Skip header and navigation

Refine By

816 records – page 1 of 41.

Moriyama and Hattori Families.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96841
Date Range
1916-1944
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191115
Physical Description
.5 cm. textual documents. 1 scrapbook.
Scope and Content
Marriage certificate for Toshiyuki Moriyama and Sakiko Hattori, 1944. Birth certificate for Toshiyulo Moriyama, 1916. Graduation certificate from the Marietta School of Costume Design, Vancouver, B.C., for Sakiko Hattori, 1942. Iwaasa, David B. "The Sugar Beet Fields and Japanese Canadian Internme…
Date Range
1916-1944
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
.5 cm. textual documents. 1 scrapbook.
Scope and Content
Marriage certificate for Toshiyuki Moriyama and Sakiko Hattori, 1944. Birth certificate for Toshiyulo Moriyama, 1916. Graduation certificate from the Marietta School of Costume Design, Vancouver, B.C., for Sakiko Hattori, 1942. Iwaasa, David B. "The Sugar Beet Fields and Japanese Canadian Internment." Nikkei Images, Nikkei National Museum and Cultural Centre, n.d. Scrap book containing sewing patterns.
Accession No.
20191115
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Other Name
BASKETBALL TEAM PATCH "LCI CLIPPERS"
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1956
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, THREAD
Catalogue Number
P20160045001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
BASKETBALL TEAM PATCH "LCI CLIPPERS"
Date Range From
1955
Date Range To
1956
Materials
FELT, THREAD
No. Pieces
1
Height
12.7
Length
12.6
Width
0.6
Description
GREEN AND YELLOW CIRCULAR TERRY CLOTH AND FELT PATCH THAT READS "LCI CLIPPERS" IN CURSIVE-STYLE FOLLOWED BY "55 56" ALL IN GREEN CHARACTERS. THE PATCH INCLUDES AN IMAGE OF A BASKETBALL NET MADE WITH YELLOW FELT AND BLACK STITCHING. THE IMAGE AND WORDS ARE SUPPORTED BY A GREEN FELT AND PALE YELLOW FELT BASE. A TERRY CLOTH-LIKE YELLOW FILLS THE CIRCLULAR CENTER OF PATCH. BACK SIDE OF STITCHING VISIBLE. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: FOUR LOOSE THREADS (ONE ON THE BACK OF THE "C" IN "LCi", ONE ON THE TOP CURVE OF PATCH, AND ONE ON THE BOTTOM CURVE OF THE "C" IN "CLIPPERS"; GENERAL DISCOLORATION AND SURFACE DIRT OVERALL.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SPORTS
COMMEMORATIVE
History
IN EARLY 2016, LLOYD YAMAGISHI DONATED TWO LETHBRIDGE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE (L. C. I.) CLIPPERS BADGES TO THE GALT MUSEUM. IN CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE MUSEUM, YAMAGISHI STATED, “I CAME ACROSS THE BADGES A NUMBER OF YEARS AGO WHEN WE MOVED MY NOW DECEASED MOTHER FROM HER HOME TO MARTHA’S HOUSE. I DIDN’T TOSS AWAY THE BADGES THINKING THEY BELONGED TO MY OLDER SISTER, SINCE SHE WAS THE ONLY SIBLING THAT ATTENDED LCI… THE BADGES WERE NOT HERS.” IT IS UNKNOWN WHO THE BADGES BELONGED TO. THEY READ, “LCI CLIPPERS 55 56” AND “PROV. CHAMPS 1956”. IT IS KNOWN THAT THE CLIPPERS WAS THE GIRLS’ BASKETBALL TEAM FOR LCI. THE 1956 LCI YEARBOOK TITLED “SPOTLITE” READS, “ON APRIL 10TH, THE CLIPPER QUEENS, COACHED BY MARGE CLARK, ENDED A TREMENDOUS BASKETBALL SEASON BY WINNING THE PROVINCIAL “A” GIRLS BASKETBALL CROWN. THE QUEENS RECORDED A LONG STRING OF PLAYOFF VICTORIES. THEY KNOCKED OVER THEIR FIRST VICTIMS, NOBLEFORD, TO GAIN THE LETHBRIDGE NORTHERN BASKETBALL LEAGUE TROPHY AND THE RIGHT TO ENTER THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA PLAYOFFS. THEN THE QUEENS SWAMPED VULCAN, WARNER AND TABER IN RAPID ORDER, RACKING UP SOME OF THE MOST ONE-SIDED SCORES EVER SEEN IN THE SOUTH. THE CENTRAL ALBERTA CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM, LACOMBE, WAS THE NEXT VICTIM TO FALL BEFORE THE QUEENS’ STEADY ATTACK, AS THE NORTHERNERS BOWED OUT IN TWO STRAIGHT GAMES. THE CLIPPER QUEENS THEN RETURNED HOME TO DEFEAT THE CAMROSE COMETS 83-24 AND 75-30 IN A TWO-OUT-OF-THREE SERIES. THIS FEAT CROWNED THEM PROVINCIAL CHAMPS OF 1955-56.” THE YEARBOOK LISTS THE PLAYERS OF THAT YEAR’S TEAM AS FOLLOWS: CAROLE PONECH (CAPTAIN), BEV COWARD (FORWARD, BETTY BEIMLER (FORWARD), BERNICE COWARD (GUARD), MAY LEISHMAN (GUARD), MARIANNE SNOWDON (FORWARD), CAROL LARSON (GUARD), SHIRON ERICKSON (CENTRE), JOYCE GOLIA (GUARD), AND DONALDA POZZI (FORWARD). THE BOOKS STATES THE COACH, MISS MARGE CLARK, WAS IN HER SECOND YEAR AS “THE QUEENS’ MENTOR.” THE TEAM MANAGER THAT YEAR WAS MYRNA VOSBURGH. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE DONOR CORRESPONDENCE. THE LCI 1956 YEARBOOK CITED ABOVE IS HOUSED IN THE GALT ARCHIVES (20001046000).
Catalogue Number
P20160045001
Acquisition Date
2016-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range
1934-1965
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20181028
Physical Description
4 pages textual material.
Scope and Content
2 essays: "Lethbridge Viaduct", and "Irrigation in Southern Alberta", by P.M. Sauder.
Date Range
1934-1965
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
4 pages textual material.
History / Biographical
Blair Ripley was born at Oxford, Nova Scotia on August 29, 1880. In 1901 he became Assistant Engineer at the Canadian Northwest Irrigation Co. in Alberta and over the next 11 years he worked as a construction engineer for Grand Trunk Pacific Railway and Canadian Pacific Railway in British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan overseeing grade revisions and the building of viaducts including the Lethbridge Viaduct. More information on his engineering on the High level Bridge can be found in "Canadian Pacific Railway High level Bridge at Lethbridge", by Dr. Alex Johnston., When these projects were completed he was sent by C.P.R. to Nova Scotia to oversee the Dominion Atlantic Railway's replacement of bridges on the Bay of Fundy. In 1912 Ripley was appointed Engineer in Charge of Grade Separation, C.P.R., North Toronto. In 1916 he was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of the Canadian Railway Troops raised for railway and bridge construction work at the front. He earned the Distinguished Service Order while overseas and, at the close of the war, he was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire. Blair Ripley died in 1958. Penrose Melvin Sauder, 1882-1971, joined the Lethbridge Northern Irrigation District in 1920, was project manager from 1925 to 1939 and official trustee of the district, 1939-1965. For a complete biography, see 19736300000.
Scope and Content
2 essays: "Lethbridge Viaduct", and "Irrigation in Southern Alberta", by P.M. Sauder.
Accession No.
20181028
Collection
Archive
Less detail

E. Turner & Sons Harvesting Crew, Barons.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95142
Date Range
1900-1915
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191023
Physical Description
8 matted black and white photographs.
Scope and Content
7 matted photographs depicting E. Turner & Sons harvesting crew. 1 matted photograph of the Hotel Lethbridge.
Date Range
1900-1915
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
8 matted black and white photographs.
History / Biographical
A history of the Turner family can be found in "Wheat Heart of the West: a history of Barons and District". A copy is located in the Galt Archives Reference Library under the call number FC 3695 S6 B2w.
Custodial History
The images belonged to the donor's father, Mr. Turner of Barons.
Scope and Content
7 matted photographs depicting E. Turner & Sons harvesting crew. 1 matted photograph of the Hotel Lethbridge.
Accession No.
20191023
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1900-1998
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20181051
Physical Description
Two 20 by 25.5 black and white photographs. One 8 by 13 cm. black and white photograph. Photocopy of a 28 by 22 cm. black and white photograph. Textual documents.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police member Ed E. Buchanan and friend in snowshoes at St. Paul, Alberta. 1921-1922. Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police constable Ed. E. Buchanan, Horse Lake Detachment, 1922-1924. Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police constable Ed. E. Buchanan along the Wa…
Date Range
1900-1998
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
Two 20 by 25.5 black and white photographs. One 8 by 13 cm. black and white photograph. Photocopy of a 28 by 22 cm. black and white photograph. Textual documents.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police member Ed E. Buchanan and friend in snowshoes at St. Paul, Alberta. 1921-1922. Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police constable Ed. E. Buchanan, Horse Lake Detachment, 1922-1924. Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police constable Ed. E. Buchanan along the Wapiti River, circa 1926. Photocopy of a digital black and white photograph of Edward E. Buchanan, Senior Staff Sergeant, 2nd in command, Lethbridge Sub-Division of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), 1944-1950. Program for funeral service, eulogy and memorial pamphlet for Edward Ettershank Buchanan, 1900-1998.
Accession No.
20181051
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1957 - 1968
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
201810350137
Physical Description
Color Slide
Scope and Content
View of the rail tracks leading into Lethbridge. The Ninth (9th) Street Bridge is visible in the distance.
  1 image  
Date Range
1957 - 1968
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
Color Slide
History / Biographical
William Hasulak was a resident of Lethbridge all his life. He worked for Eaton's and retired in 1987. His passion was the outdoors and animals. He served in the Royal Canadian Air Force in World War II. He did much travelling throughout his life taking picutres of the places he'd visited in Canada, and the United States. His hobbies included photography, collecting musical records and stamps. He passed away in 1990.
Scope and Content
View of the rail tracks leading into Lethbridge. The Ninth (9th) Street Bridge is visible in the distance.
Accession No.
201810350137
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Staff - Hegan's Christmas Gift Exchange - Eaton's

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96432
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191083368
Physical Description
1 4x5" black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Staff - Hegan's Christmas Gift Exchange - Eaton's, Part 23/83. Eaton's store manager, Mr. Hegan exchanges a Christmas gift with a fellow Eaton's manager.
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Garry Allison
Physical Description
1 4x5" black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Garry Allison was born in Lethbridge in 1940. During his career, he served as the Sports Editor of the Lethbridge Herald, as well as the District Editor, City Editor and finished his journalism career as the Outdoors Editor. He worked fulltime in the Herald's Sports department in 1974 after working in the Printing Department. Allison was an avid rodeo fan and spent much of his career covering local rodeos throughout Southern Alberta, beginning in the mid-1960s until his retirement in 2002. He received numerous awards for his coverage of rodeos, high school sports and the outdoors, including the Max Bell Memorial Award for outstanding coverage of amateur sports in Alberta. Because of his achievements in Southern Alberta sports, he was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame. Allison was heavily involved in the local community, including coaching the high school girls’ basketball in Coalhurst and Winston Churchill for ten years. Family was a central priority to Garry Allison: he and his wife, Mary, were married for 55 years and had cared for foster children for 32 years.
Scope and Content
Staff - Hegan's Christmas Gift Exchange - Eaton's, Part 23/83. Eaton's store manager, Mr. Hegan exchanges a Christmas gift with a fellow Eaton's manager.
Accession No.
20191083368
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Staff - Bill Grey - Eaton's

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96442
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191083378
Physical Description
1 5x7" black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Staff - Bill Grey - Eaton's, Part 33/83. Bill Grey, Eaton's staff member.
