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Other Name
A. P. P SHOULDER TITLE
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ALUMINUM, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20180014001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
A. P. P SHOULDER TITLE
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Materials
ALUMINUM, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.9
Length
6.0
Width
2.6
Description
SILVER SHOULDER TITLE. HAS THE LETTERS "A.P." CENTERED ABOVE THE WORD "POLICE". BACK OF TITLE HAS 2 BRASS LOOPS FOR HOLDING BRASS SPLIT PIN. THERE IS NO PIN.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS BADGE BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN. ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY PROVIDED WITH A BUCHANAN A. P. P.-RELATED DONATION MADE BY JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN 2002 (P20020090). IT STATES, "BORN IN GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, WHERE BUCHANAN BEGAN REGULAR SCHOOLING AT THE AGE OF 4, WHICH ENABLED HIM TO COMPLETE HIS HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HIS PARENTS MOVED THE FAMILY TO CANADA IN MAY 1914. THE FAMILY SETTLED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WHERE EDWARD FOUND A JOB PLUS ENROLLED IN NIGHT CLASSES AT THE EDMONTON TECHNICAL SCHOOL TAKING ENGLISH, CANADIAN HISTORY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MANUAL TRAINING IN WOODWORKING. IN FEBRUARY 1917, THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS ORGANIZED. ED JOINED IN MAY OF 1920." THESE BADGES WERE A PART OF HIS UNIFORM IN THIS ROLE. AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. DESCRIBING HER FATHER’S CAREER, BUCHANAN BEGAN, “[MY DAD] JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL…AS A ROOKIE – RIGHT AT THE START – HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. AND IT WASN’T LONG UNTIL HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE REAL POLICING. WHEN THE CRAZY PROHIBITION WAS BROUGHT IN, THAT WAS A REAL PAIN FOR THE POLICE. IT WAS [A MOVEMENT] PUSHED BY THESE DO-GOODERS, WHO DIDN’T REALIZE WHAT THEY WERE DOING. DAD WAS VERY UPSET TALKING ABOUT THAT. EVEN WHEN HE WAS JUST A YOUNG FELLOW, [HE WAS] FINDING YOUNG, GOOD FARM BOYS BLIND OR DEAD OVER A FENCE, BECAUSE THEY HAD A PROBLEM WITH THE PROHIBITION AND GETTING MOONSHINE THAT WASN’T MATURE OR SOMETHING, [WHICH] WAS POISONOUS.” “IN 1921 HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON,” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL. HE THEN GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE AND HE WAS GOING TO GO THERE, BUT THEN IN 1922 THEY GOT MARRIED [SO HE DID NOT GO TO GRAND PRAIRIE] FORTUNATELY, THE A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. DID, SO HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED. [AFTER MY PARENTS’ MARRIAGE] THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD, WHERE HE WAS ON HIS OWN [AT THE POSTING]. FROM THERE, HE DID A LOT OF WORK GOING BACK AND FORTH.” “BRAINARD [WAS] A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION… THEY BUILT DAD A LOG CABIN DOWN THERE FOR THE HOUSE WITH HIS NEW WIFE AND [SOON AFTER THEY WERE] EXPECTING THEIR FIRST CHILD. [THE CABIN HAD] ONE BIG ROOM WITH CURTAINS HERE AND THERE, AND HE DIDN’T HAVE A PRISON THERE. WHEN HE TOOK IN A PRISONER, THAT’S WHEN HE NEEDED THE OREGON BOOT AND THE BALL AND CHAIN BECAUSE HE HAD A BIG BOLT ON THE FLOOR NEAR HIS OFFICE. THAT’S WHERE THE GUY HAD TO SIT, CHAINED, UNTIL [MY FATHER] COULD TAKE HIM ON INTO EDMONTON…EVEN IN THE A.P.P. TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON. [HE WOULD BE] BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE],” BUCHANAN EXPLAINED EXPANDING ON HOW HER FATHER’S WORK TOOK HIM “BACK AND FORTH.” “THEN THEY CLOSED THAT [BRAINAR POST] DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY – A LITTLE VILLAGE – AND HE WAS THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. [HE WAS THERE] WHEN 1932 CAME ALONG AND THEN HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P… AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. [FROM THERE] HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT, WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO [COVER]. AND THERE AGAIN, WE HAD A NICE, BIG WHITE HOUSE AND A JAIL THIS TIME… THE JAIL OFFICE AND THE COURTROOM AND EVERYTHING WAS CONNECTED [TO THE HOUSE]. YOU JUST GO DOWN THE HALL AND OPEN THE DOOR AND THERE YOU GO, AND THERE’S TWO JAILS IN THERE. [THERE] HE WAS GETTING ROOKIES COMING OUT FROM EDMONTON TO TRAIN UNDER HIM… [I WAS BORN IN] ’30 [AND] NOW IN ’34, I REMEMBER GOING THERE [TO WESTLOCK].” SPEAKING ABOUT THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P. IN 1932 AND THE ABSORPTION OF SOME OF ITS MEMBERS INTO THE R. C. M P., BUCHANAN EXPLAINED, “[A. P. P. OFFICERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY [WERE RANKED] INTO THREE CATEGORIES. [FIRST, THERE WERE THE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE; THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P. THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEN THERE WERE THE ONES THAT COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY [INTO THE FORCE FOR THE TRIAL PERIOD]. THEY COULD [BE ACCEPTED] FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY AGAIN [FOR FULL-TIME]. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE, [WHO] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE…IT IS IMPORTANT [TO REMEMBER], THOSE A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT. THEY WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” WHEN ANSWERING HOW HER FATHER ENDED UP WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE, BUCHANAN SAID, “[AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P.], ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER [OF THE R. C. M. P.] HANCOCK (WILLIAM FREDERICK WATKINS “BILL” HANCOCK) KNEW DAD REALLY WELL. [PREVIOUSLY, HANCOCK] WAS THE [ACTING COMMISSIONER] FOR THE ALBERTA [PROVINCIAL POLICE]. [HANCOCK] CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, ‘BUCK – DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’A LOT – I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT, BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT. YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?’” AS A RESULT, EDWARD BUCHANAN WAS RELOCATED TO THE R. C. M. P.’S LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT IN 1944. JEAN BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “DAD’S PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, VERY FIRMLY. AND THE STAFF [IN LETHBRIDGE] ENDED UP LOVING HIM. THE SECRETARIES AND EVERYTHING, THEY WERE CRYING WHEN HE LEFT. AND I GOT LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON… BUT [IN TERMS OF] THE SITUATION [WHICH ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK WAS REFERRING TO], NO, HE WAS FINE. HE NEVER HAD ANY TROUBLE. HE JUST FIRMLY, QUIETLY DEALT WITH EVERYTHING AND EVERYTHING WAS FINE. I NEVER SAW HIM STRESSED OUT. ALWAYS COOL, LAID BACK.” “[WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE], WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET SOUTH. