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Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, WOOD, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20170023002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
FELT, WOOD, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Length
37
Width
30
Description
RED FELT BANNER WITH TOP FORMING A STITCHED LOOP FIXED TO WOODEN ROD. BANNER IS FRINGED AT THE BOTTOM AND FRONT HAS RED AND BLACK PAINTED SCENE DEPICTING FORT MACLEOD, TEEPEES, AND MOUNTAINS WITH TEXT “ORIGINAL HOME OF THE MOUNTIES, FORT MACLEOD”. BACK HAS WHITE PAPER LABEL ATTACHED WITH BLACK FADED TEXT “JUNIOR FOREST WARDENS & [ILLEGIBLE], FORT MACLEOD, ALBERTA, CANADA”. FRONT AND BACK ARE CREASED, AND FRONT HAS STAIN AT TOP BELOW ROD; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
DOCUMENTARY ARTIFACT
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JULY 21, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GLENN AND JOANNE ALLEN REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF RCMP AND LETHBRIDGE MEMORABILIA. GLENN ALLEN WAS RAISED IN LETHBRIDGE, AND COLLECTED THE OBJECTS AS A CHILD IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE RCMP FIGURINE, ALLEN RECALLED, “THESE TWO MOUNTED POLICE ITEMS, THE BANNER AND THE LITTLE STATUETTE…I WAS YOUNG, IN THE [HOMEFRONT] PERIOD FROM 1940-1945. LETHBRIDGE WAS A MAJOR BASE FOR THE COMMONWEALTH AIR TRAINING THING. WE HAD YOUNG BRITISH AIRMEN COME, AND THEY LIVED EVERYWHERE. THEY BOARDED WITH PEOPLE; THEY STAYED ON BASE, BUT WHEN THEY HAD A DAY OFF, IT WAS ONE OF THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PEOPLE OF LETHBRIDGE TO TAKE THEM ON LITTLE JOURNEYS TO PLACES. I CAN REMEMBER GOING WITH THEM…TO FORT MACLEOD, AND THEN TO PINCHER CREEK, AND WE HAD PLUMS AND CHERRIES. I CAN REMEMBER MY MOTHER BRINGING THIS BAG OF FRUIT OUT, AND SAYING TO THE ONE YOUNG FELLOW, “WOULD YOU LIKE A PIECE OF FRUIT?” HE WAS SITTING IN THE FRONT SEAT, TURNED TO MY MOTHER [WHO] WAS DRIVING THE CAR, [THEN] HE TURNED TO HIS BUDDIES IN THE BACKSEAT, AND HE [SAID], “WOULD YOU LIKE A PLUM OR A CHERRY?” WE VISITED THERE, AND THOSE WERE GIFTS FROM THOSE AIRMEN TO ME, AT THAT TIME. I HAD A LITTLE MANTLE IN MY ROOM, DOWNSTAIRS IN CALGARY, AND HAD THEM THERE. WHEN WE WERE IN LETHBRIDGE, WE HAD NO SPACE AT ALL FOR ANYTHING. OUR FURNITURE HAD TO BE ALL STORED. THE ONLY POSSESSIONS OF OURS THAT WERE IN THAT HOUSE WERE OUR BEDS AND OUR DRESSERS, MAYBE A COUPLE OF CHAIRS…” “[I DISPLAYED THEM] MORE IN CALGARY, THAN LETHBRIDGE.” ALLEN ELABORATED ON HIS FAMILY’S HISTORY IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “MY MOTHER’S FAMILY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1923, AND SHE WAS ABOUT 12 AT THE TIME. SHE DIDN’T GO TO SCHOOL ANY FURTHER AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND SHE WAS HIRED ON AS A HOUSE GIRL FOR THE STOLZ FAMILY.” “MY DAD’S NAME WAS TOM, THOMAS SPENCE ALLEN, AND MY MOTHER WAS DOROTHY EMMA SCHIELS. MY DAD’S FAMILY - HIS FATHER AND, A FEW YEARS LATER MY DAD AND HIS MOTHER - CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, AND THEY SETTLED IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE, AT 707 12A ST. NORTH. THERE WERE THREE BOYS AND ONE GIRL. THEY ALL WENT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL AT GALBRAITH HIGH SCHOOL, AND MY DAD WORKED FOR THE RAILWAYS. HE STARTED AS A MESSENGER…HE WAS 15 YEARS OF AGE. HE PROGRESSED IN THE FREIGHT CPR BUSINESS, AND BECAME A FREIGHT INSPECTOR IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THEN, IN 1948, WAS TRANSFERRED TO CALGARY. MY MOTHER WAS ALWAYS A HOUSEWIFE. THEY LIVED ON 3RD AVENUE NORTH, BY THE LEALTA THEATRE. THEY HAD JUST ONE CHILD. I GREW UP [IN THAT HOUSE] UNTIL I WAS ABOUT AGE FIVE. AT THAT TIME, THE END OF THE WAR WAS COMING, AND SOLDIERS WERE RETURNING. RENTAL HOUSING BECAME ALMOST NOT AVAILABLE. ANYBODY WHO WAS RENTING AT THAT TIME, IF YOU HADN’T BEEN IN THE FORCES, YOU WERE REQUIRED BY ORDINANCE TO FIND ANOTHER PLACE. IT WAS A HOUSE WHICH WE HAD TO GIVE UP. WE’D BEEN THERE SINCE I WAS BORN. THEN WE MOVED OVER TO 12TH STREET C, THE 500 BLOCK. WE LIVED TEMPORARILY THERE, AND THEN THAT HOUSE WAS SECONDED. WE WERE ONLY THERE MAYBE 6 MONTHS, AND THEN WE MOVED INTO AN ATTIC SPACE AT 507 12TH STREET A NORTH, AND LIVED IN THE 2 ROOMS IN THE ATTIC - NO INSULATION, AND VERY COLD IN THE WINTER, AND HOT IN THE SUMMER.” “[MY FATHER] GOT A PROMOTION [IN 1948]. HE GOT A PROMOTION TO CALGARY…A BETTER JOB.” “MY MOTHER AND DAD LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE, GREW UP IN LETHBRIDGE. MY MOTHER WAS THE COLLECTOR IN THE FAMILY. WHEN I WAS MARRIED [IN 1962], ALL OF THESE THINGS SHE GAVE ME TO JUST TAKE ALONG, BECAUSE THEY HAD BEEN GIVEN TO ME. THEY ARE JUST LITTLE ITEMS THAT WE JUST DON’T KNOW WHETHER THEY HAVE ANY VALUE, AND RATHER THAN HAVE THEM JUST GO TO LAND FILL, WE’D LIKE YOU TO HAVE A LOOK AT THEM.” “TODAY IS OUR FIFTY-FIFTH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY, AND WE’RE RETURNING TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE WE’VE HAD THESE THINGS IN OUR POSSESSION FOREVER, AND WE WANT TO SEE IF THEY HAVE ANY VALUE TO THE MUSEUM. THEY ARE RELICS THAT WE’VE [GATHERED] FROM PAST YEARS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170023001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170023002
Acquisition Date
2017-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1927
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20170023004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1927
Date Range To
1950
Materials
FELT, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
22.6
Width
19
Description
BLACK FELT PATCH WITH RED HORSESHOE AT TOP, GOLD BISON HED IN CENTER, AND GOLD BANNER AT BASE; WHITE TEXT ON HORSESHOE READS “CALGARY”, GOLD TEXT BELOW BISON READS “GINGER ALE”, RED TEXT ON BANNER READS “LETHBRIDGE HOTEL” AND BLACK TEXT ON BANNER READS “LETHBRIDGE”. BACK OF PATCH HAS WHITE BACKING THAT IS DETACHING; BACKING EXTERIOR IS STAINED WITH BLACK MARKER AND BACKING INTERIOR IS STAINED FROM ADHESIVE. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
BUSINESS
COMMEMORATIVE
History
ON JULY 21, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GLENN AND JOANNE ALLEN REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF RCMP AND LETHBRIDGE MEMORABILIA. GLENN ALLEN WAS RAISED IN LETHBRIDGE, AND COLLECTED THE OBJECTS AS A CHILD IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE PATCH, ALLEN RECALLED, “THIS IS THE CREST FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL. MY UNCLE TED [TED FISK] WHEN HE WAS YOUNG…WORKED FOR THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL, AND HIS JOB WAS [HE DID ALL SORTS OF ODD-JOBS] TO GO WITH A CART AND A HORSE, OR LATER AN AUTOMOBILE, TO THE STATION TO PICK UP ARRIVING GUESTS, TAKE THEM FROM THERE WITH THEIR BAGS OVER TO THE HOTEL, GET THEM IN THERE, TAKE THEIR BAGS UP TO THE HOTEL. “ “THE STREETCARS CAME ALONG BY GALT GARDENS, SO [THE HOTEL] WAS DIRECTLY TO THE SOUTH OF GALT GARDENS…[IT WAS THE] GARDEN HOTEL.” “HE WAS A ROOM CLERK, UNTIL HE RETIRED. IN THOSE DAYS, HE WORKED 7 DAYS A WEEK, NO TIME OFF AT ALL, AND HE WORKED A 12 HOUR SHIFT. THEY LIVED IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE, SO THEY WALKED ACROSS THAT BRIDGE THAT WENT ACROSS THE TRACKS. HE WOULD HAVE TO DO THAT AT NIGHT BECAUSE, UNLESS HE WAS ON DAY SHIFT.” “I JUST KNOW THAT TED HAD IT, AND IT WAS GIVEN TO ME.” JOANNE ALLEN ADDED, “HE STARTED [AT THE HOTEL], AND THEN WORKED THERE UNTIL HE RETIRED IN HIS ‘60S.” ALLEN ELABORATED ON HIS FAMILY’S HISTORY IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “MY MOTHER’S FAMILY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1923, AND SHE WAS ABOUT 12 AT THE TIME. SHE DIDN’T GO TO SCHOOL ANY FURTHER AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND SHE WAS HIRED ON AS A HOUSE GIRL FOR THE STOLZ FAMILY.” “MY DAD’S NAME WAS TOM, THOMAS SPENCE ALLEN, AND MY MOTHER WAS DOROTHY EMMA SCHIELS. MY DAD’S FAMILY - HIS FATHER AND, A FEW YEARS LATER MY DAD AND HIS MOTHER - CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, AND THEY SETTLED IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE, AT 707 12A ST. NORTH. THERE WERE THREE BOYS AND ONE GIRL. THEY ALL WENT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL AT GALBRAITH HIGH SCHOOL, AND MY DAD WORKED FOR THE RAILWAYS. HE STARTED AS A MESSENGER…HE WAS 15 YEARS OF AGE. HE PROGRESSED IN THE FREIGHT CPR BUSINESS, AND BECAME A FREIGHT INSPECTOR IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THEN, IN 1948, WAS TRANSFERRED TO CALGARY. MY MOTHER WAS ALWAYS A HOUSEWIFE. THEY LIVED ON 3RD AVENUE NORTH, BY THE LEALTA THEATRE. THEY HAD JUST ONE CHILD. I GREW UP [IN THAT HOUSE] UNTIL I WAS ABOUT AGE FIVE. AT THAT TIME, THE END OF THE WAR WAS COMING, AND SOLDIERS WERE RETURNING. RENTAL HOUSING BECAME ALMOST NOT AVAILABLE. ANYBODY WHO WAS RENTING AT THAT TIME, IF YOU HADN’T BEEN IN THE FORCES, YOU WERE REQUIRED BY ORDINANCE TO FIND ANOTHER PLACE. IT WAS A HOUSE WHICH WE HAD TO GIVE UP. WE’D BEEN THERE SINCE I WAS BORN. THEN WE MOVED OVER TO 12TH STREET C, THE 500 BLOCK. WE LIVED TEMPORARILY THERE, AND THEN THAT HOUSE WAS SECONDED. WE WERE ONLY THERE MAYBE 6 MONTHS, AND THEN WE MOVED INTO AN ATTIC SPACE AT 507 12TH STREET A NORTH, AND LIVED IN THE 2 ROOMS IN THE ATTIC - NO INSULATION, AND VERY COLD IN THE WINTER, AND HOT IN THE SUMMER.” “[MY FATHER] GOT A PROMOTION [IN 1948]. HE GOT A PROMOTION TO CALGARY…A BETTER JOB.” “MY MOTHER AND DAD LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE, GREW UP IN LETHBRIDGE. MY MOTHER WAS THE COLLECTOR IN THE FAMILY. WHEN I WAS MARRIED [IN 1962], ALL OF THESE THINGS SHE GAVE ME TO JUST TAKE ALONG, BECAUSE THEY HAD BEEN GIVEN TO ME. THEY ARE JUST LITTLE ITEMS THAT WE JUST DON’T KNOW WHETHER THEY HAVE ANY VALUE, AND RATHER THAN HAVE THEM JUST GO TO LAND FILL, WE’D LIKE YOU TO HAVE A LOOK AT THEM.” “TODAY IS OUR FIFTY-FIFTH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY, AND WE’RE RETURNING TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE WE’VE HAD THESE THINGS IN OUR POSSESSION FOREVER, AND WE WANT TO SEE IF THEY HAVE ANY VALUE TO THE MUSEUM. THEY ARE RELICS THAT WE’VE [GATHERED] FROM PAST YEARS.” ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE GARDEN HOTEL, WHERE EDWARD FISK WORKED AS A CLERK, WAS CONVERTED FROM A CHINA SHOP AND APARTMENTS INTO A HOTEL IN 1925. AL FREED (THE GARDEN HOTEL MANAGER) AND THE KIRKHAM BROTHERS (THOMAS S. AND J.S. KIRKHAM) FORMED THE GARDEN HOTEL COMPANY IN 1927 AND REMAINED THE OWNERS OF THE HOTEL UNTIL 1956. MRS. J.S. KIRKHAM, THEN PRESIDENT OF THE GARDEN HOTEL COMPANY, SOLD THE HOTEL IN 1956 TO A BOARD OF FOUR HOTELLIERS FROM ACROSS ALBERTA, WITH MORRIE MILNER AS MANAGER AND BOARD MEMBER. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM MAY 17, 1927 NOTED THAT RENOVATIONS IN THE GARDEN HOTEL WERE COMPLETED TO INCLUDE A BEER PARLOR FOR GUESTS. ACCORDING TO A JANUARY 29, 1926 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, THE CALGARY BREWING AND MALTING COMPANY PURCHASED THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL IN 1926. CALGARY BREWING MAINTAINED OWNERSHIP OF THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL UNTIL 1964 WHEN THE HOTEL WAS SOLD TO SAM AND RICHARD SCHULTZ AND OSCAR SABASCH. THE SCHULTZ BROTHERS AND SABASCH OPERATED THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL UNDER THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA HOTEL COMPANY LIMITED, AS NOTED IN A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM 1964 DOCUMENTING THE SALE. ALBERTA BREWERIES BECAME INVOLVED IN PURCHASING AND MANAGING HOTELS UNTIL 1957, WHEN THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT PASSED A LAW THAT HOTELS COULD NOT BE OWNED BY BREWERIES. BREWERIES HAD TEN YEARS TO SELL THEIR EXISTING HOTELS AND WERE UNABLE TO PURCHASE NEW HOTELS, ACCORDING TO THE MOLSON BREWERIES, WESTERN DIVISION FONDS HELD BY THE GLENBOW MUSEUM (HTTPS://WWW.GLENBOW.ORG/COLLECTIONS/SEARCH/FINDINGAIDS/ARCHHTM/MOLSON.CFM). FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170023001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170023004