  1 image  
Description Level
Item
Creator
Garry Allison
Physical Description
1 5x7" black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Garry Allison was born in Lethbridge in 1940. During his career, he served as the Sports Editor of the Lethbridge Herald, as well as the District Editor, City Editor and finished his journalism career as the Outdoors Editor. He worked fulltime in the Herald's Sports department in 1974 after working in the Printing Department. Allison was an avid rodeo fan and spent much of his career covering local rodeos throughout Southern Alberta, beginning in the mid-1960s until his retirement in 2002. He received numerous awards for his coverage of rodeos, high school sports and the outdoors, including the Max Bell Memorial Award for outstanding coverage of amateur sports in Alberta. Because of his achievements in Southern Alberta sports, he was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame. Allison was heavily involved in the local community, including coaching the high school girls’ basketball in Coalhurst and Winston Churchill for ten years. Family was a central priority to Garry Allison: he and his wife, Mary, were married for 55 years and had cared for foster children for 32 years.
Scope and Content
Staff - Bill Grey - Eaton's, Part 33/83. Bill Grey, Eaton's staff member.
Accession No.
20191083378
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Other Name
WEDGE CAP, "ANDERSON SISTERS"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, THREAD, PLASTIC
Catalogue Number
P20160044001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
WEDGE CAP, "ANDERSON SISTERS"
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1970
Materials
FELT, THREAD, PLASTIC
No. Pieces
1
Height
11
Length
30
Width
1.7
Description
BLACK FELT WEDGE CAP WITH RED ACCENTS STITCHING. TWO RED AND GOLD PLASTIC BEADS ON THE FRONT EDGE. CURSIVE “ANDERSON SISTERS” EMBROIDERED IN RED ON ONE SIDE AND “ALICE” ON THE OTHER. VERY GOOD CONDITION: MAKEUP STAINS PRESENT OF THE INSIDE BRIM OF THE HAT.
Subjects
CLOTHING-HEADWEAR
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS WEDGE CAP WAS A COMPONENT OF THE UNIFORM THE SISTERS WORE WHEN THEY PERFORMED AT PLACES SUCH AS ARMY BASES AND DANCE HALLS. THIS CAP BELONGED TO ALICE, THE SECOND YOUNGEST OF THE SISTERS. IN 16 DECEMBER 2016, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE: RUTH STATES, “THE HAT WOULD BE AT LEAST FROM 1940 - ’41… ALL OF THE SISTERS HAD [A CAP AND] THEY WERE SPECIAL MADE FOR THEM. ‘ANDERSON SISTERS’ WAS EMBROIDERED ON ONE SIDE AND THEN THEIR NAMES ON THE OTHER. THEY WERE MADE TO GO WITH THESE MILITARY LOOKING DRESSES THAT THEY HAD. THEY TYPICALLY ALWAYS DRESSED ALIKE FOR THE PERFORMANCES. THE HATS WERE MADE TO GO ALONG WITH THEM WHEN THEY WERE DOING PERFORMANCES AT THE MILITARY BASES.” “[THE SISTERS] USUALLY CAME UP WITH [THE UNIFORM] COLLECTIVELY,” RUTH EXPLAINED, “AND THEY WORKED WITH A TAILOR IN TOWN WHO ACTUALLY DID SOME OF THEIR SUITS. THERE MIGHT BE A LABEL THAT I COULD FIND WITH REGARDS TO WHAT THAT COMPANY WAS….THERE WERE USUALLY ALWAYS TAILORS INVOLVED, AND WHEN THEY CAME UP WITH AN IDEA OR CONCEPT, THEY’D HAVE IT DONE AT THE SAME PLACE, BUT I DON’T HAVE THE DETAILS ON THAT.” MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING THIS CAP, WERE KEPT TOGETHER IN ONE OF ALICE’S TRUNKS. WHEN RUTH AND ELEANOR WERE HELPING THEIR MOTHER SORT HER THINGS, SHE EXPLAINED THE ITEMS IN THE TRUNK TO THEM. THE WEDGE CAP CAME TO THE MUSEUM ENCLOSED IN A SHADOW BOX COMPLETE WITH ARTICLE CLIPPINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS, WHICH WAS ASSEMBLED FOR A COMMUNITY DISPLAY. PERMISSION WAS GRANTED BY THE DONOR TO REMOVE THE CAP FROM THE BOX. SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR PHOTOGRAPH OF THE BOX. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044001
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20160044002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
9.5
Width
0.6
Description
SMALL, METAL MECHANICAL PENCIL WITH ADJUSTABLE BALL CHAIN ATTACHMENT. PENCIL HAS RAISED FILIGREE-DESIGN ELEMENTS THAT IS DETACHABLE. GOOD CONDITION: OVERALL TARNISHING OF METAL
Subjects
WRITTEN COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
LEISURE
DOMESTIC
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS PENCIL CAME FROM THE COLLECTION OF ITEMS ALICE SAVED FROM THE ANDERSON SISTERS ERA. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE: RUTH EXPLAINS, “[THIS IS] A TINY LITTLE MECHANICAL PENCIL USED TO BE SITTING ON MOM’S MUSIC STAND, SO THAT IF THERE WAS A NOTATION OR SOMETHING THEY WANTED TO DO [SHE COULD WRITE IT DOWN]. [IT] WAS SOMETHING USEFUL, BUT VERY PRETTY TO BE UP WHERE THEY WERE DOING THEIR MUSIC. THEY TREATED THEIR SPACE ON STAGE VERY SPECIALLY AND THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT WAS ON HER MUSIC STAND ALL THESE YEARS.” PROFESSIONALISM IN HOW THEY PRESENTED THEMSELVES WAS IMPORTANT TO THE GROUP, THE SISTERS EXPLAINED, INCLUDING RIGHT DOWN TO THE SMALL DETAILS, SUCH AS THE PENCIL. MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING THIS PENCIL, WERE KEPT TOGETHER IN ONE OF ALICE’S TRUNKS. WHEN RUTH AND ELEANOR WERE HELPING THEIR MOTHER SORT HER THINGS, SHE EXPLAINED THE ITEMS IN THE TRUNK TO THEM. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044002
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1980
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BAKELITE, LEATHER, VELVET
Catalogue Number
P20160044003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1980
Materials
BAKELITE, LEATHER, VELVET
No. Pieces
11
Height
27
Length
38
Width
11.5
Description
A: CASE: GREEN AND OFF-WHITE LEATHER CASE. BLACK PLASTIC/SILVER METAL LABEL THAT READS “CONN” ON FRONT OF CASE. GREEN HANDLE AT TOP WITH TWO METAL LATCHES ON EITHER SIDE. HINGES ON THE BOTTOM OF CASE TO OPEN. FOUR METAL FEET ON BOTTOM. CORK EDGES AROUND THE SIDES, STITCHED ON AND PAINTED OFF-WHITE COLOUR. INSIDE IS LINED WITH A GREEN VELVET. TOP FOLDS DOWN AND IS FASTENED WITH LEATHER STRAP AND METAL SNAP BUTTON. “CONN” LABEL IN TOP LEFT CORNER OF CASE THAT IS GOLD WITH BLACK AND RED PAINT INSIDE. THREE PEOPLE OF A MARCHING BAND IN IMAGE ON LABEL. THE BOTTOM HALF OF THE INSIDE OF CASE HAS EIGHT SECTIONS FOR INSTRUMENT PIECES AND ACCESSORIES. FAIR CONDITION: MODERATE TO SEVERE SURFACE DIRT OVERALL. VARIOUS GREEN STAINS AT TOP OF CASE. METAL COMPONENTS SCUFFED. SOME STITCHING AS SIDES COMING LOOSE. LOSS OF PAINT IN SEVERAL PLACES ALONG CORK EDGE. INSIDE FABRIC WORN. B: BLACK BAKELITE CLARINET BELL WITH SILVER AROUND BOTH EDGES. “CONN DIRECTOR U.S.A.” ETCHED ON OUTER SURFACE. 11 CM LENGTH. 8 CM BELL DIAMETER. C: BLACK BAKELITE LOWER JOINT WITH SILVER KEYS. CORK EDGE ON BOTTOM AND SILVER RIM AROUND TOP. “721800” ETCHED ON BACK NEAR CORK. PADDED THUMB REST ON BACK OF THIS JOINT. 25.5 CM X 2.5 CM. D: BLACK BAKELITE UPPER JOINT WITH SILVER KEYS. BOTH ENDS COVERED IN CORK. LOGO WITH THREE MARCHING BAND FIGURES ETCHED ON FRONT NEAR THE TOP. 22.5 CM X 2.3 CM (TOP DIAMETER SLIGHTLY WIDER). E: BLACK BAKELITE BARREL JOINT WITH SILVER EDGES. 6 CM X 3 CM (BOTTOM DIAMETER) 2.8 CM (TOP DIAMETER). F: BLACK BAKELITE MOUTHPIECE WITH CORK AT BOTTOM. METAL LIGATURE WITH ITS TWO SCREWS ATTACHED SECURING A REED TO THE MOUTHPIECE. 9 CM LONG WITH 2.1 CM DIAMETER AT BOTTOM. VERY GOOD CONDITION FOR B-F: SLIGHT SCUFFS OF SURFACE G: SILVER METAL MARCHING LYRE. CIRCULAR BAND WITH ADJUSTABLE SCREW FOR ATTACHMENT TO INSTRUMENT. THIS SCREWS ONTO A STEM, WHICH EXTENDS TO CONNECT TO A LYRIFORM SPRING CLAMP THAT IS MEANT TO HOLD MUSIC. FAIR CONDITION: SEVERE GREEN STAINING IN MANY AREAS OF SURFACE. METAL SLIGHTLY SCRATCHED OVERALL. H: BLACK PLASTIC REED HOLDER WITH SLOTS FOR TWO REEDS (ONE ON FRONT AND ONE ON). “LAVOZ” ETCHED IN PLASTIC ON FRONT AND BACK AND “USA” ABOVE THAT.7.7 CM X 2 CM. I: CLARINET REED ENCASED IN REED HOLDER (H).”RICO” IN MUSIC STAFF STAMPED ON BACKSIDE AND SIZE “V-2 ½” STAMPED BELOW THE LOGO. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION FOR H-I: SOME WEAR TO SIDE OF REED HOLDER WITH REED. REED SHOWS SIGNS OF USE. J: WHITE ENVELOPE THAT READS, “CONN EXCLUSIVE TUNING RING” WITH TEXT BELOW AND DIAGRAM OF THE TUNING RING PRINTED ALL IN BLACK INK ON THE FRONT OF THE ENVELOPE. THE BACK HAS SCOTCH TAPE SECURING THE RIGHT SIDE ENVELOPE FLAP. CAN FEEL ONE TUNING RING INSIDE ENVELOPE. 14 CM X 7.9 CM. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION: PAPER OF ENVELOPE HAS SEVERELY YELLOWED. K-N: TWO IDENTICAL TUBES OF CORK GREASE WITH CAPS. WHITE PLASTIC TUBE THAT READS, “PARAMOUNT MUSIC “PREMIUM” CORK GREASE” AND AN ADDRESS BELOW ALL IN RED FONT. TWISTABLE END TO EXTEND THE GREASE IN TUBE. GREASE STILL PRESENT IN TUBES. RED PLASTIC CAPS. ONE READS “B 7 ETHYL” (K) ON INSIDE OF CAP AND THE OTHER READS “B 87 ETHYL” (N). 6.8 CM X 1,7 CM. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT SURFACE DIRT ON LABEL. DISCOLOURING OF PLASTIC AROUND BOTTOM EDGES. GREASE IS CRYSTALIZING. O-P: SMALL, BLACK PLASTIC GREASE CONTAINER IN CUBE WITH GOLD METALLIC LETTERS ON LID “YAMAHA CORK GREASE”. HINGE ATTACHING LID TO CONTAINER, SO LID COMPLETE DETACHES. GREASE INSIDE OF THE CONTAINER. 2.7 CM X 2.7 CM X 2 CM. GOOD CONDITION: SLIGHT SCRATCHING ON SURFACE. BROKEN HINGE. Q: CLARINET CLEANING SWAB WAND WITH TWISTED WIRE WAND/HANDLE AND MULTICOLOURED (BLUES AND PINKS), FABRIC SWAB. THE SWAB IS SHAGGED. 29 CM X 2.5 CM. GOOD TO VERY GOOD CONDITION: WIRE IS SLIGHTLY BENT. R: CLOTH CLEANING SWAB WITH NATURAL-COLOURED TAN SUEDE CLOTH (APPROX. 12.5 CM X 6.3 CM) THAT HAS ROUGH EDGES. ONE CORNER OF SUEDE IS PINCHED TOGETHER WITH A SILVER METAL CLASP (TOOTHED), WHICH SECURES IT AROUND A BLACK STRING (57 CM IN LENGTH) WITH A SILVER-COLOURED WEIGHT AT THE END. FAIR CONDITION: STRING IS FRAYING MODERATELY IN ONE PLACE AND SLIGHTLY IN OTHERS. SUEDE FABRIC SHOWS DIRT. WEIGHT’S METAL IS SCUFFED.
