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Other Name
CHILD'S HARNESS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170018001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CHILD'S HARNESS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
27.6
Width
33.4
Description
BROWN LEATHER CHILD HARNESS WITH SILVER BUCKLES AND LEATHER NAILS; HARNESS HAS BELT WITH TWO SUEDE LEATHER BUCKLED STRAPS RUNNING FRONT TO BACK, AND TWO SUEDE LEATHER STRAPS WITH BUCKLES HANGING DOWN SIDES. FRONT OF BELT HAS WHITE RESIDUE AND STAINING ON LEATHER; BELT IS DISCOLOURED AT ENDS; LEATHER BELT IS CRACKED ON FRONT LEFT. INSIDE OF BELT IS SUEDE; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MAY 3, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GARY HAMILTON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. HAMILTON WAS RAISED IN MAGRATH, ALBERTA, AND RECALLS THE OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ON THE LEATHER CHILD HARNESS, HAMILTON RECALLED, “[IT]S] MINE. MY MOTHER AND MY DAD USED TO TIE ME, WELL HOOK ME UP IN THE HARNESS, TIE ME TO THE CLOTHESLINE, GIVE ME SOME ROPE TO GO FROM ONE END TO THE OTHER, SO THAT THEY KNEW WHERE I WAS. I GUESS I [WAS ANGRY] ONE DAY AND BURNT THE BACKYARD DOWN [IN MAGRATH], AND THAT’S MY HARNESS.” “THE HARNESS [WAS] PART OF MY GROWING UP THAT’S ALL. I DO REMEMBER…WEARING IT.” HAMILTON ELABORATED ON HIS CHILDHOOD, NOTING, “WHEN I WAS GROWING UP IT WAS WAY DIFFERENT THAN IT IS NOW. IF YOU NEEDED A SPANKING YOU GOT A SPANKING…NOW YOU CAN’T TOUCH ANYBODY. THAT’S PART OF MY GROWING UP SO I WOULD IMAGINE EVERYBODY ELSE WAS DOING IT TOO. THEY DIDN’T THINK OF IT BY THEMSELVES.” “I WAS GONE ALL THE TIME. MY AUNT LIVED DOWN THE STREET AND I GUESS I WOULD GO VISIT HER, PUT MY HAT ON WHETHER I HAD CLOTHES ON OR NOT, GO VISIT HER. MY DAD WORKED A BLOCK AWAY. EVERYBODY KNEW ME. IT WASN’T A BIG TOWN, AND MY UNCLE WAS A SCHOOL TEACHER THERE, PRINCIPAL AT THE SCHOOL. I’VE GOT LOTS OF RELATIVES OUT THERE.” “THEY’D SEND ME TO SCHOOL AND I WOULDN’T GO. RECESS I’D GO PLAY WITH THE GUYS AT RECESS AND THEN I’D TAKE OFF AGAIN, I’D GO FISHING.” “MY MOTHER [CORRINE HAMILTON] NEVER THREW ANYTHING AWAY. GAMES FROM WHEN WE WERE KIDS…JACKETS, SHOES, SKATES, SHE KEPT IT.” “MY BROTHER AND MY SISTER [WENT THROUGH MY MOTHER’S THINGS WHEN SHE PASSED AWAY TEN YEARS AGO]…[MY BROTHER CALLED] HE SAID, “DO YOU WANT YOUR JACKET BACK? AT THE TIME I THOUGHT I WAS GOING TO MAKE A FRAME FOR ALL THIS STUFF AND THEN PUT IT ON MY WALL. ONE THING LED TO ANOTHER AND WE SOLD MY HOUSE, MOVED TO AN APARTMENT, [AND I] DIDN’T WANT TO DO IT.” “IT’S PART OF MY CHILDHOOD.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170018001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170018001
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, METAL, ELASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20160041005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
FABRIC, METAL, ELASTIC
No. Pieces
3
Height
2.5
Length
15.7
Width
7.3
Description
A: WHITE BOW TIE MADE FROM TEXTURED WHITE FABRIC. BOW SECURED IN THE CENTER OF A BAND (36.6 CM IN LENGTH) WITH A LOOP AROUND THE CENTER OF THE BOW. THE BACK HAS TWO METAL HOOKS ON THE TOP OF THE BAND ON EITHER SIDE OF THE BOW. A WHITE ELASTIC EXTENDS FROM ONE SIDE OF THE BOW WITH A LARGE (1.4 CM) LOOP FOR FASTENING. THE ELASTIC’S SIZE IS ADJUSTABLE. THE OTHER SIDE OF THE BAND HAS A HOOK ON THE END, WHICH FASTENS TO THE LOOP. MACHINE STITCHED. BOW TIE DIMENSIONS: 14.2 CM X 5.9 CM. CONDITION: WHITE IS SLIGHTLY DISCOLOURED. SEVERE TEAR IN ELASTIC BAND. SLIGHT FRAYING ON THE BAND. BROWN STAIN ON HOOK SIDE OF BAND. B-C: WHITE BOX FOR BOW TIE. HAS A REMOVABLE TOP WHICH READS “CURRIE DRESS CRAVATS” IN BLACK INK INSIDE OF A DESIGN. THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BOX READS IN BLACK IN “SIZE 14 TO 15 1/2” CONDITION: SLIGHT STAINING OVERALL. SLIGHT BLACK STAIN ON BOTTOM LEFT SIDE OF LID
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041005
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
VELVET, METAL, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20160041006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
VELVET, METAL, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
3
Length
14.4
Width
7.9
Description
BLACK VELVET BOW TIE. MACHINE STITCHED WITH 2 BOWS (2 LOOPS ON EITHER SIDE) WITH A PIECE OF FABRIC BRINGING IT IN TOGETHER. METAL HOOK PAINTED BLACK DOWN THE CENTER. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. SOME LINT ON THE VELVET WITH SLIGHT WEAR TO THE FABRIC. SOME BLACK METAL PAINT ON HOOK HAS WORN OFF. B-C: WHITE BOX FOR BOW TIE. LID READS “DRESS BOWS BY BERKLEY” WITH CREST IN BLACK INK. THE TOP OF LID HAS CUT OUT OVER MAJORITY OF THE SURFACE IN THE SHAPE OF A BOW TIE. REMNANTS OF CLEAR CELLOPHANE THAT FILLED THE CUTOUT REMAIN AROUND THE EDGES. THE SURFACE OF THE LID IS TEXTURED. OUTSIDE OF BOX IS COVERED WITH SHINY PAPER. CONDITION: MODERATE TO SEVERE BROWN STAINING ON THE BOTTOM OF BOX . TEARS AROUND THE BOX CUTOUT OVERALL DISCOLOURING
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041006
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ELASTIC, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160041007
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
ELASTIC, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
84
Width
2
Description
SUSPENDERS MADE FROM TWO PIECES OF WHITE ELASTIC THAT CROSS 61 CM DOWN. THERE IS A DIAMOND STITCHING IN THE CENTER TO FASTEN THE TWO ELASTICS TOGETHER WHERE THEY CROSS. ELASTIC IS ADJUSTABLE ON LONG ENDS. PEANUT-SHAPED METAL LOOPS ARE FASTENED TO ALL FOUR ENDS OF THE SUSPENDERS. MACHINE-STITCHED. CONDITION: OVERALL DISCOLOURING. SEVERE STAINING ON THE OUTSIDE EDGES OF LONG EDGE OF ELASTIC (STAINS ARE APPROX. 8 CM IN LENGTH CONCENTRATED AT THE EDGE).