Acquisition Date
2017-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TRANSFER PATTERN
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK
Catalogue Number
P20170022000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TRANSFER PATTERN
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
PAPER, INK
No. Pieces
2
Length
43
Width
71.3
Description
A.WHITE ENVELOPE, 11.6CM LONG X 20CM WIDE; ENVELOPE PRINTED WITH BLACK IMAGE OF A WOMAN EMBROIDERING BESIDE TABLE AND LAMP AND BLACK TEXT “THE HERALD, HOUSEHOLD ARTS DEPT., LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED, ALICE BROOKS DESIGN, YOU HAVE ORDERED TWO OR MORE PATTERNS, PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT THEY MAY [WORD TORN] ARRIVE AT THE SAME TIME BECAUSE [WORD TORN] ARE MAILED IN SEPARATE ENVELOPES”. FRONT OF ENVELOPE HAS WHITE LABEL WITH PRINTED TYPED BLACK TEXT “LH DEC. 3/47, MRS. OLE HUSTAD, 336 TALISMAN AVE., VANCOUVER, B.C., 7457”. FRONT OF ENVELOPE HAS BLACK HANDWRITTEN TEXT “EMBROIDERY” AND RED POSTAL SEAL “TORONTO, ONTARIO, DEC. 5, 1947”. BACK OF ENVELOPE HAS BROWN LONG STAIN ON LEFT SIDE; ENVELOPE IS TORN OPEN AT FRONT LEFT SIDE; ENVELOPE IS CREASED ALONG TOP AND RIGHT EDGES. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B. TRANSFER PATTERN PRINTED IN DARK GREEN ON PAPER, 43CM LONG X 71.3CM WIDE. PAPER IS FOLDED INTO FOUR SECTIONS LENGTH-WAYS AND WIDTH-WAYS; FIRST SECTION HAS PRINTED BLUE TEXT “ALICE BROOKS DESIGNS, T.M. REG. U.S. PAT. OFF., TRANSFER PATTERN, NO. 7457” AND TEXT WITH INSTRUCTIONS “MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS”, “PLACING MOTIFS”, “TRANSFERRING PATTERN”, “EMBROIDERY”, “COLOR SUGGESTIONS”, AND IMAGES OF FIVE TYPES OF STITCHES. PATTERN IS PRINTED OF: A PUPPY IN A CORNER WITH DARK FOOTPRINTS LEADING TO PUPPY; A PUPPY IN A WASHBIN WITH KETTLE POURING WATER ON IT; A CHICK CHASING A PUPPY; A PUPPY HIDING FROM A CHICK BEHIND A DOGHOUSE LABELLED WITH REVERSED TEXT “BEWARE!”, A PUPPY WITH A BONE IN GRASS LOOKING AT BUTTERFLY; A PUPPY OUTSIDE A WASHBIN WITH KETTLE AND SCRUB BRUSH, AND DARK FOOTPRINTS; A CHICK WITH LABELLED WITH REVERSED TEXT “TRIAL”. BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER HAS REVERSED NUMBERS “7457”. PAPER IS YELLOWED AND TORN IN CENTER; PAPER IS CREASED FROM FOLDS INTO SIXTEEN SECTIONS; TOP LEFT CORNER IS CREASED ALONG EDGE; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TEXTILEWORKING T&E
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
DOMESTIC
History
ON JUNE 22, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED PAT DEBOER REGARDING THE DONATION OF A NEEDLEWORK TRANSFER PATTERN. THE TRANSFER PATTERN WAS SOLD TO PAT’S MOTHER, MARGARET HUSTAD, IN 1947 THROUGH THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD. WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE PATTERN AND HOW SHE CAME TO ACQUIRE IT, DEBOER ELABORATED, “MY MOTHER [MARGARET HUSTAD] NEVER THREW ANYTHING OUT…AND I DON’T THROW ANYTHING OUT. SHE HAD THIS GREAT BIG SEWING BOX PLUS A GREAT BIG BOX OF PATTERNS…WHEN SHE DIED IT JUST GOT MOVED TO MY HOUSE. I STARTED TO GO THROUGH IT AND I’VE GIVEN…A LOT OF THE PATTERNS I TO THE DRAMA DEPARTMENT IN THE UNIVERSITY BECAUSE THEY WENT BACK TO ABOUT 1945.” “THIS PATTERN…CAME FROM LETHBRIDGE, SHE ORDERED THEM THROUGH THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD…THAT’S HOW SHE COULD HAVE ORDERED THEM. [IT’S A] TRANSFER…THEY’RE LITTLE PUPPY DOGS AND A DOG HOUSE…I THINK SHE BOUGHT IT TO USE IN THINGS IN MY ROOM.” “IT’S IMPORTANT FOR PEOPLE TO UNDERSTAND THAT…WE DIDN’T HAVE MASS [PRODUCED GOODS]. MOM DIDN’T HAVE MASS PRODUCED STUFF LIKE THEY DO NOW. SHE WAS AN EXPERIENCED SEAMSTRESS AND SHE MADE ALL MY CLOTHES, SHE ALTERED ALL HER CLOTHES AND SHE HAD SO MUCH [SEWING] STUFF. I THOUGHT WELL…I DON’T THINK IT WOULD HURT TO GIVE SOME OF THIS TO THE GALT SO THAT IF YOU EVER WANT TO DO A DIORAMA…THAT EXPLAINS WHAT WIVES AND FARM WIVES AND WOMEN DID YEARS AGO.” DEBOER SPOKE TO HER MEMORIES OF HER MOTHER’S SEWING, RECALLING, “I DON’T KNOW WHERE [MY MOTHER] LEARNED HOW TO SEW, OTHER THAN I THINK WOMEN ALWAYS SEWED. IT WAS A NECESSITY, DURING THE DIRTY ‘30S WHEN PEOPLE COULDN’T GET THINGS. WOMEN WOULD COME INTO TOWN HERE, THEY WOULD SEND THEIR HUSBANDS TO ELLISON’S AND GET FLOUR SACKS. THEY WOULD MAKE TEAS TOWELS AND PILLOW SLIPS, AND IT WAS SIMPLY BECAUSE THAT WAS WHAT THEY HAD, THAT’S WHAT THEY COULD GET. MOM WAS GOOD AT IT. DURING THE ‘30S, MOM AND HER FAMILY WERE LITERALLY LIVING HAND TO MOUTH AND MOM WAS MARRIED TO A GENTLEMEN FROM BARONS FOR FOUR OR FIVE YEARS AND SHE WAS RIGHT DURING THE MIDDLE OF THE ‘30S. [SHE] AND LLOYD HAD NO MONEY, BUT PEOPLE WOULD GIVE MOTHER THINGS. THEY WOULD GIVE HER OLD DRESSES AND THEY’D GIVE HER OLD COATS, AND SHE WOULD ALTER THEM SO THAT SHE COULD WEAR THEM, OR LLOYD COULD WEAR THEM. OTHERWISE SHE WOULDN’T [HAVE] HAD ANY CLOTHES TO WEAR.” “[MY LOVE OF SEWING] COMES FROM MY MOTHER…SHE ALWAYS WAS SEWING…THE SEWING MACHINE SAT IN THE KITCHEN, RIGHT WHERE SHE COULD GET AT IT. SHE TAUGHT ME TO SEW WHEN I WAS ABOUT TWELVE MAYBE, A SINGER SEWING MACHINE AND I DID IT. I COULD’VE USED A TREADLE SEWING MACHINE TOO BECAUSE MY AUNT THAT LIVED IN VULCAN…SHE HAD A TREADLE SEWING MACHINE, SO I’D USE THAT. MY MOM TAUGHT ME TO SEW ON AN ELECTRIC SEWING MACHINE AND SHE TAUGHT ME TO MAKE MY OWN DOLL CLOTHES. THAT’S HOW IT STARTED. I HAD AN AFFINITY FOR IT. IT WAS SOMETHING I FELT I LIKE I WAS GOING TO BE GOOD AT…YOU COULD PRODUCE SOMETHING THAT SOMEBODY ELSE COULD USE OR ENJOY. WHEN MY GIRLS WERE LITTLE I MADE ALL THEIR OWN CLOTHES. I SEWED EVERYTHING.” “MY MOTHER WAS THIRTY-EIGHT WHEN I WAS BORN…I CAME LATER IN LIFE. MY DAD [MOTHER’S SECOND HUSBAND] WAS SIXTY-SEVEN WHEN I WAS BORN. I’M MY DAD’S SECOND FAMILY. MOTHER ALWAYS SEWED, SHE SEWED FOR HER[SELF], SHE HAD A SISTER WHO HAD EIGHT CHILDREN AND FOUR GIRLS AND FOUR BOYS, AND MOM SEWED FOR THEM. THEY LIVED JUST OUTSIDE OF VULCAN…THE OTHER LADIES SEWED, BUT NOT TO THE EXTENT MY MOTHER DID. MY MOTHER REALLY WAS AN EXPERT SEAMSTRESS. SOME OF THE NEIGHBOURS WOULD BRING THINGS UP TO HAVE MOTHER FIX THEM, OR [SHE WOULD] SHOW THEM HOW TO FIX THEM. MOTHER WAS ALSO VERY GOOD AT MAKING DINING ROOM AND LIVING ROOM DRAPES. THE NEIGHBOURS WOULD SHOW UP WITH THESE BOLTS OF CLOTH AND SAY, “HERE MARGARET WE NEED DRAPES”…IT WAS A BIT UNUSUAL. THE OTHER LADIES IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD DIDN’T DO IT LIKE SHE DID…I THINK THAT WAS PART OF THE REASON WHY I TOOK TO SEWING.” “MOM A GREAT BIG KITCHEN, AND HER IRONING BOARD WAS IN THE KITCHEN AND…THE SEWING MACHINE WOULD GET MOVED OUT TO THE KITCHEN, EVERY SO OFTEN IT WOULD GET PUT AWAY…AT CHRISTMAS WHEN SHE WAS CLEANING THE HOUSE UP FOR COMPANY. IT WOULD GET PUT AWAY. MOST OF THE TIME IT WAS IN THE KITCHEN. MOM WAS SEWING AND I APPARENTLY EXPRESSED AN INTEREST, AND SO SHE SAID “OKAY IF THIS WHAT YOU’D LIKE TO DO” THEN…SHE BOUGHT PATTERNS FOR DOLL CLOTHES THAT WOULD FIT MY DOLLS AND STARTED TEACHING ME. WE’D BE IN THE KITCHEN, AND IT WAS JUST SOMETHING THAT WAS DONE, BETWEEN THE TWO OF US…IT WAS A PROGRESSION OF HER EXPERTISE AND LOVE OF DOING IT.” “I DON’T THINK SHE EVER CHARGED [FOR HER SEWING]. IT WAS THEY ASKED HER AND SHE SAID OKAY AND THAT WAS THE WAY IT WAS. I CAN NEVER REMEMBER MY MOTHER CHARGING FOR HER SEWING.” “PART OF [SEWING] WAS BONDING WITH MY MOM. I WAS AN ONLY CHILD BEING RAISED BY PARENTS WHO WERE OLD. THERE [WERE] A LOT OF TIMES WHERE I WAS BY MYSELF BECAUSE OF THE PEOPLE MOM AND DAD ASSOCIATED WITH WERE OLDER…SO [SEWING] WAS SOMETHING THAT I COULD DO THAT WOULD KEEP ME OCCUPIED…WHILE MOM AND DAD WERE VISITING…IT WAS A GENERATIONAL THING, BECAUSE MOM AND DAD WERE ESSENTIALLY A GENERATION ABOVE THE PARENTS OF ALL MY FRIENDS. I SPENT A LOT OF TIME AS A YOUNG CHILD ALONE, SO I READ OR SEWED.” “[MY PARENTS] LIVED IN VANCOUVER [AFTER RETIRING]…THEY LIVED IN VANCOUVER FROM 1945 TO 1949.” “IN 1949 THEY MOVED, THEY DIDN’T COME TO LETHBRIDGE RIGHT AWAY. I WAS RAISED IN PENTICTON. MY DAD HAD BRONCHITIS AND WHEN THEY MOVED OUT TO VANCOUVER HE FOUND THE DAMP AIR WAS TOO HARD ON HIS LUNGS. HE DIDN’T WANT TO COME BACK TO GRANUM, SO HE WENT LOOKING FOR SOME PLACE TO MOVE TO THAT WAS DRIER SO HE FOUND PENTICTON.” “IN 1961 I MARRIED A BOY FROM BARONS BY THE NAME OF RONALD DEBOER. I HAD A CHILD, AND AS I’M AN ONLY CHILD, AND DAD AND MOM DECIDED IF THEY WERE GOING TO HAVE GRANDCHILDREN, THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSE TO THEIR GRANDCHILDREN AND MOVED BACK.” “SHE KEPT SEWING. SHE MADE CLOTHES FOR HER GRANDDAUGHTER…MOM WAS ALWAYS SEWING SOMETHING. I DON’T THINK SHE MADE TOO MANY THINGS FOR ME AFTER THEY MOVED BACK TO LETHBRIDGE HERE, BUT SHE CERTAINLY DID FOR [MY DAUGHTERS]. THERE WERE SIX YEARS BETWEEN BOTH MY TWO GIRLS, MY FIRST HUSBAND WAS KILLED A YEAR AND FOUR MONTHS AFTER WE WERE MARRIED IN A FARMING ACCIDENT. I WAS SINGLE FOR TWO YEARS…THE FACT THAT MOM AND DAD WERE HERE IN LETHBRIDGE WAS MY SAVING GRACE BECAUSE I WAS OUT ON THE FARM.” “I SEWED ALL THE TIME. THE LAST FEW YEARS IS ABOUT THE ONLY TIME I HAVEN’T SEWED. THIS LAST…TEN OR FOURTEEN YEARS THAT I HAVEN’T SEWED ON A REGULAR BASIS [WAS] BECAUSE I HAD TO GO BACK TO WORK FULLTIME. BUT PREVIOUS TO THAT I SEWED ALL THE TIME. MY MACHINE WAS NEVER PUT AWAY. IT WAS DOWN IN THE BEDROOM, IT WAS JUST NEVER PUT AWAY.” “[I ALWAYS SEWED] GENERALLY SPEAKING CLOTHES. I WAS EITHER ALTERING CLOTHES…MY HUSBAND’S GOT REALLY SHORT LEGS, TWENTY-EIGHT (28) INCH LEG, YOU CAN’T GET A PANT THAT’S GOT TWENTY-EIGHT INCH LEGS, SO I WAS SHORTENING HIS JEANS. ON THE FARM YOUR WORK CLOTHES GET RIPPED AND THE SEAMS COME APART AND I DID ALL THAT.” “[I LIKED SEWING FOR] THE FACT THAT I COULD SHUT EVERYTHING ELSE OUT, AND IT WAS MY TIME. I COULD FOCUS…IF I WAS IN THE MIDDLE OF A PROJECT, YOU HAD TO KNOW WHERE THE GROCERIES WERE BECAUSE I NEVER STOPPED. [MY HUSBAND] WOULD COME IN AND SAY “YOU KNOW, IT IS SUPPER TIME”, AND I’D SAY, “YEAH, MHMM”. IT WAS A WAY FOR ME TO FOCUS, AND IT WAS MY TIME. IT WAS JUST TIME THAT WAS MINE. I WAS BEING CREATIVE, AND FELT LIKE I REALLY BEING USEFUL…IT FELT GOOD.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER MOTIVATION TO DONATE THE PATTERN, DEBOER NOTED, “I HAVEN’T BEEN DOING ANY SEWING FOR A LONG TIME AND I DECIDED BECAUSE I HAVEN’T DONE ANY SEWING FOR A LONG TIME MAYBE I SHOULD GET GOING AND START DOING SOME SEWING. WHEN I STARTED SEWING, I STARTED GOING THROUGH ALL THIS STUFF, AND I THOUGHT THERE’S A LOT OF OLD INTERESTING STUFF IN HERE. THIS IS JUST A VERY BRIEF SAMPLE OF WHAT I HAVE AT HOME. I THOUGHT MAYBE I SHOULD GET A HOLD OF [THE MUSEUM] AND SEE IF THEY’D LIKE SOMETHING THAT THEY COULD USE TO DEMONSTRATE AT SOME POINT IN TIME THROUGH THE MUSEUM OF WHAT WOMEN USED TO DO…WHAT THEY WERE EXPECTED TO DO.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170022000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170022000