Subjects
MUSICAL T&E
Historical Association
MILITARY
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS CLARINET WAS PLAYED BY THREE GENERATIONS OF THE DONORS’ FAMILY. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. RUTH EXPLAINED, “IT WAS PURCHASED BRAND NEW [IN THE] EARLY ‘50S WITH THE INTENT THAT HER FIRST SON, BERNIE (BORN IN 1950) WOULD PLAY THE CLARINET, WHICH HE DID. MOM DID USE IT FOR SOME LATER PERFORMANCES WITH THE ANDERSON SISTERS, BUT IT WAS PURCHASED [FOR HIM]. AND HIS DAUGHTER, CONNIE, ALSO PLAYED THE CLARINET.” SPEAKING OF WHY THEY SELECTED THIS OBJECT TO BE DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, RUTH SAID, “WHEN WE WERE GATHERING THINGS TOGETHER, WE THOUGHT [OF] WHAT INSTRUMENTS WE HAD THAT HAVE A CONNECTION. SO IT WAS DECIDED [ON THE CLARINET]. CONNIE WAS QUITE HAPPY TO KNOW THAT IT WAS COMING IN THIS DIRECTION, SINCE IT WAS GRANDMA’S CLARINET, IT SHOULD GO WITH GRANDMA’S THINGS.” OF ALL THE INSTRUMENTS ALICE KNEW HOW TO PLAY, THE CLARINET “WAS THE MAIN ONE,” RUTH CONTINUED, “BUT SHE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AS WELL. AND ALSO TAUGHT PIANO FOR YEARS AND YEARS AND YEARS. [ALL THE SISTERS] PLAYED PIANO REALLY WELL. SHE PLAYED OTHER INSTRUMENTS LIKE THE ORGAN, AND THERE WERE ACTUALLY INSTANCES TOO WHERE SOMEONE WOULD CALL ON HER TO LEARN HOW TO PLAY AN INSTRUMENT, AND SHE WOULD TEACH THEM HOW TO PLAY IT WITHOUT KNOWING HOW TO PLAY IT HERSELF, BECAUSE SHE KNEW THE TECHNIQUE [OR] WOULD LEARN THE TECHNIQUE. BUT THE CLARINET WAS HER MAIN THING WITH, AS I SAID, SAXOPHONE AND PIANO PROBABLY THE NEXT CLOSEST IN LINE.” THE SISTERS STATE THAT THEY REMEMBER THEIR MOTHER PLAYING THIS SPECIFIC CLARINET. ELEANOR SAID, “SHE DIDN’T PASS IT [ON] UNTIL CONNIE WANTED TO USE IT, BECAUSE BERNIE DIDN’T TAKE IT WITH HIM [FROM HOME].” RUTH ADDED, “YEAH, THAT’S RIGHT. I THINK IT’S REALLY ALWAYS BEEN HERS.” THE LAST TIME THEY REMEMBER HER PLAYING IT WOULD HAVE BEEN THE LAST TIME THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA PERFORMED, WHICH WAS A PERFORMANCE FOR THE ELKS IN GRANUM IN THE 1970S. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044003
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
BAKELITE
Catalogue Number
P20160044004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1970
Materials
BAKELITE
No. Pieces
1
Height
3
Length
8.3
Width
0.7
Description
RED TRANSLUCENT BAKELITE KEY CASE. OVAL-SHAPED KEY HOLDER WITH FADED GOLD METALLIC TEXT ON ONE SIDE WHICH READS, “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA." SLOTS ALONG BOTH SIDES TO HOLD TWO KEYS. GOOD CONDITION: MODERATE LOSS OF GOLD PAINT OF TEXT. OVERALL SCUFFING.
Subjects
PERSONAL GEAR
Historical Association
LEISURE
DOMESTIC
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THIS KEY HOLDER CAME TO THE MUSEUM WITH A NOTE THAT STATED, “EACH OF THE SISTERS HAD A KEY HOLDER. THIS ONE IS ALICE’S.” IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. IN THE INTERVIEW, RUTH EXPLAINED THE KEY HOLDER WAS FROM THE EARLY 1940S (1940-41) AND ORIGINATED IN THE ERA THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS PERFORMING FREQUENTLY. “MOM SAID THAT EACH OF [THE SISTERS] HAD ONE OF THE KEY HOLDERS,” RUTH STATED, “YOU CAN SEE THROUGH IT [AND] THERE’S A LITTLE PLACE THAT A LITTLE KEY CAN BE KIND OF FOLDED IN OR TWO KEYS. I’M NOT SURE IF THE REASON THEY EVEN HAD ONE TO START WITH WAS SOMEONE THINKING THAT MAYBE THEY’D WANT TO SELL A BUNCH [TO] MAYBE MARKET AT THEIR CONCERTS, BUT THAT WASN’T SOMETHING THEY DID. THEY WERE THERE TO SELL MUSIC NOT ITEMS. THEY DIDN’T SELL ANYTHING BUT TICKETS.” “SO, THEY ALL ENDED UP WITH [A KEY HOLDER]. I BELIEVE MOM [WAS] THE ONLY ONE WHO HAD HERS STILL. THEY WERE ALWAYS GETTING APPROACHED WITH A MARKETING IDEA. I THINK UNLESS IT WAS SOMETHING THAT GRANDPA FELT COMPLIMENTED THINGS THEY DIDN’T GET INTO DOING THAT, WHICH MAYBE WAS A MISTAKE WHEN YOU THINK OF IT FROM A MARKETING STAND POINT. BUT THEY LOOKED AT THE MUSIC FIRST, AND THE TRINKETS WEREN’T SOMETHING THEY EVER REALLY GOT INTO.” MANY OF THE ARTIFACTS DONATED TO THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING THIS KEY HOLDER, WERE KEPT TOGETHER IN ONE OF ALICE’S TRUNKS. WHEN RUTH AND ELEANOR WERE HELPING THEIR MOTHER SORT HER THINGS, SHE EXPLAINED THE ITEMS IN THE TRUNK TO THEM. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044004
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, RHINESTONE
Catalogue Number
P20160044005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, RHINESTONE
No. Pieces
2
Height
2.1
Length
2.5
Width
0.9
Description
A-B: PAIR OF GOLD-COLOURED COSTUME JEWELRY EARRINGS. CRESENT-SHAPED, CURVING OUT TO FRONT. WHITE RHINESTONES SET IN GOLD-COLOURED METAL VERTICALLY DOWN CURVE OF EARRING. SCREW-ON CLASP AT BACK. FAIR TO GOOD CONDITION: BOTTOM RHINESTONE MISSING OFF COMPONENT A AND SECOND FROM THE TOP RHINESTONE MISSING OFF B. METAL MODERATELY WORN/SCUFFED.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. OF THESE EARRINGS, RUTH RECALLED, “I KNOW THAT THESE WERE WORN WHEN THEY WERE PERFORMING. IF THEY WERE DRESSED ALIKE, THEY USUALLY HAD THE SAME JEWELRY AS WELL.” BOTH RUTH AND ELEANOR RECALLED THE EARRINGS BEING WORN BY THEIR MOTHER UP UNTIL THE 1980S. THE JEWELRY THE SISTERS WORE DURING THE PERFORMANCES “SHOWED A LOT OF USE,” RUTH EXPLAINED. “OTHER ONES REPLACED [OLDER PAIRS AS THEY WORE OUT] AND THEY WERE JUST SET ASIDE.” “ALL [THE SISTERS] LOVED TO DRESS UP. THERE WERE SOME OUTFITS THEY HAD THAT ACTUALLY HAVE GONE DOWN THROUGH FAMILY MEMBERS. HER GRANDDAUGHTER HAS A BEAUTIFUL FORMAL THAT [EACH SISTER] HAD. WHEN THEY DRESSED UP, THEY [REALLY] DRESSED UP. IT WAS WITH BRILLIANT, SHINY, BEAUTIFUL JEWELRY,” RUTH REMEMBERED. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044005
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, PAINT
Catalogue Number
P20160044006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1941
Date Range To
1985
Materials
METAL, PAINT
No. Pieces
1
Height
3.7
Length
5
Width
0.6
Description
SILVER AND BLACK OVAL BROOCH; 3 RAISED SILVER METAL LINES (LIKE A STAFF ON SHEET MUSIC) HORIZONTALLY ACROSS BROOCH WITH A SILVER SIXTEENTH NOTE SET ON TOP OF THE LINES. BACKGROUND IS COATED IN MATTE BLACK VARNISH. GOOD CONDITION: BLACK PAINT PRESENT ON SILVER METAL IN A COUPLE OF SPOTS. SLIGHT LOSS OF VARNISH IN SOME PLACES ON FRONT OF BROOCH.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
LEISURE
PERSONAL CARE
History
THE LATE ALICE PEARL HUMMEL (13 JUNE 1922 – 7 APRIL 2016) PERFORMED AS PART OF THE “ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA” ALONGSIDE HER SISTERS – FLORENCE JEANNETTE MCINTOSH (MAY 1917 – 18 MARCH 1999), MARIE EVELYN POPSON (C.1921 - 8 MARCH 2008) AND RUTH GINZER (C. 1926 - D. 2016). THE FOUR DAUGHTERS WERE BORN TO PARENTS, MARTIN EDWARD ANDERSON AND IDA JOHANNA ANDERSON (NEE JOHNSON). THE BAND WAS A FAMILY AFFAIR THAT SAW GREAT SUCCESS IN THE SOUTHERN ALBERTA REGION. ALICE’S DAUGHTERS, ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL, HONOURED THEIR MOTHER’S WISHES TO DONATE A NUMBER OF HER EFFECTS FROM HER TIME WITH LETHBRIDGE BAND TO THE MUSEUM. THE ANDERSON SISTERS HAD MATCHING UNIFORMS THEY WOULD OFTEN WEAR FOR PERFORMANCES, WHICH INCLUDED PIECES SUCH AS THIS BROOCH. IN 2016 DECEMBER 16, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED THE DAUGHTERS ABOUT THE DONATION. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT EXCHANGE. RUTH EXPLAINED, “IF THEY WERE DRESSED ALIKE, THEY USUALLY HAD THE SAME JEWELRY AS WELL.” BOTH RUTH AND ELEANOR RECALLED THE BROOCH BEING WORN BY THEIR MOTHER UP UNTIL THE 1980S. THE JEWELRY THE SISTERS WORE DURING THE PERFORMANCES “SHOWED A LOT OF USE,” RUTH EXPLAINED. “OTHER ONES REPLACED [OLDER PAIRS AS THEY WORE OUT] AND THEY WERE JUST SET ASIDE.” “ALL [THE SISTERS] LOVED TO DRESS UP. THERE WERE SOME OUTFITS THEY HAD THAT ACTUALLY HAVE GONE DOWN THROUGH FAMILY MEMBERS. HER GRANDDAUGHTER HAS A BEAUTIFUL FORMAL THAT [EACH SISTER] HAD. WHEN THEY DRESSED UP, THEY [REALLY] DRESSED UP. IT WAS WITH BRILLIANT, SHINY, BEAUTIFUL JEWELRY,” RUTH REMEMBERED. THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AS TOLD BY DONORS ELEANOR SMITH AND RUTH HUMMEL IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW: “[THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS] THE LONGEST RUNNING GROUP AT WATERTON LAKES PAVILION … [WHERE THEY PLAYED] FOR FIVE YEARS STRAIGHT,” ELEANOR EXPLAINED, “IN ADDITION TO DOING ALL KINDS OF OTHER THINGS, THEY WERE CONSTANTLY TRAVELLING [AND] WE HAVE THE RECORDINGS OF THAT.” RUTH ADDED, “THEY WERE ORIGINALLY FROM MONITOR (SASK). IN THE DIRTY 30S, WHEN THINGS GOT BAD FOR A LOT OF FARMS, THEY FOUND A WAY TO HAVE MUSIC LESSONS AND…PLAY FOR LOCAL DANCES. [ULTIMATELY, THE FAMILY] DECIDED TO LEAVE THE FARM AND HEADED OUT IN THE DIRECTION OF LETHBRIDGE (VIA DRUMHELLER). IT WAS TOUGH TIMES FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE IN THE 30S IN ALBERTA, BUT THE