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041007
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1951
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, BRONZE, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20180026000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1951
Materials
LEATHER, BRONZE, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
76
Width
7
Description
DOUBLE-BUCKLED BROWN LEATHER BELT, FLOWER IN CENTER WITH FILIGREE DESIGN. TWO BUCKLES STAMPED “SOLID BRONZE.” 38 CM FROM BUCKLE TO BUCKLE ON ONE SIDE. BELT IS 2 CM IN WIDTH ON BACK AND MOST OF FRONT, FRONT CENTER DESIGN IS 7 CM AT WIDEST POINT. MINOR WEAR ON LEATHER AROUND BUCKLES FROM BENDING. FOUR BUCKLE HOLES ON EACH SIDE.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DOMESTIC
History
ON NOVEMBER 28, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MIRIAM SMITH REGARDING HER DONATION OF A LEATHER BELT. THE BELT WAS GIVEN TO SMITH BY A RESEARCH STATION CO-WORKER NAMED ALEC JOHNSTONE, WHO DID LEATHER WORK. ON THE BELT, SMITH RECALLED, “[I FIRST ACQUIRED THE BELT] WHEN I WAS WORKING AT THE RESEARCH STATION. NOW, I THINK I GRADUATED IN’47, ’48…AND MY FIRST JOB WAS WITH THE ROYAL BANK. I WORKED THERE FOR A YEAR AND THEN I WENT OUT TO THE RESEARCH STATION. I WORKED FOR A FELLA BY THE NAME OF ARNOLD PLATT…I WAS IN THE RESEARCH STATION AND ALEC JOHNSTONE WORKED OVER IN THE EXPERIMENTAL FARM, WE USED TO CALL IT AT THE TIME, AND HE WAS DOING TOOL LEATHER WORK AND HE MADE ME THIS BELT AS A GIFT…” “WE WERE MORE RELAXED, WE DIDN’T DO THE THINGS THAT [THE OTHER WORKERS] DID…I ALWAYS REMEMBER ALEC JOHNSTONE, HE WAS A TALL, GOOD-LOOKING RED-HEADED FELLOW AND I USED TO THINK HE WAS PRETTY CUTE…HE MADE ME THIS BELT…I ASKED HIM [TO MAKE ME THIS BELT]…IT WOULD HAVE TO BE ’50, ’51…BUT HE WAS DOING TOOL LEATHER AND IT WAS REALLY VERY NICE, AND HE SHOWED ME AND I ASKED IF HE’D MAKE ME A BELT AND HE DID. HE DIDN’T EVEN CHARGE ME FOR IT. “[I WOULDN’T HAVE MUCH CONTACT WITH ALEC] BECAUSE HE WORKED ON THE EXPERIMENTAL SIDE, AND YOU KNOW MAYBE HE STOPPED IN ONCE IN A WHILE TO VISIT WITH ARNOLD PLATT OR SOMEBODY THAT WORKED THERE.” “I WORE [THE BELT] QUITE A LOT A LONG TIME AGO, BUT BELTS USED TO BE THE IN THING…I [HAVE] A DRAWER FULL OF BELTS AND I DON’T WEAR THEM…I USED TO WEAR IT WHEN I WENT TO WORK WITH A SKIRT YOU KNOW YOU…IT WAS LIKE A PIECE OF A NECKLACE.” SMITH ELABORATED ON HER TIME WORKING WITH THE RESEARCH STATION, NOTING, “THE REASON I WENT TO THE RESEARCH STATION IS MY GIRLFRIEND, HER NAME WAS IRA DORE, AND HER DAD, JOHN DORE, WORKED THERE AND ALICE HARPER, SHE WAS ALICE WAHL AT THAT TIME, HER AND I HAD BEEN FRIENDS FOR A LONG TIME AND THAT’S HOW I APPLIED AND GOT THE JOB AND IT WAS A VERY NICE JOB. GOT PICKED UP AT HOME AT 8:00[AM] GOT DRIVEN HOME AT 4:00[PM] OR 4:30[PM] AND WAS JUST REALLY A NICE PLACE. MET LOTS OF NICE PEOPLE…I WAS MARRIED IN ’52 AND IF I REMEMBER CORRECTLY, WHEN YOU GOT MARRIED, AND IF YOU WORKED FOR THE GOVERNMENT ONCE YOU WERE MARRIED, YOU DIDN’T WORK FOR THE GOVERNMENT ANYMORE, SO IT WOULD BE MAYBE IN [1949-1951] THAT I WORKED OUT THERE…[DOING] SECRETARIAL WORK.” “[THE RESEARCH STATION WAS WORKING ON] CEREALS, AND THEY WOULD PLANT DIFFERENT TYPES OF WHEAT AND BARLEY…AND CHECK IT AND SEE…I WAS IN THE...SCIENCE RESEARCH BUILDING BUT A LOT OF OUR WORKERS WERE OVER IN THE EXPERIMENTAL FARM…” “[THE RESEARCH STATION] WAS JUST A PLEASANT PLACE TO WORK. EVERYBODY WAS RELAXED AND PLANNED, THERE WAS A CAFETERIA [RUN BY NORA HAHN]…” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180026000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180026000
Acquisition Date
2018-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FUR, PLASTIC, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20190027000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1930
Date Range To
1960
Materials
FUR, PLASTIC, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
115.2
Width
60.5
Description
BROWN-BLACK FOX FUR STOLE WITH SILVER TIPS TO FUR; STOLE INCLUDES THE HEAD, PAWS, TAIL, AND FULL BODY. FRONT AND BACK LEFT PAWS HAVE TIED BLACK STRING KNOTS WITH BRASS BUTTON CLASPS EMBEDDED; PAWS HAVE CLAWS INTACT. UNDERSIDE OF THE FOX’S JAW HAS A LONG, BLACK PLASTIC FITTING; FOX FACE HAS TAXIDERMIED GLASS EYES; TAIL HAS WHITE FUR TIP. STOLE IS SHEDDING FUR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON OCTOBER 22, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SHARON APPELT REGARDING HER DONATION OF A SILVER FOX FUR STOLE. APPELT’S GRANDPARENTS, HESPIRIA AND FRED JOHNSTON, OPERATED A FOX FARM NEAR COMMERCE, ALBERTA AND PRESENT-DAY DIAMOND CITY, ALBERTA. ON THE FUR STOLE, APPELT RECALLED, “[THE FUR STOLE HAS BEEN IN MY POSSESSION] PROBABY THIRTY-FIVE YEARS [I PROBABLY GOT IT AROUND 1985]. MY MOTHER HAD IT BEFORE THAT TIME, PROBABLY FOR TWENTY YEARS. AT THAT TIME SHE HAD GOTTEN IT FROM HER MOTHER PROBABLY IN THE ‘60S.” “I THINK MY MOM [DOROTHY FILMER] JUST WANTED ME TO HAVE IT AS THE NEXT GENERATION AND MY OTHER