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. BUT WE HAD [SOME] TROUBLE BECAUSE DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US. HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE [THAT WAS] READY, SO WHEN WE CAME DOWN [WE] STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. AND THEN I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE – LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS. ANYWAY, I GOT THROUGH GRADE TWELVE AND THAT’S ALRIGHT.” “[ANOTHER THING HE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR HERE IN LETHBRIDGE] WAS TO OVERSEE THE PRISONER OF WAR (POW) CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POWS IN THE RESPECT THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. THEY WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY, BUT THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY. THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. [MY DAD] RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT… AND THEN THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK ON THE [FARMS], BECAUSE THERE WAS A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS… BUT, OF COURSE, I KNEW ABOUT THE CRUELTY OF SOME OF THE HARD-CORE NAZIS THAT WERE IN THERE. THE TROUBLE WAS THERE WASN’T ENOUGH FORCE POLICE TO GO IN THERE SAFELY. THEY COULDN’T EVEN GET IN THE POW CAMP AND THE CIVIL GUARDS WERE THE ONLY ONES THAT WERE AVAILABLE, BUT THEY DIDN’T EVEN DARE GO IN HALF THE TIME. IT WAS REALLY SOMETHING. THERE WERE SOME GUYS IN THERE THAT WERE REALLY, REALLY MEAN…” “AND OH YES, A FEW [MEN DID TRY TO ESCAPE THE CAMP],” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT THEY DIDN’T GET VERY FAR. THEY NEVER GOT AWAY. I’VE GOT RECORDS OF ONES THAT WERE CAUGHT. THEY STOLE SOMEBODY’S CAR. SOME OF THEM GOT A REGULAR SENTENCE FOR BREAKING ONE OF OUR LAWS.” BUCHANAN CONFIRMS THAT HER FATHER RETIRED FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN 1950 WHILE IN LETHBRIDGE. AFTER RETIREMENT, SHE EXPLAINED, “[HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON, HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS… BUT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE WITH HIS RECORD, SO THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA…HE THEN WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN OR SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS…” EDWARD BUCHANAN “SORT OF” RETIRED FROM THAT ROLE IN THE 1970S, HIS DAUGHTER EXPLAINED. HE CONTINUED WORKING IN SOME CAPACITIES UNTIL HIS PASSING IN 1998. “[I RECEIVED MY DAD’S R. C. M. P. POSSESSIONS, BECAUSE HE] KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER IT AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM… HE LIVED TO BE NINETY-EIGHT AND I DON’T THINK HE EVER THREW ANYTHING OUT SINCE HE WAS IN HIS TWENTIES.” ACCORDING TO EDWARD E. “BUCK” BUCHANAN’S OBITUARY, HE PASSED AWAY IN IN EDMONTON IN 1998. HIS WIFE’S NAME WAS CHRISTENE BUCHANAN AND TOGETHER THEY HAD FIVE CHILDREN – EDWARD, ROBERT, JEAN, WILLIAM, AND ROSE-MARIE. THE OBITUARY STATES HE SERVED 31 YEARS IN THE R.C.M.P, AND 15 YEARS AS THE SUPERINTENDENT OF CORRECTIONS FOR ALBERTA. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20180014001
Acquisition Date
2018-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1911
Date Range To
1915
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20160017009
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1911
Date Range To
1915
Materials
BRASS
No. Pieces
2
Length
2.7
Width
4.1
Description
A. BRASS EPAULET SHAPED AS “23” WITH NUMBERS CONNECTED; EPAULET HAS TWO METAL LOOPS SOLDERED ON BACK FOR FASTENING. EDGES SHOW MINOR CORROSION AND TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. BRASS EPAULET SHAPED AS “23” WITH NUMBERS CONNECTED; EPAULET HAS TWO METAL LOOPS SOLDERED ON BACK FOR FASTENING. BACK HAS PROMINENT TARNISHING AROUND BASE OF LOOPS; BACK HAS MINOR TARNISHING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (FIRST WORLD WAR) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (SECOND WORLD WAR AND POST-WAR). ON HIS GRANDFATHER’S, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH NOTED, “MY UNDERSTANDING [IS MY GRANDFATHER SERVED IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR] ALTHOUGH IT’S INTERESTING…I REMEMBER MY DAD SAID, WHEN THE DEPRESSION HIT, THEY WERE GOING TO LAY OFF MY GRANDFATHER, WHO WAS THE, I THINK IT WAS THE CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF ROADS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH THE MONEY, AND THE CARS AND ALL THAT STUFF, SO THEY THREATENED TO LAY HIM OFF. HE TOOK THE MILITARY SERVICE SORT OF APPROACH TO 'THEY CAN’T DO THIS TO ME,' AND SAVED HIS OWN JOB AND HIS OWN SKIN. SO, ALL THROUGH THE DEPRESSION, THEY HAD A CAR, WHICH WAS RARE. THE CAR THAT WAS PAID FOR BY SOMEBODY ELSE, SO THERE MUST HAVE BEEN SOMETHING. IT SEEMS ALMOST LIKE THE OLD BRITISH EMPIRE STYLE OF INFLUENCE THAT YOU WOULD HAVE, IF YOU WERE AN OFFICER IN THE ARMED FORCES, SO THAT PART I DO KNOW. MY GRANDFATHER DIDN’T TALK ABOUT ANYTHING EITHER. I DO KNOW ONE THING THOUGH. IT WAS INTERESTING THAT THEY WERE MORMONS, AND AFTER MY GRANDFATHER CAME BACK FROM WORLD WAR ONE, HE SORT OF ‘SPLIT THE SHEETS’.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “I THINK [THE OBJECTS ARE] A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS]…IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT.” THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S OBITUARY REPORTED THAT HE AND HUGH B. BROWN FOUNDED CARDSTON’S CAVALRY MILITIA UNIT, UNDER AN APPEAL FROM THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO THE CARDSTON DISTRICT IN 1909. IN 1911, A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE CONFIRMED WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S MEMBERSHIP WITH THE CARDSTON MILITIA, STATING THAT HE WAS A CAPTAIN IN CARDSTON’S “RED COATS”—THE “C” SQUADRON OF THE 23RD ALBERTA RANGERS. IN A 1916 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, AND ON WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S FIRST WORLD WAR ATTESTATION PAPERS, WILLIAM GEORGE IS LISTED AS SERVING WITH THE RANGERS FOR 5 YEARS PRIOR TO ENLISTING WITH THE 13TH CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE. WILLIAM GEORGE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE LORD STRATHCONA’S HORSES. THE EPAULETTES ARE SUSPECTED TO BE FROM WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S TIME WITH THE 23RD ALBERTA RANGERS. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE FROM JUNE 13, 1911 DESCRIBES THE CHANGES TO UNIFORMS OF THE 23RD ALBERTA RANGERS, INCLUDING, “CHAIN EPAULETTES FOR THE LIEUTENANTS, AND THE NUMBERS “23” WORN ON EACH SHOULDER BY THE MEN ARE MINOR POINTS…” ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH RETURNED FROM WAR TO WORK AS A ROAD FOREMAN FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS UNTIL 1929, THEN AS SUPERVISOR OF MAINTENANCE FOR MAJOR HIGHWAYS FROM FORT MACLEOD. IN 1950, AISNCOUGH RETIRED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS AND RESIDED IN LETHBRIDGE WITH HIS WIFE, ZINA, UNTIL HIS PASSING IN MARCH 1966. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FAMILY MILITARY SERVICE FILES, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017009