GIRLS, WITH THE TALENT THEY HAD, … HAD A WAY OUT…THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY. AND THEN THE ORCHESTRA REALLY CAME OUT OF THAT...” THE OBITUARY OF DONORS’ GRANDFATHER, MARTIN ANDERSON, (PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, 1981) STATES THE FAMILY ARRIVED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940. “THEY WERE SERIOUS MUSICIANS - VERY HUMBLE AND VERY QUIET,” RUTH CONTINUED, “[AS FAR AS PROMOTING THE BAND,] THAT WAS MORE GRANDPA’S JOB. WHEN IT CAME TO MUSIC, IT WAS A GIFT THEY PASSED ON - IN THE LATE ‘30S, ‘40S AND INTO THE ‘50S A BIT – [AND] IT WAS SOMETHING THEY FELT REALLY PRIVILEGED TO BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES. [DURING] THE WAR YEARS, [THEY PLAYED FOR] THE ARMY BASES THAT WERE ALL CLOSE HERE AND [THEY WERE] A PART OF THAT HISTORY.” “[THEY WERE] ON THE ROAD 6 DAYS A WEEK [WITH THEIR CAR AND TRAILER]… PLAYING NOT JUST IN LETHBRIDGE [BUT] FAR REACHING OVER IN B.C., THE NORTHERN STATES, AND QUITE FAR NORTH IN ALBERTA. SO THEY WERE A REAL PART OF THINGS AND WORKED REAL HARD. I THINK IT’S AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MUSIC HISTORY IN ALBERTA. THEY WERE, AFTER THE ANDERSON SISTERS [BAND WAS FINISHED], PROUD TO TAKE [MUSIC] INTO THE COMMUNITIES WHERE THEY WERE TEACHERS AND STILL PERFORMERS EVEN PAST THE FOUR OF THEM BEING TOGETHER.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT THEIR PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE SISTERS PERFORMING TOGETHER, RUTH ANSWERED, “WELL ELEANOR WOULD HAVE BEEN A TODDLER, MYSELF AS WELL, THE LAST FEW TIMES THAT THEY PERFORMED AS THE ANDERSON SISTERS IN THAT ERA. BUT GROWING UP THROUGH THE YEARS, THERE WASN’T A TIME WHEN WE GOT TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHERE WE DIDN’T HAVE A LOT OF MUSIC. THEY WOULD PLAY FOR US [AND] THEY WERE CALLED BACK SOMETIMES TO PERFORM AT COMMUNITY EVENTS… THE LAST ONE THAT I RECALL WAS SOMETHING IN GRANUM FOR AN ELKS 5OTH ANNIVERSARY IN GRANUM…THAT WAS THE LAST TIME PUBLICLY I REMEMBER.” THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM A HISTORY PUBLISHED IN THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD IN 24 MAY 2003 TITLED, “SISTER ACT: SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S SWINGIN’ ANDERSON SISTERS WERE ALL THE RAGE DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR.” “IT WAS THE ERA OF SWUNG, OF MUSIC WITH MEMORABLE LYRICS, AND OF DANCE. IT WAS ALSO THE TIME OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE HEYDAY OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS, AND LITERALLY EVERY TOWN IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA WAS SWINGING AND SWAYING TO THE SOUNDS OF FLORENCE, MARIE, ALICE, AND RUTH." "DUBBED THE FOUR MAIDS OF MELODY BY CJOC RADIO…" THE ARTICLE CONTINUED, "[THE SISTERS] WERE THE TOAST OF SOUTHERN ALBERTA’S DANCE HALLS." INTERVIEWED FOR THE ARTICLE WAS ONE OF THE SISTERS, MARIE POPSON. SHE WAS QUOTED, "WE PLAYED THE TRIANON A LOT, THE OLD BUCKET OF BLOOD. THEY CALLED IT THAT BECAUSE IT WAS DURING THE WAR AND THERE WERE A LOT OF FIGHTS. PRIOR TO AND AFTER THE TRIANON WAS OK, BUT IT WAS REAL LIVELY DURING THE WAR… THE CROWDS [THERE] WERE SO LARGE THEY WERE AFRAID THE FLOOR WOULD WEAKEN… THE DANCE FLOOR WAS ON THE SECOND STORY OF THE BUILDING." THE ARTICLE EXPLAINED, "FLORENCE WAS THE ELDEST OF THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND AS SUCH WAS THE BAND’S LEADER. [SHE] PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND THE PIANO. MARIE… PLAYED THE PIANO AND ALICE PLAYED THE SAXOPHONE AND CLARINET. RUTH, 'THE BABY,' … PLAYED THE DRUMS, CLARINET AND TRUMPET." THE ARTICLE READS, "'RUTH STARTED PLAYING THE DRUMS AT AGE 11 AND LATER SHE COULD HANDLE THE DRUMMING WITH HER FEET AND PLAY THE TRUMPET AT THE SAME TIME FOR SOME OF OUR NUMBERS,’ SAYS MARIE WITH A TWIRL OF THE HAND. ‘FLO AND ALICE WERE OUR MAIN SINGERS AND I MADE UP THE TRIO SOMETIMES. RUTH DIDN’T SING. WHEN WE SANG AS A TRIO RUTH WOULD PLAY THE PIANO. ALICE WOULD ALSO SING SOLO. WE PLAYED ALL THE POPULAR MUSIC OF THE DAY AND OLD-TIME MUSIC AS WELL… MY SISTERS COULD ALSO PLAY THAT FAST-PACED SQUARE DANCE MUSIC ON THE SAX, AND THAT WAS SOMETHING. WE PLAYED WALTZES, POLKAS AND EVERYTHING… YOU NAME IT, WE PLAYED IT... OUR THEME SONG WAS BREEZING ALONG WITH THE BREEZE BUT MY FAVOURITE HAD TO BE SIDE BY SIDE, WHICH WE WERE AS A GROUP. WE WERE VERY CLOSE.'" THAT ARTICLE STATES THAT MARTIN AND IDA HAD EIGHT DAUGHTERS, IN FACT, BUT ONLY FOUR LIVED TO BECOME TEENAGERS. THE FOUR SURVIVING SISTERS BEGAN THEIR MUSICAL EDUCATION AT AN EARLY AGE, ALL BEGINNING WITH PIANO. THEY BEGAN PLAYING FOR VARIOUS TYPES OF EVENTS NEAR MONITOR, WHERE THEY WERE BORN. WHILE FLORENCE WAS WITH THE ALL GIRLS BAND IN CALGARY, THE THREE YOUNGER SISTERS FORMED THEIR OWN ORCHESTRA, MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 1937. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, AFTER FLORENCE’S RETURN, THE ANDERSON SISTERS ORCHESTRA WAS FORMED. UPON ARRIVING IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1940, THEY AUDITIONED FOR THE CJOC RADIO STATION. THE ARTICLE STATES, “FOUR DAYS LATER THEY WERE ON THE AIR, LIVE, ON THE CHRISTMAS SHOPPER PROGRAM HEARD THREE TIMES A WEEK. THEY WERE ALSO ON THE AIR MONDAY NIGHTS FROM 9:15 TO 9:30 PM.” A NOTE THAT CAME WITH THE DONATION SAYS THE WEEKLY SHOW WITH CJOC WAS “BROADCAST LIVE ‘FROM HIGH ATOP THE MARQUIS HOTEL.’” BACK IN THE 2016 INTERVIEW AT THE MUSEUM, ALICE’S DAUGHTER ELEANOR COMMENTS ON THE BAND’S LEGACY. “I VOLUNTEER AT THE HOSPITAL [AND PLAY THE PIANO]. I USUALLY HAVE SENIORS INVOLVED THERE… AND WHEN I MENTION MY MOM’S NAME OR MY AUNT’S NAME, THEY REMEMBER DANCING TO THE ANDERSON SISTERS. SO, YOU KNOW, EVEN IN THIS DAY AND AGE, [PEOPLE] REMEMBER HOW MUCH FUN THEY HAD. [IT SHOWS] HOW RESPECTED THEY WERE AND I FIND THAT [BACKGROUND] JUST THRILLING.” “[MUSIC] WAS THEIR LIVELIHOOD,” RUTH ILLUMINATED, “SO [IT] WAS DRIVING THEM [THROUGH] TOUGH TIMES (SUCH AS THE DEPRESSION IN ALBERTA). THE GIRLS TOGETHER [WITH] THE TALENT THEY HAD, HAD A WAY OUT, WHERE A LOT OF OTHER PEOPLE HAD SOME BIGGER STRUGGLES. AND IT WAS THE TALENT IN THEM BEING TOGETHER. THEY COULD DO A LOT WHEN THEY STUCK TOGETHER AS A FAMILY.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND CLIPPINGS ABOUT THE ANDERSON SISTERS AND THEIR SHOWS, AND FAMILY OBITUARIES.
Catalogue Number
P20160044006
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

Edward "Ed" Redekopp fonds

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions92532
Date Range
1950-1962
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20181045
Scope and Content
001: Photocopies of pictures: Drawers with the QSL Cards in them and during the interview 002: Letters 003: QSL Cards and 1 photograph 004 – 014 QSL Cards 015- Certificates including The American Radio Relay League, Inc Operating Achievement Award WAS (1960)
Date Range
1950-1962
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Edward Redekopp
History / Biographical
Amateur radio, also known as ham radio, is the use of radio frequency spectrum for non-commercial exchange of messages. The activity was subject to international regulations and standards and required a license. A ham radio operator was required to obtain a call sign to legally identify oneself on air. Individuals sent personalized QSL cards to one another after they had made radio contact. A QSL card is a written confirmation of either a two-way radio communication between two amateur radio stations or a one-way reception of a signal from an AM radio, FM radio, television or shortwave broadcasting station. QSL cards (1950- 1962) were collected by Edward “Ed” Redekopp as a ham radio operator. Redekopp was interested in electronics and radio servicing and he was fascinated by the ability to contact other amateur radio operators around the world, including operators who didn’t speak English. At first, he communicated by key code (Morse code) and later by microphone. When asked about his hobby and its abrupt end in 1963, he said, “I had a family to look after, a job during the day, and it was too much – I spent too much time on the air, on the radio. I’d be up sometimes in the night, very rarely, but up to four in the morning sometimes, talking to Australians and New Zealanders. Well, as a working man, I had a family to look after, they needed attention.” QSL cards were donated in drawers. Cards in Drawer 1 are in files 2017.1045/008-014. Cards in Drawer 2 are in files 2017.1045/003-007. For more information about Edward “Ed” Redekopp and his hobby please refer to interview – P20180010001-006
Scope and Content
001: Photocopies of pictures: Drawers with the QSL Cards in them and during the interview 002: Letters 003: QSL Cards and 1 photograph 004 – 014 QSL Cards 015- Certificates including The American Radio Relay League, Inc Operating Achievement Award WAS (1960)
Accession No.
