERMOMETER. THE THERMOMETER'S CASING IS METAL. THERE IS A COVER ON THE THERMOMTER THAT HAS 17 HOLES PUNCHED OUT OF THE FRONT (7 ROWS ALTERNATING BETWEEN 3 AND 2 HOLES PER ROW). THERE IS A SHORT BACK TO THE COVER. THE COVER IS ATTACHED TO THE THERMOMETER WITH 2 SMALL NAILS ON EITHER SIDE. THE THERMOMETER GLIDES OUT OF THE COVER AND HINGES BACK TO STAND (SUPPORTED BY BACK OF CASE AND THE 2 NAILS). THE BACKGROUND OF THE THERMOMETER IS WHITE AND IS ATTACHED TO THE METAL CASE. “US PAT 2329685” IS ON THE BOTTOM OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE LEFT SIDE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS FROM 1 TO 6 ARE ETCHED. THE NUMBERS ARE DIVIDED INTO INCREMENTS OF FOUR. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER THERE ARE “00” ACROSS FROM EACH NUMBER ON THE LEFT. THE THERMOMETER’S GLASS IS TINTED YELLOW WITH A TRANSLUCENT CENTER. THIS TUBE IS 12.4CM IN LENGTH. TWO SMALL METAL RINGS HOLD THE GLASS THERMOMETER TO THE MEASUREMENT BACKING. THERE IS A SMALL METAL HOOK AT THE TOP OF THE THERMOMETER. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE THERMOMETER IN ITS CLOSED POSITION, "D. CARSE" IS HANDWRITTEN IN BLACK INK. GOOD CONDITION. RUSTING/STAINING OVERALL SURFACE. LOSS OF WHITE BACKING BEHIND THE THERMOMETER (SEVERE ON THE UPPER LEFT CORNER AND SLIGHT ON THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER). B: CARDBOARD CASE WITH OVERALL DIMENSIONS OF 13.9 CM X 6 CM X 2 CM. CARDBOARD BOX WITH GREEN LABEL ON FRONT. THE LABEL SAYS “RUXCO” “NO-600-MO-10” “OVEN TEST THERMOMETER RANGE 100 TO 600°F IN 10° DIVISIONS.” GOOD CONDITION. MISSING LEFT END OF BOX. SCRATCH ON THE SURFACE OF THE LEFT SIDE OF THE LABEL. STAINING IN VARIOUS PLACES.
Subjects
FOOD PROCESSING T&E
THERMAL T&E
Historical Association
TRADES
DOMESTIC
History
IN SEPTEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED IRENE MOCH ABOUT THE HISTORY OF A THERMOMETER SHE DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES. THE THERMOMETER BELONGED TO HER FATHER, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE, AND WAS USED BY HIM AS AN EMPLOYEE OF CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “HIS JOB WAS TO GO HOUSE-TO-HOUSE ON SPECIFIED CALLS TO REPAIR AND CHECK GAS APPLIANCES AT VARIOUS HOMES. HE LOVED HIS JOB. IT WAS GREAT PASSION AND HE WOULD SHARE A LOT OF HIS EXPERIENCES AT HOME WITH US. IT BECAME A BIG PART OF OUR FAMILY LIFE. HIS FIRST PASSION WAS HIS FAMILY AND HIS SECOND PASSION WAS HIS WORK. TWENTY- EIGHT YEARS, HE WAS WITH THE GAS COMPANY. HE WOULD BRING VARIOUS LITTLE ITEMS HOME, BUT MOSTLY IT WAS JUST HIS MEMORIES AND OUR MEMORIES OF THE STORIES THAT HE TOLD… MY MOM AND DAD WILLED THEIR HOUSE TO MY HUSBAND, WHO HAD BEEN CARING FOR IT OVER THE YEARS. [THEY] LEFT ALL THEIR TREASURES AS THEY WERE [TO] US BOTH TO DO WHAT WE FELT WAS BEST WITH EVERYTHING. THEY HAVE BEEN GONE SINCE 2000, 2003. SO FINALLY, THIS MOVE HAS FORCED ME TO GO THROUGH SOME OF THE THINGS THAT I HAVE, AND THIS HAS COME UP, AND IT MEANT A LOT. WE ALWAYS HAD GAS STOVE AND GAS RADIANT HEAT AND HE WOULD ALWAYS TEST MY MOTHER’S OVEN WITH THE THERMOMETER TO MAKE SURE THAT IT WAS FUNCTIONING PROPERLY. IT WAS VERY VISIBLE TO ALL OF US. IT WAS VERY IMPORTANT.” MOCH RECALLS THE THERMOMETER IN HER DAD’S WORK TOOLBOX: “… WHEREVER HE WENT, HE WOULD HAVE HIS TOOL BOX, AND THAT WAS THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF THE TOOL BOX. HE CARRIED IT IN HIS VEHICLE. HE DROVE TO THE HOUSES AND THE FIRST THING THAT CAME OUT OF HIS TOOL BOX WAS THAT.” IT WAS THE JOB AT CANADIAN WESTERN NATURAL GAS COMPANY THAT BROUGHT CARSE AND HIS FAMILY TO LETHBRIDGE: “HE HAD ANDREW’S HARDWARE IN FORT MACLEOD FOR I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY YEARS – QUITE A FEW – AND THEN HE WENT TO THE GAS PLANT IN BURDETT/ BOW ISLAND. AND FAMILY WAS COMING. [HE] NEEDED A STEADY JOB, [SO HE] CAME TO THE CITY [ TO] FIND A STEADY JOB. HE WAS A CERTIFIED PLUMBER AND GAS-FITTER SO HE APPLIED AT THE CANADIAN WESTERN AND NATURAL GAS… THAT WAS HIS WORLD. HE JUST BLOSSOMED. HE WAS A VERY PRIVATE PERSON, BUT HE LOVED TO BE WITH PEOPLE. THERE WAS A LOT OF COMRADERY AND HORSE-PLAY. HE WORKED BY HIMSELF. HE DIDN’T HAVE A PARTNER. AND [HE] WENT PLACE-TO-PLACE – AND IT GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW, AND GREW – 28 YEARS. AND IT WAS NOT UNCOMMON FOR OUR RESIDENCE PHONE AT HOME TO RING FROM VARIOUS PEOPLE, SAYING, ‘DON’T SEND SO-AND-SO; SEND DAVE BACK. DAVE KNOWS WHAT HE’S DONE HERE, AND THAT’S THE PERSON I WANT BACK.’ THAT WAS NOT UNCOMMON AT ALL TO HAPPEN AT OUR HOUSE. HE MADE A GOOD REPUTATION FOR HIMSELF, AND HE LOVED WHAT HE DID, AND IT SHOWED… HE BECAME A KIND OF AN IMAGE AND I THINK HE REVELED IN THAT. HE WAS KING OF HIS WORLD, REALLY. IT WAS VERY NICE.” “… THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEBODY ON CALL," CONTINUED MOCH, "BUT, IF IT WAS A MAJOR BLIZZARD, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THEN EVERYBODY WAS PRESSED INTO SERVICE. IF IT WAS TURKEY DAY, AND EVERYBODY WANTS TO COOK A TURKEY, AND THE PILOT LIGHT OR THE OVEN DIDN’T WORK, SOMEBODY HAD TO GO. AND THAT WAS THE BIG THING WITH THE GAS COMPANY. GAS COMPANY SERVICEMEN WERE FREE OF CHARGE AND THE ONLY CHARGE WOULD HAVE BEEN FOR A THERMOCOUPLE OR A PART THAT NEEDED TO BE REPLACED. PEOPLE WERE NOT SHY ABOUT CALLING THE GAS COMPANY TO REMEDY THEIR SITUATION. YES, THERE WAS ALWAYS SOMEONE ON CALL, AND HE HAD TO TAKE HIS TURN DOING THAT. BUT, IF THERE WAS A MASS BLIZZARD OR STORM OF SOME SORT, THEN THEY WERE ALL CALLED OUT.” MOCH EXPLAINED THE THERMOMETER WAS OF GREAT IMPORTANCE TO CARSE’S WORK: “MOST OF HIS CALLS WERE [BAKING RELATED]. PEOPLE ALWAYS BAKED IN THOSE DAYS – ALWAYS BAKED AND [IF], ‘THE OVEN WASN’T COOKING RIGHT,’ OR ‘IT WASN’T HOT ENOUGH,’ OR ‘HOW COME THIS FLOPPED?’ ‘WE’D BETTER CALIBRATE THE OVEN PROPERLY.’ AND SO [THEY'D CALL IN], ‘CAN DAVE COME OUT AND CHECK IT OUT AND CHECK THAT OUT FOR US?’ SO YES, THAT [THERMOMETRE] WAS ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS THAT HE BROUGHT OUT… MOM BAKED ALL THE TIME AS WELL, TWICE A WEEK PROBABLY. ON A REGULAR BASIS, HE WOULD JUST DOUBLE CHECK [WITH THE THERMOMETER] TO MAKE SURE THINGS WERE WORKING THE WAY THEY SHOULD. NOT NECESSARILY THAT THERE WAS A PROBLEM, BUT JUST SO THAT THEY STAY THE WAY THEY SHOULD BE. HE EDUCATED US ALL ABOUT THE BLUE FLAME AND HOW THE BLUE FLAME HAD TO HAVE THE LITTLE TIP ON THE END OF THE BLUE FLAME AND THAT MEANS IT’S BURNING CLEAN. IT WAS VERY EDUCATIONAL, TOO.” “[HE] ALWAYS CAME HOME FOR LUNCH. MOM ALWAYS HAD LUNCH READY. WE HAD LUNCH IN THE LIVING ROOM WITH A SANDWICH AND HE HAD A LITTLE SNOOZE. FIVE MINUTES, AND HE WAS OUT THE DOOR. HE WAS NEVER LATE. HE WAS ALWAYS HOME, AND HE WAS NEVER LATE COMING HOME FROM WORK. HE JUST LOVED IT… HE RETIRED IN SEPTEMBER 30, ’73. SO, PROBABLY ’43, ’44 THAT HE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE TO [WORK AT THE] GAS COMPANY.” ACCORDING TO HIS OBITUARY IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, DAVID ROXBOROUGH CARSE PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON 15 NOVEMBER 2000. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND THERMOMETER PATENT.