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY"
Date Range From
1911
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRASS, COPPER
Catalogue Number
P20160017011
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"ROYAL CANADIAN ARTILLERY"
Date Range From
1911
Date Range To
1919
Materials
BRASS, COPPER
No. Pieces
1
Length
5
Width
6.4
Description
CANADIAN ARTILLERY CAP BADGE; BADGE DEPICTS A CROWN OVER “CANADA” BANNER, OVER AN ARTILLERY FIELD GUN ABOVE BANNER WITH TEXT “QUO FAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT”. BADGE HAS MINOR TARNISHING ON FRONT AND BACK, WITH GREEN RESIDUE LEFT FROM OXIDATION; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (FIRST WORLD WAR) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (SECOND WORLD WAR AND POST-WAR). ON HIS GRANDFATHER’S, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH NOTED, “MY UNDERSTANDING [IS MY GRANDFATHER SERVED IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR] ALTHOUGH IT’S INTERESTING…I REMEMBER MY DAD SAID, WHEN THE DEPRESSION HIT, THEY WERE GOING TO LAY OFF MY GRANDFATHER, WHO WAS THE, I THINK IT WAS THE CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF ROADS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH THE MONEY, AND THE CARS AND ALL THAT STUFF, SO THEY THREATENED TO LAY HIM OFF. HE TOOK THE MILITARY SERVICE SORT OF APPROACH TO 'THEY CAN’T DO THIS TO ME,' AND SAVED HIS OWN JOB AND HIS OWN SKIN. SO, ALL THROUGH THE DEPRESSION, THEY HAD A CAR, WHICH WAS RARE. THE CAR THAT WAS PAID FOR BY SOMEBODY ELSE, SO THERE MUST HAVE BEEN SOMETHING. IT SEEMS ALMOST LIKE THE OLD BRITISH EMPIRE STYLE OF INFLUENCE THAT YOU WOULD HAVE, IF YOU WERE AN OFFICER IN THE ARMED FORCES, SO THAT PART I DO KNOW. MY GRANDFATHER DIDN’T TALK ABOUT ANYTHING EITHER. I DO KNOW ONE THING THOUGH. IT WAS INTERESTING THAT THEY WERE MORMONS, AND AFTER MY GRANDFATHER CAME BACK FROM WORLD WAR ONE, HE SORT OF ‘SPLIT THE SHEETS’.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “I THINK [THE OBJECTS ARE] A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS]…IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT.” THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S OBITUARY REPORTED THAT HE AND HUGH B. BROWN FOUNDED CARDSTON’S CAVALRY MILITIA UNIT, UNDER AN APPEAL FROM THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO THE CARDSTON DISTRICT IN 1909. IN 1911, A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE CONFIRMED WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S MEMBERSHIP WITH THE CARDSTON MILITIA, STATING THAT HE WAS A CAPTAIN IN CARDSTON’S “RED COATS”—THE “C” SQUADRON OF THE 23RD ALBERTA RANGERS. IN A 1916 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, AND ON WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S FIRST WORLD WAR ATTESTATION PAPERS, WILLIAM GEORGE IS LISTED AS SERVING WITH THE RANGERS FOR 5 YEARS PRIOR TO ENLISTING WITH THE 13TH CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE. WILLIAM GEORGE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE LORD STRATHCONA’S HORSES. THE CAP BADGE IS SUSPECTED TO BE FROM WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S TIME WITH THE 13TH CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH RETURNED FROM WAR TO WORK AS A ROAD FOREMAN FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS UNTIL 1929, THEN AS SUPERVISOR OF MAINTENANCE FOR MAJOR HIGHWAYS FROM FORT MACLEOD. IN 1950, AISNCOUGH RETIRED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS AND RESIDED IN LETHBRIDGE WITH HIS WIFE, ZINA, UNTIL HIS PASSING IN MARCH 1966. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FAMILY MILITARY SERVICE FILES, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017011
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1911
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, LEATHER
Catalogue Number
P20160017012
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1911
Date Range To
1919
Materials
WOOD, METAL, LEATHER
No. Pieces
1
Length
61.3
Diameter
3
Description
VARNISHED BROWN STRIPED WOODEN ROD WITH METAL CAP ON BASE AND BRASS CAP ON KNOB; KNOB AT TOP OF SWAGGER STICK IS WIDE AND TAPERS TO ROD; BRASS CAP ON KNOB HAS AN EMBOSSED CREST OF CANADIAN ARTILLERY WITH “CANADA” EMBOSSED BELOW. BASE OF THE KNOB HAS A BRASS RING WITH “A” EMBOSSED ON FRONT; BRASS RING HAS LEATHER STRAP FIXED TO BACK. METAL END CAP HAS MINOR TARNISHING; BRASS CAP ON KNOB HAS MINOR TARNISHING; LEATHER STRAP IS CRACKED AND FLAKING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
ON SEPTEMBER 16, 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED CHRIS AINSCOUGH REGARDING HIS DONATION OF A COLLECTION OF MILITARY OBJECTS. THE OBJECTS BELONGED TO AISNCOUGH’S GRANDFATHER AND FATHER, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH (FIRST WORLD WAR) AND REED WILSON AINSCOUGH (SECOND WORLD WAR AND POST-WAR). ON THE SWAGGER STICK, CHRIS AINSCOUGH NOTED, “THERE’S TWO SWAGGER STICKS. [THE WOODEN] ONE WAS MY GRANDFATHER’S, I THINK, AND THE [LEATHER] ONE WAS DAD’S.” ON HIS GRANDFATHER’S, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S, MILITARY SERVICE, CHRIS AINSCOUGH NOTED, “MY UNDERSTANDING [IS MY GRANDFATHER SERVED IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR] ALTHOUGH IT’S INTERESTING…I REMEMBER MY DAD SAID, WHEN THE DEPRESSION HIT, THEY WERE GOING TO LAY OFF MY GRANDFATHER, WHO WAS THE, I THINK IT WAS THE CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF ROADS FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA, AND THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE WITH THE MONEY, AND THE CARS AND ALL THAT STUFF, SO THEY THREATENED TO LAY HIM OFF. HE TOOK THE MILITARY SERVICE SORT OF APPROACH TO 'THEY CAN’T DO THIS TO ME,' AND SAVED HIS OWN JOB AND HIS OWN SKIN. SO, ALL THROUGH THE DEPRESSION, THEY HAD A CAR, WHICH WAS RARE. THE CAR THAT WAS PAID FOR BY SOMEBODY ELSE, SO THERE MUST HAVE BEEN SOMETHING. IT SEEMS ALMOST LIKE THE OLD BRITISH EMPIRE STYLE OF INFLUENCE THAT YOU WOULD HAVE, IF YOU WERE AN OFFICER IN THE ARMED FORCES, SO THAT PART I DO KNOW. MY GRANDFATHER DIDN’T TALK ABOUT ANYTHING EITHER. I DO KNOW ONE THING THOUGH. IT WAS INTERESTING THAT THEY WERE MORMONS, AND AFTER MY GRANDFATHER CAME BACK FROM WORLD WAR ONE, HE SORT OF ‘SPLIT THE SHEETS’.” AINSCOUGH ELABORATED ON HIS MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE COLLECTION, STATING, “I THINK [THE OBJECTS ARE] A BIG PART OF SOUTH ALBERTA’S HISTORY. DAD WAS VERY ACTIVE IN THE MILITARY AND THE MILITIA FOR MANY YEARS. I THINK THAT’S THE BIGGEST PART [OF WANTING TO DONATE THE OBJECTS]…IT’S DIVESTING, BECAUSE AFTER MY DAD DIED [IN 1992], MY MOTHER STAYED IN THE HOUSE FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS, AND THEN SHE MOVED OUT TO THE COAST. IT WAS AT THAT TIME, WHEN WE WERE GOING THROUGH THE STUFF IN THE HOUSE, THAT WE THOUGHT THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO GET IT DOWN TO SOMEPLACE LIKE THE GALT THAT WOULD LOOK AFTER IT.” THE DONOR’S GREAT GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM THOMAS AINSCOUGH, MARRIED MARGARET A. AINSCOUGH IN 1878 AND EMIGRATED FROM SMITHFIELD, UTAH TO CANADA IN 1898, BRINGING SIX CHILDREN, AGED 1 TO 18, WITH THEM. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH, THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, WAS AMONG THE CHILDREN (BORN 1885). THE AINSCOUGHS INITIALLY SETTLED IN WHISKEY GAP, ALBERTA, BEFORE RELOCATING TO WOOLFORD, ALBERTA. WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S OBITUARY REPORTED THAT HE AND HUGH B. BROWN FOUNDED CARDSTON’S CAVALRY MILITIA UNIT, UNDER AN APPEAL FROM THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO THE CARDSTON DISTRICT IN 1909. IN 1911, A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE CONFIRMED WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S MEMBERSHIP WITH THE CARDSTON MILITIA, STATING THAT HE WAS A CAPTAIN IN CARDSTON’S “RED COATS”—THE “C” SQUADRON OF THE 23RD ALBERTA RANGERS. IN A 1916 LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, AND ON WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH’S FIRST WORLD WAR ATTESTATION PAPERS, WILLIAM GEORGE IS LISTED AS SERVING WITH THE RANGERS FOR 5 YEARS PRIOR TO ENLISTING WITH THE 13TH CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE. WILLIAM GEORGE SERVED OVERSEAS WITH THE LORD STRATHCONA’S HORSES. ACCORDING TO HIS LETHBRIDGE HERALD OBITUARY, WILLIAM GEORGE AINSCOUGH RETURNED FROM WAR TO WORK AS A ROAD FOREMAN FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS UNTIL 1929, THEN AS SUPERVISOR OF MAINTENANCE FOR MAJOR HIGHWAYS FROM FORT MACLEOD. IN 1950, AISNCOUGH RETIRED FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS AND RESIDED IN LETHBRIDGE WITH HIS WIFE, ZINA, UNTIL HIS PASSING IN MARCH 1966. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FAMILY MILITARY SERVICE FILES, NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS ON WILLIAM GEORGE AND REED AINSCOUGH, A RESUME FOR REED AINSCOUGH, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20160017001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20160017012
Acquisition Date
2016-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20150035000
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
2
Length
4.5
Width
3
Description
A – B: WORLD WAR I COLLAR BADGE THAT HAS “CANADIAN MEDICAL CORPS” STAMPED BRONZE-COLOURED WITH REMOVABLE PIN. THE BADGE DEPICTS A MAPLE LEAF WREATH WITH A SNAKE AROUND THE SWORD AT THE CENTER. THERE IS A CROWN AT THE TOP OF THE BADGE. GOOD CONDITION. THE METAL HAS DULLED AND DARKENED.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
ON NOVEMBER 25, 2015, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN CONDUCTED A PHONE INTERVIEW WITH MIKE LEVIN OF OTTAWA, ONTARIO TO DISCUSS A WORLD WAR I COLLAR BADGE THAT HE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM. THE BADGE BELONGED TO HIS GRANDFATHER, DR. JOHN STANLEY WRAY, WHO WAS A MEDICAL PHYSICIAN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA AND A WORLD WAR I VETERAN. LEVIN HAS BEEN IN POSSESSION OF THE BADGE SINCE 2009-2010 AFTER THE PASSING OF HIS UNCLE, ROBERT G. WRAY, WHO HAD INHERITED IT FROM HIS FATHER, DR. J. S. WRAY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THE BADGE HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT PHONE INTERVIEW: “MY MOTHER’S FAMILY DIDN’T TALK ABOUT THEMSELVES AT ALL… [W]HEN MY GRANDFATHER DIED BEFORE I WAS BORN. I LIVED OUT OF THE COUNTRY FOR A LONG TIME AND WHEN I CAME BACK, I RE-ACQUAINTED MYSELF WITH MY UNCLE BOB. HE’S THE ONE WHO DONATED SOME STUFF TO THE GALT BEFORE..." THE DONOR’S UNCLE BOB (ROBERT G. WRAY) PASSED AWAY IN EDMONTON. ACCORDING TO THE INTERVIEW, THIS MILITARY BADGE IS THE ONLY OBJECT THAT EXISTS WITHIN THE FAMILY FROM DR. JOHN S. WRAY’S MILITARY SERVICE. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT DR. JOHN S. WRAY COMES FROM A HISTORY FOUND IN A 1924 PUBLICATION TITLED, ALBERTA PAST AND PRESENT, BY JOHN BLUE: “DR. JOHN STANLEY WRAY, A WORLD WAR VETERAN WHO, SINCE JUNE 1919, HAS ENGAGED IN THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AT LETHBRIDGE, WAS BORN IN LINWOOD, ONTARIO, OCTOBER 28, 1882, A SON OF GEORGE AND ANN (ALLINGHAM) WRAY, BOTH OF WHOM WERE NATIVES OF IRELAND...” “JOHN STANLEY WRAY IS THE YOUNGEST OF A FAMILY OF SIX CHILDREN. HE WAS EDUCATED IN PUBLIC SCHOOL NO. 21 IN WELLESLEY TOWNSHIP, WATERLOO DISTRICT, ONTARIO, AND LATER HE ATTENDED THE KITCHENER HIGH SCHOOL AND THE EDMONTON HIGH SCHOOL. HE THERE ACQUIRED A LICENSE TO TEACH AND DEVOTED ABOUT THREE YEARS TO THE PROFESSION OF TEACHING IN AND NEAR EDMONTON BUT REGARDED THIS MERELY AS AN INITIAL STEP TO OTHER PROFESSIONAL LABOR. HE THEN ENTERED THE MEDICAL SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO IN TORONTO, CANADA, IN 1905, AND BY REASON OF THE STEADY PROGRESS THAT HE MADE IN HIS STUDIES WAS THERE GRADUATED IN 1909. HE THEN LOCATED FOR PRACTICE AT RAYMOND, ALBERTA, WHERE HE CONTINUED FOR SIX YEARS, WHEN THE NEED FOR AID IN CONNECTION WITH THE WORLD WAR LED HIM TO JOIN THE ARMY AS A MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN ARMY MEDICAL CORPS, WITH THE RANK OF CAPTAIN. HE SERVED IN CALGARY UNTIL MARCH, 1917, WHEN HE WAS ATTACHED TO THE ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-FIRST BATTALION IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT AND WENT OVERSEAS. HE SERVED IN ENGLAND WITH RESERVE BATTALIONS AND IN HOSPITALS AND WAS FOR A TIME A MEMBER OF A TRAVELING MEDICAL BOARD, THUS CONTINUING IN ACTIVE DUTY UNTIL MAY, 1918, WHEN HE WENT TO FRANCE AND WAS ATTACHED TO THE THIRD CANADIAN AMBULANCE CORPS. LATER HE WAS IDENTIFIED WITH THE FIRST CANADIAN FIELD ARTILLERY AND WAS IN THE BATTLE OF AMIENS IN AUGUST, 1918. LATER HE RETURNED TO ENGLAND WITH A BROKEN ARM AND WAS DISCHARGED FROM THE CANADIAN ARMY ON THE 27TH OF APRIL, 1919. AT THE BREAKING OF THE HINDENBURG LINE ON THE 1ST AND 2ND OF SEPTEMBER, 1918, HE WAS ON DUTY WITH THE THIRD FIELD AMBULANCE. FOLLOWING HIS RETURN HOME HE LOCATED AT LETHBRIDGE FOR THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE IN JUNE, 1919, AND HAS HERE REMAINED.” ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT DR. WRAY’S SERVICE IN WORLD WAR I COMES FROM HIS SERVICE RECORDS OBTAINED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA’S ONLINE DATABASE. ACCORDING TO THE RECORDS, DR. WRAY ENLISTED ON JUNE 13, 1916 IN THE SARCEE CAMP IN CALGARY. DR. WRAY AND MARION WRAY HAD THREE CHILDREN: MARGARET ALICE LEWIS, PHYLISS NEILSON LEVIN, AND ROBERT G. WRAY. DR. WRAY PASSED AWAY IN LETHBRIDGE DURING 1952 AT THE AGE OF 69 YEARS. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, FULL ALBERTA PAST AND PRESENT ARTICLE, AND SERVICE RECORDS.