Acquisition Date
2017-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WEDGE CAP
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170009001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WEDGE CAP
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Materials
COTTON, SILK, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
29
Width
11.4
Description
BLUE WEDGE CAP WITH FOLDED EDGE SEWN AROUND CAP; FRONT OF CAP HAS TWO BRASS BUTTONS EMBOSSED WITH CROWN OVER EAGLE IN FLIGHT AND TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF CAP HAS METAL SEAL ON BLACK BACKGROUND; SEAL SHOWS BRASS, RED, AND SILVER CROWN OVER A BRASS FLYING EAGLE OVER FOUR BRASS LEAF FRONDS TIED IN THE CENTER. INSIDE OF CAP IS LINED WITH RED SILK AND DISCOLOURED VELVET EDGING; TOP OF INSIDE HAS FOLD IN SILK WITH “MATHESON” WRITTEN ON EITHER SIDE IN BLACK MARKER. INSIDE CAP HAS DISCOLOURED GREY TAG WITH BLUE STITCHED EDGING AND BLUE AND RED EMBROIDERED TEXT “THE MUIR BRAND, EST. 1875, MUIR CAP & REGALIA LTD., SI SIMCOE ST. TORONTO”. INSIDE LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF CAP HAS HOLE IN VELVET LINING; INSIDE BACK OF CAP HAS FRAYING ALONG VELVET EDGING; CAP IS FADED ON OUTSIDE AND HAS SOILING ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE WEDGE CAP, MATHESON RECALLED, “[THIS IS THE ORIGINAL] FROM THE R.C.A.F. RIGHT FROM DAY ONE.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE CAP, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY..." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009001
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
R.C.A.F. DRESS JACKET
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, SILK, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170009002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
R.C.A.F. DRESS JACKET
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Materials
COTTON, SILK, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
79
Width
47
Description
BLUE COTTON JACKET WITH BLUE SILK LINING; JACKET HAS FIVE POCKETS ON FRONT WITH TWO UPPER POCKETS WITH BRASS “R.C.A.F.” BUTTONS ON COVER FLAPS, TWO LOWER POCKETS WITH BRASS “R.C.A.F.” BUTTONS ON COVER FLAPS, AND ADDITION POCKET ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE WITH NO COVER FLAP. JACKET HAS FOUR ADDITIONAL BUTTONS FOR FASTENING RUNNING DOWN RIGHT-WEARING SIDE WITH BUTTON HOLES OF LEFT-WEARING SIDE; ALL BUTTONS ON JACKET ARE BRASS WITH EMBOSSED CROWN OVER FLYING EAGLE, OVER TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. JACKET SLEEVES HAVE DOUBLE BLACK STRIPES AROUND CENTER BLUE STRIPE ABOVE CUFFS [SECOND LIEUTENANT BARS]; SHOULDERS HAVE BLUE PATCHES SEWN ON WITH WHITE TEXT “CANADA”. FRONT LEFT-WEARING SIDE OF JACKET HAS BADGE WITH BLUE BACKGROUND SEWN ON; BADGE SHOWS RED AND BRASS CROWN OVER WHITE AND BLACK GLOBE WITH RED LIGHTING BOLT ACROSS FRONT, WITH BRASS WINGS OUTSTRETCHED AND LAUREL LEAVES AROUND GLOBE AT INSIDE OF WINGS [AIRBORNE INTERCEPTOR BADGE]. BACK OF JACKET HAS TWO BLACK BELT LOOPS AT SIDES. INSIDE RIGHT-WEARING SIDE IS POCKET SEWN INTO LINING; OUTSIDE OF POCKET HAS WHITE LABEL WITH STITCHED TEXT “HANFORD-DREWITT LTD., WINNIPEG”. INSIDE LINING HAS RIP AT TOP OF SPLIT AT BACK; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE JACKET, MATHESON RECALLED, “THIS IS JUST THE WINTER DRESS. THERE WAS THE TUNIC AND THEN THE SUMMER ONES.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE JACKET, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY, ESPECIALLY THIS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009002
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOL, SILK, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20170009003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1957
Date Range To
1963
Materials
WOOL, SILK, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
119
Width
48
Description
BLUE WOOL COAT WITH TWO POCKETS ON FRONT AND TWO BRASS BUTTONS ON RIGHT-WEARING SIDE AND THREE BRASS BUTTONS ON LEFT-WEARING SIDE; BRASS BUTTONS ALL HAVE EMBOSSED CROWN AT TOP WITH FLYING EAGLE UNDER, AND LOWER TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. COAT SLEEVES HAVE THREE BRASS BUTTONS DOWN CUFFS WITH EMBOSSED CROWN OVER FLYING EAGLE AND TEXT “R.C.A.F.”. COAT SHOULDERS HAVE BLUE BADGES SEWN ON WITH WHITE TEXT “CANADA” AND EPAULETS ATTACHED DISPLAYING TWO BLACK STRIPES AND MIDDLE BLUE STRIPE [SECOND LIEUTENANT STRIPES]. INSIDE OF JACKET HAS BLUE SILK LINING; LEFT-WEARING SIDE ON INSIDE HAS A POCKET AND BLACK PLASTIC BUTTON; TAG SEWN ONTO INSIDE POCKET IS WHITE WITH RED TEXT “HANFORD-DREWITT LTD., WINNIPEG”. INSIDE LINING IS STAINED GREEN AT COLLAR AND ON LEFT-WEARING SIDE; OUTSIDE OF COAT HAS SOILING AND STAINING ON FRONT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MARCH 1, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CLYDE MATHESON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE APPAREL. MATHESON SERVED TWO YEARS IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY ON H.M.C.S. “NADEN” BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE. ON THE COAT, MATHESON RECALLED, “THIS IS JUST THE WINTER DRESS. THERE WAS THE TUNIC AND THEN THE SUMMER ONES.” “THEY’VE BEEN HANGING UP IN MY CLOSET FOR FIFTY SOME ODD YEARS AND I THINK IT’S TIME THAT I DID SOMETHING WITH THEM.” “ABOUT 1955 I JOINED THE NAVY AND I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO YEARS AND THEN TRANSFERRED WITH AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. I WENT IN THE AIR FORCE IN ABOUT 1957 AND THEN GRADUATED FROM THE AIR OBSERVER SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG ABOUT 1958 AND GOT MY WINGS THEN AND THAT’S WHERE THESE ALL ARE ORIGINALLY FROM. THIS ALL I’VE GOT OF ALL THE UNIFORMS I HAD.” MATHESON SPOKE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE NAVY AND AIR FORCE, STATING, “IN 1955 WHEN I GOT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL, THE LAST THING I WANTED TO DO WAS ANYMORE SCHOOLING. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT, SO SPUR OF THE MOMENT THING I JOINED THE NAVY. I WAS IN THE NAVY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND I REALIZED I HAD MADE A MISTAKE. I LASTED TWO YEARS IN THERE, AND THEN TRANSFERRED TO THE AIR FORCE. I GUESS THAT WAS PROBABLY JUST THE REASON TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE BACK THEN.” “MY DAD WAS KIND OF ANTI-MILITARY. MY BROTHER, BILL, WAS IN THE PARATROOPERS DURING THE WAR…HE WAS KIND OF A HERO WHEN WE WERE KIDS…I THINK MAYBE THE REASON I JOINED THE NAVY IS MY DAD WAS AN OLD FISHERMAN IN SCOTLAND AND HE KIND OF REALLY LOVED THE NAVY. I MIGHT HAVE DONE THAT TO PLEASE HIM, BUT I THINK THE MAIN REASON WAS TO GET OUT OF LETHBRIDGE.” “THE KOREAN WAR [WAS IN] ’55, IT WAS JUST ABOUT FINISHING UP AND THE VIETNAM WAR WAS JUST GETTING [STARTED]. THE ONLY CLAIM I HAD WHEN I WAS IN THE SERVICE IS THEY DID A LOT OF FLYING. ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD, NOVA SCOTIA, 405 SQUADRON AND WE DID A LOT OF FLYING DURING THE CUBAN CRISIS. THE REST OF OUR TIME WAS JUST THESE LONG BORING PATROLS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC LOOKING FOR SUBMARINES.” “[I KNEW I MADE THE WRONG CHOICE IN THE NAVY FROM] THE DISCIPLINE OF IT. IT DIDN’T MAKE SENSE TO ME, I THINK. THERE WAS SO MUCH STUFF CARRIED OVER FROM LORD NELSON…BUT I STUCK IT OUT FOR TWO YEARS. I ENDED UP GETTING A PRETTY GOOD TRADE IN THE NAVY. I WAS AN AIR AND A WEATHER OBSERVER, SO I HAD A JAMMY TRADE, AND A POSTING ALL THE TIME I WAS IN THE NAVY. IT JUST WASN’T FOR ME AND I WAS GOING THROUGH WHAT THEY CALL AN UPPER YARDS MAN PLAN WHERE YOU GET YOUR COMMISSION THROUGH THE RANKS IN THE AIR FORCE OR IN THE NAVY. I WAS IN TALKING TO THIS COMMANDER MARVIN…THERE WAS A CRUISER OUT, THE MAIDEN, IN ONTARIO, AND HE CALLED ME IN AND SAID, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET READY FOR THESE EXAMS”. I HAD DONE SOME, AND I JUST HAPPENED TO MENTION TO HIM I CHANGED MY MIND ABOUT MAKING THE NAVY MY CAREER AND I WAS THINKING ABOUT TRANSFERRING GOING TO AIRCREW IN THE AIR FORCE. HE MUST NOT HAVE LIKED THE NAVY VERY MUCH EITHER. BEFORE I KNEW IT I WAS IN FRONT OF THE RECRUITING OFFICER FOR THE AIR FORCE AND AWAY I WENT.” “IN THE AIR FORCE [I WAS A FLYING OFFICER]. I WAS JUST AN OOD, AN ORDINARY SEAMAN IN THE NAVY.” “WHEN THEY GIVE YOU A COMMISSION, IT’S A SHORT SERVICE COMMISSION WHICH IS ABOUT FIVE YEARS…ALL MY TIME WAS SPENT IN GREENWOOD NOVA SCOTIA FROM ABOUT ’58 TO ABOUT ’63. THEN THEY OFFERED AN EXTENSION TO MY COMMISSION BUT BY THAT TIME I DECIDED THIS WASN’T FOR ME EITHER AND I TURNED THAT DOWN AND GOT OUT AND WENT BACK TO SCHOOL.” “I WENT BACK TO THE U OF A [IN 1963] AND GRADUATED IN DENTISTRY IN ’68.” “I WOULD DO IT AGAIN IF I HAD TO. IT WAS THE BEST TIME OF MY LIFE ESPECIALLY WHEN I GOT IN THE AIR FORCE. WE WERE AIRCREW SO WE WERE MAKING PRETTY GOOD MONEY. I WASN’T MARRIED AND I SAW A LOT OF THE WORLD FLYING AROUND DOWN THERE IN NOVA SCOTIA MAINLY EUROPE. I DON’T REGRET IT AT ALL.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT HIS MOTIVATIONS FOR DONATING THE COAT, MATHESON NOTED, “I JUST DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT’S JUST [BEEN] HANGING THERE FOR FIFTY YEARS, SO I FIGURED MAYBE [THE MUSEUM] MIGHT HAVE SOME USE FOR IT. I WOULDN’T WANT TO SEE IT GET THROWN AWAY..." FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170009001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170009003
Acquisition Date
2017-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CHILD'S HARNESS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
LEATHER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170018001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CHILD'S HARNESS
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
LEATHER, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
27.6
Width
33.4
Description