TWO SISTERS DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHILDREN AND I HAD CHILDREN, SO SHE PROBABLY THOUGHT IT WOULD BE SOMETHING WE WOULD PASS DOWN THE LINE ON MY SIDE…I JUST REMEMBER MY MOM ALWAYS SAYING THAT IT WAS SUCH A PERFECT STOLE BECAUSE IT HAD THE CROSS ON IT, THE SILVER FOX CROSS THAT WAS QUITE DISTINCTIVE ON ITS BACK SO YOU KNOW IT WAS NOT JUST DIFFERENT SHADES, IT HAD THE CROSS ON IT THAT WAS MORE RARE.” “I ACTUALLY WORE [THE STOLE] A COUPLE OF TIMES JUST KIND OF DURING HALLOWEEN GET TOGETHERS AND I WAS ALWAYS GLAD TO HAVE IT IN MY POSSESSION…I WAS LIVING IN LETHBRIDGE AT A DIFFERENT HOUSE [WHEN I GOT IT]…[I WORE IT] PROBABLY WHEN MY CHILDREN WERE TEENAGERS. IT WAS FUN TO PULL IT OUT AND REMEMBER GRANDPARENTS AND GREAT GRANDPARENTS…[I WORE IT FOR HALLOWEEN] PROBABLY NOT SO MUCH AN OUTFIT BUT JUST DRESS UP WITH THE STOLE AND MAYBE A HAT AND SPECIAL PURSE. HAD THE PARTIES GOING AROUND THE HOUSE.” “[THE STOLE WAS STORED] JUST IN MY HOPE CHEST, A CEDAR HOPE CHEST…IT WAS A FUN THING TO LOOK AT ALSO AS A LITTLE GIRL. PULL IT OUT AND PUT IT ON…WE’D JUST FOOL AROUND WITH IT. IT’S IN THE TICKLE TRUNK I GUESS THEY CALLED IT…I’M BORN IN ’56 SO [I PLAYED WITH IT] PROBABLY UP UNTIL 1966 OR ’68.” “[THE STOLE CREEPED ME OUT] A LITTLE BIT BECAUSE WE ALWAYS LOOKED AT THE NOSE PART WITH THE PLASTIC THING UNDER IT THAT WOULD OPEN UP AND IT WOULD LOOK LIKE IT’S WAS GOING TO BITE YOU AND IT HAD A CLASP THAT YOU COULD WRAP IT AROUND YOUR NECK AND WEAR IT JUST LIKE IT IS, LIKE A STOLE.” APPELT ELABORATED ON HER GRANDPARENTS' FOX FARM, NOTING, “I DIDN’T KNOW MY GRANDPARENTS BECAUSE THEY PASSED WHEN I WAS QUITE YOUNG, SO TO HAVE ANYTHING OF THEIRS IN MY POSSESSION WAS SOMETHING THAT I ACKNOWLEDGED AND WAS GRATEFUL TO LEARN ABOUT. I HAVE ALL THEIR DIARIES, MY GRANDMA’S DIARIES, FROM BACK IN 1917 SO IT TALKED A LOT ABOUT HER LIFE ON THE FARM, THE HARDSHIPS…KNOWING THAT THEY WERE HOMESTEADERS AND THAT THE ONLY THING THEY COULD DO WAS GROW CROPS AT THAT TIME. HAVING THE SILVER FOX FARM FOR EXTRA INCOME WAS PROBABLY VERY BENEFICIAL FOR THEM.” “[MY MOTHER’S] FATHER HAD PASSED AWAY IN I THINK IN 1960 OR ‘61 AND THEN MY GRANDMOTHER WAS ILL AND DIED IN ’65 SO AT THAT TIME MY UNCLE WOULD HAVE BROUGHT IT IN TO HER HOUSE IN LETHBRIDGE…[MY GRANDPARENTS WERE] HESPIRIA AND FRED JOHNSTON…[MY UNCLE, GORDON JOHNSTON] STAYED ON THE FARM UNTIL ABOUT 1998…” APPELT NOTED THAT HER GRANDPARENTS WERE FARMING FOXES WHEN HER MOTHER LIVED ON THE FARM, RECALLING, “THE PICTURE I BELIEVE IS FROM WHEN [MY MOTHER] WAS PROBABLY IN HER TWENTIES THAT THEY WERE DOING THAT SO SHE WAS BORN IN 1917. THOSE PICTURES ARE PROBABLY IN THE ‘30S AND ‘40S AND SHE WAS STILL LIVING ON THE FARM AT THAT TIME…[THE FOX FARM WAS OPERATING] PROBABLY IN THE ‘30S AND ‘40S BECAUSE THEY HOMESTEADED THERE I THINK IN 1908 THAT MY GRANDFATHER GOT THE FARM AND THEN MY GRANDMOTHER CAME IN ’17 WHEN THEY WERE MARRIED, SO IT WAS PROBABLY DURING THE ‘30S I WOULD SAY, MAYBE INTO THE ‘40S. IT’S HARD TO SAY HOW LONG THEY HAD IT.” “[MY MOM SAID] JUST THAT IT WAS THERE AND THAT THEY RAISED [THE FOXES] AS WELL AS THE ANGORA RABBITS THAT WERE IN CAGES THERE SO SHE DIDN’T REALLY SAY TOO MUCH MORE. IT WAS JUST I GUESS SURVIVAL TO SUPPLEMENT INCOME WITH THE CROPS AND DURING THE DEPRESSION AND IT WAS TOUGH TIMES…I DON’T KNOW [IF SUCH FARMS WERE COMMON]. I NEVER HEARD ANYTHING MORE ABOUT OTHER PEOPLE HAVING THOSE FARMS.” “[I DON’T REMEMBER] TOO MUCH OF MY GRANDFATHER BECAUSE I WAS JUST FIVE. MY GRANDMOTHER HAS THREE SISTERS, WE GOT TO GO OUT TO THEIR FARM IN THE SUMMER TIME AND SPEND A WEEK OR TWO. MY OLDER SISTERS WOULD GET TO SPEND MORE TIME THERE BECAUSE THEY WERE OLDER. I DIDN’T GET TO SPEND AS MUCH TIME BECAUSE I WAS YOUNGER AND MAYBE IT WAS A LOT TO HAVE THREE LITTLE KIDS RUNNING AROUND BUT IT WAS A PLACE TO GO IN THE SUMMER. THEY LIVED A MILE AND A HALF EAST OF PARK LAKE SO WE SPENT A LOT OF TIME IN PARK LAKE SWIMMING…[THE FOX PENS] WEREN’T THERE THAT I NOTICED IN THE ‘90S WHEN THEY HAD A BIG AUCTION THERE BUT THEY COULD HAVE BEEN I JUST DON’T KNOW WHAT I WOULD HAVE BEEN LOOKING AT.” “IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN SOMETHING THAT WAS RARE BACK THEN TO RAISE SILVER FOXES IN THAT AREA. I NEVER EVER HEARD OF ANYBODY ELSE SAYING THAT SILVER FOXES WERE PART OF THEIR GRANDPARENT’S FARM, SO I THINK IT WAS PRETTY SPECIFIC TO SAYING THAT IT WAS A GREAT THING THAT [MY GRADPARENTS] DID TO SUPPLEMENT [THEIR] INCOME BACK THEN ESPECIALLY WHEN THE CROPS WERE BAD. THEY DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MONEY, THEY PROBABLY GOT SOME GOOD MONEY FROM OUT OF THESE.” ON HER MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE STOLE TO THE MUSEUM, APPELT SHARED, “I’M JUST SORTING THROUGH SOME THINGS IN MY HOME AND I SAW IT SITTING THERE, BEING THAT I HAVE TWO CHILDREN BUT NO GRANDCHILDREN I THOUGHT IT WAS TIME TO MAYBE PASS IT DOWN TO FURTHER PEOPLE THAT WOULD BE ABLE TO ENJOY IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PHOTOGRAPHS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON THE JOHNSTON FOX FARM, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190027000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190027000