Catalogue Number
P20160027000
Acquisition Date
2016-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.6
Width
15
Description
BOOK WITH BLACK HARDCOVER. THE FRONT COVER OF THE BOOK HAS IN GOLD LETTERING “NACCO DYES” WITH A SMALL, GOLD LOGO IN THE CENTER AND “NATIONAL ANILINE & CHEMICAL CO. …” IN GOLD AT THE BOTTOM. THE SPINE OF THE BOOK HAS “NACCO DYES NO. 172” IN GOLD LETTERS. THE INSIDE COVER OF THE BOOK BEGINS WITH “NATIONAL SERVICE” WITH ADDITIONAL TEXT SUCCEEDING. THE PAGES ARE THICK, WHITE BOARD THAT ARE ATTACHED TO ONE ANOTHER WITH PAPER SEAMS. THE BOARDS FOLD OUT ACCORDIAN-STYLE INTO A HORIZONTAL LINE. THERE ARE 6 BOARDS IN TOTAL. THE FIRST FOUR BEGINNING FROM THE LEFT ARE TITLED, “NACCO UNION DYES.” EACH BOARD HAS TWO COLUMNS OF RECTANGULAR DYE SAMPLES. THERE ARE 9 ROWS ON EACH BOARD. THE TWO SAMPLES IN EACH ROW ARE THE SAME COLOUR BUT ON DIFFERENT TYPES OF FABRIC. THE 5TH BOARD IS DIVIDED INTO TWO COLUMNS. THE LEFT IS TITLED, “NACCO NEUTRAL DYES” AND THERE ARE 10 SAMPLES OF VARIOUS DYE COLOURS UNDERNEATH IT. THE RIGHT SIDE IS TITLED, “NACCO WOOL DYES.” GOOD CONDITION. THE BOARDS HAVE YELLOWED. SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE BLACK COVER. SLIGHT BROWN STAIN ON 5TH AND 6TH BOARDS. ACCRETION ON LOWER SECTION ON THE BACKSIDE OF BOARD TO THE RIGHT OF THE TITLE PAGE (5TH BOARD).
Subjects
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRADES
RETAIL TRADE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS’ FATHER SOLD DYE TO LOCALS ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY. MORRIS DESCRIBES THE PURPOSE OF THE DYES AND HOW HER FATHER BECAME INVOLVED: “DYEING WAS NECESSARY TO DYE THE WOOL THAT YOU SPUN AND SOMETIMES YOU COULDN’T GET THE NECESSARY DYES IN THE STORE, SO I DON’T KNOW WHERE MY DAD GOT THOSE. THEY MIGHT HAVE SENT HIM SOME OR WHAT AND THEN HE WOULD CHOOSE THE COLOURS THEY WANTED AND HE WOULD ORDER THEM. NOW IT SO HAPPENS THAT THE PEOPLE IN THE COLONY ALL WANTED THESE PARTICULAR DYES BECAUSE THEY WERE BETTER THAN THE KIND THEY GOT IN THE STORE. I DON’T KNOW WHY. SO MY DAD BUILT A SCALE AND I REMEMBER THIS SCALE. IT STOOD ON THE TABLE, IT HAD A CENTRAL PART, THEN THERE WAS A ROD GOING ACROSS AND IT CAME DOWN LIKE THIS AND THREE NAILS ON ONE SIDE BROUGHT IT DOWN AND WHEN YOU WANTED TO SELL THE DYE YOU PUT A PIECE OF PAPER DOWN, PUT IN A SPOONFUL UNTIL WE BALANCED [IT] AND THEN YOU GOT AN EVEN BALANCE AND THAT AMOUNT CAME TO TEN CENTS. IF WANTED LESS THEN YOU PUT TWO NAILS DOWN AND THOSE CAME TO FIVE CENTS SO… I SUPPOSE [HE SOLD THE DYE] BECAUSE HE WANTED TO MAKE SOME MONEY. HE SOLD VEGETABLES IN THE WINTERTIME TO THE LOCALS WHO DIDN’T GROW GARDENS. IN SUMMERTIME IF HE COULD GET A JOB HARVESTING WORKING SOMEWHERE ON FARMS HE DID THAT. [HE WAS] THE MIDDLE MAN [SELLING DYES]… [A]ND NOBODY TOLD ANYONE THE STOREKEEPERS THAT OR HE’D HAVE PROBABLY BEEN TOLD TO STOP IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93RD BATTERY"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1961
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, COPPER
Catalogue Number
P20160017007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93RD BATTERY"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1961
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, COPPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
90.2
Width
5.7
Description
GREY BELT WITH BRASS AND COPPER CLASP BUCKLE; BUCKLE HAS EMBOSSED CREST ON FRONT SHOWING A CROWN ABOVE AN ARTILLERY FIELD GUN, WITH A BANNER AT THE BOTTOM WITH THE TEXT “QUO FAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT”; BUCKLE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED ON BACK, “TOP, R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93 BTY (SP), R.C.A.”. BELT HAS BRASS AND COPPER CAPS ON ENDS WITH PAIRS OF METAL PRONGS EXTENDING FROM ENDS OF CAPS; BELT HAS TWO BRASS AND COPPER ADJUSTABLE LOOPS. INSIDE OF BELT HAS BLACK HAND-WRITTEN TEXT, “MAJOR R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93 BTY.” INSIDE OF BELT IS STAINED WITH WHITE AND YELLOW; INSIDE OF BELT IS WORN AND FRAYED BELOW PRONGS FROM ENDS; BUCKLE HAS WHITE AND GREEN RESIDUE FROM OXIDATION AT BASE OF CLASP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 1) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (WORLD WAR 2 AND POST-WAR). ON HIS FATHER’S, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH RECALLED, “I THINK THAT THE WAR WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE BEST THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO MY DAD. HE NEVER SPOKE ABOUT IT MUCH, BUT THE FRIENDSHIPS THAT HE DEVELOPED THROUGH HIS CONTACTS IN THE WAR WENT ON RIGHT UNTIL HIS DEATH…IT’S PROBABLY LIKE BEING ON A TEAM, YOU KNOW, AND I THINK IT’S THAT FELLOWSHIP YOU GET FROM RELYING ON PEOPLE, AND TRAINING WITH PEOPLE, AND GETTING THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING. I THINK THAT’S SORT OF A BIG PART OF IT.” “THE ONLY STORIES THAT I EVER REMEMBER HIM TELLING ME WAS, THEY WERE IN LONDON, AND THEY CLIMBED UP A CHURCH TOWER—IT WAS TWIN TOWERS ON THIS CHURCH…I WAS LOOKING AT A PICTURE OF IT IN A BOOK, AND HE SAYS, YES, THAT HE AND A COUPLE OF GUYS WERE ON LEAVE, AND THEY CLIMBED UP TO THE TOP OF THIS TOWER—THEY HAD TO SQUIRM THEIR WAY TO THE TOP, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, THE AIR RAID SIRENS WENT, AND THEY WERE HUSTLING TO GET DOWN, AND THEY GOT DOWN TO THE STREET, AND THE OTHER SPIRE WAS GONE. THERE’S THAT, AND I DID ASK HIM WHAT HAPPENED TO HIM WHEN HE GOT WOUNDED. HE DIDN’T GO INTO VERY MUCH DETAIL ON IT, BUT JUST SAID THAT THEY WERE OUT ON A SORTIE—HE WAS A FORWARD OBSERVATION OFFICER…THAT’S A WICKED JOB BECAUSE YOU’RE IN FRONT OF EVERYBODY, AND HE SAID, HE HEARD A BURST OF MACHINE-GUN. THEY STARTED RUNNING DOWN THIS ROAD, AND THEY USED TO SKIP THE BULLETS DOWN THIS ROAD, APPARENTLY, AND THOSE GERMAN MACHINE-GUNS WERE 10 SHOTS FOR EVERY BROWNING—AND HE SAID, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HAD A BURNING IN HIS LEG AND HE HOPPED ALONG, AND THAT WAS IT. IT DAMAGED HIS LEG SO BADLY THAT HE COULDN’T GO BACK, SO THOSE ARE THE TWO STORIES. OTHER THAN THAT, I THINK HE TALKED ABOUT, ONE [OTHER] DAY, BECAUSE I FOUND THESE PHOTOS. I THINK HE EITHER HID THEM OR GOT RID OF THEM LATER, AND IT WAS BLACK-AND-WHITE PHOTOS OF A CONCENTRATION CAMP, AND I THINK HE SAID IT WAS BERGEN-BELSEN, BECAUSE BERGEN-BELSEN WAS IN LOWER GERMANY…HE SAID THEY HAD TO DON GAS-MASKS WHEN THEY WERE ABOUT 5 MILES AWAY, BECAUSE THEY HAD EXHUMED EVERYTHING, AND THAT WAS IT. I WAS PROBABLY ABOUT 10 OR 12 WHEN HE TOLD ME THAT ONE. I HAD NIGHTMARES FOR A LONG TIME – LOOKING AT THAT.” “I’M SORRY TO SAY THAT I KNOW NOTHING [ABOUT MY FATHER’S MILITARY EXPERIENCES], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T TALK ABOUT IT. I THINK IT WAS JUST SOMETHING THAT HE DID ON HIS OWN, AND CHOSE NOT TO [TALK ABOUT]…AFTER HIS FUNERAL SERVICE, EVERYBODY CAME BACK TO THE HOUSE AND MY UNCLE, HUGHIE CRAIG, [FROM] FORT MACLEOD, WE WERE SITTING IN THE LIVING ROOM, AND HE SAID, “HAS ANYBODY GOT ANY STORIES ABOUT REED?” THIS WAS MY UNCLE, WHO WAS A COLD IRISH-ENGLISH GUY. NOBODY DID, AND HE SAID THAT THEY WERE IN BELGIUM SOMEWHERE, AND HUGHIE WAS AN ELECTRICIAN SO HE WAS WITH…THE CALGARY SIGNAL CORP…HE WAS AT AN INTERSECTION…THERE’S A CONVOY COMING THROUGH, CANADIAN CONVOY. HE’S SITTING IN THE JEEP WITH HIS DRIVER, AND, ALL OF A SUDDEN, HE HEARS THIS “HUGHIE, HUGHIE.” HE LOOKS UP, AND HERE’S MY DAD. HE BROKE OUT; CAME OVER TO HUGHIE AND SAID, “WE’RE IN A HOTEL FIVE MILES UP THE ROAD HERE.” HE SAYS, “WHY DON’T I COME BACK AND GET YOU FOR DINNER?” SO, HE DROVE BACK; PICKED UP HUGHIE; THEY WENT AND HAD DINNER. HUGHIE…WAS A CAPTAIN AT THAT TIME—SO HE HAD FIVE OR SIX GUYS WITH HIS GROUP. CAME BACK. THEY WERE ALL DEAD. SHOT UP BY THE GERMANS…[I] NEVER HEARD THAT ONE FROM