Catalogue Number
P20150035000
Acquisition Date
2015-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALLIED VICTORY MEDAL, WWI
Date Range From
1914
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BRONZE, COPPER PLATE, RIBBON
Catalogue Number
P20170001001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALLIED VICTORY MEDAL, WWI
Date Range From
1914
Date Range To
1919
Materials
BRONZE, COPPER PLATE, RIBBON
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.3
Length
14.5
Width
3.9
Diameter
3.6
Description
GREAT WAR VICTORY MEDAL. ROUND COPPER-PLATED BRONZE MEDAL ATTACHED TO WATERED RIBBON IN RAINBOW COLOURS, BEGINNING WITH VIOLET ON THE OUTSIDE EDGES AND MEETING WITH RED AT THE CENTER. THE OBVERSE OF THE MEDAL HAS AN EMBOSSED IMAGE OF WINGED FEMALE FIGURE OF VICTORY WITH LEFT ARM RAISED AND SHE IS HOLDING A PALM BRANCH IN HER RIGHT HAND. WREATH EMBOSSED ON CIRCUMFERENCE OF REVERSE, WITH TEXT READING "THE GREAT WAR FOR CIVILISATION 1914-1919" ENGRAVED AT CENTRE. EDGE ENGRAVED WITH TEXT READING “228409 PTE. T. OKUTAKE. P. P. C. L. I.” BOTH ENDS OF THE RIBBON ARE FRAYING WITH WHITE THREADS VISIBLY COMING LOOSE. SLIGHT LOSS OF SHAPE TO SHORTER SIDE OF THE RIBBON AND WRINKLING OVERALL. SLIGHT SCUFFING AND LOSS OF FINISH OF THE MEDAL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
THE MEDALS' DONOR PATRICIA "PAT" SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED FROM TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. THE INFORMATION BELOW IS COMPILED FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES, WHICH ALL PROVIDE GREATER DETAIL ABOUT THE LIFE OF TOMOMI OKUTAKE. ON 13 OCTOBER 1976, TOMOMI OKUTAKE’S WIFE – TSURU OKUTAKE (NEE GENKA) – WAS INTERVIEWED BY TOMIO WAKAYAMA. THE INTERVIEW IS HELD BY SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW, WHICH WAS TRANSLATED FOR THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES BY TOMOKO GREENSHIELDS: OF THE FAMILY’S IMMIGRATION TO CANADA, MRS. OKUTAKE EXPLAINED THAT HER HUSBAND CAME FROM SHURI, OKINAWA. “[TOMOMI] CAME [TO CANADA] IN 1907. I CAME HERE IN 1930… HE CAME TO WORK FOR A TRAIN COMPANY (THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY). WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE REASON FOR HER HUSBAND’S IMMIGRATION TO CANADA, MRS. OKUTAKE STATED, “WELL, JAPAN HAD A WAR WITH CHINA… THE SHINO-JAPANESE WAR. HE WAS TAUGHT THAT OKINAWA OWED CHINA… SO HE DID NOT WANT TO FIGHT WITH CHINA… HIS UNCLE WENT TO HAWAII LONG BEFORE, [SO] HE WANTED TO GO TO A FOREIGN COUNTRY [AS WELL]…" CONTINUING WITH THE DISCUSSION OF MR. OKUTAKE’S IMMIGRATION, MRS. OKUTAKE MENTIONED, "HE STAYED IN VANCOUVER [UPON HIS ARRIVAL IN CANADA]. [THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED THERE BEFORE JAPANESE PEOPLE CAME] WERE AGAINST THE JAPANESE IMMIGRANTS…” MRS. OKUTAKE SPECULATES THAT MR. OKUTAKE MOVED TO ALBERTA AROUND 1911. SHE SAYS, “[HE WORKED AT] THE COAL MINE NUMBER 6… UNTIL HE RETIRED. THE NUMBER 6... SHUT DOWN, SO HE WORKED AT THE NUMBER 8 UNTIL HE WAS 65, 64.” THIS SPECULATION IS CONFIRMED IN A FAMILY HISTORY WRITTEN BY PAT SASSA FOR A HISTORY BOOK ABOUT THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA JAPANESE-CANADIAN COMMUNITY TITLED NISHIKI: NIKKEI TAPESTRY (PUBLISHED IN 2001). THIS HISTORY STATES THAT OKUTAKE ARRIVED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911. IN THE 1976 INTERVIEW, MRS. OKUTAKE CONTINUES ABOUT HER HUSBAND’S EXPERIENCE WORKING ABOVE GROUND FOR THE MINES, “I THINK [HIS JOB WAS HARD]. MY HUSBAND’S JOB WAS TO LOAD COAL UP ON A CART… OTHER PEOPLE TRIED BUT THEY COULD NOT [DO IT LIKE HE COULD]… HE WAS A MAN WHO COULD ENDURE SO MUCH… HE WORKED AT A COAL MINE DURING THE WINTER AND WORKED AT A FARM DURING THE SUMMER.” MRS. OKUTAKE SAID HER HUSBAND HAD RECEIVED HIS CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP IN EITHER 1914 OR 1915. A CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION HOUSED AT THE NIKKEI NATIONAL MUSEUM IN BRITISH COLUMBIA STATES THAT TOMOMI OKUTAKE WAS NATURALIZED ON JANUARY 25, 1915. ACCORDING TO HIS ATTESTATION PAPERS, MR. OKUTAKE ENLISTED IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR ON 26 MAY 1916 IN CALGARY. THESE PAPERS LIST HIM AS BEING BORN ON 21 NOVEMBER 1889. THERE IS A DISCREPANCY BETWEEN THE BIRTH YEAR LISTED IN THE SERVICE RECORDS AND THAT IN FAMILIAL DOCUMENTS, WHICH RECORD 1888. IN AN INTERVIEW CONDUCTED BY GALT COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN THAT TOOK PLACE ON 16 JANUARY 2017 WITH OKUTAKE’S DAUGHTER, PATRICIA SASSA, SHE EXPLAINED THE DIFFERING RECORDS: “… [IT’S] NOT TYPO, BUT A LOT OF THE JAPANESE PEOPLE WOULD PUT THEIR JAPANESE AGE DOWN, BECAUSE WHEN THEY’RE BORN THEY’RE ALREADY A YEAR OLD. SO THAT MIGHT BE THE REASON.” IN THE 1976 INTERVIEW, OKUTAKE’S WIFE DESCRIBED HIS ENLISTMENT: “HE STUDIED THE HAN CHINESE IN JAPAN WHEN HE WAS LITTLE. IN CONFUCIANISM, THEY SAY THAT WHEN PEOPLE MOVE TO A NEW PLACE THEY SHOULD ACT AS PEOPLE DO IN THAT PLACE. HE LIVED IN CANADA, SO HE TRIED TO FULFILL HIS OBLIGATION AS A CANADIAN… HE AND MR. KANDA WENT TO [AN] ALBERTA CITY HALL TO TELL THEM THAT THEY WANTED TO GO TO THE WAR. IT WAS IN THE NEWSPAPER… IT SAID THAT TWO SCARY-LOOKING JAPANESE MEN APPLY TO GO TO THE WAR (LAUGHED). SCARY FACE OR SOMETHING. I FORGOT. THEY COULD NOT MIX ONLY ONE OR TWO JAPANESE SOLDIERS WITH WHITE SOLDIERS, SO THE JAPANESE SOLDIERS WERE PUT TOGETHER WITH JAPANESE SOLDIERS. I CANNOT REMEMBER WHERE THEY WERE ASKED TO GO SOMEWHERE. I WOULD ASSUME THEY WENT TO VANCOUVER.” ACCORDING TO HIS SERVICE RECORDS, TOMOMI OKUTAKE BEGAN HIS MILITARY CAREER WITH THE 13TH REGIMENT CANADIAN MOUNTED RIFLES (C.M.R.), WHERE HE WAS TAKEN ON SERVICE FROM CALGARY ON 26 MAY 1916. HE WAS ASSIGNED THE SERVICE NUMBER 228409. HE ARRIVED IN ENGLAND ON 6 JULY 1916 BY THE S. S. OLYMPIC. HIS NAME APPEARS ON THE NOMINAL ROLL FOR THE PRINCESS PATRICIA’S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY (P.P.C.L.I.), WHICH STATES HE JOINED THE P.P.C.L.I. IN FIELD ON 21 SEPTEMBER 1916. ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION STATES THAT HIS DATE OF SERVICE WITH THE INFANTRY BEGAN ON 27 AUGUST 1916 AND THE THEATRE OF WAR WAS FRANCE. HE WAS STRUCK OFF STRENGTH FROM THE P.P.C.L.I. TO THE 52ND BATTALION ON 4 OCTOBER 1916. RECORDS FROM THE CANADIAN GREAT WAR PROJECT STATE HE RANKED A TROOPER WITH THE 13TH REGIMENT AND A PRIVATE IN BOTH THE P.P.C.L.I. AND THE 52ND BATTALION. WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHO FROM THE JAPANESE COMMUNITY IN LETHBRIDGE JOINED THE WAR, MRS. OKUTAKE ANSWERED, “… ONLY MY HUSBAND. OH, [AND] MR. SHINBASHI… MY HUSBAND FOUGHT IN THE FRONT LINE. THERE WERE GERMAN SOLDIERS IN FRONT OF THEM. THEY THREW A GRENADE AT EACH OTHER. [THE JAPANESE SOLDIERS] WERE IN A TRENCH WHICH THE GERMANS MADE [AND THE GERMANS] THREW GRENADES STRAIGHT AT THEM. HE WAS SCARED… THERE WAS NOT ENOUGH FOOD, SO THE SOLDIERS FOUGHT OVER A PIECE OF BREAD LIKE HUNGRY GHOST[S]. HE SAID THAT THAT WAS WAR.” OKUTAKE’S STATEMENT OF SERVICE RECEIVED FROM THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA STATES THAT HIS THEATRES OF SERVICE WERE CANADA, BRITAIN, AND FRANCE. FOR HIS SERVICE, HE RECEIVED THE BRITISH WAR MEDAL AND VICTORY MEDAL, BOTH OF WHICH HAVE BEEN DONATED TO THE GALT MUSEUM BY SASSA. RESEARCH SHOWS THE 52ND BATTALION, WHICH OKUTAKE WAS A PART OF, FOUGHT AS PART OF THE 9TH INFANTRY BRIGADE RESERVE AT THE BATTLE OF VIMY RIDGE. ACCORDING TO INFORMATION FROM THE VIRTUAL MUSEUM OF CANADA, “FEBRUARY 1917 SAW THE 52ND TRAINING AND PREPARING FOR THE VIMY RIDGE OFFENSIVE. THE BATTALION PLAYED AN ACTIVE ROLE CONDUCTING LARGE SCALE TRENCH RAIDS IN THE LEAD UP TO THE ATTACK ON APRIL 9. THESE EFFORTS LEFT THE UNIT DRAINED AND WHEN THE ATTACK WENT FORWARD, THE 52ND PLAYED A SUPPORTING ROLE AS THE 9TH BRIGADE RESERVE.” THE 52ND BATTALION WAS ATTACHED TO THE LAKE SUPERIOR SCOTTISH REGIMENT. WHILE WITH THE 52ND BATTALION, HE REPORTED SICK ON 30 OCTOBER 1916 AND UNDERWENT MULTIPLE AMBULANCE AND HOSPITAL TRANSFERS THROUGH FRANCE, AND EVENTUALLY TO ENGLAND, AS A RESULT OF A HERNIA. HE UNDERWENT AN OPERATION IN NOVEMBER 1917. AFTER RECOVERY, HE WAS DISCHARGED FROM THE WHARNCLIFFE WAR HOSPITAL, SOUTH YORKSHIRE, ENGLAND ON 30 JANUARY 1917 AND WAS TAKEN ON STRENGTH FROM THE CANADIAN CASUALTY ATTACHMENT CENTRE TO THE COMMANDING CANADIAN GARRISON DUTY DEPOT. HE WAS THEN STRUCK OFF STRENGTH TO THE MANITOBA REGIMENT DEPOT ON 13 MARCH 1917 AND ATTACHED TO THE 1ST C.C.D. (SPECULATED ABBREVIATION FOR CAVALRY COMMAND DEPOT) AND THEN RECEIVED BY THE 18TH RESERVE BATTALION SHORTLY ON 13 SEPTEMBER 1917. THE PLACES OF SERVICE FOLLOWING HIS DISCHARGE FROM THE HOSPITAL WERE IN ENGLAND. ON 9 DECEMBER 1918, HE WAS PUT ON TRANSFER DUTY TO CANADA. OKUTAKE’S DISCHARGE CERTIFICATE STATES HE WAS “DISCHARGED FROM THE SERVICE [ON 10 MAY 1919] BY REASON OF DEMOBILIZATION. WHEN ASKED IF HE WAS MORE HIGHLY RESPECTED BY HIS COMMUNITY UPON HIS RETURN TO CANADA AFTER THE WAR. MRS. OKUTAKE EXPLAINED IN 1976 THAT THIS WAS NOT SO: “[NO], GOING TO THE WAR DID NOT REALLY DO ANYTHING. HE WAS PROUD [OF HIS SERVICE TO HIS COUNTRY].” LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES FROM MAY 1916 STATE UNREST IN THE LETHBRIDGE COLLIERIES – WHERE OKUTAKE WAS EMPLOYED PRIOR TO HIS ENLISTMENT – BECAUSE OF THE INCREASE OF JAPANESE LABOUR IN THE MINES DUE TO WAR-TIME LABOUR SHORTAGES. THE REACTION AGAINST JAPANESE LABOR WITHIN MINING UNIONS ESCALATED BY 1918. ON 6 DECEMBER 1918, THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD REPORTS, “THE MINERS OF THIS DISTRICT, ACCORDING TO LOCAL OFFICIALS, ARE DETERMINED TO ENFORCE THEIR DEMANDS THAT NO MORE JAPANESE LABOR BE EMPLOYED IN THE MINES HERE. THERE ARE AT PRESENT ONLY TWO JAPANESE MINERS EMPLOYED HERE, AND THEY ARE AT NO. 6 MINE OF THE GALT COLLIERIES. THIS MATTER OF ORIENTAL LABOR HAS BEEN HANGING FIRE FOR A LONG TIME, BUT THE NOTICE OF A STRIKE CAME YESTERDAY WITH SUDDENNESS AND CONSIDERABLE SURPRISE AMONG LOCAL MINING CIRCLES. [THE VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE MINE] IS CREDITED WITH HAVING PRECIPITATED THE ULTIMATUM IN THE ABSENCE OF PRESIDENT BIGGS… IF THE JAPANESE [MINERS] WHO ARE AT NO. 6 ARE STILL AT WORK ON MONDAY MORNING, THERE WILL BE NO OTHER MINERS TO WORK WITH THEM. IF THE COMPANY STILL PERSISTS IN RETAINING THEIR SERVICE, THEN THE ENTIRE DISTRICT WILL BE CALLED OUT, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIALS… AT THE PRESENT TIME THERE ARE ABOUT 15 JAPANESE [MINERS] WORKING AT THE GALT COLLIERIES, ALL OF WHOM ARE ABOVE GROUND ON PICKING JOBS OR OTHER WORK OF THIS NATURE. NONE ARE IN THE PIT. MANY OF THESE [WORKERS] HAVE BEEN EMPLOYED BY THE COMPANY SINCE THE TIME NO. 6 MINE WAS UNDER