BROWN LEATHER CHILD HARNESS WITH SILVER BUCKLES AND LEATHER NAILS; HARNESS HAS BELT WITH TWO SUEDE LEATHER BUCKLED STRAPS RUNNING FRONT TO BACK, AND TWO SUEDE LEATHER STRAPS WITH BUCKLES HANGING DOWN SIDES. FRONT OF BELT HAS WHITE RESIDUE AND STAINING ON LEATHER; BELT IS DISCOLOURED AT ENDS; LEATHER BELT IS CRACKED ON FRONT LEFT. INSIDE OF BELT IS SUEDE; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MAY 3, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GARY HAMILTON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. HAMILTON WAS RAISED IN MAGRATH, ALBERTA, AND RECALLS THE OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ON THE LEATHER CHILD HARNESS, HAMILTON RECALLED, “[IT]S] MINE. MY MOTHER AND MY DAD USED TO TIE ME, WELL HOOK ME UP IN THE HARNESS, TIE ME TO THE CLOTHESLINE, GIVE ME SOME ROPE TO GO FROM ONE END TO THE OTHER, SO THAT THEY KNEW WHERE I WAS. I GUESS I [WAS ANGRY] ONE DAY AND BURNT THE BACKYARD DOWN [IN MAGRATH], AND THAT’S MY HARNESS.” “THE HARNESS [WAS] PART OF MY GROWING UP THAT’S ALL. I DO REMEMBER…WEARING IT.” HAMILTON ELABORATED ON HIS CHILDHOOD, NOTING, “WHEN I WAS GROWING UP IT WAS WAY DIFFERENT THAN IT IS NOW. IF YOU NEEDED A SPANKING YOU GOT A SPANKING…NOW YOU CAN’T TOUCH ANYBODY. THAT’S PART OF MY GROWING UP SO I WOULD IMAGINE EVERYBODY ELSE WAS DOING IT TOO. THEY DIDN’T THINK OF IT BY THEMSELVES.” “I WAS GONE ALL THE TIME. MY AUNT LIVED DOWN THE STREET AND I GUESS I WOULD GO VISIT HER, PUT MY HAT ON WHETHER I HAD CLOTHES ON OR NOT, GO VISIT HER. MY DAD WORKED A BLOCK AWAY. EVERYBODY KNEW ME. IT WASN’T A BIG TOWN, AND MY UNCLE WAS A SCHOOL TEACHER THERE, PRINCIPAL AT THE SCHOOL. I’VE GOT LOTS OF RELATIVES OUT THERE.” “THEY’D SEND ME TO SCHOOL AND I WOULDN’T GO. RECESS I’D GO PLAY WITH THE GUYS AT RECESS AND THEN I’D TAKE OFF AGAIN, I’D GO FISHING.” “MY MOTHER [CORRINE HAMILTON] NEVER THREW ANYTHING AWAY. GAMES FROM WHEN WE WERE KIDS…JACKETS, SHOES, SKATES, SHE KEPT IT.” “MY BROTHER AND MY SISTER [WENT THROUGH MY MOTHER’S THINGS WHEN SHE PASSED AWAY TEN YEARS AGO]…[MY BROTHER CALLED] HE SAID, “DO YOU WANT YOUR JACKET BACK? AT THE TIME I THOUGHT I WAS GOING TO MAKE A FRAME FOR ALL THIS STUFF AND THEN PUT IT ON MY WALL. ONE THING LED TO ANOTHER AND WE SOLD MY HOUSE, MOVED TO AN APARTMENT, [AND I] DIDN’T WANT TO DO IT.” “IT’S PART OF MY CHILDHOOD.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170018001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170018001
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CHILD'S JACKET
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, RAYON
Catalogue Number
P20170018002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CHILD'S JACKET
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, RAYON
No. Pieces
1
Length
46
Width
30.2
Description
CHILD’S BROWN LEATHER SUEDE JACKET WITH FRINGED SLEEVES, BOTTOM, AND CHEST DECORATION. FRONT OF JACKET HAS TWO POCKETS AT SIDES AND SILVER ZIPPER RUNNING DOWN; JACKET LINING IS BROWN COTTON. INSIDE COLLAR OF JACKET IS YELLOW TAG WITH BLACK AND BROWN STITCHED BILINGUAL (ENGLISH AND FRENCH) TEXT “ALL WEATHER, SUEDINE JACKET, SEE SAW, COTTON COATED VINYL, DO NOT DRY CLEAN, TAIWAN”. INSIDE RIGHT WEARING SIDE IS WHITE TAG WITH BLACK TEXT “SHELL EXPANDED…COTTON BACKING, LINING: 100% RAYON”. JACKET SEAMS AND EDGING ON POCKETS AND FRINGING IS MACHINE-STITCHED WITH CREAM THREAD. JACKET HAS SCUFFS AND STAINING FROM WEAR ON FRONT, SLEEVES, AND BACK; LOOSE THREAD AT LOWER LEFT-WEARING SIDE EDGE ALONG FRINGE AND STITCHING MISSING IN PLACES ALONG LOWER LEFT WEARING EDGE; JACKET HAS SINGLE PUNCTURE HOLES AT TOPS OF BOTH SHOULDERS AND GO THROUGH BOTH SIDES OF JACKET AND LINING. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON MAY 3, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GARY HAMILTON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. HAMILTON WAS RAISED IN MAGRATH, ALBERTA, AND RECALLS THE OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ON THE SUEDE JACKET, HAMILTON RECALLED, “MY PARENTS GAVE IT TO ME…SIXTY-FIVE YEARS AGO. [I REMEMBER] PLAYING IN IT… PLAYING IN THE DIRT. [THE JACKET WAS] PROBABLY MY FAVOURITE [GROWING UP].” “I LIVED IN THE COUNTRY AND EVERYBODY ELSE DRESSED THE SAME WAY, OR CLOSE TO THE SAME. [I CAME] FROM THE FARM MOVED INTO TOWN.” “[WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE] WHEN I WAS IN GRADE FOUR.” HAMILTON ELABORATED ON HIS CHILDHOOD, NOTING, “WHEN I WAS GROWING UP IT WAS WAY DIFFERENT THAN IT IS NOW. IF YOU NEEDED A SPANKING YOU GOT A SPANKING…NOW YOU CAN’T TOUCH ANYBODY. THAT’S PART OF MY GROWING UP SO I WOULD IMAGINE EVERYBODY ELSE WAS DOING IT TOO. THEY DIDN’T THINK OF IT BY THEMSELVES.” “I WAS GONE ALL THE TIME. MY AUNT LIVED DOWN THE STREET AND I GUESS I WOULD GO VISIT HER, PUT MY HAT ON WHETHER I HAD CLOTHES ON OR NOT, GO VISIT HER. MY DAD WORKED A BLOCK AWAY. EVERYBODY KNEW ME. IT WASN’T A BIG TOWN, AND MY UNCLE WAS A SCHOOL TEACHER THERE, PRINCIPAL AT THE SCHOOL. I’VE GOT LOTS OF RELATIVES OUT THERE.” “THEY’D SEND ME TO SCHOOL AND I WOULDN’T GO. RECESS I’D GO PLAY WITH THE GUYS AT RECESS AND THEN I’D TAKE OFF AGAIN, I’D GO FISHING.” “MY MOTHER [CORRINE HAMILTON] NEVER THREW ANYTHING AWAY. GAMES FROM WHEN WE WERE KIDS…JACKETS, SHOES, SKATES, SHE KEPT IT.” “MY BROTHER AND MY SISTER [WENT THROUGH MY MOTHER’S THINGS WHEN SHE PASSED AWAY TEN YEARS AGO]…[MY BROTHER CALLED] HE SAID, “DO YOU WANT YOUR JACKET BACK? AT THE TIME I THOUGHT I WAS GOING TO MAKE A FRAME FOR ALL THIS STUFF AND THEN PUT IT ON MY WALL. ONE THING LED TO ANOTHER AND WE SOLD MY HOUSE, MOVED TO AN APARTMENT, [AND I] DIDN’T WANT TO DO IT.” “IT’S PART OF MY CHILDHOOD.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170018001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170018002
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RAWHIDE DRUM
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
HIDE, WOOD, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20170018003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RAWHIDE DRUM
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
HIDE, WOOD, LEATHER
No. Pieces
2
Height
9
Diameter
34
Description
A. RAWHIDE DRUM WITH HIDE FITTED OVER ROUND WOODEN FORM; HIDE HAS LEATHER LOOPED ABOVE WOODEN FORM, WITH LEATHER STRAPS TIED INTO CENTER OF DRUM WITH CLOTH AND WIRE AT ENDS OF LEATHER STRAPS. DRUM HAS METAL NAILS THROUGH HIDE AND WOODEN FORM. DRUM HAS FOUR PUNCHED HOLES IN HIDE ALONG EDGE AT SURFACE, AND FOUR ADDITIONAL HOLES ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF DRUM. INSIDE OF DRUM HAS TWO PUNCHED HOLES AT BASE OF WOODEN FORM. HIDE IS WORN AND CRACKED ALONG WOODEN FORM; HIDE IS SEPARATING FROM LEATHER CORD ALONG WOODEN FORM; LEATHER IS STAINED AND EMBRITTLED; WOODEN FORM IS CRACKED AND SPLITTING. CLOTH IN CENTER OF DRUM HOLDING LEATHER STRANDS IS DISCOLOURED AND FRAYING. HIDE IS DISCOLOURED AND STAINED ON EDGES, SURFACE, AND INSIDE OF DRUM. OVERALL FAIR CONDITION. B. WOODEN DRUM STICK, 1.2CM WIDE X 37CM LONG. LIGHT WOOD WITH WIDER HANDLE END THAT TAPERS; WOOD VARNISHED DARKER. TAPERED END IS CHIPPED AND CRACKED. VARNISH IS PEELED AND FADED; WOOD IS CRACKED DOWN TOP END. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
INDIGENOUS
Historical Association
LEISURE
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
ON MAY 3, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GARY HAMILTON REGARDING HIS DONATION OF OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD. HAMILTON WAS RAISED IN MAGRATH, ALBERTA, AND RECALLS THE OBJECTS FROM HIS CHILDHOOD IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA. ON THE RAWHIDE DRUM, HAMILTON RECALLED, “IT WAS GIVEN TO MY DAD AND I ENDED UP WITH IT. FROM WHAT I REMEMBER IT’S…AT LEAST SIXTY, SIXTY-FIVE YEARS OLD. THE STICK IS THE SAME, THERE SHOULD BE SOME CLOTH WRAPPED AROUND THE END. IT’S ORIGINAL, I THINK IT’S MADE BY A BLOOD TRIBE [MEMBER], BECAUSE I KNOW MY DAD KNEW A LOT OF THEM. I THINK IT WAS MADE BY ANDY SHADE.” “[I REMEMBER MY FATHER] GETTING IT. HE JUST SHOWED UP, ANDY WAS THERE. THEY WERE HAVING A BEER AND HE BROUGHT IT INTO HIM.” “[MY FATHER AND ANDY SHADE] WERE FRIENDS. THEY WERE FRIENDS IN MAGRATH AND IN LETHBRIDGE, THAT’S WHEN HE GOT IT…IT’S FROM MAGRATH.” “WE PLAYED WITH IT. WE’D WALK AROUND TOWN, GO UP AND DOWN THE STREET.” “[MOTHER] HAD CLOTHES FROM WHEN WE WERE LITTLE, NOT ALL THE CLOTHES BUT SOME HANGING UP. THIS WAS UP THERE. SHE HAD STORAGE ON HER WALL FULL OF TOYS, [AND] GAMES.” “IT DOES MEAN SOMETHING. IT DID MEAN SOMETHING. IT’S PART OF MY CHILDHOOD, PART OF MY GROWING UP.” HAMILTON ELABORATED ON HIS CHILDHOOD, NOTING, “WHEN I WAS GROWING UP IT WAS WAY DIFFERENT THAN IT IS NOW. IF YOU NEEDED A SPANKING YOU GOT A SPANKING…NOW YOU CAN’T TOUCH ANYBODY. THAT’S PART OF MY GROWING UP SO I WOULD IMAGINE EVERYBODY ELSE WAS DOING IT TOO. THEY DIDN’T THINK OF IT BY THEMSELVES.” “I WAS GONE ALL THE TIME. MY AUNT LIVED DOWN THE STREET AND I GUESS I WOULD GO VISIT HER, PUT MY HAT ON WHETHER I HAD CLOTHES ON OR NOT, GO VISIT HER. MY DAD WORKED A BLOCK AWAY. EVERYBODY KNEW ME. IT WASN’T A BIG TOWN, AND MY UNCLE WAS A SCHOOL TEACHER THERE, PRINCIPAL AT THE SCHOOL. I’VE GOT LOTS OF RELATIVES OUT THERE.” “THEY’D SEND ME TO SCHOOL AND I WOULDN’T GO. RECESS I’D GO PLAY WITH THE GUYS AT RECESS AND THEN I’D TAKE OFF AGAIN, I’D GO FISHING.” “MY MOTHER [CORRINE HAMILTON] NEVER THREW ANYTHING AWAY. GAMES FROM WHEN WE WERE KIDS…JACKETS, SHOES, SKATES, SHE KEPT IT.” “MY BROTHER AND MY SISTER [WENT THROUGH MY MOTHER’S THINGS WHEN SHE PASSED AWAY TEN YEARS AGO]…[MY BROTHER CALLED] HE SAID, “DO YOU WANT YOUR JACKET BACK? AT THE TIME I THOUGHT I WAS GOING TO MAKE A FRAME FOR ALL THIS STUFF AND THEN PUT IT ON MY WALL. ONE THING LED TO ANOTHER AND WE SOLD MY HOUSE, MOVED TO AN APARTMENT, [AND I] DIDN’T WANT TO DO IT.” “IT’S PART OF MY CHILDHOOD.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170018001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170018003
Acquisition Date
2017-05
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WEDDING DRESS & CAPE SET
Date Range From
1958
Date Range To
1965
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, NYLON
Catalogue Number
P20160041001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WEDDING DRESS & CAPE SET
Date Range From
1958
Date Range To
1965
Materials
COTTON, NYLON
No. Pieces
3
Length
106
Width
36.5
Description
A. SLEEVELESS, CREAM, TEXTURED COTTON-BLEND DRESS. DRESS HAS STITCHED SEAMS RUNNING DOWN SIDES, FRONT, AND BACK. DRESS HAS A ZIPPER RUNNING MIDWAY DOWN BACK, WITH A STITCHED SEAM EXTENDING FROM END OF ZIPPER. DRESS HAS TRIANGLE CUT OUT OF BACK AT THE END OF THE SEAM. DRESS HAS SLIGHT RED-BROWN CIRCULAR STAIN ON FRONT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. REVERSIBLE CAPE, 120CM WIDE X 66CM LONG. PALE YELLOW, TEXTURED COTTON-BLEND FABRIC ON ONE SIDE AND BLACK WITH CREAM-SPECKLED PATTERN ON THE OTHER SIDE. BOTH SIDES OF THE CAPE INCLUDE TWO BUTTONS COVERED IN THE PATTERNED FABRIC OF THE OPPOSITE SIDE (FOR SECURING A BELT/STRAP). CAPE HAS TWO ARM-HOLES ON LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES, AND ONE SLIT RUNNING 15.5 CM UP THE CENTER OF THE BACK FROM THE HEM. CAPE SHOWS LITTLE SIGNS OF WEAR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. C. BELT FOR CAPE, 28.5CM LONG X 6.5CM WIDE. SMALL REVERSIBLE BELT FOR CAPE, ATTACHING WITH BUTTONS TO THE CAPE. FABRIC MATCHES THE PATTERNS OF THE CAPE AS CREAM AND BLACK WITH CREAM-SPECKLED PATTERN. ENDS OF THE STRAP ARE TAPERED INTO ARROW-POINTS. BELT SHOWS LITTLE SIGN OF WEAR; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
History