20181045
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Other Name
RUBBER STAMP SET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, RUBBER, METAL
Catalogue Number
P20170032000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RUBBER STAMP SET
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1950
Materials
WOOD, RUBBER, METAL
No. Pieces
327
Height
9.5
Length
35.5
Width
27.5
Description
AA – BOX. H: 9.5 CM. L: 35.5 CM. W: 27.5 CM. FINISHED WOOD BOX, WITH TWO HINGES AND A FRONT CLASP. FR. FRONT CLASP IS BROKEN AND TARNISHED. RIGHT HINGE MISSING LEFTMOST SCREW. LID IS MISSING WOOD FROM THE LEFT HINGE. MISSING VARNISH, SCRATCHES, AND DINGS ON ALL SURFACES. AB – TOP TRAY. H: 2.4 CM. L: 33.5 CM. W: 25.2 CM. WOODEN TRAY WITH EIGHT DIVIDERS; SEVEN ROWS AND ONE SQUARE. FABRIC LOOP ON INNER LEFT WALL. FR. MISSING THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE TRAY, WITH THE BACK WALL AND MIDDLEMOST DIVIDERS LIFTING FROM THE FLOOR OF THE TRAY. STAINED WITH BLACK, GREEN, AND RED INK. FROM AC – DM, ALL ENTRIES ARE WOODEN STAMPS WITH RED RUBBER PADS. AC – “HOUSE” H: 2.5 CM. L: 3.7 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A TWO-STORY HOUSE. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. AD – “DOG” H: 2.5 CM. L: 1.7 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LABELED DOG IN SCRATCHED-IN BLUE PEN, STAMP IMAGE OF A HORSE. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. AE – “CIRCUS” H: 2.5 CM. L: 5.8 CM. W: 3.7 CM. IMAGE OF A TENT WITH THE WORDS “THE BIG SHOW”. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN. AF – “XMAS-TREE” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.7 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A PINE TREE WITH CANDLES. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. AG – “FARMER” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A MAN WITH A PITCHFORK. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. AH – “INDIAN” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A MAN IN A FEATHER HEADPIECE. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLUE, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. AI – “SQUIRREL” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A SQUIRREL. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. AJ – “SANTA” H: 2.5 CM. L: 3.2 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF SANTA WITH A BAG OF TOYS. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. AK – “APPLE” H: 2.5 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF AN APPLE. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, RED, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. AL – “ENGINE” H: 2.5 CM. L: 3.5 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A TRAIN ENGINE. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN, RED; MISSING VARNISH. AM – “SIR JOHN” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.2 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A MAN’S PORTRAIT. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN. AN – “TREE” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.8 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A TREE. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. AO – “WIGWAM” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.7 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A TEEPEE. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. AP – “BARN” H: 2.5 CM. L: 4.2 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A BARN. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. AQ – “BOAT” H: 2.5 CM. L: 3.7 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A SAIL BOAT. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. AR – “ESKIMO” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A MAN IN A FUR OUTFIT WITH A SPEAR. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. AS – “MONKEY” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.9 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A MONKEY. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. AT – “WHEAT” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A WHEAT GRAIN. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. AU – “BOOK” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.9 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF AN OPEN BOOK. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. AV – “CORN” H: 2.5 CM. L: 3.3 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A HEAD OF CORN. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN. AW – “DOLL” H: 2.5 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A DOLL IN DRESS AND BONNET. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. AX – “GEORGE V” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.7 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A BEARDED MAN. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED STAINING. AY – “SEAL” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.9 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A SEAL. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. AZ – “OWL” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.5 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF AN OWL. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. BA – “FLAG” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.9 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A CANADIAN RED ENSIGN. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, RED; MISSING VARNISH. BB – “CLOWN” H: 2.5 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A CLOWN. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. BC – “CIRCLE” H: 2.5 CM. L: 3.2 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A CIRCLE. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE, GREEN, RED; MISSING VARNISH. BD – “IGLOO” H: 2.5 CM. L: 4.2 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF AN IGLOO, WITH A MAN SITTING NEXT TO IT. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK, RED, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. BE – “POINTING HAND” H: 3.5 CM. L: 3.6 CM. W: 2.8 CM. IMAGE OF A POINTING HAND. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. BF – “BOY” H: 2.5 CM. L: 1.7 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A BOY WITH A KITE. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. BG – “SOLDIER” H: 2.5 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A MAN WITH A GUN. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. BH – “FENCE” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.6 CM. W: 3.1 CM. IMAGE OF A FENCE. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLUE, GREEN, RED. BI – “PRINCE” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.2 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A MAN’S PORTRAIT. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. BJ – “RADIO” H: 2.5 CM. L: 3 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A DIAL RADIO. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. BK – “BALL” H: 2.5 CM. L: 2.9 CM. W: 3 CM. IMAGE OF A STRIPPED BALL. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. BL – “1” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.3 CM. W: 2.7 CM. NUMBER 1. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH; HANDLE HAS BEEN BROKEN AND GLUED BACK TOGETHER. BM – “2” H: 3.6 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 2.8 CM. NUMBER 2. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH; HANDLE HAS BEEN BROKEN AND GLUED TOGETHER. BN – “3” H: 3.7 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 2.7 CM. NUMBER 3. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH; HANDLE HAS BEEN BROKEN AND GLUED TOGETHER. BO – “4” H: 3.8 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 2.7 CM. NUMBER 4. FR. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH; HANDLE HAS BEEN BROKEN AND GLUED TOGETHER. BP – “5” H: 3.7 CM. L: 1.7 CM. W: 2.7 CM. NUMBER 5. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH; HANDLE HAS BEEN BROKEN AND GLUED TOGETHER. BQ – “6” H: 3.7 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 2.7 CM. NUMBER 6. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. BR – “7” H: 3.7 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 2.7 CM. NUMBER 7. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. BS – “8” H: 3.6 CM. L: 1.9 CM. W: 2.6 CM. NUMBER 8. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. BT – “9” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 2.7 CM. NUMBER 9. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH; HANDLE CRACKED. BU – “O” H: 3.7 CM. L: 1.4 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LOWERCASE O. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. BV – “A” H: 3.7 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 2.7 CM. CAPITAL A. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. BW – “A” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 2.9 CM. LOWERCASE A. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. BX – “B” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL B. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. BY – “B” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.3 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LOWERCASE B. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. BZ – “C” H: 3.9 CM. L: 1.7 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL C. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. CA – “C” H: 3.7 CM. L: 1.4 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LOWERCASE C. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. CB – “D” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL D. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. CC – “D” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LOWERCASE D. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, RED; MISSING VARNISH. CD – “E” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL E. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. CE – “E” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.3 CM. W: 2.9 CM. LOWERCASE E. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. CF – “F” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL F. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. CG – “F” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.1 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LOWERCASE F. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. CH – “G” H: 3.8 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 2.9 CM. CAPITAL G. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. CI – “G” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.7 CM. W: 2.9 CM. LOWERCASE G. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. CJ – “H” H: 3.9 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL H. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. CK – “H” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LOWERCASE H. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. CL – “I” H: 3.8 CM. L: 0.8 CM. W: 2.9 CM. CAPITAL I. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. CM – “I” H: 3.8 CM. L: 0.8 CM. W: 2.9 CM. LOWERCASE I. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. CN – “J” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.4 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL J. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. CO – “J” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LOWERCASE J. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. CP – “K” H: 3.8 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL K. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. CQ – “K” H: 3.7 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LOWERCASE K. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. CR – “L” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.9 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL L. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. CS – “-” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.4 CM. W: 1.8 CM. DASH. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. CT – “M” H: 3.8 CM. L: 2.4 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL M. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. CU – “N” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL N. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN, RED; MISSING VARNISH. CV – “N” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LOWERCASE N. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. CW – “O” H: 3.9 CM. L: 1.9 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL O. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. CX – “0” H: 3.7 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 2.8 CM. NUMBER 0. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN, RED; MISSING VARNISH. CY – “P” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL P. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. CZ – “P” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LOWERCASE P. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. DA – “Q” H: 3.7 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL Q. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. DB – “Q” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.7 CM. W: 2.9 CM. LOWERCASE Q. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. DC – “R” H: 3.8 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL R. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. DD – “R” H: 3.7 CM. L: 1.2 CM. W: 2.8 CM. LOWERCASE R. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. DE – “S” H: 3.7 CM. L: 1.7 CM. W: 2.7 CM. CAPITAL S. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. DF – “T” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.8 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL T. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. DG – “U” H: 3.7 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL U. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. DH – “V” H: 3.4 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL V. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. DI – “W” H: 3.7 CM. L: 3 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL W. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. DJ – “X” H: 3.8 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL X. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. DK – “Z” H: 3.8 CM. L: 1.7 CM. W: 2.7 CM. CAPITAL Z. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. DL – “X” H: 3.7 CM. L: 1 CM. W: 1.8 CM. LOWERCASE X. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. DM – “Y” H: 3.8 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 2.8 CM. CAPITAL Y. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN, RED; MISSING VARNISH. DN – BOTTOM TRAY. H: 2.2 CM. L: 33.5 CM. W: 25.3 CM. WOODEN TRAY WITH SIXTEEN DIVIDERS; FIFTEEN ROWS AND ONE RECTANGLE. FABRIC LOOP ON INNER LEFT WALL. GD. MISSING THE RIGHT SIDE FABRIC LOOP. STAINED WITH BLACK, GREEN, AND BLUE INK. FROM DO – MO, ALL ENTRIES ARE WOODEN STAMPS WITH RED RUBBER PADS. DO – “A” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE A. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. DP – “A” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE A. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. DQ – “A” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE A. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. DR – “B” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE B. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. DS – “B” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE B. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, BLUE. DT – “C” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE C. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, RED. DU – “C” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE C. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN, RED. DV – “D” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE D. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; PAD GLUED DOWN WITH GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, BLUE, RED. DW – “D” H: 1.9 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE D. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. DX – “E” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE E. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, RED. DY – “E” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE E. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, RED. DZ – “F” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE F. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED STAINING. EA – “G” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE G. GD. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED RED. EB – “G” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE G. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. EC – “H” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE H. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. ED – “H” H: 1.9 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE H. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN. EE – “K” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE K. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, GREEN STAINING. EF – “K” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE K. GD. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING. EG – “M” H: 1.9 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE M. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE STAINED GREEN. EH – “M” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE M. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN, RED. EI – “N” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE N. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. EJ – “O” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE O. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, RED. EK – “O” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE O. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. EL – “P” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE P. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. EM – “R” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE R. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. EN – “S” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE S. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. EO – “S” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE S. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, BLUE STAINING. EP – “T” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE T. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, RED. EQ – “T” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE T. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, RED STAINING. ER – “U” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE U. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. ES – “U” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE U. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, GREEN STAINING. ET – “V” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE V. EX. PAD LOOKS UNUSED. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING. EU – “W” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE W. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE UNSTAINED. EV – “W” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE W. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, BLUE STAINING. EW – “X” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. LOWERCASE X. VG. PAD PARTIALLY BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED. EX – “A” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL A. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN. EY – “C” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL C. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, GREEN STAINING. EZ – “D” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL D. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING. FA – “E” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL E. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN. FB – “H” H: 1.9 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL H. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE STAINED BLACK. FC – “I” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL I. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, BLUE. FD – “J” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL J. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK. FE – “L” H: 1.9 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL L. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. FF – “M” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.7 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL M. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. FG – “N” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL N. GD. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT RED STAINING. FH – “O” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL O. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT RED STAINING. FI – “P” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL P. EX. PAD LOOKS UNUSED. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLUE, RED. FJ – “Q” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL Q. VG. PAD LOOKS UNUSED; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE UNSTAINED. FK – “R” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL R. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. FL – “ONE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD ONE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, GREEN STAINING; MISSING VARNISH FM – “TWO” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD TWO. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. FN – “THREE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD THREE. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. FO – “FOUR” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD FOUR. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN. FP – “SIX” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SIX. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. FQ – “SEVEN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SEVEN. GD. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE, RED STAINING. FR – “EIGHT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD EIGHT. GD. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING FS – “NINE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD NINE. GD. PAD LOOKS UNUSED; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. FT – “TEN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD TEN. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED; MISSING VARNISH. FU – “S” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL S. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE STAINED GREEN, RED. FV – “T” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL T. GD. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING. FW – “U” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL U. EX. PAD LOOKS UNUSED. HANDLE UNSTAINED. FX – “W” H: 1.9 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL W. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING. FY – “V” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL V. EX. PAD LOOKS UNUSED. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING. FZ – “X” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL X. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED GREEN, RED. GA – “Y” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.7 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL Y. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, RED. GB – “1” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. NUMBER 1. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, RED. GC – “1” H: 1.9 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. NUMBER 1. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, RED STAINING. GD – “1” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. NUMBER 1. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN, BLUE. GE – “3” H: 1.9 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. NUMBER 3. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, RED. GF – “4” H: 1.9 CM. L: 0.7 CM. W: 0.9 CM. NUMBER 4. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN. GG – “5” H: 1.9 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. NUMBER 5. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT RED STAINING. GH – “7” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. NUMBER 7. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, RED. GI – “8” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. NUMBER 8. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, RED. GJ – “HAD” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD HAD. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED; MISSING VARNISH GK – “HAVE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD HAVE. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. GL – “AWAY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD AWAY. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE UNSTAINED; MISSING VARNISH GM – “GOOD” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD GOOD. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE UNSTAINED; MISSING VARNISH. GN – “DOWN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD DOWN. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. GO – “NAME” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD NAME. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING. GP – “COLOUR” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD COLOUR. GD. PAD HAS BEEN CUT, WITH THE “U” REMOVED AND THE “R” GLUED BACK ON; MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. GQ – “BROWN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BROWN. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. GR – “GREEN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD GREEN. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. GS – “RED” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD RED. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK. GT – “ORANGE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD ORANGE. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED; MISSING VARNISH. GU – “YELLOW” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD YELLOW. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. GV – “BLUE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BLUE. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN. GW – “BLACK” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BLACK. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK. GX – “LITTLE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD LITTLE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. GY – “BIG” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BIG. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN. GZ – “CORN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD CORN. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. HA – “APPLE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD APPLE. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HB – “WHEAT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD WHEAT. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. HC – “GRASS” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD GRASS. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT RED STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. HD – “FLAG” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD FLAG. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING. HE – “PAPER” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD PAPER. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, BLUE STAINING. HF – “CAR” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD CAR. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, BLUE STAINING. HG – “FLOWER” H: 1.9 CM. L: 3 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD FLOWER. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, RED STAINING. HH – “STAR” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD STAR. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. HI – “CIRCLE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD TREE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, BLUE STAINING. HJ – “TREE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD TREE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, BLUE STAINING. HK – “SAY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SAY. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED; MISSING VARNISH. HL – “SAID” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SAID. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED STAINING. HM – “BALL” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BALL. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HN – “CIRCUS” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD CIRCUS. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN. HO – “CLOWN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD CLOWN. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING. HP – “IGLOO” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD IGLOO. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. HQ – “WIGWAM” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD WIGWAM. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, RED. HR – “SCHOOL” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SCHOOL. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. HS – “SOME” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SOME. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. HT – “WAS” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD WAS. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED STAINING. HU – “MET” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD MET. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE UNSTAINED. HV – “CAME” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD CAME. GD. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, BLUE STAINING. HW – “RAN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD RAN. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. HX – “COME” H: 1.9 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD COME. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. HY – “DID” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD DID. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HZ – “MADE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD MADE. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. IA – “SEE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SEE. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, RED. IB – “WENT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD WENT. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE UNSTAINED IC – “SAW” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SAW. GD. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, GREEN STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. ID – “JUMP” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD JUMP. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, GREEN STAINING. IE – “PLAY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD PLAY. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED GREEN. IF – “LOOK” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD LOOK. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING A CORNER. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, GREEN STAINING. IG – “LONG” H: 1.9 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD LONG. EX. PAD LOOKS UNUSED. HANDLE UNSTAINED. IH – “THEM” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD THEM. EX. PAD LOOKS UNUSED. HANDLE UNSTAINED. II – “AFTER” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD AFTER. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. IJ – “WANT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD WANT. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, RED. IK – “WILL” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD WILL. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. IL – “MAKE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD MAKE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. IM – “CAN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD CAN. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. IN – “ARE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD ARE. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED. IO – “WERE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD WERE. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING. IP – “LIKE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD LIKE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED IQ – “READ” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD READ. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. IR – “RADIO” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD RADIO. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT RED STAINING. IS – “AEROPLANE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 4.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD AEROPLANE. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, GREEN STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. IT – “FLY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD FLY. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED; MISSING VARNISH. IU – “BOAT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BOAT. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. IV – “RIDE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD RIDE. GD. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. IW – “FENCE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD FENCE. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED RED; MISSING VARNISH. IX – “TURKEY” H: 1.9 CM. L: 3 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD TURKEY. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE, RED STAINING. IY – “WITH” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD WITH. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED; MISSING VARNISH. IZ – “LIVE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD LIVE. VG. PAD MINIMALLY BLACK, GREEN. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, GREEN STAINING. JA – “MORNING” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD MORNING. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK, PURPLE. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, PURPLE. JB – “OLD” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD OLD. GD. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE UNSTAINED JC – “MAY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD MAY. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. JD – “TOO” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD TOO. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, BLUE. JE – “ALL” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD ALL. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED. JF – “FARM” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD FARM. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN, RED; MISSING VARNISH. JG – “HEN” H: 1.9 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD HEN. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. JH – “CAT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD CAT. GD. PAD STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE. JI – “RABBIT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD RABBIT. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED STAINING. JJ – “COW” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD COW. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. JK – “DONKEY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD DONKEY. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. JL – “HORSE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD HORSE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. JM – “SHEEP” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SHEEP. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. JN – “GOAT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD GOAT. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. JO – “ROOSTER” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD ROOSTER. GD. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT CORNERS. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. JP – “TIGER” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD TIGER. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. JQ – “BEAR” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BEAR. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. JR – “BIRD” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BIRD. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. JS – “MONKEY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD MONKEY. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED STAINING. JT – “SEAL” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SEAL. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. JU – “GOOSE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD GOOSE. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED; MISSING VARNISH. JV – “DOG” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD DOG. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE. JW – “SQUIRREL” H: 2.2 CM. L: 4.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SQUIRREL. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED. JX – “PIG” H: 1.9 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD PIG. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK. JY – “BARN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BARN. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, BLUE, PURPLE. JZ – “SISTER” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SISTER. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE UNSTAINED. KA – “BROTHER” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BROTHER. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING. KB – “BABY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BABY. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK, GREEN. KC – “CHILDREN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 4.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD CHILDREN. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. KD – “MOTHER” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD MOTHER. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED STAINING. KE – “FATHER” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD FATHER. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. KF – “GIRL” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD GIRL. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK; MISSING VARNISH. KG – “BOY” H: 1.9 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD BOY. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, RED. KH – “MAN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD MAN. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED; MISSING VARNISH. KI – “HE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD HE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. KJ – “HE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD HE. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE UNSTAINED. KK – “SHE” H: 1.9 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD SHE. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. KL – “SHE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD SHE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. KM – “HIS” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD HIS. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. KN – “HIS” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD HIS. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. KO – “HER” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD HER. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE UNSTAINED. KP – “HER” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD HER. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING. KQ – “THEY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD THEY. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE UNSTAINED. KR – “ME” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD ME. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING. KS – “YOU” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD YOU. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. KT – “YOU” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD YOU. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. KU – “YOUR” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD YOUR. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. KV – “IT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD IT. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. KW – “WE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD WE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED GREEN, BLUE; MISSING VARNISH. KX – “TELL” H: 1.9 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD TELL. EX. PAD LOOKS UNUSED. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE, RED STAINING. KY – “CUT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD CUT. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, BLUE, RED STAINING. KZ – “DRAW” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD DRAW. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED GREEN, BLUE. LA – “MAY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE NAME MAY. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED. LB – “BILLY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE NAME BILLY. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, BLUE STAINING. LC – “FIND” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD FIND. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED GREEN. LD – “MOLLY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE NAME MOLLY. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, BLUE, RED, PURPLE STAINING. LE – “THIS” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD THIS. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. LF – “SANTA CLAUS” H: 2.2 CM. L: 5.3 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE NAME SANTA CLAUS. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, RED STAINING. LG – “WHEN” H: 1.9 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD WHEN. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT RED STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. LH – “COUNT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD COUNT. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING. LI – “WHY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD WHY. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING. LJ – “THEY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD THEY. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, BLUE, RED STAINING. LK – “YES” H: 1.9 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD YES. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE PARTIALLY STAINED GREEN. LL – “PASTE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD PASTE. GD. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE UNSTAINED. LM – “CAN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD CAN. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, BLUE STAINING. LN – “INDIAN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD INDIAN. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN, BLUE. LO – “DO” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD DO. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN, BLUE STAINING. LP – “THE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD THE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN. LQ – “HOW” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD HOW. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. LR – “WHAT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD WHAT. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE, RED STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. LS – “GIVE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 2.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD GIVE. VG. PAD MINIMALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. LT – “?” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. QUESTION MARK. VG. PAD STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. LU – “.” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. PERIOD. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, RED STAINING. LV – “+” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. PLUS SIGN. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED RED. LW – “-” H: 2.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. MINUS SIGN. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, BLUE. LX – “AND” H: 1.9 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD AND. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED GREEN, BLUE. LY – “MY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD MY. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED GREEN, BLUE. LZ – “ING” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE LETTERS ING. VG. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. MA – “ED” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE LETTERS ED. GD. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT ONTO HANDLE. HANDLE UNSTAINED. MB – “THE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD THE. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN, BLUE. MC – “IT” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD IT. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MINIMALLY STAINED GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. MD – “AM” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD AM. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING. ME – “HAS” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD HAS. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. MF – “NO” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD NO. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, GREEN STAINING; MISSING VARNISH. MG – “TO” H: 1.9 CM. L: 1.2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD TO. GD. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK; GLUED DOWN WITH HARD GLUE LEAKING OUT. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING. MH – “ON” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD ON. GD. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK; LIFTING AT THE CORNERS. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK, BLUE STAINING. MI – “AN” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD AN. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT GREEN STAINING. MJ – “GO” H: 2.2 CM. L: 1.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD GO. VG. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE STAINED BLACK, GREEN; MISSING VARNISH. MK – “IN” H: 1.9 CM. L: 1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD IN. VG. PAD ALMOST COMPLETELY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE UNSTAINED; MISSING VARNISH. ML – “PRETTY” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.1 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD PRETTY. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE UNSTAINED. MM – “BROWNIE” H: 2.2 CM. L: 3.5 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE CAPITALIZED WORD BROWNIE. PR. PAD MISSING. HANDLE HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLUE STAINING. MN – “DOLL” H: 0.2 CM. L: 2 CM. W: 0.9 CM. THE WORD DOLL. PR. PAD PARTIALLY STAINED BLACK. HANDLE MISSING. MO – “H” H: 0.2 CM. L: 0.6 CM. W: 0.9 CM. CAPITAL H. PR. PAD HAS ALMOST NONEXISTENT BLACK STAINING. HANDLE MISSING.
Subjects
WRITTEN COMMUNICATION T&E
Historical Association
EDUCATION
History
DONOR RITA MEDVE RETIRED FROM TEACHING IN 2010 AFTER SERVING 35 YEARS WITH SCHOOL DISTRICT 51. THIS STAMP BOX WAS USED IN HER CLASSROOMS FOR THE ENTIRE PERIOD. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ABOUT THIS STAMP BOX COMES FROM AN INTERVIEW WITH MEDVE THAT WAS CONDUCTED BY COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON OCTOBER 18, 2017: MEDVE BEGAN AT WESTMINSTER SCHOOL IN 1973 AND, AFTER MOVING THROUGH ANOTHER SIX SCHOOLS, RETURNED THERE FOR THE FINAL 21 YEARS OF HER CAREER. SHE WAS INTRODUCED TO WESTMINSTER SCHOOL AS A RESULT OF HER STUDIES IN EDUCATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE, INTERNING AT WESTMINSTER WITH GRADE 6 TEACHER FUMI TAMAGI. FOLLOWING THE COMPLETION OF HER STUDIES, SHE WAS INVITED TO APPLY FOR THE POSITION VACATED BY TAMAGI WHO WAS TRANSFERRING TO A DIFFERENT SCHOOL. THIS STAMP BOX WAS A PRESENT FROM TAMAGI TO MEDVE UPON THE AWARDING OF MEDVE'S NEW TEACHING POSITION. MEDVE RECALLED TAMAGI USING IT HERSELF AS ONE OF HER TEACHING TOOLS. TALKING ABOUT TAMAGI IN THE CLASSROOM MEDVE STATES, “THE CHILDREN ALL LOVED HER. SHE HAD CONTROL OVER THE CLASSROOM AND I LEARNED A LOT FROM HER… SHE HELPED ME WORK WITH CHILDREN WHO HAD CHALLENGES. THAT’S WHEN I KNEW THAT I ACTUALLY NEEDED TO BE IN SPECIAL EDUCATION, BESIDES MY PHYSICAL EDUCATION THAT I WAS MAJORING IN. THERE WERE CHILDREN IN HER CLASSROOM THAT HAD CHALLENGES, BUT NOT AGGRESSIVENESS, SO SHE SHOWED ME DIFFERENT WAYS OF HANDLING DIFFERENT CHALLENGES AND SHE TAUGHT ME TO TEACH TO THE CHILDREN, NOT TO THE CURRICULUM; AND THAT’S HOW I TAUGHT MY 35 YEARS OF TEACHING.” THE STAMPS WERE USED IN THE CLASSROOM TO ASSIST IN THE TEACHING OF KIDS WITH LEARNING CHALLENGES AND THOSE LEARNING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. MEDVE STATES, “I REMEMBER [TAMAGI] GIVING IT TO ME TO USE WITH THE SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS, BECAUSE IT WAS HELPING THEM WITH THEIR SPELLING, THEIR READING. ESL STUDENTS WOULD - WE WOULD GIVE THEM A PICTURE, AND THEN WE’D USE THE STAMP TO SHOW WHAT THAT WORD WAS, THAT RELATED TO THE PICTURE. … IT WAS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN THAT CLASSROOM TO THEM, BECAUSE IT WAS PHYSICAL, USING ALL YOUR KINESTHETICS - FEELING, TOUCHING.” ON TEACHING SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN THROUGHOUT HER CAREER SHE STATES, “FOR 15 YEARS, I TAUGHT SPECIAL EDUCATION IN A CONFINED ROOM – A NORMAL CLASSROOM SETTING – AND I WOULD HAVE, ON AVERAGE, ABOUT 12 STUDENTS WORKING WITH ME. I ALSO TAUGHT PHYSED TO THE REGULAR CHILDREN, AT DIFFERENT TIMES OF THE DAY. … AFTER 15 YEARS, I WENT INTO A REGULAR CLASSROOM, BUT, BECAUSE I HAD SPECIAL ED BACKGROUND, AND NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE DID, AT THAT TIME, I WOULD BE GIFTED WITH MANY CHALLENGED STUDENTS, MANY. LIKE, FOR EXAMPLE, OUT OF 28 CHILDREN, I MIGHT HAVE 12 CHALLENGED STUDENTS…” FUMIKO “FUMI” TAMAGI PASSED AWAY DECEMBER 15TH, 2015 AT 93 YEARS. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING REFERENCED INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTIONS PLEASE SEE THIS RECORD’S PERMANENT FILE.