CONSTRUCTION MORE THAN 10 YEARS AGO. OF THE JAPANESE COLONY IN THE MINING CAMP THREE OR FOUR WENT TO VANCOUVER WHEN THE WAR BROKE OUT AND THERE ENLISTED WITH THE JAPANESE BATTALION OF THE CANADIAN ARMY… LEWIS STOCKETT, HEAD OF THE MINES BRANCH OF THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, WHEN SEEN BY A REPRESENTATIVE OF THE HERALD THIS MORNING, STOUTLY DENIED THAT ANY JAPANESE [WORKERS] WERE EMPLOYED AT THE GALT COAL MINES AT LETHBRIDGE, OR, AS A MATTER OF FACT, AT ANY OF THEIR MINES…” WHILE HIS RETURN FROM SERVICE FOR HIS COUNTRY DID NOT GARNER OKUTAKE INCREASED RESPECT AMONG THE CAUCASIAN POPULATION IN LETHBRIDGE, HE WAS A RESPECTED LEADER WITHIN THE JAPANESE-CANADIAN COMMUNITY. MRS. OKUTAKE EXPLAINS, “[AT NUMBER 6], HE CAME AS A LEADER [AMONG THE OTHER JAPANESE PEOPLE]. MANY PEOPLE DID NOT UNDERSTAND JAPANESE BECAUSE THEY WERE IN THE COUNTRY SIDE FROM OKINAWA, SO THEY NEEDED A LEADER… PEOPLE WHO WERE MY HUSBAND’S AGE HAD AN EDUCATION.” THE OKINAWAN IMMIGRANTS THE AGE OF MR. TOMOMI OKUTAKE COULD SPEAK JAPANESE, BUT THE OLDER OKINAWAN IMMIGRANTS COULD ONLY SPEAK THE OKINAWAN DIALECT. ACCORDING TO DONOR PAT SASSA’S FAMILY HISTORY IN NIKKEI TAPESTRY, BECAUSE OF HER FATHER’S ABILITY TO SPEAK JAPANESE, THE OKINAWAN DIALECT, AND ENGLISH “HE WAS APPOINTED AS SPOKESPERSON FOR MANY OF THE SETTLER AND CHURCH GROUPS, THE MOST FREQUENT BEING THE LOCAL BUDDHIST TEMPLES AND THE OKINAWA CULTURE SOCIETY…” THE FAMILY HISTORY STATES, “MRS. TSURU OKUTAKE WAS BORN TO CHYOTATSU AND MAKATO GENKA ON DECEMBER 18, 1904 IN OKINAWA, JAPAN… SHE MARRIED TOMOMI CHOJITSU OKUTAKE IN APRIL 1930. HE WAS BORN ON NOVEMBER 21, 1888 AT SHURI CITY, OKINAWA, JAPAN… TOMOMI RETURNED TO OKINAWA [TWELVE YEARS AFTER THE WAR] AND LATER MARRIED TSURU GENKA IN APRIL 1930. THEY MADE THEIR FIRST HOME IN THE READYMADE DISTRICT AND TRIED FARMING, BUT SOON RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO BE EMPLOYED WITH THE COLLIERS (NO. 6 MINES). THE SITE (NO. 8) WAS MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE SHORTLY AFTER, AND HE CONTINUED AS A MINER UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT IN 1953. HE WAS UNABLE TO BENEFIT FROM BOTH PENSIONS, SO HE CHOSE TO RETIRE AS A WAR VETERAN.” A CANADIAN IMMIGRATION SERVICE RECORD DATED 10 MAY 1930 LISTS THAT MR. OKUTAKE MADE A RETURN TO CANADA FROM A PORT IN MANILA, PHILIPPINES ON THE S. S. EMPRESS OF CANADA - BRINGING HIS NEW WIFE WITH HIM. THESE RECORDS STATE THAT MR. OKUTAKE’S NATIONALITY WAS CANADIAN FROM THE YEARS 1907-1929, LISTING HARDIEVILLE, ALBERTA AS HIS ADDRESS. DURING HER INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN IN 2017, SASSA COMMENTED: “…HE WAS A LEARNED, SELF-EDUCATED MAN, BUT I DO BELIEVE THAT HE WAS STUDYING HIS ENGLISH PRIOR TO ENLISTING BECAUSE HE, YOU KNOW, WORKED ACROSS CANADA YOU KNOW, WITH THE RAILWAY WITH THE CPR, SO I THINK THAT HE PICKED UP THE LANGUAGE VERY QUICKLY… HE SPENT A LOT OF QUIET TIME IN HIS ROCKING CHAIR. HIS HEAD WAS ALWAYS DOWN, ALWAYS QUIETLY THINKING AND WHEN I LOOK BACK NOW I REALLY DO THINK HE MAY HAVE SUFFERED SOME YOU KNOW, POST TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCES… BUT ANYWAYS, HE WAS ALWAYS IN DEEP THOUGHT AND I DO BELIEVE HE WAS RE-LIVING THE WARS NOW THAT I THINK BACK. HE WAS CONSERVATIVE. I THINK HE SPOKE ONLY WHEN HE WAS ASKED SOMETHING…” SASSA STATED IN HER FAMILY HISTORY, “TOMOMI DID NOT TALK ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCES IN THE WAR, AND I AM DISAPPOINTED THAT I WAS NOT THE PERSISTENT, CURIOUS CHILD WHO ASKED MANY QUESTIONS; THEREFORE, MUCH OF HIS PERSONAL MEMORIES GO UNSHARED…” IN THE INTERVIEW WITH MACLEAN, SASSA ELABORATED, “I DO REMEMBER HIM IN DISCUSSION WITH SOME ADULTS TALKING ABOUT HIS HOW HE WAS LICE INFESTED, AND THAT’S ALL I CAN REMEMBER THAT HE TALKED ABOUT…” SHE CONTINUED, “I REMEMBER HE NEVER MISSED A REMEMBRANCE DAY SERVICE AT THE CENOTAPH, WHICH WAS THEN AT THE GALT GARDENS. NEVER EVER MISSED. IF IT WAS SUB-ZERO, I DON’T REMEMBER EVEN GETTING IN HIS CAR IN THOSE DAYS. HE WALKED FROM HARDIEVILLE. IF IT WAS WINTER HE STILL WALKED. ALWAYS WORE A SUIT AND TIE WHEN HE WENT UP TOWN, AND ALWAYS DRESSED LIKE A GENTLEMAN WITH A CAP ON, YOU KNOW, WHEN HE WENT TO THE CEREMONIES.” IN HER INTERVIEW, SASSA EXPLAINED HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE ARTIFACTS: “... IT WAS AT THE TIME OF THE MOVE WHEN MY FATHER PASSED AWAY. THAT WOULD BE IN 1971, AND I WAS AWARE THAT HE HAD THESE TREASURES INSIDE OF AN ATTACHÉ… [AND] IN THAT WERE THESE MEDALS… I ACQUIRED THESE I THINK AFTER MARRIAGE, BECAUSE I DIDN’T HAVE THEM IN MY POSSESSION UNTIL ROY AND I WERE MARRIED, SO I MUST HAVE... TAKEN THEM AT THAT TIME AND SO, BUT AT THAT TIME THEY WERE ALREADY IN LETHBRIDGE, SO MY MOTHER HAD THEM… SHE NEEDED SOMEBODY TO LOOK AFTER THEM... MY SISTER [ESTHER AYUKAWA] TOOK [THE VICTORY MEDAL] AND HOW IT WAS RETURNED TO ME WAS... SHE FELT THAT BECAUSE HIS HOME WAS HERE IN LETHBRIDGE AND HE IS BURIED IN THE VETERAN’S PLOTS HERE IN LETHBRIDGE, SHE FELT IT BELONGED HERE. SO SHE BROUGHT THEM BACK AND THEN WE DISCUSSED THE IDEA THAT PERHAPS IT WOULD HAVE A MORE HISTORICAL VALUE IF WE DONATED THEM TO THE MUSEUM.” SPEAKING OF HER FATHER’S PASSING, SASSA REMEMBERS, “HE HAD [A STROKE] AT HOME…AND SO MY MOTHER’S FRIEND CALLED THE AMBULANCE AND HE WAS ADMITTED AND BELIEVE IT OR NOT, IT WAS ARMISTICE DAY. AND ROY AND I WERE IN TABER ATTENDING THE CENOTAPH… HE HAD A SECOND STROKE AND PASSED AWAY ON [NOVEMBER] 23RD, [1971].” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001001