MY DAD.” “[I] NEVER EXPERIENCED [MY FATHER HAVING PTSD]; NEVER HEARD ABOUT IT…I NEVER PUT TWO AND TWO TOGETHER UNTIL I REALIZED THAT, WHEN THEY GOT BACK, THEY HAD THE CHOICE OF EITHER, I THINK, $500.00 COMPENSATION, OR EDUCATION, AND I THINK THEY COULD ALSO DO THE VLA HOUSES. HE WENT FOR THE $500.00, AND BOUGHT FURNITURE, SO I’M NOT SURE IF THAT WAS KIND OF IRRATIONAL CHOICE AT THAT TIME…IT’S JUST MY SUSPICION NOW.” “MY ONE UNCLE IN LETHBRIDGE WAS A DOCTOR, AND MY OTHER UNCLE IN VANCOUVER BECAME THE CHIEF FORESTER FOR MACMILLAN AND BLOEDEL, AND DAD WANTED TO BE A DENTIST BUT, WHEN THEY CAME BACK, HE HAD DENTAL TOOLS THAT HE HAD BOUGHT PRIOR. BUT, I THINK SOMETHING HAPPENED—IT MUST BE POST TRAUMATIC STRESS, OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, THAT JUST SORT OF PUT HIM OFF THAT. I THINK HE JUST WANTED TO GET BACK TO A REGULAR LIFE, SO HE NEVER CHASED DOWN THE DENTISTRY, WHICH IS INTERESTING, BECAUSE OF COURSE, THEY WOULD HAVE HAD THEIR SCHOOLING PAID FOR. SO, THAT’S ALWAYS A QUESTION [I HAD]—BUT I NEVER PRIED, BUT I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT WAS CURIOUS.” “WE MOVED [FROM FORT MACLEOD TO MEDICINE HAT] IN 1959…AND I THINK DAD WAS THE CO [OF THE SALLY HORSE IN MEDICINE HAT] FROM ’64 TO ’68. I’M PRETTY SURE THOSE WERE THE YEARS, SO IT WAS FIVE YEARS, WHERE YOU WAIT YOUR CHANCE/YOU WAIT YOUR OPPORTUNITY; PROVE YOURSELF; AND THEN UP YOU GO.” “[HIS SERVICE] DEFINITELY GOES INTO THE LATE ‘60S. HE WAS STILL SORT OF ACTIVE IN LETHBRIDGE. I’M NOT SURE EXACTLY IN WHAT FUNCTION MILITARILY, BUT HE DID GO TO EVENTS THAT OCCURRED.” “HE SAVED EVERYTHING THOUGH…[THE UNIFORM AND APPEARANCE ASPECT WAS] PROBABLY A BIG PART OF [HIS MILITARY EXPERIENCE].” “[DAD] HAD A PRETTY GOOD LIBRARY. HE WAS FAIRLY WELL-READ. HE KNEW A LOT ABOUT CANADIAN MILITARY HISTORY. I KNOW THAT FOR SURE. ONE THING I KNOW HE WAS PROUD OF WAS THAT TWICE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE WON THE WORTHINGTON TROPHY, WHICH WAS, I THINK, FOR THE BEST MILITIA IN CANADA….HE WAS THE…AIDE-DE-CAMP FOR [GRANT MACEWAN] FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS. I KNOW PRINCESS ALEXANDRA, WHO WAS THE QUEEN’S COUSIN, PRESENTED THE GUIDON TO THEM UP HERE, ACTUALLY, IT WAS…OVER AT THE CURRIE BARRACKS…IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1967 OR SOMETHING.” “I KNOW WE VERY SELDOM WENT ON FAMILY HOLIDAYS BECAUSE HE USUALLY TOOK THE HOLIDAYS THAT HE GOT, AND HE’D EITHER GO TO SHILO, OR HE’D GO UP HERE, AND THEY SPENT A LOT OF TIME OUT AT SUFFIELD, ON THE RANGE OUT THERE, SO HOLIDAYS WERE TIED INTO THAT. WHEN HE WAS LIEUTENANT-COLONEL, THAT WAS ALMOST LIKE A FULL-TIME JOB…WE NEVER SAW HIM. HE WOULD BE TRAVELING ON THE ROAD, AND THEN HE’D COME HOME, I THINK IT WAS THURSDAY NIGHT. THURSDAY NIGHT WAS…YOUNG SOLDIERS…AND THEN TUESDAY NIGHT WAS WHEN THE OFFICERS AND THE NCO’S WOULD DO SOMETHING, SO THOSE TWO NIGHTS WERE TAKEN UP. SATURDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE. SUNDAY, HE’D BE OUT THERE…HE PUT IN 40 HOURS A WEEK OR MORE DOING THAT, AS A JOB, AS WELL AS HIS JOB AS AN INSURANCE SALESMAN.” ON HIS GRANDFATHER’S, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH NOTED, “MY UNDERSTANDING [IS MY GRANDFATHER SERVED IN WORLD WAR 1] ALTHOUGH IT’S INTERESTING…I REMEMBER MY DAD SAID, WHEN THE DEPRESSION HIT, THEY WERE GOING TO LAY OFF MY GRANDFATHER, WHO WAS THE, I THINK IT WAS THE CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF ROADS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH THE MONEY, AND THE CARS AND ALL THAT STUFF, SO THEY THREATENED TO LAY HIM OFF. HE TOOK THE MILITARY SERVICE SORT OF APPROACH TO “THEY CAN’T DO THIS TO ME,” AND SAVED HIS OWN JOB AND HIS OWN SKIN. SO, ALL THROUGH THE DEPRESSION, THEY HAD A CAR, WHICH WAS RARE. THE CAR THAT WAS PAID FOR BY SOMEBODY ELSE, SO THERE MUST HAVE BEEN SOMETHING. IT SEEMS ALMOST LIKE THE OLD BRITISH EMPIRE STYLE OF INFLUENCE THAT YOU WOULD HAVE, IF YOU WERE AN OFFICER IN THE ARMED FORCES, SO THAT PART I DO KNOW. MY GRANDFATHER DIDN’T TALK ABOUT ANYTHING EITHER. I DO KNOW ONE THING THOUGH. IT WAS INTERESTING THAT THEY WERE MORMONS, AND AFTER MY GRANDFATHER CAME BACK FROM WORLD WAR ONE, HE SORT OF ‘SPLIT THE SHEETS’.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “WELL, DOWNSIZING. I THINK THE FACT THAT IT HAS SAT IN DRAWERS AND BOXES, AND NOTHING MUCH HAS BEEN DONE WITH IT, AND, I ACTUALLY HAVE PLANNED TO DO A SMALL SORT OF CROSS SECTION OF WHAT I CONSIDERED TO BE MEANINGFUL THINGS THAT COME OUT OF IT, AND I THINK IT IS A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS].” “ACTUALLY, IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT…ESPECIALLY MY GRANDFATHER’S STUFF—THE SWORD AND THE BOOTS AND ALL OF THAT—HOW MANY GENERATIONS DO YOU SORT OF KEEP THAT FOR?” “MY BROTHER HAD PART OF [THE COLLECTION], AND THEN HE MOVED FROM THE HOUSE, TO A CONDO. THEN I ENDED UP WITH IT. MY SON IS NOT THAT INTERESTED IN THAT MATERIAL, AND, AS FAR AS ORAL TRADITION, THERE IS NONE, BECAUSE MY DAD NEVER SPOKE ABOUT THE WAR...[I ENDED UP WITH THE ENTIRE COLLECTION] I THINK IT’S BECAUSE I WAS IN A HOUSE, AND HE WAS DOWNSIZING…THEN, WHEN I MOVED OUT HERE AGAIN, WHAT DO I DO WITH ALL THIS STUFF?” THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S OBITUARY REPORTED THAT HE AND HUGH B. BROWN FOUNDED CARDSTON’S CAVALRY MILITIA UNIT, UNDER AN APPEAL FROM THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO THE CARDSTON DISTRICT IN 1909. IN 1911, A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE CONFIRMED WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S MEMBERSHIP WITH THE CARDSTON MILITIA, STATING THAT HE WAS A CAPTAIN IN CARDSTON’S “RED COATS”—THE “C” SQUADRON OF THE 23RD ALBERTA RANGERS. IN A 1916 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, AND ON WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S WORLD WAR 1 ATTESTATION PAPERS, WILLIAM GEORGE IS LISTED AS SERVING WITH THE RANGERS FOR 5 YEARS PRIOR TO ENLISTING WITH THE 13TH CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE. WILLIAM GEORGE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE LORD STRATHCONA’S HORSES. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, REED AINSCOUGH MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO BRANCH MANAGER OF CANADA LIFE IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, IN 1969 AND MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. REED AINSCOUGH WAS A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC LODGE, LODGE OF PERFECTION, ROSE CROIX, CONSISTORY, SHRINE, ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR, AND SERVED AS THE MASTER OF THE LODGE OF PERFECTION UNTIL 1977. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, REED AINSCOUGH WAS ALSO ACTIVE WITH THE FORT MACLEOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LIONS’ CLUB, HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND FORT MACLEOD MUSEUM DURING HIS TIME LIVING IN FORT MACLEOD. IN MEDICINE HAT, AISNCOUGH SERVED AS PRESIDENT OF THE HEART AND STROKE ASSOCIATION, AND ACTED AS A SENATOR FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE UPON MOVING TO THE CITY. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE MILITARY SERVICE FILES FOR WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH AND FRANK AINSCOUGH, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017007
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WINDSHIELD COVER
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
174
Width
82
Description
YELLOW COTTON-BLEND COVER WITH MACHINE-STITCHED EDGES; FRONT OF COVER HAS LOGO IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF WHITE SHIELD WITH RED BORDER, A WHITE ROSE WITH GREEN LEAVES ON YELOW CIRCLE ON SHIELD, AND RED TEXT “WHITE ROSE”. FRONT OF COVER HAS STENCILED GREEN TEXT AT TOP “DRIVE IN-“ AND RED STENCILED TEXT BELOW “LET US CLEAN YOUR WINDSHIELD!” BACK OF COVER IS WHITE COTTON-NYLON FABRIC. FRONT IS STAINED WITH TWO LARGE HOLES ON LEFT AND RIGHT WITH RIPS EXTENDING FROM HOLES; BACK IS STAINED; RIGHT EDGE FRAYED; COVER IS SEVERELY CREASED AND FOLDED. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