Acquisition Date
2019-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
STAGE PERFORMANCE BORDER
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLYWOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20110031021
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
STAGE PERFORMANCE BORDER
Date Range From
1918
Date Range To
1950
Materials
PLYWOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
5
Height
303.5
Length
114.3
Description
STAGE PERFORMANCE BORDER, IN FIVE PANEL PIECES. .001 TOP CENTRE PANEL. RECTANGULAR. VERY THIN PLYWOOD. GREEN BACKGROUND WITH PINK/RED FLOWERS. TWO FLAGS IN THE CENTRE: THE KUOMINTANG/NATIONAL LEAGUE FLAG IS ON THE LEFT (NAVY BLUE WITH A GOLDEN YELLOW SUN IN THE MIDDLE) AND THE FLAG OF THE REPUBLIC OF CHINA IS ON THE RIGHT (RED BODY, WITH A NAVY BLUE RECTANGLE IN THE TOP LEFT CORNER AND A GOLDEN YELLOW SUN IN THE MIDDLE OF THIS NAVY SECTION). BETWEEN THE FLAGS IS A NAVY BLUE, ROUGHLY OCTAGON SHAPE, WITH ANOTHER GOLDEN YELLOW SUN IN THE CENTRE. ALONG THE BOTTOM IS A REPEATING PATTERN IN RED AND YELLOW OF TWO DOTS, A LINE, AND A DOT. SCREW HOLES ALONG THE TOP AND SIDES FOR MOUNTING. ON THE FAR RIGHT SIDE OF THE PANEL IS A SMALL RECTANGULAR PIECE, ATTACHED WITH WIRE, ROUGHLY 19CM X 7.6CM. PANEL IS 241.6CM X 47.6CM POOR TO FAIR CONDITION. PANEL IS WELL WORN, THE COLOURS ARE FADED, AND THE PAINT IS CHIPPED IN SEVERAL SPOTS. .002 TOP SIDE PANEL. RECTANGULAR. VERY THIN PLYWOOD. ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE PANEL ARE THE TOPS OF TWO COLUMNS. A SMALL PINK/RED FLOWER ON A GREEN VINE IS VISIBLE ON THE COLUMN. TO THE LEFT OF THE COLUMNS IS A SECTION OF GREEN WITH PINK/RED FLOWERS. ALONG THE BOTTOM IS A REPEATING PATTERN IN RED AND YELLOW OF TWO DOTS, A LINE, AND A DOT. BELOW THE RED AND YELLOW SECTION IS A NAVY BLUE SECTION, WITH A YELLOW SECTION JUST TO THE RIGHT OF THE COLUMN. SCREW HOLES ALONG THE TOP AND SIDES FOR MOUNTING. PANEL IS 200.7CM X 56.2CM POOR TO FAIR CONDITION. PAINT SCRATCHED OFF, ESPECIALLY ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE GREEN FLOWER SECTION. NOT AS FADED OR AS WORN AS .001. TAPE REMNANTS IN THE GREEN SECTION TO THE RIGHT OF COLUMNS. .003 TOP SIDE PANEL. RECTANGULAR. VERY THIN PLYWOOD. ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE PANEL ARE THE TOPS OF TWO COLUMNS. TO THE LEFT OF THE COLUMNS IS A SECTION OF GREEN WITH PINK/RED FLOWERS. ALONG THE BOTTOM IS A REPEATING PATTERN IN RED AND YELLOW OF TWO DOTS, A LINE, AND A DOT. BELOW THE RED AND YELLOW SECTION IS A NAVY BLUE SECTION, WITH A YELLOW SECTION JUST TO THE RIGHT OF THE COLUMN. SCREW HOLES ALONG THE TOP AND SIDES FOR MOUNTING. PANEL IS 243.2CM X 55.2CM POOR TO FAIR CONDITION. TAN PAINT ALONG THE BOTTOM, OVER THE GREEN SECTION, IN SEVERAL AREAS. THE NAVY BLUE SECTION HAS A LOT OF HAIRLINE CRACKS IN THE PAINT. .004 SIDE PANEL. RECTANGULAR. VERY THIN PLYWOOD. ON THE BOTTOM OF THE PANEL IS A RECTANGLE IN THREE SHADES OF BROWN/TAN. ALONG THE LEFT SIDE OF THE PANEL THERE ARE TWO COLUMNS, WHICH HAVE PINK/RED FLOWERS ON GREEN VINES WRAPPED AROUND THEM. NAVY BLUE CURTAIN TO THE RIGHT OF COLUMNS. THERE IS A VERTICAL RECTANGLE OVER THIS NAVY CURTAIN. THE RECTANGLE HAS A LIGHT BLUE/GREEN BACKGROUND AND HAS SEVEN CHINESE CHARACTERS IN YELLOW. THERE IS ORNAMENTATION AROUND THIS RECTANGLE. THE NAVY CURTAIN IS HELD BACK WITH A GOLDEN YELLOW TIEBACK NEAR THE TOP. ON THE FAR RIGHT SIDE IS A VERTICAL RECTANGLE WITH AN ORANGE BACKGROUND AND SEVEN CHINESE CHARACTERS IN BLACK. SCREW HOLES FOR MOUNTING AROUND EDGE OF PANEL. PANEL IS 303.5CM X 114.3CM POOR TO FAIR CONDITION. IN WORSE CONDITION THAN .005. LOTS OF LITTLE HOLES, ESPECIALLY ON THE NAVY CURTAIN. LOTS OF WALL PAINT FLECKS, ESPECIALLY ON THE COLUMNS. THE BLUE VERTICAL RECTANGLE IS MORE GREEN THAN ON .005 AND THE PAINT IS VERY, VERY WORN. .005 SIDE PANEL. RECTANGULAR. VERY THIN PLYWOOD. ON THE BOTTOM OF THE PANEL IS A RECTANGLE IN THREE SHADES OF BROWN/TAN. ALONG THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE PANEL THERE ARE TWO COLUMNS, WHICH HAVE PINK/RED FLOWERS ON GREEN VINES WRAPPED AROUND THEM. NAVY BLUE CURTAIN TO THE LEFT OF COLUMNS. THERE IS A VERTICAL RECTANGLE OVER THIS NAVY CURTAIN. THE RECTANGLE HAS A LIGHT BLUE/GREEN BACKGROUND AND HAS SEVEN CHINESE CHARACTERS IN YELLOW. THERE IS ORNAMENTATION AROUND THIS RECTANGLE. BELOW THIS BLUE RECTANGLE, ON THE NAVY CURTAIN, ARE SEVERAL CHINESE CHARACTERS ON A DIAGONAL, PAINTED ON IN RED. THE NAVY CURTAIN IS HELD BACK WITH A GOLDEN YELLOW TIEBACK NEAR THE TOP. ON THE FAR LEFT SIDE IS A VERTICAL RECTANGLE WITH AN ORANGE BACKGROUND AND SEVEN CHINESE CHARACTERS IN BLACK. SCREW HOLES FOR MOUNTING AROUND EDGE OF PANEL. PANEL IS 303.5CM X 114.3CM POOR TO FAIR CONDITION. LOTS OF CHIPPED PAINT. PANEL IS FADED/DISCOLOURED. BOTTOM BACK IS IN ESPECIALLY POOR CONDITION AND IS VERY DIRTY.