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
BRITISH WAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1914
Date Range To
1918
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
SILVER, RIBBON
Catalogue Number
P20170001002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BRITISH WAR MEDAL
Date Range From
1914
Date Range To
1918
Materials
SILVER, RIBBON
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.3
Length
13
Width
3.5
Diameter
3.6
Description
ROUND SILVER MEDAL WITH A STRAIGHT CLASP SUSPENDER. ATTACHED TO THE SUSPENDER IS A WATERED RIBBON IN BLUE, BLACK, WHITE AND ORANGE. MEDAL DESIGN DEPICTS UNCLOTHED HORSEMAN EMBOSSED ON REVERSE. HORSE TRAMPLES ON THE PRUSSIAN SHIELD AND SKULL AND CROSS-BONES. IN THE UPPER PORTION BETWEEN HORSE'S NECK AND RIDER'S KNEE IS SUN OF VICTORY. EMBOSSED TEXT ALONG BORDER READS “1914 1918”. OBVERSE HAS EFFIGY OF KING GEORGE V FACING LEFT WITH TEXT READING "GEORGEIVS V BRITT:OMN:REX ET IND:IMP:". MEDAL EDGE ENGRAVED WITH TEXT READING “228409 PTE. T. OKUTAKE. P. P. C. L. I.” CONDITION: VERY SLIGHT DISCOLOURATION OF THE RIBBON. FRAYING ON BOTH RIBBON ENDS. SLIGHT SCUFFING TO MEDAL’S FINISH.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
DONOR PATRICIA SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. FOR A MORE DETAILED HISTORY, PLEASE SEE P20170001001. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001002
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170001003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.7
Length
2.8
Width
2.8
Description
THIS IS A COLLAR BADGE THAT ACCORDING TO RESEARCH IS EITHER MADE OF COPPER OR BRASS. THE BADGE IS THE SHAPE OF A MAPLE LEAF WITH A CROWN IN THE CENTER AND “CANADA” ACROSS THE BOTTOM. THERE IS ONE LOOP ATTACHED TO BOTH THE BOTTOM AND THE TOP OF THE BACK OF THE BADGE. CONDITION: THE METAL IS BROWNING. THE TOP POINT OF THE MAPLE LEAF IS BENT INWARDS. THE LOOPS ON THE BACK OF THE BADGE ARE BENT TOWARDS THE TOP OF THE BADGE.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
DONOR PATRICIA SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. FOR A MORE DETAILED HISTORY, PLEASE SEE P20170001001. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001003
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170001004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
MILITARY BADGE
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
1.2
Length
3.7
Width
3.7
Description
A: COLLAR BADGE MADE OF EITHER BRASS OR COPPER. BADGE IN SHAPE OF A MAPLE LEAF WITH A CROWN IN THE TOP OF THE LEAF. IN THE CENTER IS THE NUMBER “52” WITH A CIRCULAR BORDER AROUND IT CONTAINING THE WORDS “NEW ONTARIO”. AT THE BASE OF THE LEAF READS, “CANADA”. THERE IS A SHINE TO THE METAL’S VARNISH. ON THE BACK SIDE IS TWO METAL LOOPS, ONE ATTACHED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE BADGE. B: DOUBLE-PRONGED METAL PIN HORIZONTALLY THROUGH THOSE LOOPS. PIN IS 4.2 CM IN LENGTH. CONDITION: MINOR WEAR TO VARNISH.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
DONOR PATRICIA SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. FOR A MORE DETAILED HISTORY, PLEASE SEE P20170001001. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001004
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170001005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1919
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
2
Height
1.2
Length
4.4
Width
2.9
Description
A: A PRINCESS PATRICIA CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY COLLAR BADGE. THE DESIGN IS A FLOWER ENCLOSED IN A CIRCLE, WHICH READS “PRINCESS PATRICIA’S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY”. AT THE TOP OF THE CIRCLE IS A CROWN AND THERE IS A SMALL DESIGN EXTENDING FROM THE BOTTOM. ON THE BACK SIDE OF THE BADGE ARE TWO LOOPS – ONE AT EITHER SIDE. B: DOUBLE-PRONGED METAL PIN HORIZIONALLY THROUGH THOSE LOOPS. PIN IS 3.9 CM IN LENGTH. OVERALL CONDITION: METAL HAS DARKENED.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
MILITARY
History
DONOR PATRICIA SASSA’S FATHER, OKINAWAN TOMOMI OKUTAKE, WAS ONE OF 222 JAPANESE CANADIANS TO VOLUNTEER FOR THE CANADIAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE IN 1916, SERVING IN THE INFANTRY. LANDING IN CANADA VIA VANCOUVER IN 1907, OKUTAKE WORKED FOR THE CPR BEFORE MIGRATING WEST TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK AT THE NO. 6 MINE, WHERE HE SETTLED IN HARDIEVILLE IN 1911 – CONNECTING WITH OTHER OKINAWANS ALREADY ESTABLISHED IN THE COMMUNITY. FROM THERE, HE MADE THE DECISION TO SUPPORT HIS NEW COUNTRY, CANADA, IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1919, OKUTAKE RETURNED TO HARDIEVILLE TO CONTINUE HIS WORK IN THE MINES AFTER THE WAR – RIGHT UP UNTIL HIS RETIREMENT. OF THE JAPANESE CANADIANS WHO VOLUNTEERED FOR THE CEF, 55 WERE KILLED DURING WW1. FOR A MORE DETAILED HISTORY, PLEASE SEE P20170001001. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS, SERVICE RECORDS, COPIES OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES.
Catalogue Number
P20170001005
Acquisition Date
2017-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

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