THIS LOGAN GARMENT COMPANY DRESS WAS PURCHASED BY JOAN HAIG IN THE LATE 1950S IN HER HOMETOWN OF LIPTON, SASKATCHEWAN. THE DRESS CAME WITH HER WHEN SHE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE IN THE EARLY 1960S. JOAN AND HER HUSBAND, BRUCE HAIG, DONATED THIS ITEM TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: ABOUT THE DRESS, JOAN BEGAN, “I BOUGHT IT IN 1958 IN THE FALL. THE SALESPERSON [FROM LETHBRIDGE’S LOGAN GARMENT COMPANY] CAME TO MY LITTLE [HOMETOWN] OF LIPTON, SASKATCHEWAN WHERE I WAS TEACHING, AND I THOUGHT IT WAS KIND OF NEAT… I WAS TEACHING [IN LIPTON] AT THE TIME [AFTER GRADUATION], WHILE LIVING WITH MY PARENTS. THAT’S WHEN I BOUGHT IT… THE SALESPERSON CAME TO THE HOUSE AND JUST KNOCKED ON THE DOOR. MY MOTHER HAD A REPUTATION FOR REALLY HAVING VERY NICE CLOTHES AND WEARING THEM WELL, SO SOMEBODY IN TOWN LIKELY SUGGESTED, ‘YOU KNOW, YOU MIGHT WANT TO GO AND TALK TO MRS. ROBERTSON,’ BUT SHE DIDN’T BUY ANYTHING, I DID... I LOVE CLOTHES, AND [THE DRESS] WAS DIFFERENT. I KNEW THERE WOULDN’T BE A BUNCH OF THEM WALKING AROUND, SO I ORDERED ONE… THEY MEASURED YOU, YOU PICKED YOUR CLOTH SAMPLES, COLOURS, AND STYLE. THEN THEY TOOK ALL YOUR MEASUREMENTS AND AFTER A CERTAIN NUMBER OF WEEKS THE GARMENTS ARRIVED IN THE MAIL. IT WAS COOL… [I SELECTED THIS ONE BECAUSE] I THOUGHT THE NECKLINE WAS JUST THE BEST OF THE BEST. IT HAD THESE LITTLE POINTY DEALIES, SO YOU COULD WEAR YOUR JEWELRY AND IT WOULD SHOW THAT KIND OF THING. IT WAS DIFFERENT THAN MOST OF THE THINGS WE WOULD SEE, [BECAUSE] WE USUALLY BOUGHT OUR CLOTHES IN REGINA.” “I WORE IT A FEW TIMES,” JOAN CONTINUED, “[SPECIFICALLY WHEN] WE GOT MARRIED IN MAY OF 1960… WE GOT MARRIED [IN] THE CHURCH IN FORT QU’APPELLE, SASKATCHEWAN. WE HAD OUR RECEPTION IN LIPTON… IT WAS A BEAUTIFUL SPRING DAY, SO I DECIDED THAT THIS WOULD BE AN APPROPRIATE OUTFIT TO CHANGE INTO TO GO AWAY… WHEN WE DROVE OFF IN BRUCE’S LITTLE VOLKSWAGEN. I THOUGHT I LOOKED PRETTY SWISHY [IN THE DRESS] TO TELL YOU THE TRUTH.… THE CAPE HAS A LITTLE BELT ON THE BACK, THEN INSIDE THERE ARE BUTTONS, SO THAT YOU COULD SWITCH THE LITTLE BELT TO THE INSIDE TO MATCH THAT PARTICULAR LOOK...I ALWAYS WORE IT WITH THE BLACK SIDE OUT.” IN ADDITION TO WEARING ON HER WEDDING DAY, JOAN EXPLAINED, “I PROBABLY WORE IT [GOING TO WORK AS A TEACHER, BECAUSE] PEOPLE DRESSED UP IN THOSE DAYS. [YOU] DIDN’T GO ANYWHERE IN JEANS OR SLACKS... IT WAS NICE TO DRESS UP. YOU WOULDN’T GO OUT NOT LOOKING WELL PUT OUT. WOMEN WORE DRESSES OR SUITS, AND GENTLEMEN WORE NICELY PRESSED TROUSERS, SHIRTS, AND TIES. EVEN STUDENTS - I WENT TO TEACHERS' COLLEGE AND YOU ALWAYS WENT TO SCHOOL IN A DRESS...THE ONLY ONES WHO WORE UNIFORMS WERE THE SISTERS, THE NUNS. IT WAS OLD-FASHIONED, BUT IT WAS NICE… [THAT CHANGED IN THE] LATE ‘60’S, MAYBE EVEN EARLY ‘70’S.” PRIOR TO MEETING HER HUSBAND, BRUCE HAIG, JOAN HAD NO PRIOR CONNECTION TO LETHBRIDGE. SHE JUST KNEW THAT IS WHERE THE YELLOW DRESS CAME FROM. SHE EXPLAINED, “I DIDN’T EVEN KNOW FOR SURE WHERE [LETHBRIDGE] WAS [WHEN I PURCHASED THE DRESS FROM THE COMPANY]. I MET BRUCE IN 1959 AT UNIVERSITY.” SPEAKING ABOUT THE COMPANY WHERE THIS DRESS WAS MADE, BRUCE HAIG EXPLAINED, “IT WAS A BIG COMPANY… [IT] CAME OUT OF LOGAN, UTAH… THEY WENT ALL ACROSS WESTERN CANADA SELLING DOOR-TO-DOOR [WITH] DOOR-TO-DOOR SALESMEN. I REMEMBER SEEING THE NEW BUILDING HERE WHEN I WAS A KID. I THINK IT WAS UP NEAR 9TH STREET AND STAFFORD DRIVE, JUST CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN AS I RECALL. I DIDN’T REALIZE THEY HAD SALESMEN UNTIL I MET HER, AND SHE SAID, ‘OH, I KNOW YOU. I HAVE A DRESS FROM YOUR PLACE.’” “A LOT OF PEOPLE DID A LOT OF THINGS WITH SALESPEOPLE IN THOSE DAYS, ESPECIALLY IN RURAL AREAS. IT WAS NOT UNCOMMON TO HAVE SOMEBODY COME TO THE DOOR AND BUY STUFF FROM THEM. IT WASN’T A BIG LEAP OF FAITH, AND I BELIEVE THAT THEY SENT IT C. O. D. (COLLECT ON DELIVERY), SO THAT YOU DIDN’T FEEL LIKE YOU WERE GETTING GYPPED OUT OF YOUR MONEY. THEY WOULDN’T GET THEIR MONEY UNTIL YOU GOT YOUR GOODS,” JOAN CONTINUED, “[THE DRESS] WAS QUITE EXPENSIVE IN THOSE DAYS AS A YOUNG TEACHER, WHO DIDN’T MAKE MUCH MONEY AT ALL. IT WAS FAIRLY EXPENSIVE FOR ME, BUT IT SEEMS TO ME THAT I THOUGHT, YOU KNOW, I’D BLOW THE BANK AND GO FOR IT. WE HAD IT CLEANED AT LOGAN GARMENTS (THE COMPANY THAT MADE IT) WHEN WE CAME BACK TO LETHBRIDGE,” JOAN HAIG RECALLED. JOAN EXPLAINED THAT SHE BEGAN TO PERMANENTLY RESIDE IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1961 FOLLOWING HER MARRIAGE TO BRUCE HAIG, WHO GREW UP IN THE CITY. SHE EXPLAINED, “I DON’T THINK I WORE [THE DRESS MUCH AFTER MOVING TO LETHBRIDGE. AT FIRST] I DID WEAR IT… I WORKED AT THE UNIVERSITY AND I GOT TO BE PRETTY THIN… I LOST A LOT OF WEIGHT, SO IT WAS TOO BIG FOR ME. I TOOK IN ONE SIDE, AND IT WAS A HECK OF A LOT OF WORK, SO I NEVER DID DO THE OTHER SIDE. I PUT IT BACK THE WAY IT USED TO BE BEFORE I BROUGHT IT [TO THE MUSEUM]. … I MAY HAVE WORN IT A FEW TIMES… BRUCE’S MOTHER USED TO HAVE A LOT OF LADIES IN AND THINGS LIKE THAT, SO YOU’D SPIFF UP TO GO TO THOSE.” “I THOUGHT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS MADE IN LETHBRIDGE IT WOULD BE KIND OF NEAT TO HAVE IT AT THE LETHBRIDGE MUSEUM,” JOAN HAIG ELABORATED ON WHY SHE KEPT AND DONATED THE DRESS TO THE MUSEUM FOR PRESERVATION, “IT’S NEVER GOING TO GO OUT OF STYLE. IT DOESN’T SCREAM 1950... I THINK THAT’S WHY I KEPT IT, BECAUSE IT’S KIND OF AGELESS… YOU COULD STILL WEAR THE CAPE [TODAY]. I DID WEAR THE CAPE A LOT, BECAUSE IT’S LIKE A SPRING JACKET. THEN I GOT SO THAT I DROVE EVERYWHERE, AND CAPES ARE NOT CONDUCIVE TO DRIVING, SO THAT STOPPED THAT. BUT IT’S HAD A LOT OF WEAR. I HAVE A SPECIAL PLACE IN MY HEART FOR IT.” RESEARCH WAS CONDUCTED USING THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARCHIVES TO DETERMINE FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE LOGAN GARMENT CO., THE MAKER OF THIS DRESS. DOCUMENTATION ABOUT THE COMPANY’S ESTABLISHMENT IN LETHBRIDGE WAS PRINTED IN THE DECEMBER 7, 1936 EDITION OF THE HERALD. IT STATED, “OTTO MEHR, HEAD OF THE LOGAN GARMENT CO., TOLD THE HERALD ON MONDAY THAT MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT OF THE COMPANY’S NEW PLANT IN LETHBRIDGE IS NOW BEING INSTALLED AND IT IS HOPED THAT THE FACTORY WILL COMMENCE OPERATIONS NEXT MONDAY…” “AT A DIRECTORS’ MEETING OF THE LOGAN GARMENT CO. ON FRIDAY, JULY 2, HEBER K. MERRILL, SON OF DR. H. K. MERRILL, PRESIDENT OF THE COMPANY, WAS APPOINTED MANAGER OF THE LETHBRIDGE BRANCH… [HE] WILL RESIDE IN LETHBRIDGE… HEBER MERRILL IS A GRADUATE OF THE LOGAN (UTAH) AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE...,” IT READS IN THE JULY 10, 1937 PUBLICATION. AN ARTICLE FROM JUNE 30, 1937 ACCOUNTING DETAILS OF THE CEREMONIAL CROWNING OF “QUEEN OF CARDSTON JUBILEE” DESCRIBES, “THE LOGAN GARMENT CO. BAND FROM LOGAN, UTAH WILL ARRIVE THIS EVENING… THIS IS LOGAN’S SALUTE TO CARDSTON, THE ORIGINAL TEMPLE CITY PIONEERS COMING FROM LOGAN.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041001
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DRESS PANTS
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160041003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DRESS PANTS
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
COTTON, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
72
Width
46
Description
MENS BLACK DRESS PANTS, FRONT WAISTBAND HAS COVERED SILVER HOOK CLASP AND SILVER ZIPPER. OUTSIDE HAS TWO BLACK VELVET STRIPS RUNING ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT OVER THE SIDE POCKETS, AND RUNNING DOWN THE LENGTH OF EACH LEG. INSIDE OF PANTS IS A BLACK PLASTIC BUTTON AND BLACK COTTON FABRIC WITH BUTTON-HOLE FOR SECURING THE PANTS. POCKETS ON RIGHT AND LEFT SIDES OF THE HIPS AND ON THE REAR ARE LINED WITH TAN FABRIC. PANTS ARE LINED WITH CREAM COTTON FABRIC. INSIDE THE PANTS ARE SIX WHITE PLASTIC BUTTONS POSITIONED AROUND THE WAIST. OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041003
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
TUXEDO VEST
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160041004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
TUXEDO VEST
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
COTTON, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
56
Width
49.5
Description
MEN’S WHITE TUXEDO VEST MADE FROM COTTON. LEFT WEARING SIDE OF THE VEST HAS AN INTERIOR TAG MARKED WITH A RED “L” TO DISTINGUISH THE LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES. VEST HALVES ARE ATTACHED WITH A THIN, WHITE FABRIC TIE AT THE NECK. VEST SECURES ACROSS THE CHEST WITH SILVER BUCKLE CLASP ON THE LEFT SIDE, AND THREE WHITE PLASTIC (FAUX-PEARL) BUTTONS ON THE RIGHT SIDE. LEFT SIDE OF THE VEST HAS THREE BUTTON-HOLES SEWN. TWO SMALL POCKETS ARE POSITIONED ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT OUTER SIDES OF THE VEST. UPPER LEFT SIDE IS STAINED BROWN ON THE INSIDE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CLOTHING-OUTERWEAR
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041004
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FABRIC, METAL, ELASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20160041005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
FABRIC, METAL, ELASTIC
No. Pieces
3
Height
2.5
Length
15.7
Width
7.3
Description
A: WHITE BOW TIE MADE FROM TEXTURED WHITE FABRIC. BOW SECURED IN THE CENTER OF A BAND (36.6 CM IN LENGTH) WITH A LOOP AROUND THE CENTER OF THE BOW. THE BACK HAS TWO METAL HOOKS ON THE TOP OF THE BAND ON EITHER SIDE OF THE BOW. A WHITE ELASTIC EXTENDS FROM ONE SIDE OF THE BOW WITH A LARGE (1.4 CM) LOOP FOR FASTENING. THE ELASTIC’S SIZE IS ADJUSTABLE. THE OTHER SIDE OF THE BAND HAS A HOOK ON THE END, WHICH FASTENS TO THE LOOP. MACHINE STITCHED. BOW TIE DIMENSIONS: 14.2 CM X 5.9 CM. CONDITION: WHITE IS SLIGHTLY DISCOLOURED. SEVERE TEAR IN ELASTIC BAND. SLIGHT FRAYING ON THE BAND. BROWN STAIN ON HOOK SIDE OF BAND. B-C: WHITE BOX FOR BOW TIE. HAS A REMOVABLE TOP WHICH READS “CURRIE DRESS CRAVATS” IN BLACK INK INSIDE OF A DESIGN. THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BOX READS IN BLACK IN “SIZE 14 TO 15 1/2” CONDITION: SLIGHT STAINING OVERALL. SLIGHT BLACK STAIN ON BOTTOM LEFT SIDE OF LID
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041005
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
VELVET, METAL, CARDBOARD
Catalogue Number
P20160041006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
VELVET, METAL, CARDBOARD
No. Pieces
3
Length
14.4
Width
7.9
Description
BLACK VELVET BOW TIE. MACHINE STITCHED WITH 2 BOWS (2 LOOPS ON EITHER SIDE) WITH A PIECE OF FABRIC BRINGING IT IN TOGETHER. METAL HOOK PAINTED BLACK DOWN THE CENTER. CONDITION: VERY GOOD. SOME LINT ON THE VELVET WITH SLIGHT WEAR TO THE FABRIC. SOME BLACK METAL PAINT ON HOOK HAS WORN OFF. B-C: WHITE BOX FOR BOW TIE. LID READS “DRESS BOWS BY BERKLEY” WITH CREST IN BLACK INK. THE TOP OF LID HAS CUT OUT OVER MAJORITY OF THE SURFACE IN THE SHAPE OF A BOW TIE. REMNANTS OF CLEAR CELLOPHANE THAT FILLED THE CUTOUT REMAIN AROUND THE EDGES. THE SURFACE OF THE LID IS TEXTURED. OUTSIDE OF BOX IS COVERED WITH SHINY PAPER. CONDITION: MODERATE TO SEVERE BROWN STAINING ON THE BOTTOM OF BOX . TEARS AROUND THE BOX CUTOUT OVERALL DISCOLOURING
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041006
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ELASTIC, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160041007
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
ELASTIC, METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
84
Width
2
Description
SUSPENDERS MADE FROM TWO PIECES OF WHITE ELASTIC THAT CROSS 61 CM DOWN. THERE IS A DIAMOND STITCHING IN THE CENTER TO FASTEN THE TWO ELASTICS TOGETHER WHERE THEY CROSS. ELASTIC IS ADJUSTABLE ON LONG ENDS. PEANUT-SHAPED METAL LOOPS ARE FASTENED TO ALL FOUR ENDS OF THE SUSPENDERS. MACHINE-STITCHED. CONDITION: OVERALL DISCOLOURING. SEVERE STAINING ON THE OUTSIDE EDGES OF LONG EDGE OF ELASTIC (STAINS ARE APPROX. 8 CM IN LENGTH CONCENTRATED AT THE EDGE).