Subjects
PUBLIC ENTERTAINMENT DEVICE
Historical Association
ASSOCIATIONS
FINE ARTS
LEISURE
History
THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THIS ARTIFACT COMES FROM INTERVIEWS HELD WITH MAY LEE AND JUDY CHAN, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG AND JANICE WONG. PERSONAL DETAILS ABOUT THE LIVES OF MAY LEE, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG THEIR IMMIGRATION TO CANADA ARE FOUND BELOW THE ARTIFACT DETAILS AND BELOW THE INFORMATION ABOUT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY BUILDING. MAY RECALLED THAT THERE WERE OPERAS AT THE SOCIETY BUILDING, BUT THAT THEY DIDN’T COME VERY OFTEN. SHE DIDN’T RECALL ATTENDING MANY OPERAS, BUT DID REMEMBER THAT “HONG WONG WAS SINGING THERE.” RICHARD, MEANWHILE, THOUGHT THAT THE OPERAS WERE FINISHED BEFORE HE ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE. HE NEVER SAW AN OPERA PRODUCTION AT THE SOCIETY BUILDING, BUT DID RECALL THAT PROJECTION FILMS WERE SHOWN. RICHARD SUGGESTED “ASK HONG. HE LIKED A LITTLE BIT OF OPERA TOO … HE SANG IN STUFF LIKE THAT.” HONG INDICATED THAT THERE WAS NO OPERAS AT THE SOCIETY BUILDING WHEN HE CAME IN 1951, BUT THAT THE SOCIETY DID STAGE PRODUCTIONS AT THE UNIVERSITY. ASKED WHERE THE COSTUMES CAME FROM, HONG SAID “WE GOT THEM FROM CALGARY AT THAT TIME, WELL, ACTUALLY WE JUST BORROWED THEM. WE DIDN’T HAVE THE MONEY TO BUY THEM.” HONG CONTINUED SAYING THAT THIS STAGE PERFORMANCE BORDER WAS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH A LARGE MURAL (SEE P20010027000) AND A STAGE. A SERIES OF ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD GIVE BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY AND ITS BUILDING: THE BUILDING THAT HOUSED THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE SOCIETY WAS BUILT IN 1909-1910 IN THE 300 BLOCK OF 2 AVENUE SOUTH AND IT WAS ORIGINALLY A RESTAURANT. BY 1915 IT HAD BECOME THE HEADQUARTERS FOR THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH OF THE KAO MIN TANG (ALTERNATIVE SPELLINGS INCLUDE KUOMINTANG, KUO MIN TANG, GUOMINDANG, AND GUO MIN DANG). THE BUILDING WAS DESIGNATED AS A PROVINCIAL HERITAGE RESOURCE IN 1995 BECAUSE OF ITS VALUE AS A SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CENTRE FOR THE LETHBRIDGE CHINESE COMMUNITY. THE BUILDING WAS USED IN A VARIETY OF WAYS BY THE SOCIETY AND INCLUDED, AT VARIOUS TIMES, A RESTAURANT, A SCHOOL, AND LIVING ACCOMODATIONS. IN FEBRUARY 2011 A SECTION OF THE BRICK FAÇADE FELL OFF THE BUILDING AND CITY INSPECTORS DETERMINED THAT THE TIMBER AND RED BRICK STRUCTURE WAS POTENTIALLY UNSTABLE. THE BUILDING WAS TORN DOWN A SHORT TIME LATER. LETHBRIDGE'S CHINATOWN EMERGED IN 1901, A RESULT OF THE CHINESE POPULATION BEING RELEGATED TO A SECTION OF THE CITY BETWEEN GALT GARDENS AND THE COULEES. IN A JANUARY 7, 2002 ARTICLE ALBERT LEONG EXPLAINS THAT NO ONE REALLY WANTED CHINESE PEOPLE AROUND AND THAT “’ THEY WERE TOLD THAT THE ONLY PLACE THEY COULD START BUSINESSES WAS BETWEEN THE COULEES AT THE PARK, BECAUSE THE CITY DIDN’T WANT ANY COMPETITION FOR THE WHITE BUSINESSMEN … BUT ‘GHETTO-IZED’ OR NOT, THE CHINESE WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE FORMED AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE BACKBONE OF THIS CITY, [AND MADE] NOTEWORTHY [CONTRIBUTIONS] TO THE HISTORY OF THIS PLACE.’” BUSINESSES SUCH AS LAUNDRIES, MARKET GARDENS, AND RESTAURANTS WERE OPENED IN CHINATOWN, WITH THE RESIDENTS LIVING IN ROOMS ABOVE THE BUSINESSES. IN 1912 THERE WERE ABOUT 100 PEOPLE LIVING IN CHINATOWN AND BY THE 1930S, IT WAS A BUSTLING COMMUNITY. THE POPULATION OF CHINATOWN DWINDLED FOLLOWING THE SECOND WORLD WAR. JANICE WONG, PRESIDENT OF THE SOCIETY IN 2015, GAVE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THE SOCIETY IN AN INTERVIEW: AS OF 2015, THE SOCIETY EXISTS MORE AS A SOCIAL CLUB AND THE SOCIETY HOLDS THREE CELEBRATORY DINNERS EACH YEAR, USUALLY HELD AT THE NEW DYNASTY RESTAURANT. THE SOCIETY ALSO VISITS THE CEMETERY ON A YEARLY BASIS “TO HONOUR THE ANCESTORS, CLEAN THE TOMBS, BRING FOOD, DO THE USUAL THINGS THAT WE USED TO DO – EAT ON GRAVES, BURN THE INCENSE. WE DO THAT EVERY YEAR STILL TO HONOUR OUR ANCESTORS. IT IS USUALLY IN THE SPRING … IN APRIL.” JANICE BRIEFLY DISCUSSED THE FUTURE OF THE SOCIETY, INDICATING THAT THERE IS SOME TALK ABOUT RE-BUILDING “BUT THAT INVOLVES A LOT OF PLANNING, AND MONEY, AND FUNDRAISING” AND SHE QUESTIONS