LAND TRANSPORTATION-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON AUGUST 22, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARY OBERG REGARDING HER DONATION OF AN AUTOMOBILE WINDSHIELD COVER. THE COVER WAS USED BY HER FATHER IN LETHBRIDGE. ON HER FATHER’S USE OF THE COVER, OBERG ELABORATED, “[I REMEMBER] HOW EMBARRASSING IT WAS THAT ALL THE OTHER DADS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD WOULD JUST GET OUT IN THE MORNING, AND SCRAPE THEIR WINDSHIELD OFF, BUT OUR DAD [JACK GRANT KEYS] HAD THIS BRIGHT YELLOW THING STRAPPED ONTO HIS WINDSHIELD TO KEEP THE SNOW OFF. AS CHILDREN, THE PEER PRESSURE WAS PRETTY INTENSE, AND WE WERE THE ONLY ONES ON THE STREET THAT HAD THIS GREAT BIG CANVAS THING ON THE FRONT OF OUR DAD’S CAR. WHEN WE MOVED TO EDMONTON, WE DIDN’T HAVE A GARAGE AT THAT POINT. AGAIN, THERE GOES THIS (EVEN THOUGH WHITE ROSE GASOLINE HAD BECOME OBSOLETE). MY DAD DIDN’T THROW TOO MANY THINGS OUT IF THEY STILL HAD A USEFUL PURPOSE, AND SO, THERE IT WAS, FRONT AND CENTER AGAIN–-THE ONLY GUY ON THE BLOCK. I DON’T KNOW WHY SOMEBODY DIDN’T COME UP WITH SOMETHING NOT QUITE SO OBVIOUS. IT WAS JUST AN EMBARRASSMENT THAT MY FATHER ALWAYS HAD TO COVER UP HIS WINDSHIELD.” “HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE [WHITE ROSE OIL COMPANY] PLANT. WELL, HE CALLED IT ‘THE PLANT’, BUT THEY DIDN’T MANUFACTURE ANY PRODUCTS THERE. THERE WERE BIG TANKS. I BELIEVE THEY WERE UP ON THIRD AVENUE SOUTH–-I WANT TO SAY IN THE AREA OF HARLEY-DAVIDSON. WE LIVED ON 18TH STREET, AND I KNOW THAT IT WAS STRAIGHT NORTH ON 18TH STREET, AND EITHER LEFT OR RIGHT. IT WAS IN THAT GENERAL AREA. IT WAS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE, [AND] HE WAS THE MANAGER OF THE PLANT. I THINK HE WAS EVEN THE ONLY EMPLOYEE, BUT HE USED TO GO AROUND IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TO ALL OF THE GAS STATIONS THAT WERE DEALING IN WHITE ROSE OIL, AND GET THEIR ORDERS…THEN, THERE MUST HAVE BEEN A DRIVER THAT WOULD COME AND FILL UP THEIR TANKER TRUCKS FROM WHERE HE WAS–-THE BULK STATION–-AND GO AND DELIVER IT. I KNOW THAT [DAD] WAS ON THE ROAD AN AWFUL LOT, BUT I DON’T RECALL, AS A CHILD, THAT THERE WERE OTHER EMPLOYEES, OTHER THAN THE TRUCK DRIVER.” “I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS THAT FOND OF HIS JOB. IN THE WINTER-TIME, IT WAS REALLY TOUGH. HE USED TO FREEZE HIS FINGERS, ON OCCASION, BECAUSE HE WAS THE ONE THAT HAD TO CLIMB UP THE STAIRCASE THAT WENT AROUND THESE BIG TANKS IN THE COLD OF WINTER, AND DO A DIP STICK TO MEASURE HOW MUCH FUEL WAS IN THE TANKS. WE DIDN’T HAVE SNOW BLOWERS…IT WAS TOUGH BECAUSE HE DID SPEND SOME TIME OUTSIDE, WITH HIS JOB, AND THEN [HAD] AN AWFUL LOT OF TIME ON THE ROADS. THERE WERE MANY TIMES THAT HE WOULD…BE STRANDED IN SMALL COMMUNITIES, BECAUSE OF BAD ROADS. OF COURSE HE WOULD HAVE PREFERRED TO BE HOME WITH HIS FAMILY. I DON’T RECALL THAT HE WAS REALLY ‘GUNG-HO’. I KNOW THAT SHELL TRIED TO GET HIM TO MOVE TO EDMONTON ON A FEW OCCASIONS, AND HE FLATLY REFUSED…WE MOVED IN ’63, SO IT WOULD HAVE BEEN MY GRANDMOTHER WAS ILL, AND DEALING WITH CANCER, AND IT WAS JUST A VERY INAPPROPRIATE TIME FOR US TO LEAVE. MY MOTHER WAS AN ONLY CHILD, SO THERE WERE NO OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS TO STAY AND LOOK AFTER HER. THEN, FINALLY SHELL SAID, “THIS IS YOUR FINAL CHOICE, AND THERE IS NO OPTION.” I GUESS IT WASN’T A CHOICE–-IT WAS EITHER MOVE, OR LOSE YOUR JOB. IT WAS A MATTER OF PUTTING IN TIME UNTIL HE RETIRED.” “MY DAD PASSED AWAY, AND WE ACQUIRED IT FROM HIS WIDOW…IT’S A SMALL PART OF MY DAD. I DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF THINGS [FROM HIM]. THIS WAS MY DAD’S THIRD MARRIAGE, WHEN HE PASSED, AND HIS FAMILY/HIS WIFE DISPOSED OF A LOT OF THINGS THAT WE [THE CHILDREN] POSSIBLY WOULD HAVE KEPT. THEY MEANT NOTHING TO HER, BUT THEY WERE LIVING OUT ON SALT SPRING ISLAND AT THE TIME. I WAS LIVING IN REGINA. MY BROTHER LIVED IN CHICAGO, AND MY SISTER LIVED IN CALIFORNIA. NONE OF US REALLY WANTED ‘THINGS’, LIKE FURNITURE, SO IT WAS JUST A LITTLE TRINKET THAT BROUGHT BACK SO MANY MEMORIES, AND IT WENT BACK AS FAR AS LETHBRIDGE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180021001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180021005
Acquisition Date
2018-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
STREET SIGN; "3RD AVENUE S."
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1952
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PORCELIN, ENAMEL, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160039002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
STREET SIGN; "3RD AVENUE S."
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1952
Materials
PORCELIN, ENAMEL, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
11.5
Length
53.5
Description
BLUE SIGN WITH ENAMEL BASE COVERED IN PORCELAIN THAT HAS BEEN BAKED TO THE SURFACE. "3RD AVENUE S. PAINTED IN WHITE BLOCK LETTERS OVER BLUE. 3 HOLES PUNCHED AT EACH THE TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES. EACH HOLE HAS A METAL RIVET. THE SIGN IS CURVED OUTWARDS TO THE FACE. THE BACK SIDE OF SIGN IS UNFINISHED AND LIGHT GREY IN COLOUR WITH THE BLUE GLAZE AROUND THE EDGES WHERE IT HAS RUN OVER FROM THE FRONT SIDE. CONDITION: THERE ARE IMPERFECTIONS IN OVERALL GLAZE ON THE SIGN AND A SIGNIFICANT LOSS OF THAT GLAZE AROUND THE EDGES.SLIGHT CHIPPING ALONG TOP. SURFACE SLIGHTLY SCUFFED OVERALL. GENERAL WEAR AROUND RIVETS.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
IN 2016, THE GALT MUSEUM APPROVED A PURCHASE OF TWO FORMER LETHBRIDGE STREET SIGNS – ONE FROM 5TH STREET SOUTH AND THE OTHER FROM 3RD AVENUE SOUTH. THEY WERE COLLECTED FROM AN ESTATE DISPERSAL AGENT, BRENT CUMMINS, WHO BOUGHT AND DISPERSED THE ESTATE OF THE LATE MR. MICHEAL VARZARI. AS STATED IN HIS OBITUARY, “[VAZARI] WAS A GREAT COLLECTOR OF RELICS FROM DAYS GONE BY…” THE ESTIMATED DATE OF ORIGIN FOR THE SIGNS IS 1910-11. AT THE TIME OF DONATION, THERE ARE IDENTICAL VERSIONS OF THESE SIGNS STILL INSTALLED ON THE CORNERS OF THE RESIDENCES AT 1505 - 4TH AVENUE SOUTH AND 920 – 9TH AVENUE SOUTH. THROUGH LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARCHIVAL RESEARCH IT WAS DETERMINED THAT THE ISSUE OF LETHBRIDGE’S USE OF STREET NAMES OVER STREET NUMBERS WAS RAISED AS EARLY AS 1907. STREETS ASSIGNED WITH NUMBERS OPPOSED TO NAMES WERE SEEN TO BE AN INDICATOR OF A MORE MODERN CITY. AN EDITORIAL IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON 11 APRIL 1908 SHEDS LIGHT INTO THE STREET SIGN SENTIMENTS OF THE EARLY DAYS OF THE CITY: “TWO OR THREE YEARS AGO THEY ORDERED STREET SIGNS. THEY CAME AND REPOSED PEACEFULLY IN THE DUSTY CORNERS OF THE FIRE HALL UNTIL IT DAWNED UPON THE MIND OF [AN] ALDERMAN… THAT IT WAS TIME THAT THE CITY STARTED USING THEM. ‘TWAS ORDERED THIS, AND NOW THEY ARE UP. NOW THE ALDERMEN ARE FEELING THE HUNCH THAT SOME PEOPLE HAVE HAD FOR A LONG TIME THAT THE STREETS SHOULD BE NUMBERED AND DIVIDED SYSTEMATICALLY INTO STREETS AND AVENUES… BUT IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO WASTE THE PRICE OF THOSE STREET SIGNS. SO I SUPPOSE THAT THE PRESENT AWKWARD SYSTEM WILL HOLD GOOD UNTIL THE SIGNS WEAR OUT... THE CHANGE SHOULD BE MADE BEFORE THE CITY PUTS IN ITS PERMANENT SIDEWALKS AND THEN THE NAMES COULD BE PUT IN THE CEMENT IN NICE COLORED CEMENT ALMOST AS PRETTY AS THE BEAUTIFUL BLUE AND WHITE SIGNS THAT ARE STUCK UP ALL OVER THE CITY WHERE THERE IS A CORNER BUILDING TO STICK THEM ON.” ON 18 JULY 1908, THE HERALD PUBLISHED AN ARTICLE