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
PERSONAL CARE
PROFESSIONS
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041007
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
TOBACCO, PAPER
Catalogue Number
P20160041008
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1956
Date Range To
1966
Materials
TOBACCO, PAPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
12.8
Diameter
1.7
Description
CIGAR LABELLED “KING EDWARD” AT MOUTH. CIGAR IS BROWN, UNTREATED PAPER ROLLED. LABEL IS STICKER THAT GOES AROUND CIRCUMFERENCE OF THE CIGAR – GOLD WITH BLACK BACKGROUND AROUND WRITING – TEXT IS GOLD. WHITE BORDER. CIGAR WRAPPED IN CELLOPHANE.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
PROFESSIONS
LEISURE
History
THE TUXEDO SET – COMPLETE WITH JACKET, PANTS, VEST, TWO BOWTIES, AND A CIGAR THAT WAS FOUND IN THE JACKET POCKET – CAME TO THE MUSEUM FROM DONORS BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG. THE TUXEDO AND THE PIECES THAT WENT ALONG WITH IT BELONGED TO BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG (1901-1986). BRUCE AND JOAN HAIG DONATED THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS TO THE GALT MUSEUM, WHERE COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED AN INTERVIEW WITH THE COUPLE ON NOVEMBER 25, 2016. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW: “IN 1977, WE MOVED INTO BRUCE’S PARENTS’ HOUSE,” JOAN STATED AS SHE BEGAN TO SPEAK ABOUT THE TUXEDO ENSEMBLE, “AND MOTHER, [PHYLLIS HAIG (NEE HARRISON)] HAD [THE TUXEDO] IN A BOX IN THE STOREROOM. SHE HAD IT MARKED TO GO TO THE APARTMENT [THEY LATER MOVED TO], BUT THEY NEVER TOOK IT. BRUCE’S DAD HAD HAD A SEVERE STROKE AND WAS UNABLE TO WEAR IT ANYMORE, SO SHE JUST LEFT IT. IT SAT ON THE TOP SHELF THERE UNTIL WE MOVED JUST A FEW WEEKS AGO. OUR DAUGHTER IS NOW IN THE HOUSE, AND THIS BOX WAS STILL ON THE SHELF IN THE STOREROOM, SO SHE DEPOSITED IT AT OUR HOUSE.” “[WE WERE ALWAYS AWARE OF THE ITEMS’ EXISTENCE, BECAUSE] AND IT WAS PA’S TUX.” PA BEING BRUCE’S FATHER, DR. ARTHUR HAIG, AS JOAN EXPLAINED. SHE CONTINUED, “IT’S NOT SOMETHING YOU’RE GOING TO JUST DUMP. WE DIDN’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT, SO WE JUST KEPT LOOKING AT THE BOX THAT SAID, ‘PA’S TUX,’ ON THE SIDE.” IN THE INTERVIEW, BRUCE ASKED JOAN IF HE EVER WORE HIS FATHER’S SUIT, SHE REPLIED, “NO, IT’S MILES TOO BIG FOR YOU.” THE HAIG’S BROUGHT IN A PHOTOGRAPH OF DR. HAIG WEARING THE SUIT TAKEN IN NOVEMBER 1963. BRUCE SAID, “AT ABOUT THAT TIME HE WAS HEAVILY INTO MEDICAL POLITICS. HE HAD JUST BEEN APPOINTED THE HEAD OF THE PROVINCE FOR THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, THE ALBERTA DIVISION PRESIDENT. THAT’S THE PICTURE THAT WE HAVE IN HERE. IT WAS JUST LIKE A PICTURE THAT WAS TAKEN WITH A CAMERA AT THE HOTEL BEFORE OR AFTER A DINNER-TYPE THING. WE FIGURED THAT’S [THE TIME PERIOD] WHEN HE WAS WEARING IT. HE USED TO WEAR A TUX [OFTEN]. I HAVE A PICTURE FROM BACK IN THE TWENTIES – HE GRADUATED ABOUT ’26 FROM MCGILL – AND THERE’S A PICTURE OF HIM IN A TUXEDO. IT WOULDN’T HAVE BEEN [THE ONE WE ARE DONATING], BECAUSE HE DIDN’T MOVE TO LETHBRIDGE UNTIL 1929.” EXPLAINING HER FATHER-IN-LAW’S NEED FOR SUCH ATTIRE, JOAN ADDED, “THEY DID HAVE A LOT OF FORMAL EVENTS AND FORMAL PARTIES. HOUSE PARTIES IN THOSE DAYS WERE FORMAL. WOMEN WORE LONG GOWNS, AND MEN WORE TUXES.” SOCIAL LISTINGS PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ACCOUNT VARIOUS ENGAGEMENTS DR. AND MRS. HAIG ATTENDED OR HOSTED TOGETHER, INCLUDING ONE PUBLISHED IN THE JUNE 18, 1957 PAPER. IT IS STATED, “DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE ALBERTA DIVISION OF THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AND MRS. HAIG, WILL BE AMONG THE GUESTS AT THE RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE CANADIAN MEDIAL ASSOCIATION...” DURING THE 2016 INTERVIEW, BRUCE CONTINUED, “HE WAS HEAVILY INTO THE KINSMAN AND THEN ROTARY CLUB. HE JUST LOVED THOSE SERVICE CLUBS. I’M SURE HE WORE [THE TUX] MANY TIMES FOR [RELATED EVENTS].” ON MAY 4, 1936, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTED, “DINING ROOM OF THE ASSINIBOIA HOTEL HERE WAS COMFORTABLY FILLED BY SCORES OF YOUNG BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN RESIDENT IN THREE ALBERTA CITIES, SATURDAY NIGHT, AS THE RECENTLY ORGANIZED KINSMEN CLUB OF MEDICINE HAT WAS FORMALLY PRESENT WITH ITS CHARTER LINKING IT WITH 50 OTHER KIN CLUBS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. CONFERRING OF THE CHARTER WAS PERFORMED BY DR. ARTHUR HAIG OF LETHBRIDGE, KIN GOVERNOR FOR DISTRICT NO. 4.” “MEN WORE FORMAL ATTIRE,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “SO DID WOMEN TO ALL OF THEIR FUNCTIONS. [BRUCE’S FATHER] WAS QUITE A PROMINENT DOCTOR. HE WAS THE CHIEF OF SURGERY AT ST. MIKE’S, AND THEN AT THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL. HE WAS A BIG MAN ON CAMPUS, AND KNEW IT.” UPON EXAMINATION OF THE TUXEDO JACKET’S LABEL, IT IS NOTED THAT THE JACKET IS FROM 1956. BRUCE EXPLAINED, “[IN] 1956, I’M AT UNIVERSITY. AT U OF S, SASKATOON [DURING THE TIME]… WE DO HAVE A [HOME] MOVIE OF A PARTY IN 1940 OR ’41, IN THE BASEMENT, AND I THINK THEY’RE ALL WEARING TUXES THERE.” “[MY PARENTS] WERE VERY SOCIAL. [MY FATHER] WAS FROM CLARESHOLM. [MY FATHER’S] FATHER HAD DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS OF THE SPINE. HE HAD BEEN MISTREATED BY A CHIROPRACTOR FOR HIS BAD BACK, AND THEY FOUND THAT HE HAD TUBERCULOSIS. [AFTER MY GRANDFATHER’S PASSING], HIS MOTHER GROOMED TWO OR THREE OF THE KIDS TO BECOME DOCTORS, PROBABLY AS A RESULT OF THIS TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE. THEY REALLY BECAME THE NOUVEAU RICHE, BECAUSE IN THE ‘20S AND ‘30S, MEDICAL PEOPLE WERE ON A PARTICULAR PEDESTAL THAT THEY DON’T HAVE NOW BECAUSE OF SOCIALIZED MEDICINE. THEY HAD A CERTAIN OPINION OF THEMSELVES. THEY DRESSED UP AND THEY WERE IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND THAT’S JUST THE WAY IT IS.” ABOUT DR. ARTHUR HAIG’S PRACTICE, JOAN ADDED, “HE HAD A CONTRACT WITH THE GALT MINE, SO WHEN OTHER PEOPLE WERE STRUGGLING VERY HARD, HE WAS DOING PRETTY WELL. IN 1937 THEY BUILT THAT HOUSE. [THEY] HAD IT CUSTOM BUILT FOR THEM, SO THAT INDICATES THAT THERE WASN’T A LACK OF FUNDS AT ALL. THEY SOCIALIZED IN THESE CIRCLES. LETHBRIDGE WAS A VERY, VERY CLIQUEY TOWN; AND THEY WERE IN THE TOP CLIQUE.” “THE NORTH SIDE, OF COURSE, WERE THE LABORING GROUPS AND THE SOUTH SIDE WERE THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONALS AND NEVER THE TWAIN SHOULD MEET,” BRUCE ELABORATED ABOUT EARLY LETHBRIDGE SOCIETY, LAUGHING. “HE KNEW A LOT OF PEOPLE, AND I KNOW THAT EVEN NOW I RUN INTO PEOPLE THAT I THINK ARE OLDER THAN GOD, AND THEY SAY, ‘OH, DR. HAIG DELIVERED ME,’” JOAN ILLUMINATED, “AND OF COURSE IN THOSE DAYS, DOCTORS WORKED 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. WHEN THEY GOT CALLED THEY WENT, SO HE EARNED HIS TIME OFF AND HIS FRIVOLITIES. HE WAS A VERY INTERESTING MAN. HE AND I GOT ON QUITE WELL.” “WITH THE ROTARY [CLUB] THEY USED TO HAVE THESE BIG MASQUERADE PARTIES. BRUCE’S MOTHER AND I ONCE DRESSED UP. SHE PROBABLY WORE THIS [JACKET TO ONE OF THESE PARTIES] – DRESSED UP IN TUXEDOES AND TOP HATS AND THE WHOLE THING. I BORROWED ONE FROM A DRAMA CLUB. [DR. ARTHUR HAIG] LIT US EACH A CIGAR, SO THAT IT WOULD HAVE ASHES ON THE END. WE WEREN’T SMOKING THEM, BUT WE HAD CIGARS WITH US. [WE] HAD LOTS OF FUN. THAT WAS AFTER [BRUCE’S FATHER’S] STROKE… [AND AT THESE EVENTS] DIFFERENT GROUPS WOULD HAVE A TABLE. THEY DIDN’T BUY A TABLE, BUT THEY WOULD CLAIM A TABLE AND YOU DIDN’T DARE SIT AT THE HAIG CLINIC TABLE. AND [THERE] WAS THE CAMPBELL CLINIC TABLE, AND SO WE WENT AND SAT AT IT, AND BRUCE’S BROTHER WAS THERE AND DIDN’T RECOGNIZE HIS OWN MOTHER AND TOLD US TO GET LOST… [BRUCE’S MOTHER] LAUGHED ABOUT THAT FOR YEARS AFTERWARDS, ABOUT HOW HER OWN SON HAD TRIED TO THROW HER OUT OF THE PARTY,” JOAN RECALLED AS SHE LAUGHED. THE CIGAR DONATED AS PART OF THE COLLECTION IS A PART OF THE TUXEDO’S STORY. “IT FELL OUT OF THE POCKET WHEN I TOOK THE THING OUT OF THE BOX,” JOAN EXPLAINED, “HE SMOKED CIGARS FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE. IN FACT, EVEN WHEN WE MOVED INTO THE HOUSE, YOU COULD STILL SENSE THAT THERE HAD BEEN CIGARS SMOKED IN THAT HOUSE AND THAT TOOK YEARS TO AIR OUT.” “HE [ALSO] SMOKED CIGARETTES,” BRUCE ADDED, “IN LATER YEARS WHEN THEY STARTED TO HAVE THE CANCER SCARE, THEY WOULD HAVE THE LITTLE EXTENSION ON THE CIGARETTE.” IN THE LETHBRIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S 1991 PUBLICATION TITLED, “LETHBRIDGE: ITS MEDICAL DOCTORS, DENTISTS, DRUG STORES,” IT STATES, “[DR. ARTHUR A. HAIG] GRADUATED [IN] 1926 [FROM] MCGILL. [HE] PRACTICED IN LETHBRIDGE FROM 1928 AND WAS JOINED BY HIS BROTHER, DR. WILLARD HAIG IN 1934. WITH DRS. J. E. AYRE, H. A. ARNOLD, W.R. HAIG AND E. A. M. CAIRNS FORMED THE HAIG CLINIC IN 1939. [DR. A. HAIG] WAS BORN [IN] DEVIL’S LAKE, NORTH DAKOTA, MOVED TO CLARESHOLM, ALTA, IN 1902. [HE WAS A] SPECIALIST IN GENERAL SURGERY.” AN ARTICLE IN THE JANUARY 7, 1989 EDITION OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD WAS PUBLISHED IN COMMEMORATION OF THE HAIG’S CLINIC 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT STATED, “THE HAIG CLINIC WAS FORMED JAN. 1, 1939… IT OPENED IN THE MCFARLAND BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE… IN 1950, A NEED FOR MORE SPACIOUS PREMISES RESULTED IN THE PRESENT HAIG CLINIC BUILDING, 601 6TH AVE, S… IN 1963, ARTHUR RETIRED FOR HEALTH REASONS. HE DIED NOV. 14, 1986 AT THE AGE OF 83.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, DETAILED ARTICLES LETHBRIDGE HERALD OUTLINING THE HAIG CLINIC HISTORY AND THE HAIG’S SOCIAL OUTINGS.