WHETHER OR NOT THERE IS ENOUGH OF A MEMBERSHIP BASE TO GO FORWARD WITH RE-BUILDING. SHE ALSO EXPLAINED THAT PREVIOUS CHINESE IMMIGRANTS HAD TENDED TO COME FROM THE SAME GEOGRAPHIC REGION, BUT THAT PRESENTLY IMMIGRANTS ARE COMING FROM ALL OVER CHINA: “THERE’S A LOT OF INFLUX OF PEOPLE FROM CHINA THAT AREN’T FROM THE SAME AREA, BECAUSE TRADITIONALLY, THE PEOPLE WERE ALL FROM THE SAME AREA AND SPOKE THE SAME DIALECT AND HAD THAT SORT OF THING KEEPING THEM TOGETHER AS A COMMUNITY OVERSEAS FROM CHINA.” PERSONAL DETAILS ABOUT THE LIVES OF MAY LEE, RICHARD LOO, AND HONG WONG AND THEIR IMMIGRATION TO CANADA ARE BELOW: MAY LEE: MAY WAS ACTUALLY BORN IN CANADA AND IS KNOWN AS A GOLD MOUNTAIN GIRL, BECAUSE SHE IS A CANADIAN-BORN CHINESE WOMAN. MAY EXPLAINS: “I WAS BORN IN CANADA. I WAS BORN IN NANOOSE BAY. WHEN I WAS 4 YEARS OLD, WE MOVED TO VICTORIA. WHEN I WAS 9 YEARS OLD AND THE WHOLE FAMILY, IN 1930, GO BACK TO CHINA.” DURING THE WAR, THE JAPANESE BOMBED THE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL IN TOCSIN CITY AND MAY’S MOTHER DECIDED TO SEND MAY AND HER BROTHER TO HONG KONG TO START THE PROCESS OF COMING TO CANADA. MAY STARTED ENGLISH SCHOOL IN HONG KONG, BUT OFTEN MISSED CLASSES BECAUSE SHE WAS SICK FROM THE HEAT. SHE SAYS THAT SHE’S LEARNED MOST OF HER ENGLISH FROM HER HUSBAND, HER CHILDREN, GRANDCHILDREN, AND EVEN GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN. SHE WAS MARRIED TO HOM MEN LEE, AKA JIMMY LEE, ON NOVEMBER 16, 1938 IN VICTORIA, BC. JIMMY WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE AT THE GALT HOSPITAL, BUT WAS SENT BACK TO CHINA AS A CHILD FOR HIS EDUCATION. JIMMY’S FAMILY HAD COME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1914 AND OWNED LEE-DUC CLEANERS. THE LEE FAMILY LIVED ABOVE THE SHOP, WHICH WAS ON 13TH STREET NORTH, NEAR HIGA’S JEWELERS. MAY’S MAIN MEMORY OF CHINATOWN: “ALL I REMEMBER IN CHINATOWN, IN SUMMERTIME, LOTS OF OLD GUYS SITTING IN FRONT OF GUOMINDANG. AUNTIE HELEN GREW UP IN CHINATOWN. I THINK SHE KNOWS MORE ABOUT CHINATOWN. IN THE OLDEN DAYS, I HARDLY GO OUT, JUST TO BUY GROCERIES.” JUDY ADDED THAT MAY HAD 8 CHILDREN AND WAS KEPT BUSY AT HOME RAISING THEM. RICHARD LOO: RICHARD ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1953, HAVING LEFT THE MAINLAND OF CHINA IN 1949. RICHARD’S GRANDFATHER HAD MOVED TO CANADA IN EITHER LATE 1800S OR THE EARLY 1900S AND HAD HAD TO PAY THE HEAD TAX. HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED AS A COOK IN RESTAURANTS, EITHER IN LETHBRIDGE OR IN TABER (ACCORDING TO RICHARD, HIS GRANDFATHER WORKED THROUGH THE WAR YEARS IN TABER). RICHARD’S GRANDFATHER HAD PLANNED ON MOVING BACK TO CHINA WHEN HE RETIRED, BUT THEN THE COMMUNISTS TOOK OVER, AND HE ELECTED TO STAY. AT THAT TIME, HE INVITED RICHARD TO MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE AS WELL. RICHARD LEFT HONG KONG, AFTER LIVING THERE FOR 8 MONTHS, ON A FRIDAY AFTERNOON AT 2PM LOCAL TIME. HE FINALLY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE SUNDAY AFTERNOON. HE WAS LUCKY IN THAT HE WAS ABLE TO GET HIS FLIGHTS ON SALE. NORMALLY A TICKET FROM HONG KONG TO VANCOUVER WOULD HAVE COST $700, BUT RICHARD WAS ABLE TO SECURE A FLIGHT FOR ONLY $500. HE ALSO INDICATED THAT HIS FLIGHT TO LETHBRIDGE WAS ONLY $39.95. ON RECALLING HIS FIRST TIME IN LETHBRIDGE, RICHARD RECOUNTED THE FOLLOWING STORY: “SO, BY THE TIME I GOT TO THE AIRPORT, I DIDN’T KNOW HOW TO SAY NOTHING. DIDN’T KNOW – MAYBE COULD SAY ‘GOOD MORNING’ – THAT’S ALL YOU COULD SAY, JUST ANYWAYS HOW TO SAY ‘HELLO’ – SO, ANYWAY, SO IN THE MEANTIME, THE FELLOW AT THE AIRPORT MUST HAVE KNOWN ZEKE, YOU KNOW ZEKE QUAN [OWNER OF] THE LOTUS INN [RESTAURANT], AND HE PHONED HIM UP. HE SAYS, ‘ZEKE.’ I DIDN’T KNOW WHAT HE WAS TALKING ABOUT – NOTHING. AND THEN HE SAYS, ‘HEY, THIS IS A CHINA BOY HERE. WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO WITH HIM?’ SO, ZEKE SAYS, ‘OH, JUST TAKE HIM TO CHINATOWN AND DUMP HIM.’ NOW, I DIDN’T KNOW THOSE, NOT UNTIL LATER ON. ZEKE’S SON GO TO SAME SCHOOL I DID – CENTRAL SCHOOL.” RICHARD INITIALLY LIVED IN THE SOCIETY BUILDING FOR SEVERAL YEARS, OCCUPYING A ROOM THAT HAD BEEN RECENTLY VACATED BY ANOTHER MAN NAMED LOO WHO HAD GONE TO WORK IN PICTURE BUTTE. RICHARD RECALLED THAT THE SOCIETY WAS A GOOD PLACE TO FEEL A SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND THAT IT WAS A WELCOMING PLACE FOR NEW CHINESE IMMIGRANTS, A PLACE WHERE THEY WEREN’T DISCRIMINATED AGAINST. HONG WONG: HONG ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1951 AND WAS INVITED TO THE CITY BY HIS UNCLE SHUEY WONG, WHO WAS ALREADY LIVING HERE. UNCLE SHUEY HAD COME TO CANADA SEVERAL YEARS BEFORE AND HAD HAD TO PAY THE $500 HEAD TAX. HONG TRAVELED WITH HIS BROTHER FROM MAINLAND CHINA TO HONG KONG, IN ORDER TO GO TO THE CANADIAN EMBASSY. ON HIS FERRY RIDE TO HONG KONG, HE WAS SHOT BY BANDITS AND WAS REQUIRED TO STAY IN THE HOSPITAL FOR QUITE SOME TIME TO RECOVER. HIS BROTHER ELECTED TO REMAIN IN HONG KONG, AS HIS MOTHER-IN-LAW LIVED IN THE CITY AND GOT HONG’S BROTHER WORK IN A THEATRE. TO GET TO CANADA, HONG FLEW FROM JAPAN TO GUAM, TO VANCOUVER, AND THEN FINALLY TO LETHBRIDGE. HIS FIRST IMPRESSION OF LETHBRIDGE: COLD. HONG SAID: “’WELL, IN HONG KONG IT WAS AROUND MAYBE 20 SOME 30 ABOVE. AND HERE, AT THAT TIME, MAYBE 20 BELOW, OR 20 SOME BELOW. I DIDN’T HAVE THE EAR MUFFS. I SAID, ‘GEE, I’M NOT SO HAPPY HERE, IT SEEMS SO COLD.’” UNCLE SHUEY TOLD HONG THAT IT WAS ONE OF THE COLDEST WINTERS HE COULD REMEMBER. HONG WORKED FOR HIS UNCLE IN HIS SHOP ON 9TH AVENUE, DOING CHORES AROUND THE STORE, UNTIL HIS ENGLISH HAD IMPROVED ENOUGH SO THAT HE COULD SERVE CUSTOMERS. HE JOINED THE CHINESE NATIONALIST LEAGUE SOCIETY ALMOST AS SOON AS HE ARRIVED: “WHEN I CAME HERE, I JOINED IN THE SAME YEAR BECAUSE MY UNCLE WAS A MEMBER. SO THAT’S WHY HE GOT ME IN TO BE A MEMBER. OH, AT THAT TIME, I BET, 95% OF THE CHINESE PEOPLE THEY BELONG TO THE CHINESE NATIONAL LEAGUE, I BELIEVE.” HE CONTINUED, SAYING THAT YOU COULDN’T BE A MEMBER OF BOTH THE SOCIETY AND THE MASONS, AND HE BELIEVES ABOUT 5% OF THE CITY’S CHINESE POPULATION WOULD HAVE BELONGED TO THE MASONS. HE ADDED: “BUT WE ARE STILL FRIENDS, STILL FRIENDS. WE’RE NOT ENEMY OR ANYTHING BUT, IT’S JUST THAT THE ORGANIZATIONS ARE DIFFERENT. THAT’S ALL.” HONG ENJOYED THE CAMARADERIE OF THE SOCIETY. HE SAID: “I REMEMBER, I LIKE IT BECAUSE THEY HAVE THE PARTY AND SO MANY PEOPLE. AND THEN YOU MEET ALL THE CHINESE PEOPLE THERE IN THE ONE GROUP. WELL, ANYWAY, WHEN YOU SEE SO MANY PEOPLE IN ONE PARTY, AND THEN WHEN THEY COME OUT MOSTLY THE PEOPLE THAT PARTY AND IT FEELS LIKE A LOTS OF FRIENDS OR EVEN LIKE THE FAMILY. SO YOU FEEL GOOD, YOU FEEL BETTER, AND THEN, WELL, MY UNCLE BELONGS THERE TOO AND THEN THE OTHERS BELONG THERE TOO, YEAH, EVERYBODY LIKE IN THE BIG FAMILY. YES, NICE, OTHERWISE YOU DON’T HAVE ANY FRIENDS, YOU DON’T MEET ANYBODY, IF YOU NOT BELONG THERE, I THINK NOT SO FRIENDLY TO YOU.” HONG INDICATED THAT WHEN A SPECIAL MEAL WAS HELD AT THE SOCIETY, IT WAS THE MEN WHO DID THE COOKING: “AT THAT TIME JUST ABOUT EVERYBODY KNOWS HOW TO COOK BECAUSE MOSTLY WE WORK IN THE KITCHEN WHEN THEY CAME HERE.” HE SAID THAT DINERS WOULD PAY A SMALL FEE TO EAT AT THE LEAGUE WHEN SPECIAL MEALS WERE PUT ON. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND FOR INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS.
Catalogue Number
P20110031021
Acquisition Date
2011-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DYE SAMPLES
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1977
Materials
CARDBOARD, FABRIC, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.6
Width
15
Description
BOOK WITH BLACK HARDCOVER. THE FRONT COVER OF THE BOOK HAS IN GOLD LETTERING “NACCO DYES” WITH A SMALL, GOLD LOGO IN THE CENTER AND “NATIONAL ANILINE & CHEMICAL CO. …” IN GOLD AT THE BOTTOM. THE SPINE OF THE BOOK HAS “NACCO DYES NO. 172” IN GOLD LETTERS. THE INSIDE COVER OF THE BOOK BEGINS WITH “NATIONAL SERVICE” WITH ADDITIONAL TEXT SUCCEEDING. THE PAGES ARE THICK, WHITE BOARD THAT ARE ATTACHED TO ONE ANOTHER WITH PAPER SEAMS. THE BOARDS FOLD OUT ACCORDIAN-STYLE INTO A HORIZONTAL LINE. THERE ARE 6 BOARDS IN TOTAL. THE FIRST FOUR BEGINNING FROM THE LEFT ARE TITLED, “NACCO UNION DYES.” EACH BOARD HAS TWO COLUMNS OF RECTANGULAR DYE SAMPLES. THERE ARE 9 ROWS ON EACH BOARD. THE TWO SAMPLES IN EACH ROW ARE THE SAME COLOUR BUT ON DIFFERENT TYPES OF FABRIC. THE 5TH BOARD IS DIVIDED INTO TWO COLUMNS. THE LEFT IS TITLED, “NACCO NEUTRAL DYES” AND THERE ARE 10 SAMPLES OF VARIOUS DYE COLOURS UNDERNEATH IT. THE RIGHT SIDE IS TITLED, “NACCO WOOL DYES.” GOOD CONDITION. THE BOARDS HAVE YELLOWED. SLIGHT SCUFFING ON THE BLACK COVER. SLIGHT BROWN STAIN ON 5TH AND 6TH BOARDS. ACCRETION ON LOWER SECTION ON THE BACKSIDE OF BOARD TO THE RIGHT OF THE TITLE PAGE (5TH BOARD).