THAT STATED, “THE WALKS ARE GOING AND ON THEM ARE BEING PLACED IN LARGE LETTERS THE NAMES OF THE STREETS NOT THE NUMBERS… NINETEEN OUT OF EVERY TWENTY PEOPLE IN THE CITY ARE IN FAVOR OF THE CHANGE [TO A NUMBER SYSTEM]… IF ANYONE IS NOT IN FAVOR OF IT LET HIM GO TO CALGARY AND SEE HOW EASY IT IS FOR HIM TO GO ANYWHERE HE WANTS WITHOUT POKING QUESTIONS AT EVERY ONE HE MEETS… IT’S A REGULAR SNAP.” THE DEBATE CONTINUED UNRESOLVED AND WAS REFERENCED AGAIN IN 1909 AS AN OBSTACLE TO THE CITY SECURING STREET MAIL DELIVERY. ON 8 FEBRUARY 1910, THE HERALD SAID: “… IS IT NOT ABOUT TIME THE CITY COUNCIL WERE ADOPTING THE METHOD IN HAVING THE STREETS AND AVENUES NUMBERED SYSTEMATICALLY? THE HERALD HAS ADVOCATED THIS CHANGE IN SEASON AND OUT OF SEASON ALMOST TO WEARINESS. SUPT. ROSS OF THE POSTAL SERVICE NOW ADVOCATES A MORE MODERN SYSTEM AND SAYS IT WOULD AID VERY MATERIALLY IN THE SUCCESSFUL WORKING OF THE SERVICE.” AND ON 4 OCTOBER 1910, IT IS PUBLISHED THAT “THE HERALD HAS SEEN ONE MORE OF THE THINGS IT HAS ADVOCATED BROUGHT TO PASS. THE STREETS AND AVENUES ARE NUMBERED.” BY THE LATE 40S, STREET SIGNS WERE IN THE NEWS ONCE MORE, SPECIFICALLY THE NEED FOR MORE OF THEM, AS THE CITY GRAPPLED WITH ITS EXPANDING URBAN FOOTPRINT. BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLECTOR COMES FROM HIS OBITUARY, WHICH STATES MICHAEL ARTHUR “COUTTSO” VARZARI WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE ON 17 NOVEMBER 1929 AND “WAS RAISED ‘DOWN NUMBER THREE.’” THE OBITUARY GOES ON SAYING, “HE ALWAYS ATTRIBUTED HIS STRONG AND SOLID WORK ETHIC AND HIS APPRECIATION FOR THE SIMPLE THINGS IN LIFE TO HIS UPBRINGING ‘DOWN NUMBER THREE’.” HE WORKED FROM THE GROUND UP IN THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT, FIRST AS AN APPRENTICE, THEN AS A “FULL-FLEDGED ELECTRICIAN,” AND HE RETIRED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF CONSTRUCTION. VARZARI’S BROTHER WAS GEORGE VARZARI WHO WAS THE OWNER AND PRESIDENT OF NATIONAL SALVAGE, A BUSINESS HE STARTED AROUND 1951. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING IN-DEPTH LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE CITY’S STREET SIGNS.
Catalogue Number
P20160039002
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
STREET SIGN; "5TH STREET S."
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1952
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ENAMEL, PORCELAIN, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160039001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
STREET SIGN; "5TH STREET S."
Date Range From
1910
Date Range To
1952
Materials
ENAMEL, PORCELAIN, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
11.5
Length
53.5
Description
BLUE SIGN WITH ENAMEL BASE COVERED IN PORCELAIN THAT HAS BEEN BAKED TO THE SURFACE. "5TH STREET S" PAINTED IN WHITE BLOCK LETTERS OVER BLUE. 3 HOLES PUNCHED AT EACH THE TOP AND BOTTOM EDGES. EACH HOLE HAS A METAL RIVET. THE SIGN IS CURVED OUTWARDS TO THE FACE. THE BACK SIDE OF SIGN IS UNFINISHED AND LIGHT GREY IN COLOUR WITH THE BLUE GLAZE AROUND THE EDGES WHERE IT HAS RUN OVER FROM THE FRONT SIDE. CONDITION: TOP CENTER RIVET IS MISSING. AROUND THAT CENTER HOLE THERE IS A LOSS OF THE PORCELAIN INTO THE "TR" OF "STREET". THERE ARE IMPERFECTIONS IN OVERALL GLAZE ON THE SIGN AND A SIGNIFICANT LOSS OF THAT GLAZE AROUND THE EDGES. WHITE PAINT ON TOP OF FINISHED PAINT ON THE UPPER RIGHT SECTION OF SIGN. SLIGHT CHIPPING ALONG TOP. GENERAL WEAR AROUND RIVETS. BACK SIDE HAS LOSS OF THE PORCELAIN OVERALL AND A DUST/ROUGH MATERIAL STUCK TO THE SURFACE.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
IN 2016, THE GALT MUSEUM APPROVED A PURCHASE OF TWO FORMER LETHBRIDGE STREET SIGNS – ONE FROM 5TH STREET SOUTH AND THE OTHER FROM 3RD AVENUE SOUTH. THEY WERE COLLECTED FROM AN ESTATE DISPERSAL AGENT, BRENT CUMMINS, WHO BOUGHT AND DISPERSED THE ESTATE OF THE LATE MR. MICHEAL VARZARI. AS STATED IN HIS OBITUARY, “[VAZARI] WAS A GREAT COLLECTOR OF RELICS FROM DAYS GONE BY…” THE ESTIMATED DATE OF ORIGIN FOR THE SIGNS IS 1910-11. AT THE TIME OF DONATION, THERE ARE IDENTICAL VERSIONS OF THESE SIGNS STILL INSTALLED ON THE CORNERS OF THE RESIDENCES AT 1505 - 4TH AVENUE SOUTH AND 920 – 9TH AVENUE SOUTH. THROUGH LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARCHIVAL RESEARCH IT WAS DETERMINED THAT THE ISSUE OF LETHBRIDGE’S USE OF STREET NAMES OVER STREET NUMBERS WAS RAISED AS EARLY AS 1907. STREETS ASSIGNED WITH NUMBERS OPPOSED TO NAMES WERE SEEN TO BE AN INDICATOR OF A MORE MODERN CITY. AN EDITORIAL IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED ON 11 APRIL 1908 SHEDS LIGHT INTO THE STREET SIGN SENTIMENTS OF THE EARLY DAYS OF THE CITY: “TWO OR THREE YEARS AGO THEY ORDERED STREET SIGNS. THEY CAME AND REPOSED PEACEFULLY IN THE DUSTY CORNERS OF THE FIRE HALL UNTIL IT DAWNED UPON THE MIND OF [AN] ALDERMAN… THAT IT WAS TIME THAT THE CITY STARTED USING THEM. ‘TWAS ORDERED THIS, AND NOW THEY ARE UP. NOW THE ALDERMEN ARE FEELING THE HUNCH THAT SOME PEOPLE HAVE HAD FOR A LONG TIME THAT THE STREETS SHOULD BE NUMBERED AND DIVIDED SYSTEMATICALLY INTO STREETS AND AVENUES… BUT IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO WASTE THE PRICE OF THOSE STREET SIGNS. SO I SUPPOSE THAT THE PRESENT AWKWARD SYSTEM WILL HOLD GOOD UNTIL THE SIGNS WEAR OUT... THE CHANGE SHOULD BE MADE BEFORE THE CITY PUTS IN ITS PERMANENT SIDEWALKS AND THEN THE NAMES COULD BE PUT IN THE CEMENT IN NICE COLORED CEMENT ALMOST AS PRETTY AS THE BEAUTIFUL BLUE AND WHITE SIGNS THAT ARE STUCK UP ALL OVER THE CITY WHERE THERE IS A CORNER BUILDING TO STICK THEM ON.” ON 18 JULY 1908, THE HERALD PUBLISHED AN ARTICLE THAT STATED, “THE WALKS ARE GOING AND ON THEM ARE BEING PLACED IN LARGE LETTERS THE NAMES OF THE STREETS NOT THE NUMBERS… NINETEEN OUT OF EVERY TWENTY PEOPLE IN THE CITY ARE IN FAVOR OF THE CHANGE [TO A NUMBER SYSTEM]… IF ANYONE IS NOT IN FAVOR OF IT LET HIM GO TO CALGARY AND SEE HOW EASY IT IS FOR HIM TO GO ANYWHERE HE WANTS WITHOUT POKING QUESTIONS AT EVERY ONE HE MEETS… IT’S A REGULAR SNAP.” THE DEBATE CONTINUED UNRESOLVED AND WAS REFERENCED AGAIN IN 1909 AS AN OBSTACLE TO THE CITY SECURING STREET MAIL DELIVERY. ON 8 FEBRUARY 1910, THE HERALD SAID: “… IS IT NOT ABOUT TIME THE CITY COUNCIL WERE ADOPTING THE METHOD IN HAVING THE STREETS AND AVENUES NUMBERED SYSTEMATICALLY? THE HERALD HAS ADVOCATED THIS CHANGE IN SEASON AND OUT OF SEASON ALMOST TO WEARINESS. SUPT. ROSS OF THE POSTAL SERVICE NOW ADVOCATES A MORE MODERN SYSTEM AND SAYS IT WOULD AID VERY MATERIALLY IN THE SUCCESSFUL WORKING OF THE SERVICE.” AND ON 4 OCTOBER 1910, IT IS PUBLISHED THAT “THE HERALD HAS SEEN ONE MORE OF THE THINGS IT HAS ADVOCATED BROUGHT TO PASS. THE STREETS AND AVENUES ARE NUMBERED.” BY THE LATE 40S, STREET SIGNS WERE IN THE NEWS ONCE MORE, SPECIFICALLY THE NEED FOR MORE OF THEM, AS THE CITY GRAPPLED WITH ITS EXPANDING URBAN FOOTPRINT. BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLECTOR COMES FROM HIS OBITUARY, WHICH STATES MICHAEL ARTHUR “COUTTSO” VARZARI WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE ON 17 NOVEMBER 1929 AND “WAS RAISED ‘DOWN NUMBER THREE.’” THE OBITUARY GOES ON SAYING, “HE ALWAYS ATTRIBUTED HIS STRONG AND SOLID WORK ETHIC AND HIS APPRECIATION FOR THE SIMPLE THINGS IN LIFE TO HIS UPBRINGING ‘DOWN NUMBER THREE’.” HE WORKED FROM THE GROUND UP IN THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE’S ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT, FIRST AS AN APPRENTICE, THEN AS A “FULL-FLEDGED ELECTRICIAN,” AND HE RETIRED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF CONSTRUCTION. VARZARI’S BROTHER WAS GEORGE VARZARI WHO WAS THE OWNER AND PRESIDENT OF NATIONAL SALVAGE, A BUSINESS HE STARTED AROUND 1951. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING IN-DEPTH LETHBRIDGE HERALD RESEARCH REGARDING THE CITY’S STREET SIGNS.