Catalogue Number
P20160041008
Acquisition Date
2016-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PLASTIC, PAINT, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170023001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
PLASTIC, PAINT, METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
10
Length
9.5
Width
3.8
Description
FIGURINE OF ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE OFFFICER ON BLACK HORSE; OFFICER IS PAINTED TO WEAR BROWN ROUND-BRIM HAT, RED SERGE JACKET, NAVY BREECHES, AND BROWN BOOTS. HORSE IS PAINTED BLACK WITH GREY AND BROWN SADDLE AND BRIDLE; FIGURINE IS FIXED TO GREY RECTANGULAR BASE WITH TEXT STAMPED ON BOTTOM “LINEOL, GERMANY”. OFFICER IS DETCHABLE AND SECURES TO HORSE WITH METAL PEG. PAINT IS SCRAPED AND PEELED ON FIGURINE; HORSE’S LEGS ALL HAVE CRACKS RUNNING THROUGH; BASE IS CRACKED FROM EDGE TO HORSE’S FRONT LEFT LEG AND HIND RIGHT LEG; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
TOY
Historical Association
LEISURE
SAFETY SERVICES
MILITARY
History
ON JULY 21, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED GLENN AND JOANNE ALLEN REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF RCMP AND LETHBRIDGE MEMORABILIA. GLENN ALLEN WAS RAISED IN LETHBRIDGE, AND COLLECTED THE OBJECTS AS A CHILD LIVING IN LETHBRIDGE. ON THE RCMP FIGURINE, ALLEN RECALLED, “THESE TWO MOUNTED POLICE ITEMS, THE BANNER AND THE LITTLE STATUETTE…I WAS YOUNG, IN THE [HOMEFRONT] PERIOD FROM 1940-1945. LETHBRIDGE WAS A MAJOR BASE FOR THE COMMONWEALTH AIR TRAINING THING. WE HAD YOUNG BRITISH AIRMEN COME, AND THEY LIVED EVERYWHERE. THEY BOARDED WITH PEOPLE; THEY STAYED ON BASE, BUT WHEN THEY HAD A DAY OFF, IT WAS ONE OF THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PEOPLE OF LETHBRIDGE TO TAKE THEM ON LITTLE JOURNEYS TO PLACES. I CAN REMEMBER GOING WITH THEM…TO FORT MACLEOD, AND THEN TO PINCHER CREEK, AND WE HAD PLUMS AND CHERRIES. I CAN REMEMBER MY MOTHER BRINGING THIS BAG OF FRUIT OUT, AND SAYING TO THE ONE YOUNG FELLOW, “WOULD YOU LIKE A PIECE OF FRUIT?” HE WAS SITTING IN THE FRONT SEAT, TURNED TO MY MOTHER [WHO] WAS DRIVING THE CAR, [THEN] HE TURNED TO HIS BUDDIES IN THE BACKSEAT, AND HE [SAID], “WOULD YOU LIKE A PLUM OR A CHERRY?” WE VISITED THERE, AND THOSE WERE GIFTS FROM THOSE AIRMEN TO ME, AT THAT TIME. I HAD A LITTLE MANTLE IN MY ROOM, DOWNSTAIRS IN CALGARY, AND HAD THEM THERE. WHEN WE WERE IN LETHBRIDGE, WE HAD NO SPACE AT ALL FOR ANYTHING. OUR FURNITURE HAD TO BE ALL STORED. THE ONLY POSSESSIONS OF OURS THAT WERE IN THAT HOUSE WERE OUR BEDS AND OUR DRESSERS, MAYBE A COUPLE OF CHAIRS…” “[I DISPLAYED THEM] MORE CALGARY, THAN LETHBRIDGE.” ALLEN ELABORATED ON HIS FAMILY’S HISTORY IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “MY MOTHER’S FAMILY CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1923, AND SHE WAS ABOUT 12 AT THE TIME. SHE DIDN’T GO TO SCHOOL ANY FURTHER AT THAT POINT IN TIME, AND SHE WAS HIRED ON AS A HOUSE GIRL FOR THE STOLZ FAMILY.” “MY DAD’S NAME WAS TOM, THOMAS SPENCE ALLEN, AND MY MOTHER WAS DOROTHY EMMA SCHIELS. MY DAD’S FAMILY - HIS FATHER AND, A FEW YEARS LATER MY DAD AND HIS MOTHER - CAME TO LETHBRIDGE IN 1910, AND THEY SETTLED IN NORTH LETHBRIDGE, AT 707 12A ST. NORTH. THERE WERE THREE BOYS AND ONE GIRL. THEY ALL WENT THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL AT GALBRAITH HIGH SCHOOL, AND MY DAD WORKED FOR THE RAILWAYS. HE STARTED AS A MESSENGER…HE WAS 15 YEARS OF AGE. HE PROGRESSED IN THE FREIGHT CPR BUSINESS, AND BECAME A FREIGHT INSPECTOR IN LETHBRIDGE, AND THEN, IN 1948, WAS TRANSFERRED TO CALGARY. MY MOTHER WAS ALWAYS A HOUSEWIFE. THEY LIVED ON 3RD AVENUE NORTH, BY THE LEALTA THEATRE. THEY HAD JUST ONE CHILD. I GREW UP [IN THAT HOUSE] UNTIL I WAS ABOUT AGE FIVE. AT THAT TIME, THE END OF THE WAR WAS COMING, AND SOLDIERS WERE RETURNING. RENTAL HOUSING BECAME ALMOST NOT AVAILABLE. ANYBODY WHO WAS RENTING AT THAT TIME, IF YOU HADN’T BEEN IN THE FORCES, YOU WERE REQUIRED BY ORDINANCE TO FIND ANOTHER PLACE. IT WAS A HOUSE WHICH WE HAD TO GIVE UP. WE’D BEEN THERE SINCE I WAS BORN. THEN WE MOVED OVER TO 12TH STREET C, THE 500 BLOCK. WE LIVED TEMPORARILY THERE, AND THEN THAT HOUSE WAS SECONDED. WE WERE ONLY THERE MAYBE 6 MONTHS, AND THEN WE MOVED INTO AN ATTIC SPACE AT 507 12TH STREET A NORTH, AND LIVED IN THE 2 ROOMS IN THE ATTIC - NO INSULATION, AND VERY COLD IN THE WINTER, AND HOT IN THE SUMMER.” “[MY FATHER] GOT A PROMOTION [IN 1948]. HE GOT A PROMOTION TO CALGARY…A BETTER JOB.” “MY MOTHER AND DAD LIVED IN LETHBRIDGE, GREW UP IN LETHBRIDGE. MY MOTHER WAS THE COLLECTOR IN THE FAMILY. WHEN I WAS MARRIED [IN 1962], ALL OF THESE THINGS SHE GAVE ME TO JUST TAKE ALONG, BECAUSE THEY HAD BEEN GIVEN TO ME. THEY ARE JUST LITTLE ITEMS THAT WE JUST DON’T KNOW WHETHER THEY HAVE ANY VALUE, AND RATHER THAN HAVE THEM JUST GO TO LAND FILL, WE’D LIKE YOU TO HAVE A LOOK AT THEM.” “TODAY IS OUR FIFTY-FIFTH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY, AND WE’RE RETURNING TO LETHBRIDGE BECAUSE WE’VE HAD THESE THINGS IN OUR POSSESSION FOREVER, AND WE WANT TO SEE IF THEY HAVE ANY VALUE TO THE MUSEUM. THEY ARE RELICS THAT WE’VE [GATHERED] FROM PAST YEARS.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170023001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170023001
Acquisition Date
2017-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20180022000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
175
Width
61.5
Description
GOBELIN TAPESTRY, MACHINE-STITCHED AND WOVEN; SCENE WOVEN DEPICTS FOUR FIGURES IN A HOUSE AROUND A TABLE, THREE ADULTS AND A CHILD; INTERIOR OF HOUSE DEPICTED SHOWS CABINET AND VASES ON CARPET IN FOREGROUND ON LEFT SIDE; BACKGROUND HAS TWO CHAIRS AND A LANDSCAPE PAINTING ON WALL AT LEFT, CENTER OF ROOM HAS A FIREPLACE AND COOKING POT WITH SIX PLATES ON MATLEPIECE, RIGHT SIDE OF FIREPLACE SHOWS PODIUM WITH BOOKS STACKED AND CABINET; RIGHT SIDE SHOWS FIGURES IN FOREGROUND AROUND A TABLE SEWING, AND WINDOW ON RIGHT WALL OPEN. SCENE IS WOVEN USING GOLD AND BROWN HUES PRIMARILY, WITH PINK AND GOLD FOR FLOOR. FRONT HAS ORANGE STAINING ALONG UPPER EDGE ON RIGHT, CENTER, AND LEFT SIDES; TAPESTRY SHOWS SIGNS OF FADING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. *UPDATE* IN JANUARY 2021 COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT NICOLE WILKINSON ATTACHED A COTTON MUSLIN SLEEVE TO THE REVERSE SIDE.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARY WITDOUCK REGARDING HER DONATION OF A GOBELIN TAPESTRY. WITDOUCK IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM HOLLAND IN 1955 WITH HER FAMILY, THE BOUWS, AND HAD BEEN GIFTED THE TAPESTRY BY HER MOTHER PRIOR TO IMMIGRATING, HAVING PURCHASED THE TAPESTRY FROM A BELGIAN SALESMAN. ON THE TAPESTRY, WITDOUCK ELABORATED, “THERE WERE A FEW TAPESTRIES [IN THE FAMILY] BUT THEY WERE NOT GOLDEN. THEY WERE TAPESTRIES [OF] TULIP FIELDS AND THEY WERE MORE VELVETY TYPES WITH BRIGHT COLOURED TULIP FIELDS…IN DIFFERENT COLOURS HERE, DIFFERENT COLOURS THERE. TO ME, THEY WERE NICE AT THE TIME BUT THEY FADED MORE AND THEY WERE JUST NOT LIKE THIS ONE.” WITDOUCK TOLD THE STORY OF HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE TAPESTRY, RECALLING, “IT WAS AROUND THE END OF FEBRUARY IN 1955. I WAS SEVENTEEN YEARS OLD AND WORKED ON MY FATHER’S FARM. OUR FARM WAS SITUATED NEAR THE SMALL TOWN OF ERP IN THE PROVINCE OF NORTH BRABANT, NETHERLANDS. THE ECONOMY IN EUROPE AT THE TIME, DUE TO THE AFTERMATH OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR WAS NOT GOOD AND THAT WAS EXPECTED TO LAST FOR MANY MORE YEARS. LIFE FOR US, MYSELF AND OUR WHOLE FAMILY, WAS ABOUT TO CHANGE IN A BIG WAY AS MY PARENTS HAD MADE PLANS TO IMMIGRATE TO CANADA. THE DAY THAT WE WOULD LEAVE WAS ONLY ABOUT THREE WEEKS AWAY ON MARCH 25TH TO BE EXACT AND LOTS HAD TO BE DONE TO PREPARE FOR THAT DAY. JUST AROUND THAT TIME, A MAN RIDING A TRANSPORT BICYCLE STOPPED BY OUR HOUSE. THE MAN SAID THAT HE WAS SELLING TAPESTRIES AND ASKED MY MOTHER IF HE COULD SHOW THEM TO HER. THE TAPESTRIES WERE GOBELINS AND WERE MADE IN BELGIUM. SEVERAL OF US GIRLS, ALONG WITH MY MOTHER STOOD AROUND THE SALESMAN AS HE SHOWED US THE DIFFERENT ONES. MY MOTHER THEN SAID TO US OLDER GIRLS, 'IF YOU LIKE TO HAVE ONE YOU MAY ALL PICK ONE.' WE WERE HAPPY WITH THAT TO GET THESE TAPESTRIES. I DON’T KNOW WHAT MY MOM PAID FOR THEM. WE CAREFULLY WRAPPED THEM AS SOON THESE TAPESTRIES WOULD COME ALONG TO CANADA. AFTER ARRIVING IN CANADA, I WAS NOT ABLE TO SHOW OFF MY TAPESTRY ON THE WALL UNTIL 1965 ABOUT 10 YEARS LATER. RALPH [WITDOUCK] AND I MET AND MARRIED IN 1960, AND CAME TO LIVE ON A FARM IN A SMALL TWO-ROOM HOUSE. [WE] DID NOT HAVE A WALL LARGE ENOUGH TO HANG THIS BEAUTIFUL TAPESTRY. OUR FAMILY GREW AND FIVE YEARS AND THREE LITTLE ONES LATER, WE MOVED INTO A MUCH LARGER HOME. EVER SINCE THEN, NEARLY FIFTY YEARS, WE HAVE BEEN ABLE TO SHOW OFF THIS BEAUTIFUL TAPESTRY. THE REASON WHY THE TAPESTRY ALSO MEANT A LOT TO US IS BECAUSE BELGIUM WAS THE PLACE WHERE RALPH WAS BORN…I STILL REMEMBER MANY OF THE OLDER HOMES IN HOLLAND, THAT HAD THE SAME TYPE OF FURNITURE, FIREPLACE WITH PLATES ON TOP, WINDOWS THAT OPENED FROM THE TOP…AND A DOOR WHERE YOU COULD LEAVE THE TOP HALF OPEN, AND ALSO A BIBLE STAND WITH BIBLE. I ALSO REMEMBER MY GRANDMOTHER BEING DRESSED LIKE THE MOTHER IN THE TAPESTRY. ALSO SEWING AND KNITTING WAS ALL DONE BY HAND.” “IT’S IMPORTANT BECAUSE I’VE ALWAYS LIKED OLD PLACES IN EARLIER DAYS. I REALLY LIKED GOING TO MY GRANDPARENTS BECAUSE THINGS WERE SO DIFFERENT THEN. ALREADY [BEFORE 1955]…OUR PLACE WAS A BIT MORE MODERN. I CAN CONNECT WITH LOTS OF THOSE THINGS [IN THE TAPESTRY] BECAUSE I SAT ON THOSE CHAIRS AND I KNOW MY GRANDMA WAS DRESSED SOMETHING LIKE THE LADY IN THERE.” “BELGIUM WOULD