Subjects
MERCHANDISING T&E
Historical Association
INDUSTRY
TRADES
RETAIL TRADE
History
THE KONKINS WERE A RUSSIAN-SPEAKING FAMILY FROM THE TOWN OF SHOULDICE, ALBERTA, NEAR CALGARY. THEY AND MANY OTHER RUSSIAN FAMILIES COMPOSED THAT TOWN’S DOUKHOBOR COLONY. IT WAS THERE WILLIAM KONKIN MARRIED ELIZABETH WISHLOW. IN 1928, THEIR DAUGHTER, ELSIE WAS BORN. THEY LATER MOVED TO A FARM IN VAUXHALL, ALBERTA. THE PRECEDING AND FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM A TWO-PART INTERVIEW WITH DONOR ELSIE MORRIS, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON FEBRUARY 17, 2016. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION COMES FROM FAMILY HISTORIES AND TEXTS PROVIDED BY THE DONOR. A FULL HISTORY OF THE KONKIN FAMILY CAN BE FOUND WITH THE RECORD P20160003001. MORRIS’ FATHER SOLD DYE TO LOCALS ON THE DOUKHOBOR COLONY. MORRIS DESCRIBES THE PURPOSE OF THE DYES AND HOW HER FATHER BECAME INVOLVED: “DYEING WAS NECESSARY TO DYE THE WOOL THAT YOU SPUN AND SOMETIMES YOU COULDN’T GET THE NECESSARY DYES IN THE STORE, SO I DON’T KNOW WHERE MY DAD GOT THOSE. THEY MIGHT HAVE SENT HIM SOME OR WHAT AND THEN HE WOULD CHOOSE THE COLOURS THEY WANTED AND HE WOULD ORDER THEM. NOW IT SO HAPPENS THAT THE PEOPLE IN THE COLONY ALL WANTED THESE PARTICULAR DYES BECAUSE THEY WERE BETTER THAN THE KIND THEY GOT IN THE STORE. I DON’T KNOW WHY. SO MY DAD BUILT A SCALE AND I REMEMBER THIS SCALE. IT STOOD ON THE TABLE, IT HAD A CENTRAL PART, THEN THERE WAS A ROD GOING ACROSS AND IT CAME DOWN LIKE THIS AND THREE NAILS ON ONE SIDE BROUGHT IT DOWN AND WHEN YOU WANTED TO SELL THE DYE YOU PUT A PIECE OF PAPER DOWN, PUT IN A SPOONFUL UNTIL WE BALANCED [IT] AND THEN YOU GOT AN EVEN BALANCE AND THAT AMOUNT CAME TO TEN CENTS. IF WANTED LESS THEN YOU PUT TWO NAILS DOWN AND THOSE CAME TO FIVE CENTS SO… I SUPPOSE [HE SOLD THE DYE] BECAUSE HE WANTED TO MAKE SOME MONEY. HE SOLD VEGETABLES IN THE WINTERTIME TO THE LOCALS WHO DIDN’T GROW GARDENS. IN SUMMERTIME IF HE COULD GET A JOB HARVESTING WORKING SOMEWHERE ON FARMS HE DID THAT. [HE WAS] THE MIDDLE MAN [SELLING DYES]… [A]ND NOBODY TOLD ANYONE THE STOREKEEPERS THAT OR HE’D HAVE PROBABLY BEEN TOLD TO STOP IT.” PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, OBITUARIES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND FAMILY HISTORIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160003004
Acquisition Date
2016-02
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93RD BATTERY"
Date Range From
1951
Date Range To
1959
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, COPPER
Catalogue Number
P20160017007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93RD BATTERY"
Date Range From
1951
Date Range To
1959
Materials
COTTON, BRASS, COPPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
90.2
Width
5.7
Description
GREY BELT WITH BRASS AND COPPER CLASP BUCKLE; BUCKLE HAS EMBOSSED CREST ON FRONT SHOWING A CROWN ABOVE AN ARTILLERY FIELD GUN, WITH A BANNER AT THE BOTTOM WITH THE TEXT “QUO FAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT”; BUCKLE HAS TEXT ENGRAVED ON BACK, “TOP, R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93 BTY (SP), R.C.A.”. BELT HAS BRASS AND COPPER CAPS ON ENDS WITH PAIRS OF METAL PRONGS EXTENDING FROM ENDS OF CAPS; BELT HAS TWO BRASS AND COPPER ADJUSTABLE LOOPS. INSIDE OF BELT HAS BLACK HAND-WRITTEN TEXT, “MAJOR R.W. AINSCOUGH, 93 BTY.” INSIDE OF BELT IS STAINED WITH WHITE AND YELLOW; INSIDE OF BELT IS WORN AND FRAYED BELOW PRONGS FROM ENDS; BUCKLE HAS WHITE AND GREEN RESIDUE FROM OXIDATION AT BASE OF CLASP; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (FIRST WORLD WAR) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (SECOND WORLD WAR AND POST-WAR). THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. ACCORDING A RESUME FOR REED W. AINSCOUGH INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT FILE, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH WAS BORN ON JUNE 21, 1918 IN CARDSTON, ALBERTA. IN 1940, REED AINSCOUGH JOINED THE 93RD BATTERY OF THE ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY [RCA] STATIONED AT FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, AND WAS PROMOTED TO A SECOND LIEUTENANT. REED AINSCOUGH WAS POSTED OVERSEAS IN 1942 AND SERVED UNTIL HIS DISCHARGE ON JANUARY 8, 1946. LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES REPORTED REED AINSCOUGH AS BEING IN THE THICK OF THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE, NOTABLY AT CAEN. IT WAS REPORTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 1944 THAT REED AINSCOUGH WAS PROMOTED TO CAPTAIN, AND WAS WOUNDED IN HIS LEG IN OCTOBER 1944. REED AINSCOUGH WAS SENT TO BELGIUM FOR SURGERY AND TO BE HOSPITALIZED, AND WAS RETURNED TO CANADA ON THE HOSPITAL SHIP H.M.C.S. LADY NELSON IN 1945. IN 1947, REED AINSCOUGH BECAME THE BATTERY COMMANDER OF THE 93RD BATTERY RCA, AND SERVED AS THE COMMANDER UNTIL 1959, BEING PROMOTED TO MAJOR IN 1951. IN 1959, UPON A TRANSFER WITH HIS EMPLOYMENT AT CANADA LIFE, HE MOVED TO MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, AND JOINED THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE AS A SQUADRON COMMANDER IN 1961. IN 1964, HE WAS PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT COLONEL AND COMMANDER OF THE SOUTH ALBERTA LIGHT HORSE, AND WAS APPOINTED AIDE-DE-CAMP TO LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR GRANT MACEWAN UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. ON OCTOBER 20, 1993, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE. ON HIS FATHER’S, REED WILSON AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH RECALLED, “I THINK THAT THE WAR WAS PROBABLY ONE OF THE BEST THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO MY DAD. HE NEVER SPOKE ABOUT IT MUCH, BUT THE FRIENDSHIPS THAT HE DEVELOPED THROUGH HIS CONTACTS IN THE WAR WENT ON RIGHT UNTIL HIS DEATH…IT’S PROBABLY LIKE BEING ON A TEAM, YOU KNOW, AND I THINK IT’S THAT FELLOWSHIP YOU GET FROM RELYING ON PEOPLE, AND TRAINING WITH PEOPLE, AND GETTING THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING. I THINK THAT’S SORT OF A BIG PART OF IT.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “I THINK [THE OBJECTS ARE] A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS]…IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE MILITARY SERVICE FILES FOR WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH AND FRANK AINSCOUGH, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017007
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
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