Catalogue Number
P20160039001
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1957
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, VINYL, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170005002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1957
Materials
FABRIC, VINYL, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.5
Length
25.5
Diameter
19.5
Description
BLACK CONDUCTOR’S HAT WITH GOLD ACCENTS; BLACK VINYL BRIM WITH GREEN COLOURED FABRIC ON BOTTOM; TWO PARALLEL GOLD-COLOURED BANDS STITCHED ONTO HAT; “CPR CONDUCTOR” IS STITCHED ONTO FRONT OF HAT IN A BRONZE-COLOURED THREAD; TWO BLACK EYELETS LOCATED ON BOTH SIDES OF THE HAT. INSIDE IS LINED WITH GREY FABRIC. INSIDE TAG READS "4 - SCULLY 7 1/8 MONTREAL" PRINTED IN BLACK INK. THE "4" HAS BEEN CROSSED OUT AND "5" HAS BEEN WRITTEN BY HAND BOTH IN BLUE INK. TAN LEATHER RIM AROUND THE INSIDE CIRCUMFERENCE OF HAT. GOOD CONDITION: WHITE BAND INSIDE OF HAT BRIM IS STAINED GREY; PIECES OF YELLOWED PAPER ARE STUCK INTO BOTH SIDES OF THE HAT; CIRCULAR-SHAPED INDENT IS PRESENT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TOP OF THE HAT. SEVERE WEAR/STAIN IN CENTER OF THE INSIDE OF HAT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
THIS CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (CPR) CONDUCTOR CAP BELONGED TO JAMES (JIM) FRANCES LOGAN, WHO WORKED FOR THE CPR IN LETHBRIDGE FOR FORTY-FOUR YEARS FOLLOWING WORLD WAR I. IN A PHONE CALL THAT TOOK PLACE ON JULY 16, 2018 BETWEEN LOGAN'S GRANDSON, CALVIN LOGAN AND GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN, CALVIN LOGAN STATED HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED FOR CPR FROM 1913 TO 1957. ON MARCH 9, 2017 MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CALVIN LOGAN, WHO HAD POSSESSION OF THE CAP AT THE TIME OF DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “MY FATHER (DENZIL LOGAN) GAVE ME THIS HAT PROBABLY FIFTEEN YEARS AGO. IT CAME FROM HIS FATHER, JAMES FRANCES LOGAN… MY DAD FELT IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT THAT I HAVE SOMETHING, A KEEPSAKE, OF MY GRANDFATHER’S AND WITH THAT, I’VE ALWAYS ADMIRED [THE CAP]. I REMEMBER IT IN MY FATHER’S POSSESSION, IN HIS HOUSE. [THE CAP WAS] ON A SHELF IN HIS STUDY." "MY GRANDFATHER LIVED HERE SINCE THE EARLY 1900’S AND MY DAD WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1926, SO THIS HAT KIND OF HAS A REAL SIGNIFICANCE FOR ME IN LETHBRIDGE," LOGAN EXPLAINED, "MY GRANDFATHER WAS VERY PROUD TO HAVE WORKED FOR THE CPR FOR WELL OVER FORTY YEARS AND WAS VERY PROUD OF HIS POSITION AND ROLE IN THE CPR." “I WOULD BE OVER AT [MY GRANDPARENTS] HOME; GRANDMA WOULD THERE AND [GRANDPA] WOULD BE ON THE ROAD,” LOGAN SAID AS HE RECALLED HIS EARLIEST MEMORIES OF HIS GRANDFATHER AND THE CPR, “HE ALSO WOULD ALWAYS BE WEARING OVERALLS AND I AM STILL A PERSON THAT LOVES TO WEAR OVERALLS TOO. THE FIRST PAIR OF OVERALLS [I HAD] WHEN I GOT TO BE OLDER WERE FROM MY GRANDFATHER. THEY WERE BLUE AND WHITE STRIPED OVERALLS. HE HAD LOTS OF PAIRS OF THEM FROM HIS DAYS AT THE CPR. I HAVE INHERITED THAT KIND OF TRADITION FROM MY GRANDFATHER, I GUESS.” “MY OTHER MEMORY [WOULD BE] WHEN I GOT TO BE PROBABLY SEVEN OR EIGHT WHEN [CPR] OFFERED OUR FAMILY TO RIDE THE LAST ACTUAL PASSENGER TRAIN THAT RAN FROM LETHBRIDGE TO CALGARY. THE IMMEDIATE FAMILY MEMBERS OF MY GRANDFATHER WERE INVITED TO JOIN HIM ON THE TRAIN. WE GOT TO RIDE FROM LETHBRIDGE, OVER THE HIGH LEVEL BRIDGE, TO CALGARY AND BACK AGAIN… THAT IS THE ONLY TRIP AS A KID THAT I DO REMEMBER." "ANOTHER ONE OF MY MEMORIES," LOGAN CONTINUED, "IS OF THE TRAIN THAT THEY HAD AT GALT GARDENS. I WOULD IMAGINE MYSELF AS A CONDUCTOR AND BACK THEN YOU COULD GO RIGHT INSIDE THE TRAIN. ONE MINUTE I WAS THE ENGINEER AND THE NEXT MINUTE I WAS THE CONDUCTOR. I WAS TRYING TO IMAGINE MYSELF AS A TRAIN PERSON AND WORKING WITH THE ENGINES SO LARGE AND JUST HOW COOL IT WOULD BE AS A KID GROWING UP THINKING OF MYSELF WORKING ON THESE BIG HUGE STEAM ENGINE TRAINS." "[WHEN I WAS YOUNG], I WANTED TO SEE WHERE [MY GRANDFATHER] WAS WORKING AND WHAT HE DID, BUT OFTEN TIMES IT WAS VERY DIFFICULT TO DO THAT BECAUSE OF THE TYPE OF JOB HE HAD. MY LAST MEMORIES OF THE RUN THAT HE HAD WERE FROM WHEN HE WORKED AS A CONDUCTOR IN THE REGULAR RUN FROM LETHBRIDGE TO YAK AND THEN IT WAS A RETURN TRIP FROM YAK TO LETHBRIDGE. THAT WAS THE LAST ROUTE HE WAS RUNNING BEFORE HE RETIRED,” LOGAN RECALLED. “I’D ALWAYS FELT A CONNECTION [TO TRAINS],” LOGAN CONTINUED, “NOT ONLY THROUGH MY GRANDFATHER, BUT ALSO THROUGH MY FATHER. A GREAT DEAL OF LIVESTOCK WAS HAULED IN THOSE DAYS THROUGH TRAIN AND FOR MANY OF THE PUBLIC YARDS ACROSS CANADA, TRAINS WERE THEIR WAY OF SHIPPING CATTLE TO DIFFERENT AREAS FOR PROCESSING. EVERY DAY OF [MY DAD’S] WORK WAS LOADING BOXCARS WITH CATTLE. I WAS AROUND THE YARDS PROBABLY MORE THAN MOST KIDS, BECAUSE MY DAD ON A SATURDAY OR SUNDAY WOULD HAVE TO STOP IN AT THE YARDS. I WOULD ALWAYS BE THE FIRST ONE IN THE CAR TO COME WITH HIM, I SAW MANY A CATTLE LOADED UP INTO THE BOXCARS. MY CLEARER MEMORIES [OF THE RAILWAY YARDS] WERE MORE SO OF MY FATHER’S CONNECTION WITH THE RAILWAY. [I ALSO REMEMBER] THERE WERE TIMES WHEN THERE WERE TRAIN ACCIDENTS [MY FATHER WOULD BE] CALLED OUT.” LOGAN WENT ON TO DESCRIBE HIS GRANDFATHER’S HISTORY, “MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN IN POTSDAM, NEW YORK. [AROUND THAT TIME] THERE WAS A LOT OF OPPORTUNITY IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. I THINK THE REASON MY GRANDFATHER ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE WAS BECAUSE HIS FATHER HAD ACQUIRED LAND HERE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA… [MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER] OWNED QUITE A NUMBER OF ACRES IN THAT AREA OF LETHBRIDGE. SO AS FAR AS THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF HOW THEY ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE, I DON’T REALLY KNOW THAT PART OF IT, BUT I DO KNOW THAT MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER DID OWN A FARM AND IT WAS A PART OF THE FAIRWAY PLAZA AREA TODAY.” AN ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN THE APRIL 6TH, 1944 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD LISTED JAMES LOGAN JR. AS ONE OF THE EIGHT REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE CRANBROOK SECTION OF C.P.R. EMPLOYEES (FROM THE TERRITORY COVERING CROW’S NEST TO CRESTON) TO ATTEND A PROVINCIAL C. P. R. MEETING ABOUT VICTORY BOND SALE METHODS IN VANCOUVER. JAMES FRANCIS LOGAN’S OBITUARY WAS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1983. IT READS: “LOGAN PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE ON MAY 8TH, 1983 AT THE AGE OF 90 YEARS, BELOVED HUSBAND OF MRS. DOROTHY LOGAN… MR. LOGAN WAS BORN MAY 9TH, 1892 AT OGDENSBURG, NEW YORK AND CAME TO CANADA AND LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, WHERE HE FIRST WORKED IN THE MINES. HE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE 20TH BATTERY FROM 1914 TO 1918 AND WAS THE LAST SURVIVING MEMBER OF 25TH CANADIAN FIELD ARTILLERY. HE WORKED FOR THE C. P. R. FOR 44 YEARS AND AT THE TIME OF HIS RETIREMENT WAS A CONDUCTOR.” FOR INFORMATION ABOUT J. F. LOGAN’S EXPERIENCE DURING WORLD WAR I, PLEASE SEE ARCHIVES ACCESSION NUMBER 19861018001. PLEASE REFERENCE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD CLIPPINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20170005002
Acquisition Date
2017-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160008001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
WOOD, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
38.3
Length
121.5
Width
4.6
Description
SIGN. WOOD AND METAL. BORDER OF SIGN IS PAINTED MEDIUM/DARK BROWN. MAIN PORTION OF SIGN IS GOLDEN ROD YELLOW, WITH BLACK LETTERING. TEXT READS: “A SAFE WORKER IS A VALUABLE EMPLOYEE”. TWO METAL BRACKETS FOR HANGING ATTACH TO BACK OF SIGN. EACH BRACKET ATTACHES TO THE BACK WITH TWO FLAT HEADED BOLTS, WHICH ARE VISIBLE ON THE YELLOW SIDE OF THE SIGN. NUTS HOLD THE BOLTS ON THE BACK. HANDWRITTEN IN BLUE INK ON BOTTOM LEFT SIDE “317-9353”. REVERSE OF SIGN IS UNFINISHED DARK, ROUGH PINE BORDER. OVERALL IN GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION. SIGN IS VERY DIRTY. SOME OF BROWN PAINT AROUND BORDER HAS SCRATCHED OFF, REVEALING BLACK PAINT UNDERNEATH.