HAVE HAD THOSE SAME SCENES IN THOSE DAYS. THEY WERE OLD FARM HOMES…THEY WERE AN AWFUL LOT ALIKE.” “I’VE ALWAYS ENJOYED HAVING THIS ON THE WALL. MOST OF THE TIME IT WAS EITHER IN THE DINING ROOM OR IN THE LIVING ROOM, EITHER ABOVE THE CHESTERFIELD OR [IN FAIRMONT SUBDIVISION] WE HAD IT IN THE DINING ROOM, THERE WAS A NICE BIG WALL THERE.” “THE FARM THAT WE WERE LIVING ON WHEN I LIVED IN THE TWO-ROOMED HOUSE WAS SE 10-11-20. THEN WE MOVED TO SW 15-11-20 AND THERE WAS A TWO-STORY HOUSE ON THERE THAT WAS BUILT IN 1906. IT WAS OLD AND IT WAS COLD. IT WAS ONLY INSULATED WITH NEWSPAPERS BUT WE HAD MUCH MORE ROOM...WE LIVED THERE UNTIL WE WERE ABLE TO BUILD A NEW HOME ON THAT PLACE [IN 1975]. BUT AS SOON AS WE MOVED TO SW 15-11-20, I WAS ABLE TO PUT [THE TAPESTRY] UP.” “AT THAT TIME, IT WAS HANGING ON A ROD. THERE WERE ALSO TASSELS ON THERE…I THINK MY KIDS HAD PROBABLY PULLED ON IT TOO MUCH. THEY WERE ALL LITTLE ONES [AND] BECAUSE IT WAS ALWAYS HANGING ABOVE THE CHESTERFIELD AND THE KIDS ARE ON THE CHESTERFIELD [IT WAS DAMAGED]. AFTER THAT, PROBABLY TWENTY YEARS AFTER THAT, WE DECIDED TO FRAME IT. I HAD IT, WE LIVED IN FAIRMONT FOR ABOUT TWELVE YEARS…MAYBE FIFTEEN YEARS…I HAD IT HANGING IN THE DINING ROOM ON A NICE BIG WALL. IT’S ALWAYS BEEN ON THE WALL UNTIL WE GOT [IN THIS LETHBRIDGE HOUSE], BECAUSE I KNEW THAT THIS WAS THE LAST PLACE UNTIL WE HAVE TO GO TO…ONE OF THOSE PLACES [SENIORS’ HOMES]. YOU DON’T KNOW WHERE YOU’LL END UP, BUT NOW WE DECIDED THAT WE SHOULD DECIDE WHAT TO DO WITH IT.” WITDOUCK RECALLED THE MOVE HER FAMILY MADE TO CANADA IN 1955, STATING, “WE [THE BOUW FAMILY] LEFT MARCH 25TH, AND WE ARRIVED IN CANADA…AT PIER 21 IN HALIFAX ON APRIL 2ND. WE ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE ON APRIL 6TH. MY BIRTHDAY WAS ON JULY 6TH SO I WAS NEARLY 18.” “[MY PARENTS] THOUGHT, WELL ‘MAYBE THIS [TAPESTRY] IS A NICE MEMORY’ AND [MY MOTHER] WANTED TO MAKE US HAPPY BECAUSE WE WERE IMMIGRATING AND WE LEFT OUR FRIENDS BEHIND, FAMILY. MY OLDER SISTER WAS ALREADY IN CANADA BECAUSE SHE GOT MARRIED THE YEAR BEFORE. [THAT WAS] ONE MORE REASON WHY MY PARENTS WANTED TO IMMIGRATE TOO, BECAUSE THEY KNEW THAT THE FAMILY WOULD BE DIVIDED FOREVER IF WE DIDN’T GO. LOTS OF TIMES WITH FAMILIES, SOME WOULD LIKE TO GET MARRIED BUT THERE WAS NO CHANCE IN HOLLAND. AFTER THE WAR, THE ECONOMY WAS REALLY BAD AND PEOPLE COULD NOT BUILD ANY HOMES FOR THEIR CHILDREN WHO [GOT] MARRIED.” “THERE WERE NINE CHILDREN, TEN WITH THE ONE THAT IMMIGRATED TO [CANADA] BEFORE…THE YOUNGEST ONE WAS FIVE, AND MY SISTER WAS 22 BY THEN AND THE NEXT ONE WAS 21. WE SLEPT WITH THREE IN A BED. ON THE FARM, WHEN WE ARRIVED, [THERE WAS] NO RUNNING WATER AND THAT WAS THE NORM FOR ALL NEW IMMIGRANTS.” “MY OLDER SISTER ENDED UP IN SPRING COULEE [WITH] HER HUSBAND, AND NATURALLY WE WANTED TO BE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TOO. BUT IN SPRING COULEE THERE’S NO SUGAR BEETS [AND] WE WANTED TO BE SOMEWHERE WHERE A FARMER WAS GOING TO GIVE US A JOB. THAT’S THE ONLY WAY YOU COULD COME IS IF YOU HAD A JOB LINED UP FOR A FAMILY LIKE THAT.” “I MISSED MY FRIENDS THE MOST BUT, IN THE MEANTIME, YOU END UP WITH NEW FRIENDS, SLOWLY…WE WERE ONLY [HERE] FOUR DAYS AND I HAD A JOB IN MILK RIVER ALREADY. IN THE MEANTIME, I GOT TO KNOW RALPH. I ONLY GOT TO COME HOME ONCE IN TWO WEEKS FROM MILK RIVER TO PICTURE BUTTE AND WE WENT TO CHURCH. RALPH WAS CATHOLIC TOO AND THIS IS HOW WE GOT TO SEE EACH OTHER AND HE FLIPPED MY HAT OFF. HE WAS KIND OF A FUNNY GUY. WE BECAME FRIENDS AND THEN IF YOU HAVE FRIENDS HERE, YOU DON’T REALLY FORGET THE ONES IN HOLLAND BUT IT BECOMES EASIER.” “I WAS NEVER AGAINST [IMMIGRATING]…WE [SAW] THAT THERE WAS GOING TO BE A FUTURE HERE IN CANADA FOR US. WHEN WE FIRST ARRIVED IN CANADA WE COULD SEE THAT ALL THE FARMERS WERE NOT ALL THAT RICH EITHER. THEY WERE WILLING TO GIVE US A JOB BECAUSE THEY NEEDED PEOPLE TO HELP IN THE SUGAR BEETS AND THAT. BUT AT THE SAME TIME WE COULD SEE THAT THEY WERE NOT ALL THAT RICH YET EITHER. THERE WAS THE ODD ONE THAT WAS VERY WELL OFF BUT LOTS OF THEM WERE NOT. BUT THEY WERE WILLING TO GIVE US A JOB. WE ARRIVED IN APRIL [WITH] THE FARMER, BUT WHEN THE BEETS WERE READY TO BE THINNED AND HOED AND HARVESTED…[AFTER THAT] MY DAD WAS OUT OF A JOB. WE COULD STILL LIVE IN THE HOUSE AS LONG AS WE WANTED BUT OF COURSE MY DAD WANTED A JOB AND HE LOOKED AROUND. HE ENDED UP [AT LOURDES FARM].” [MY DAD] WORKED THERE FOR TWO YEARS, BUT HE WANTED TO FARM FOR HIMSELF. THEN HE CAME AND WORKED FOR TIFFIN BUT NOT ON THE DAIRY. HE HAD ANOTHER PLACE, AND TIFFINS WERE VERY GOOD FOR US. THEY GAVE US A MILK COW AND THAT MEANT A LOT. WE HAD A YARD AND A LITTLE GARDEN, AND MY DAD RENTED LAND FOR SUGAR BEETS FROM TIFFIN FOR A FEW YEARS THEN HE BOUGHT A FARM IN BOW ISLAND. MY PARENTS MOVED TO BOW ISLAND BUT I NEVER MOVED WITH THEM BECAUSE I HAD A GOOD JOB HERE. THEN RALPH AND I WERE GOING TOGETHER ALREADY AND HE WAS TALKING SOMETIMES ABOUT GETTING MARRIED.” “I THINK [IMMIGRATING] WAS HARDEST ON MY MOTHER, YET SHE WAS THE BIGGEST PUSH BEHIND IMMIGRATING. I THINK IT WAS THE HARDEST ON HER MAINLY BECAUSE, DURING THE DAY WE WERE ALL OUT WORKING IN THE BEETS. IF WE WEREN’T WORKING IN THE BEETS, THE CHILDREN WERE GOING TO SCHOOL. LUCKILY THE YOUNGEST ONE WAS NOT IN SCHOOL YET AND THAT HELPED MY MOM. BUT SHE DIDN’T KNOW MUCH ENGLISH YET, MAYBE A LITTLE BIT, BUT NOT ENOUGH TO UNDERSTAND WHAT THE RADIO WAS SAYING. THEN HER PARENTS IN HOLLAND HAD A GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY...SHE WENT BACK. THAT WAS TWO AND A HALF YEARS AFTER SHE WAS HERE, SHE WENT BACK TO CELEBRATE HER PARENTS’ ANNIVERSARY. MY DAD DIDN’T GO, MAINLY BECAUSE IT WAS EXPENSIVE AND HE PROBABLY NEEDED THE MONEY HERE TO KEEP GOING. WHEN SHE CAME BACK SHE WAS A DIFFERENT PERSON. SHE WAS SO HAPPY TO BE BACK.” ON HER MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE TAPESTRY, WITDOUCK NOTED, “I WANT TO SCALE DOWN. I’M 81 NOW, YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN SUDDENLY YOUR LIFE TAKES A TURN...THIS IS WHY I WANT TO TAKE CARE OF [THE TAPESTRY] NOW BEFORE IT HAS TO BE DONE IN A HURRY.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INLCUDING MARY WITDOUCK’S TYPED STORY, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180022000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180022000
Acquisition Date
2018-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
203
Width
262
Description
FINISHED QUILT WITH BLUE BACKING AND TRIM ALONG EDGES; QUILT TOP HAND-STITCHED, BACKING AND TRIM MACHINE STITCHED. QUILT TOP IS WHITE WITH MULTI-COLOURED FLOWERS ARRANGED IN RINGS; FLOWERS HAVE GREEN LEAVES SURROUNDING PETALS AND LEAVES CONNECT TO FORM THE RINGS. QUILT TOP HAS TWO WHITE FABRICS STITCHED TOGETHER AS BACKGROUND FOR FLOWERS. FRONT HAS MINOR STAINING; BACK HAS SMALL HOLE WITH FRAYED EDGES AND LOSS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE APPLIQUE QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” “THIS BLUE AND WHITE [APPLIQUE] ONE WAS MADE FOR MY [OLDER] SISTER MARY AND SHE WAS AWAY FROM HOME SO IT NEVER GOT HANDED OFF…THE [APPLIQUE] QUILT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC AND THE REST OF THEM, I THINK, WERE JUST IN STORAGE IN THE [ATTIC].” “[MARY] WAS THE SECOND IN LINE…[SHE WAS BORN] IN 1935. I THINK [MY MOM] THOUGHT THAT MARY WAS ONE OF THE ONES THAT WAS OUT OF THE FAMILY. SHE WAS THE BLACK SHEEP, I THINK.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “MARY HAD GONE TO THE CONVENT AND THAT’S PROBABLY WHILE SHE WAS GONE WHEN IT WAS MADE.” “[MARY WAS BORN IN] ’35, SO IN ‘55 SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN 20 YEARS OLD AND WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE CONVENT. [THE QUILT WAS MADE] PROBABLY MID ‘50S.” ED BETTS NOTED, “IT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC , IT WAS SEWN…HOW THE OLD 100-POUND FLOUR SACKS USED TO COME, WHITE, IT WAS ALL SEWN UP AND HER NAME WAS PUT ON IT IN INDELIBLE PENCIL.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, ON THE QUILT'S INVOLVEMENT IN THE "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT", “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN. I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “[SHE MADE QUILTS THAT] WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED CRAZY [QUILTS] BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. THE BLUE APPLIQUE QUILT WAS DISPLAYED AS PART OF THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM'S "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT" WITH THE NUMBER "AQP 2-0284." THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT DOCUMENTED QUILTS REFLECTING QUILTING TRENDS OF THE 20TH CENTURY IN ALBERTA, ACCORDING TO A CALL FOR QUILTS PUBLISHED BY LUCCIE HEINS, CURATOR FOR THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM MANAGING THE PROJECT. THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT'S SECOND PHASE BEGAN IN 2014 TO EXAMINE QUILTS IN PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, WITH THE EARLIER FIRST PHASE EXAMINING QUILTS PRIVATELY OWNED. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
197
Width
154.5
Description
QUILT TOP WITH MULTI-COLOURED AND MULTI-FABRIC CRAZY QUILT DESIGN IN A TWENTY SQUARE GRID; EACH GRID SQUARE HAS AN EIGHT-POINT STAR SEWN TOGETHER WITH MIXED-PATTERNED FABRICS. GRID SQUARES ARE DIVIDED BY EXTRA FABRIC TO FORM BORDERS. QUILT HAS ONE GRID BORDER OF DENIM EXTENDED PAST QUILT EDGE. QUILT IS HANDSTITCHED WITH STITCHES VISIBLE ON BACK; EDGES ARE UNFINISHED AND FRAYING; SMALL, FRAYED TEAR IN MIDDLE OF QUILT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE CRAZY QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

107 records – page 1 of 6.