Subjects
VISUAL COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
SAFETY SERVICES
TRANSPORTATION
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A SERIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND AN INTERVIEW WITH THE DONOR CONDUCTED BY KEVIN MACLEAN. FROM JOHN’S INTERVIEW: JOHN STARTED WORKING AT THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP, AB IN 1992. HE DESCRIBED HOW IT WAS THAT HE CAME TO WORK THERE: “I WAS WORKING AS A SEASONAL MACHINE OPERATOR ON THE PACIFIC REGION, WHICH MEANT THAT IN THE SPRINGTIME EVERY YEAR, I GENERALLY START OUT SOMEWHERE NEAR THE FRASER CANYON AND OVER THE COURSE OF THE YEAR I’D WORK ANYWHERE FROM THERE TO SWIFT CURRENT AND FROM THE U.S. BORDER AS FAR NORTH AS [THE CPR HAD TRACKS, TO ROUGHLY ST. PAUL, AB]. THE LENGTH OF MY YEAR’S EMPLOYMENT WOULD BE DETERMINED IN MY SENIORITY AND THE AMOUNT OF WORK THAT WAS AVAILABLE. I WAS REAL TIRED OF BEING ON THE ROAD. THE YEAR PREVIOUSLY, THERE’D BEEN A TEMPORARY JOB – A COUPLE OF TEMPORARY JOBS THAT WERE BULLETINED AT THE FROG SHOP IN THE FALL, PROCESSING SOME SCRAP MATERIAL THAT WAS THERE. A FRIEND AND MINE BID THOSE JOBS AND GOT THEM. THAT MEANT WE WERE ON THE SHOP’S SENIORITY LIST AND WHEN THE OPPORTUNITY AROSE, THERE WAS A POSITION THERE BULLETINED – ACTUALLY A COUPLE OF POSITIONS BULLETINED THERE – MY FRIEND AND I BID THEM TO BE ABLE TO BE AT HOME AND HAVE A YEAR ROUND JOB. MIGHT NOT HAVE BEEN THE BEST IDEA EVER, BUT IT WAS GOOD TO BE HOME AND SLEEP IN MY OWN BED AT NIGHT AND WAKE UP AND SEE MY HORSES IN THE MORNING.” JOHN REMOVED THIS SIGN FROM HIS WORKPLACE WHEN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY ELECTED TO CLOSE THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP IN THE SPRING OF 2002. JOHN’S SUPERVISOR, GUY MITCHELL, KNEW THAT HE HAD AN INTEREST IN HISTORY AND OLD THINGS AND ALLOWED JOHN TO TAKE SOME ITEMS HOME. JOHN RECOUNTED THE EXPERIENCE: “WHEN I ASKED [GUY] WHAT WAS TO BECOME OF THE [SAFE WORKER] SIGN HE SAID, ‘YOU CAN HAVE IT, JOHN. THEY’LL JUST THROW IT AWAY. IT’S JUST JUNK AS FAR AS ANYONE ELSE CONCERNED.’ I ASKED HIM, ‘GEE, COULD I HAVE THE LITTLE PLAQUE OFF THE DOOR?’ AND HE SAID, ‘OF COURSE, YEAH, TAKE IT. IT’S GOING TO GET – SOMEONE ELSE WILL KNOCK IT OFF AND IT’LL GET BROKEN. SO MUCH THE BETTER. YOU WANNA SEE IT HANG IN THERE, GO FOR IT. IT’S ALL YOURS.’” JOHN EXPLAINED THAT THIS SIGN HUNG ON THE WALL: “IT WAS HANGING ON THE WALL WELL ABOVE THE DOORWAY, AND [I] PUT A LADDER UP AND TOOK THE TWO BIG SCREWS OUT OF THE WALL THAT HELD IT IN PLACE, AND TOOK THE TWO LITTLE TINY SCREWS OUT OF THE DOORWAY THAT HELD THE FROG SHOP SIGN IN PLACE. THAT WAS ONE OF THE LAST DAY – I THINK IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN EVEN THE LAST DAY THAT WE WERE THERE – AS I RECALL THAT’S THE CASE.” JOHN EXPLAINED WHY HE WAS SO INTERESTED IN THIS PARTICULAR SIGN: “BUT THE SIGN WAS SIGNIFICANT TO ME IN IT OF ITSELF GIVEN THAT WE SOMETIMES JOKED THAT THAT WAS THE ENTIRETY FOR A LONG TIME OF THE RAILWAY’S SAFETY PROGRAM – WAS A SIGN LIKE THIS. ON ALL THE MIRRORS IN ALL OF THE EMPLOYEES’ BATHROOMS, GOING BACK AT LEAST WHEN I FIRST WORKED FOR THE RAILWAY THE SUMMER OUT OF THE UNIVERSITY IN 1975, THE MIRRORS WERE ALL PAINTED WITH A SIGN ABOVE - AT THE TOP AND THE BOTTOM OF THE MIRROR THAT SAID, “YOU’RE LOOKING AT THE MAN MOST RESPONSIBLE YOUR SAFETY.” THOSE WERE QUITE OFTEN CHANGED BY EMPLOYEES TO SAY SOMETHING QUITE DIFFERENT, BUT YEAH, IT WAS SOMETHING OF A JOKE.” HE WENT ON FURTHER, SAYING THAT IN 1978 HE AND A FRIEND LOOKED INTO THE OLD ROUNDHOUSE AT THE RAIL YARD IN LETHBRIDGE AND “WAS MORTIFIED” TO SEE THE WORKING CONDITIONS: “WE PULLED UP BEHIND THE OLD ROUNDHOUSE IN THE OLD YARD HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, AND LOOKED IN THE DOORWAY. THAT’S AS MUCH AS I KNOW OF THE OLD ROUNDHOUSE, AND I WAS MORTIFIED TO SEE MEN WORKING IN A POORLY VENTILATED, ANCIENT, REALLY FALLING APART BUILDING. MORE PIGEONS THAN PEOPLE INSIDE, IN A CLOUD OF DUST AND WELDING SMOKE THAT YOU COULD NOT SEE THROUGH. THAT’S WHERE THIS SIGN CAME FROM.” IN COMPARISON, THE WORKING CONDITIONS IN THE KIPP FROG SHOP WERE MUCH BETTER, BUT JOHN EXPLAINS THAT THERE WERE STILL PROBLEMS: “WHEN I WENT TO WORK AT THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP IN EARLY ’92, A GREAT NUMBER OF PEOPLE WORKING THERE, AND THEN THERE WERE ONLY 12 EMPLOYEES THERE AND A SUPERVISOR, HAD WORKED THERE. CONSEQUENTLY, THAT FACILITY WAS LIGHT YEARS BEYOND WHERE THEY WORKED PREVIOUSLY, AND THEY’RE PRETTY COMFORTABLE IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT. THEY FELT THAT, YOU KNOW, THEY WERE DOING PRETTY WELL. THERE WERE A NUMBER OF US OVER THE COURSE OF THE NEXT COUPLE OF YEARS THAT CAME TO WORK THERE THAT HAD PREVIOUSLY WORKED ON THE SEASONAL WORK CREWS, AS MACHINE OPERATORS, WERE HAPPY TO HAVE A FULL TIME, YEAR-ROUND JOB. IT WASN’T A VERY PLEASANT PLACE TO WORK. IT WAS VERY DUSTY, VERY NOISY, AND DESPITE A RELATIVELY DECENT WELDING FUME VENTILATION SYSTEM, IT WASN’T A GOOD PLACE TO BE. AND WE LOOKED AT THE SIGN EVERY DAY AS YOU WALKED OUT. IN THE COURSE OF READING THE MSDS ON THE WELDING WIRE AND THE WELDING ROD WE USED, AFTER I WORKED THERE FOR MAYBE A YEAR OR SO – MAYBE A COUPLE YEARS – I SAW THAT THE WELDING WIRE MANUFACTURER – WELL THE WELDING ROD MANUFACTURER – SUGGESTED THAT PEOPLE HAVE AT LEAST ANNUAL BLOOD TESTS TO DETERMINE THEIR BLOOD LEVELS OF HEAVY METALS, IN PARTICULAR MANGANESE.” JOHN EXPLAINED THAT TOO MUCH MAGNESIUM IN THE HUMAN BODY CAN MIMIC PARKINSON’S DISEASE, A CONDITION CALLED PARKINSONISM. SUMPTION PUSHED FOR BLOOD TESTING TO BE DONE IN THE 1990S: “THAT STARTED US DOWN THE ROAD THAT RESULTED IN A STUDY BEING DONE BY A GROUP OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE SPECIALISTS FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY, INCLUDING OF THE FOREMOST – THE WORLD’S MOST FOREMOST – MOVEMENT DISORDER SPECIALIST … . CONSEQUENTLY, WE ALL SPENT TWO DAYS IN CALGARY, GOT MRI, GOT BLOOD TESTS, AND THEREAFTER WERE REGULARLY SUBJECTED TO URINE TESTS.” THE RESULTS OF ALL OF THIS TESTING: “CONSEQUENTLY, THE VENTILATION SYSTEM WAS IMPROVED, THE DUST CAPTURE SYSTEM WAS IMPROVED FOR THE GRINDING PROCEDURES, AND ALL EMPLOYEES WORE POWER PURIFIED AIR RESPIRATORS THEREAFTER. SO WE HAD A MUCH SAFER WORK ENVIRONMENT.” JOHN NEVER SAW THIS SIGN HANGING IN THE ROUNDHOUSE AND HAD THE FOLLOWING TO SAY: “IT’S FAR TOO OLD TO HAVE BEEN MADE FOR THE FROG SHOP IN 1982. WHEN YOU LOOK AT THESE … BOLTS – HAVEN’T SEEN THEM DO LIKE THAT IN AN AWFUL LONG TIME. THIS IS HAND-PUNCHED – THIS IS HAND-CUT AND HAND-PUNCHED. LOOT AT THE WIDTH OF THE PINE PLANK THAT IT’S ON. IT’S NOT REGULAR, OLD CPR RED. THEY DIDN’T BUY THINGS. THEY ARE NOTORIOUSLY CHEAP. I REMEMBER THIS YELLOW PAINT. THIS IS THE SAME YELLOW PAINT THAT THEY PAINTED THEIR MOTOR CARS WITH – THE LITTLE, FREEZE-YOUR-ASS-OFF TRACK MOBILES WE USED TO TRAVEL ON WHEN WE’RE WORKING ON THE TRACK. YEAH, I WAS TOLD THAT. BUT I KNOW THEY WOULDN’T HAVE A SIGN PAINTED. I KNOW THEY WOULDN’T BUY ONE FROM ANYONE. AND THAT WAS WHAT I WAS TOLD BY ALL THE PEOPLE THAT I WORKED WITH THERE; SOME OF WHOM HAD A GREAT MANY YEARS. AND THERE WERE A COUPLE OLD GUYS THAT I WORKED WITH THAT RETIRED AT 35 YEARS, SHORTLY AFTER I ARRIVED IN THE FROG SHOP THERE IN ’92.” JOHN DESCRIBED WHERE THE SIGN HUNG IN THE FROG SHOP IN KIPP: “IT HUNG IN THE DOORWAY THAT LEAD OUT OF THE SHOP INTO THE HALLWAY INTO OUR CHANGE ROOM. I LOOKED AT IT EVERY DAY, AT LUNCHTIME, COFFEE TIME.” JOHN ADDED THE FOLLOWING ABOUT WORKER SAFETY: “I JUST THINK THAT THIS IS TO ME ILLUSTRATIVE OF HOW FAR WE’VE COME WHEN IT COMES TO WORKERS’ SAFETY. AND WHEN YOU TAKE A LOOK AROUND TODAY OF HOW HORRIFYINGLY FAR WE HAVE TO GO. TO THINK THAT THERE ARE PEOPLE, WHAT LESS THAN TWO WEEKS AGO, STANDING IN FRONT OF THE LEGISLATURE IN EDMONTON FIGHTING THE NOTION THAT FARM WORKERS IN ALBERTA SHOULD HAVE THE SAME PROTECTION THAT THEY DO EVERYWHERE ELSE IN THE COUNTRY AND HAVE FOR YEARS AND YEARS. TOO MANY PEOPLE DIE GOING TO WORK. IT’S TOO EASY TO HAPPEN AND IT’S EVEN EASIER NOW. IT’S SCARY TO THINK OF YOUNG PEOPLE. I’VE WORKED WITH LOTS OF YOUNG PEOPLE AS THE YEARS HAVE GONE ON. I’M OLD. I KNOW OLD PEOPLE - OLDER PEOPLE - LOOKED OUT FOR ME AND HELPED ME; AND I’M REALLY FORTUNATE FOR THAT. BUT IN THIS HURRY-UP WORLD, NOW AND PARTICULARLY AS YOU SEE UNION MEMBERSHIP DECLINING AND IT BECOMING MORE AND MORE DIFFICULT TO OBTAIN A UNION CONTRACT, TO RATIFY A UNION VOTE, GEE I DON’T WANT TO SEE ANYONE - ANYBODY ELSE GET HURT. AND I HOPE THAT THAT GETS BETTER. BECAUSE I’VE SEEN REALLY BAD THINGS HAPPEN TO PEOPLE AND IT WASN’T BECAUSE THEY WERE DUMB AND IT WASN’T BECAUSE THEY WERE CARELESS. FAR TOO OFTEN IT WAS BECAUSE THEY JUST DIDN’T KNOW AND SOMEBODY WHO SHOULD KNOW BETTER DIDN’T GET IN LINE.” RELOCATING THE RAIL YARDS TO KIPP IS COVERED IN DETAIL IN SEVERAL LETHBRIDGE HERALD NEWSPAPER ARTICLES, ESPECIALLY IN THE PERIOD OF 1980 TO 1982. THESE ARTICLES TEND TO FOCUS ON THE BENEFIT FOR THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE AND THE ABILITY TO REDEVELOP THE YARDS. FOR EXAMPLE, AN OCTOBER 10, 1980 ARTICLE DISCUSSES REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES: “THERE MUST BE A GOOD CORRIDOR WITH A DIVIDED HIGHWAY THROUGH THE CITY TO ACCOMMODATE BOTH TRAFFIC THAT DOESN’T WANT TO STOP AND TRAFFIC THAT WANTS TO GET OFF AT DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE. RAILWAY RELOCATION GIVES ROOM FOR SUCH A CORRIDOR FROM THE RAILWAY BRIDGE THROUGH TO 13TH ST.” FOR MORE DETAILS, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE. FOR COPIES OF NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND FOR A TRANSCRIPT OF THE INTERVIEW, PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20160008001
Acquisition Date
2016-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20150013006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Height
53.5
Length
33.2
Width
25.5
Description
CREAM AND BLUE PLAID, TERRY CLOTH BIB. BOTTOM HALF OF BIB HAS A 9.5CM BLUE STRIPE. IN THE CENTRE OF THE STRIPE ARE THE WORDS "GOOD BOY" WITH FLOWERS ON EITHER SIDE. BIB TIES AROUND NECK WITH TWO ATTACHED CREAM COLOURED TIES. MEASUREMENTS OF BIB FROM TIE TIP TO BOTTOM IS 53.5CM, WHILE BIB ITSELF IS ONLY 33.2CM. SOME STAINING ON BIB, ESPECIALLY IN THE CENTRE, ABOVE 'GOOD BOY'.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS BIB BELONGED TO ROBERT ALLAN SMITH (THE DONOR) AS A CHILD AND WAS SAVED FOR DONATION TO THE MUSEUM BY HIS MOTHER, PHYLLIS SMITH. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON THE SMITH FAMILY WAS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR AT THE TIME OF DONATION. BEGINNING IN THE 1940S, THE SMITH FAMILY RESIDED AT 1254 7 AVENUE SOUTH. PHYLLIS REMAINED IN THE HOUSE UNTIL HER DEATH AT 104 YEARS OF AGE, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2009. WHILE CLEANING UP HIS MOTHER’S HOUSE, THE DONOR CAME ACROSS SEVERAL BAGS MARKED ‘FOR MUSEUM’. THE ITEMS WERE USED BY THE DONOR FROM AN INFANT UNTIL THE AGE OF APPROXIMATELY 9 YEARS OLD. IN THE INTERVIEW, KEVIN ASKS IF ROBERT FELT HIS CHILDHOOD WAS IDYLLIC. ROBERT RESPONDS, SAYING: “FOR ME IT WAS. I MEAN, I WAS BORN IN WARTIME STILL AND MAYBE IT WASN’T IDYLLIC FOR MY PARENTS, BUT IT WAS FOR ME. AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WERE DIFFERENT THEN. YOU WERE JUST LET OUT THE DOOR AND YOU WENT OUT TO PLAY WITH THE NEIGHBOURHOOD KIDS AND THERE WERE NO CONCERNS THAT THE PARENTS HAVE TODAY. YES, A VERY HAPPY TIME, I WOULD SAY.” ROBERT WAS BORN IN OCTOBER 1940 TO PHYLLIS (NEE GROSS) AND ALLAN F. SMITH, AT ST. MICHAEL’S HOSPITAL. PHYLLIS WAS BORN TO FELIX AND MAGDALENA (NEE FETTIG) GROSS IN HARVEY, ND AND MOVED WITH HER FAMILY TO A FARM IN THE GRASSY LAKE AREA. SHE MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE AND ATTENDED ST. BASIL’S SCHOOL IN THE 1910s. ALLAN WAS BORN IN ECHO BAY, ON, TO REV D.B. AND MRS. SMITH. HIS FATHER WAS A UNITED CHURCH MINISTER AND MOVED THE FAMILY TO EDMONTON. ALLAN WAS OFFERED A JOB AT WESTERN GROCERS IN LETHBRIDGE AND MET PHYLLIS WHILE IN THE CITY. THEY WERE MARRIED ON SEPTEMBER 2, 1939. ROBERT IS AN ONLY CHILD AND SUFFERED FROM RHEUMATIC FEVER AS A CHILD. HE BELIEVES THIS MAY BE PART OF THE REASON HIS MOTHER SAVED THESE ITEMS. HE EXPLAINS, SAYING: “I’M AN ONLY CHILD AND THEY WOULD BE MORE MEANINGFUL AND I WENT THROUGH A CHILDHOOD ILLNESS. I HAD RHEUMATIC FEVER. I MIGHT NOT HAVE SURVIVED. SOME OTHER KIDS DIDN’T SURVIVE, BUT I DID.” HE ALSO DESCRIBES HIS MOTHER AS BEING “A SAVER OF THINGS. HAVING GONE THROUGH THE DEPRESSION … THEY SAVED LOTS OF STUFF … ANYTHING THEY THINK THEY MIGHT USE IN THE FUTURE WAS SAVED.” PHYLLIS WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY IN THE 1970s AND WORKED AT THE GALT MUSEUM AS PART OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ACCORDING TO THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, ROBERT RECEIVED MANY AWARDS WHILE IN HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING THE SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP FOR PROFICIENCY IN ENGINEERING, A GOLD MEDAL FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF ALBERTA, AND RECEIVED THE HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE IN GRADUATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS AND COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20150013006
Acquisition Date
2015-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.