Catalogue Number
P20170032000
Acquisition Date
2017-10
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
CARDBOARD, INK
Catalogue Number
P20190002002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Materials
CARDBOARD, INK
No. Pieces
2
Height
3
Length
6.8
Width
3.3
Description
A.CARDBOARD AMMUNITION BOX TOP, 6.8CM LONG X 3.3CM WIDE X 3CM TALL. BROWN CARDBOARD WITH PRINTED YELLOW AND BLUE LABELS ON TOP, BOTTOM, AND SIDES. TOP OF BOX HAS PRINTED TEXT “22 LONG RIFLE, SMOKELESS GREASED, CIL SUPER-CLEAN, MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN INDUSTRIES LIMITED, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA” WITH “CIL” LOGO AND IMAGE OF A BULLET ALONG TOP EDGE. FRONT OF BOX HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND, “THESE CARTRIDGES ARE PRIMED WITH “SUPER-CLEAN” NON-RUSTING PRIMING. IF THE RIFLE HAS FIRST BEEN THOROUGHLY CLEANED AND “DOMINION” “SUPER-CLEAN” .22’S ARE USED EXCLUSIVELY, THEY WILL NOT RUST OR CORRODE THE BORE.” BACK OF BOX HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND, “THESE .22” LONG-RIFLE “SUPER-CLEAN” GREASED CARTRIDGES HAVE BEEN SPECIALLY DEVELOPED FOR GAME AS WELL AS TARGET SHOOTING, AND WILL BE FOUND TO BE POWERFUL AND ACCURATE AND ALWAYS DEPENDABLE”. BOTTOM OF BOX HAS BLUE TEXT ON YELLOW BACKGROUND “MADE IN CANADA BY, CANADIAN LIMITED INDUSTRIES, “DOMINION” AMMUNITION DIVISION, MONTREAL, CANADA.” SIDE OPENING FLAP HAS BLUE TEXT AND “CIL” LOGO ON YELLOW BACKGROUND, “”SUPER-CLEAN”, .22 LONG RIFLE, 50 R.F., SMOKELESS, GREASED”. BOX HAS TORN AND MISSING OPENING FLAP ON LEFT SIDE; BOX HAS TEAR ON TOP IN UPPER-RIGHT CORNER; BOX EDGES ARE WORN AND BOX TOP IS CREASED AND DENTED; OVERALL GOOD CONDITION. B.CARDBOARD BASE OF BOX, 6.3CM LONG X 3CM WIDE X 2.8CM TALL. BROWN CARDBOARD BOX WITHOUT TOP; SIDES FOLDED INTO BOX CREATING BASE. BOX IS STAINED DOWN INSIDE FLAPS AND ON INSIDE BASE; TOP EDGES AND CORNERS ARE WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JANUARY 10, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JEAN BUCHANAN REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REVOLVER AND FIREARM ACCESSORIES. THE FIREARM WAS USED BY BUCHANAN’S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, DURING HIS CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. ON HER FATHER’S REVOLVER AND USE OF AMMUNITION, BUCHANAN RECALLED, “[MY DAD] USED [THE SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVER]…STARTING IN 1932, WITH THE RCMP, MAY BE WHEN HE GOT THAT GUN. HE HAD IT REGISTERED IN 1940, AND GETTING ANOTHER 5 YEARS REGISTRATION IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1935. [THE GUN] WAS HIS SIDEARM…HIS SERVICE WEAPON…HE HAD THAT ALL THE TIME…IT WOULD GO RIGHT ON HIS BELT THERE.” “[DAD KEPT THE GUN] IN [MY PARENTS’] BEDROOM. RIGHT ON THE BEDROOM CLOSET DOOR, RIGHT OPEN. I NEVER TOUCHED IT, BECAUSE HE HAD GIVEN ME MY TRAINING AND LET ME USE IT WHEN I WAS YOUNG. I HAD RESPECT FOR IT, AND I HAD NO SPECIAL CURIOSITY, WHICH IS A GOOD THING. [DAD KNEW I WAS] AN ADVENTUROUS PERSON, BUT I NEVER EVER TOUCHED IT, OUT OF COMPLETE RESPECT FOR DAD AND WHAT HE HAD THERE.” “ALL I CAN REMEMBER [IS HE HAD TWO HANDGUNS OR SIDEARMS]…HE DIDN’T GO OUT PRACTICING VERY MUCH; HE DIDN’T HAVE TO. HE COULD PASS HIS MARKSMANSHIP, AND THEN, EVERY TIME THERE WERE THINGS AT REGINA DEPOT TRAINING COURSES (UPGRADING, REFRESHER COURSES) THEY DID THEIR MARKSMANSHIP THERE, TOO. THEY WERE ALWAYS TESTED ON THEIR MARKSMANSHIP, AT REGINA DEPOT.” “I THINK [THE REVOLVER HAD] QUITE A BIT [OF MEANING TO MY DAD], BECAUSE HE HAD IT IN HIS HOUSE. IT WAS REALLY STRANGE BECAUSE I ASKED HIM WHERE IT WAS, WHEN HE SHOWED ME THE PAPERS, AND HE HAD IT IN A SHOE BOX IN HIS BEDROOM CLOSET. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE GREAT [HIDING] PLACES FOR IT IN THOSE DAYS, BUT THAT’S WHERE HE KEPT IT. HE MADE SURE IT WAS THERE, AND HE KNEW WHERE IT WAS.” “[I HAVE NO] KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HIM HAVING TO FIRE THIS WEAPON…AT ANYONE. IF HE WOULD HAVE, HE WOULD HAVE FIRED TO MISS SOMEONE, JUST AS A WARNING SHOT. HE DEFINITELY WENT FOR WARNING SHOTS, BUT HE NEVER SHOT ANYBODY WITH IT." “[HE WOULD HAVE STOPPED CARRYING THE GUN] AT THE VERY END OF 1950, WHEN HE RETIRED FROM THE R.C.M.P.” “[I’VE HAD THE REVOLVER] SINCE 1998—THE PASSING OF MY FATHER, BECAUSE I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTRIX. IT WAS AUTOMATICALLY MY RESPONSIBILITY TO TAKE ALL OF HIS FIREARMS, IN MY POSSESSION.” “I WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR [THE CARE OF] IT, AND IT WAS A REAL KEEPSAKE. [THE GUN WAS] WAS VERY PERSONAL, BECAUSE I’M SURE [MY DAD] OWNED THAT EVEN BY BACK IN 1935, [WHEN] HE WAS IN WESTLOCK, IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT THERE FOR 10 YEARS. IT WAS OF SENTIMENTAL VALUE BECAUSE HE TOOK ME OUT (I’M PRETTY SURE I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, WHEN HE HAD ME IN THE BACKYARD)—WE HAD FARMLAND AND FOREST—AND HE HAD A TARGET PRACTICE OUT THERE. HE HAD ME USE THAT FIREARM. HE SHOWED ME HOW TO USE IT, HOW TO AIM, AND HOW TO HANDLE IT SAFELY. I ALWAYS RESPECTED THAT, AND THAT WAS GOOD. THAT’S THE ORIGINAL HOLSTER FOR THAT GUN, WHICH YOU CAN SEE IS LOOPED, TO PUT ON HIS BELT. HE ALSO CARRIED A .32 COLT SEMI-AUTOMATIC.” “I’VE ALWAYS APPRECIATED REVOLVERS, AND RIFLES. IT’S NEVER BEEN ANYTHING THAT I THOUGHT ANY DANGER OF. YOU LEARN THE SAFETY, AND YOU TAKE YOUR COURSE. I HAVE MY COURSE DONE, AND I PASSED IT WITH FLYING COLORS. I HAD MY PERMIT TO HAVE IT. I HAVE TAKEN IT OUT, ON MY OWN ACREAGE, AND FIRED IT A BIT, BUT IT ISN’T SOMETHING I WANT TO DO. IT’S A SENTIMENTAL THING THAT I CAN NOW FEEL I’D LIKE TO HAVE IT IN YOUR MUSEUM. I KNOW IT’S NOW IN A SAFE PLACE, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT EVER FALLING INTO THE WRONG HANDS. AND, IF I WANT TO COME AND VISIT IT, I CAN COME AND SEE IT.” ON JUNE 8, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BUCHANAN REGARDING HER FATHER’S CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S HISTORY, “[MY DAD WAS EDWARD BUCHANAN, WHO RETIRED AT THE RANK OF] SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT…HE RETIRED IN 1950 FROM THE [R.C.M.P].” “HE JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL. IN ’21, HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON…BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL AND THEN AFTER, HE GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE. HE WAS GOING TO GO TO GRANDE PRAIRIE BUT THEN IN ’22, THEY GOT MARRIED. A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED…THAT’S WHEN THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD.” “EVEN IN THE A.P.P., TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON…BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN AND THEN MAYBE, AT THE VERY FIRST WINTER AS A ROOKIE, HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. IT WASN’T LONG AND HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE OF THE REAL POLICING.” “WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P. [IN 1932] HE WAS THE TOP CLASS OF [THE] A.P.P. THAT AUTOMATICALLY WERE ACCEPTED INTO THE R.C.M.P. HE WAS PUT IN CHARGE, WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P.—FIRST HE STARTED OUT IN CHARGE OF BRAINARD—HORSE LAKE—A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION. THEY CLOSED THAT DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY, A LITTLE VILLAGE, AND HE WAS THE ONLY ONE IN CHARGE, THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. THAT’S WHEN THAT 1932 [CHANGE] CAME ALONG AND HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P. AND WENT FROM THERE.” “IN ’32, IT WAS R.C.M.P. AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. THEN HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. [THERE] WAS NO DETACHMENT IN BARRHEAD. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO COVER.” “[A.P.P. MEMBERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY HAD THREE CATEGORIES THERE, OF THE A.P.P. MEMBERS…[THERE WERE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE, THAT THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P.; THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEY WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE. THEN THERE [WERE THE ONES THAT] COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY. THEN THERE [WERE] ONES THAT COULD GET IN FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY. THEY’D BE ACCEPTED FOR A YEAR. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE AND [THEY] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE.” “A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING. THESE WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” “ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK KNEW DAD REALLY WELL, HE’D EVEN BEEN IN THE A.P.P. HE CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, “BUCK, [DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’, A LOT] I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT…YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE, I THINK, THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?” “[WE CAME DOWN HERE IN] ’44…I NEVER HAD ANY PROBLEM [WITH THE MOVE]. I WAS ALWAYS ADVENTUROUS. I HAD LOTS OF FRIENDS BUT I WAS ALWAYS HAPPY TO GO.” “WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US AND THEN HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE READY, SO WE CAME DOWN AND STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN, HERE. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE, LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS.” “[DAD] HAD TO OVERSEE THE POW CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POW’S IN THIS RESPECT, THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. [THEY] WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY…THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY, THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. HE RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT AND HELPED THEM, [GAVE] THEM ADVICE, “YOU KNOW, YOU GOTTA GO BACK TO GERMANY AND THEN APPLY TO COME BACK.” THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK…‘CAUSE THERE [WAS] A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS AND THEY NEEDED THAT HELP. SOME OF THOSE FARMERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET SOME OF THESE GERMANS, AND SOME OF THE FARMERS’ DAUGHTERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET THAT, TOO. THEN THERE’S SOME LATER MARRIAGES AFTER THAT. IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO CONDEMN ALL THOSE POW’S BECAUSE A LOT OF THEM WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD, MORAL FELLOWS THAT DIDN’T WANT TO BE INVOLVED WITH ANY KILLING.” “HE WAS A PLAIN STAFF SERGEANT, NCO, SECOND IN CHARGE OF THE SUBDIVISION.” “[THEN HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON [TO RETIRE IN 1950], HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS. HE JOINED THE R.C.M. P. VETS BUT WITH HIS RECORD, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE. THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA WHICH, AT THAT TIME, THERE WERE ONLY TWO: LETHBRIDGE AND FORT SASKATCHEWAN. [THE] ONLY PLACE IN FORT SASKATCHEWAN WAS FOR WOMEN, SO [WOMEN] HAD TO GO ALL THE WAY TO FORT SASKATCHEWAN, EVEN IF [THEY] WAS FROM LETHBRIDGE. THAT WASN’T A VERY GOOD DEAL, SO DAD COULD SEE A REAL NEED [FOR WORK]. IT WAS A REAL MESS WHEN HE LOOKED AT THE PRISONS.” “HE REALIZED, BEING AN R.C.M.P., THAT MANY OF THE YOUNG CITY POLICE, TOWN SHERIFFS, SOME OF THESE MAGISTRATES, THEY MESSED THINGS UP. HE STARTED A TRAINING SCHOOL FOR THESE MUNICIPAL POLICE AND THAT JUST WENT TERRIFICALLY. THEY HAD [THE SCHOOLS] IN CALGARY AND IN EDMONTON TWICE A YEAR. THEY HAD A BIG GROUP FROM MEDICINE HAT COME UP AND [TAKE] THE SCHOOLING, LETHBRIDGE CAME UP, AND SOME OF THE PRISON GUARDS TOOK [THE TRAINING], TOO.” “[HE] WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN/SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, HE WAS SO BUSY THAT THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS BECAUSE…THE FIRST THING HE HAD TO DO WAS TO DEVELOP THE PRISONS FOR ALBERTA. TWO WAS NOT SUFFICIENT.” “[DAD’S] PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, HUMOROUS, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, AND VERY FIRMLY. THE STAFF…ALL LOVED HIM. I [HAVE] LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON…“YOU’RE THE BEST BOSS WE EVER HAD.” ALL HE HAD WAS A VISION OF WHAT NEEDED TO BE DONE…HE COULD GO AND EXPLAIN THE NEED FOR THE JAILS, WHAT IT WOULD COST AND WHAT IT NEEDED TO FIX THE PROBLEM. HE NEVER HAD PROBLEM GETTING EXACTLY WHAT HE NEEDED FROM THEM.” ON THE DONATION OF THE REVOLVER AND AMMUNITION, BUCHANAN NOTED, “MY DAD KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER [HIS BELONGINGS] AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM. [DAD KNEW] THAT I WASN’T ONE TO PUT IT IN MY BASEMENT TO HAVE GOODNESS-KNOWS-WHAT-HAPPEN TO IT. HE HAD LEFT ALL OF THAT IN CHARGE OF ME. I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE.” “I AM NOW AT THE YOUNG AGE OF 88; I’M NOT WORRIED ABOUT LIVING ANOTHER 10 YEARS. I DIDN’T WANT THE CHANCE OF ANYBODY STEALING IT, OR GETTING THEIR HANDS ON IT, SO I WANTED TO MAKE SURE YOU GOT IT. AND, I DON’T NEED IT, SO WHY KEEP IT? IF I GET LONESOME, AND WANT TO SEE IT, I’LL COME TO THE MUSEUM AND LOOK AT IT.” “I’LL FEEL HAPPY, TO KNOW IT’S GOT A GOOD HOME. I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL TRANSCRIPTIONS FROM INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190002001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190002002
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
GUN OIL
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
GLASS, CORK, OIL
Catalogue Number
P20190002003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
GUN OIL
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Materials
GLASS, CORK, OIL
No. Pieces
1
Height
10.4
Length
3.5
Width
4.6
Description
GLASS BOTTLE CONTAINING AMBER OIL, WITH CRACKED AND TORN CORK IN TOP OPENING. BOTTLE HAS ROUND NECK, DOMED TOP AND SQUARE BODY; BOTTLE HAS BLUE AND WHITE LABEL ON FRONT. FRONT LABEL BLUE BACKGROUND WITH WHITE CROWN ABOVE WHITE SHIELD WITH RED AND BLUE TEXT; LABEL IS TORN ACROSS SHIELD MAKING RED TEXT INDECIPHERABLE, BLUE TEXT BELOW READS “PURE VANILLA”; SHIELD HAS WHITE DOTS AROUND BASE AND WHITE TEXT BELOW “FLAVORING EXTRACTS, CAMPBELL BROS & WILSON LIMITED, WINNIPEG – CANADA, EST. 1882”. BACK OF BOTTLE HAS EMBOSSED IN GLASS “2 FL. OZ”. BASE OF BOTTLE HAS EMBOSSED IN GLASS “1, 4818, FDJ” WITH “D” IN A DIAMOND. CORK IS TORN OFF AT THE TOP OF THE BOTTLE NECK; LABEL IS WORN AND DISCOLORED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JANUARY 10, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JEAN BUCHANAN REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REVOLVER AND FIREARM ACCESSORIES. THE FIREARM WAS USED BY BUCHANAN’S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, DURING HIS CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON THE USE OF THE GUN OIL, NOTING, “[DAD HAD A BAG] BECAUSE, IN HIS YOUNGER DAYS, HE OFTEN HAD TO GO OUT ON HORSEBACK. HE’D BE GONE, HUNTING DOWN A MURDERER, AND HE MIGHT HAVE HAD A GUIDE WITH HIM. HE TOOK SOME OF HIS CLEANING EQUIPMENT FOR THE REVOLVER, AND HIS RIFLE, TOO…HE COULD PACK HIS LUNCH…KNIVES, SURVIVAL, AND HIS DIRTY OLD CLEANING CLOTH THAT HE USED, AND AN OLD BOTTLE OF GUN OIL, SO HE COULD CLEAN THE GUN IN CASE HE HAPPENED TO DROP IT IN SOME MUD. YOU NEVER KNOW [WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN] WHEN YOU’RE OUT…YOU HAVE TO KEEP YOUR GUN VERY CLEAN. HE KEPT EVERYTHING VERY CLEAN…YOU HAVE TO KEEP THE GUN CLEAN IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE IT, BECAUSE YOU COULD DAMAGE IT IF YOU HAVE ANY DIRT IN THE BARREL.” ON HER FATHER’S REVOLVER, BUCHANAN RECALLED, “[MY DAD] USED [THE SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVER]…STARTING IN 1932, WITH THE RCMP, MAY BE WHEN HE GOT THAT GUN. HE HAD IT REGISTERED IN 1940, AND GETTING ANOTHER 5 YEARS REGISTRATION IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1935. [THE GUN] WAS HIS SIDEARM…HIS SERVICE WEAPON…HE HAD THAT ALL THE TIME…IT WOULD GO RIGHT ON HIS BELT THERE.” “[DAD KEPT THE GUN] IN [MY PARENTS’] BEDROOM. RIGHT ON THE BEDROOM CLOSET DOOR, RIGHT OPEN. I NEVER TOUCHED IT, BECAUSE HE HAD GIVEN ME MY TRAINING AND LET ME USE IT WHEN I WAS YOUNG. I HAD RESPECT FOR IT, AND I HAD NO SPECIAL CURIOSITY, WHICH IS A GOOD THING. [DAD KNEW I WAS] AN ADVENTUROUS PERSON, BUT I NEVER EVER TOUCHED IT, OUT OF COMPLETE RESPECT FOR DAD AND WHAT HE HAD THERE.” “ALL I CAN REMEMBER [IS HE HAD TWO HANDGUNS OR SIDEARMS]…HE DIDN’T GO OUT PRACTICING VERY MUCH; HE DIDN’T HAVE TO. HE COULD PASS HIS MARKSMANSHIP, AND THEN, EVERY TIME THERE WERE THINGS AT REGINA DEPOT TRAINING COURSES (UPGRADING, REFRESHER COURSES) THEY DID THEIR MARKSMANSHIP THERE, TOO. THEY WERE ALWAYS TESTED ON THEIR MARKSMANSHIP, AT REGINA DEPOT.” “I THINK [THE REVOLVER HAD] QUITE A BIT [OF MEANING TO MY DAD], BECAUSE HE HAD IT IN HIS HOUSE. IT WAS REALLY STRANGE BECAUSE I ASKED HIM WHERE IT WAS, WHEN HE SHOWED ME THE PAPERS, AND HE HAD IT IN A SHOE BOX IN HIS BEDROOM CLOSET. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE GREAT [HIDING] PLACES FOR IT IN THOSE DAYS, BUT THAT’S WHERE HE KEPT IT. HE MADE SURE IT WAS THERE, AND HE KNEW WHERE IT WAS.” “[I HAVE NO] KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HIM HAVING TO FIRE THIS WEAPON…AT ANYONE. IF HE WOULD HAVE, HE WOULD HAVE FIRED TO MISS SOMEONE, JUST AS A WARNING SHOT. HE DEFINITELY WENT FOR WARNING SHOTS, BUT HE NEVER SHOT ANYBODY WITH IT." “[HE WOULD HAVE STOPPED CARRYING THE GUN] AT THE VERY END OF 1950, WHEN HE RETIRED FROM THE R.C.M.P.” “[I’VE HAD THE REVOLVER] SINCE 1998—THE PASSING OF MY FATHER, BECAUSE I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTRIX. IT WAS AUTOMATICALLY MY RESPONSIBILITY TO TAKE ALL OF HIS FIREARMS, IN MY POSSESSION.” “I WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR [THE CARE OF] IT, AND IT WAS A REAL KEEPSAKE. [THE GUN WAS] WAS VERY PERSONAL, BECAUSE I’M SURE [MY DAD] OWNED THAT EVEN BY BACK IN 1935, [WHEN] HE WAS IN WESTLOCK, IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT THERE FOR 10 YEARS. IT WAS OF SENTIMENTAL VALUE BECAUSE HE TOOK ME OUT (I’M PRETTY SURE I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, WHEN HE HAD ME IN THE BACKYARD)—WE HAD FARMLAND AND FOREST—AND HE HAD A TARGET PRACTICE OUT THERE. HE HAD ME USE THAT FIREARM. HE SHOWED ME HOW TO USE IT, HOW TO AIM, AND HOW TO HANDLE IT SAFELY. I ALWAYS RESPECTED THAT, AND THAT WAS GOOD. THAT’S THE ORIGINAL HOLSTER FOR THAT GUN, WHICH YOU CAN SEE IS LOOPED, TO PUT ON HIS BELT. HE ALSO CARRIED A .32 COLT SEMI-AUTOMATIC.” “I’VE ALWAYS APPRECIATED REVOLVERS, AND RIFLES. IT’S NEVER BEEN ANYTHING THAT I THOUGHT ANY DANGER OF. YOU LEARN THE SAFETY, AND YOU TAKE YOUR COURSE. I HAVE MY COURSE DONE, AND I PASSED IT WITH FLYING COLORS. I HAD MY PERMIT TO HAVE IT. I HAVE TAKEN IT OUT, ON MY OWN ACREAGE, AND FIRED IT A BIT, BUT IT ISN’T SOMETHING I WANT TO DO. IT’S A SENTIMENTAL THING THAT I CAN NOW FEEL I’D LIKE TO HAVE IT IN YOUR MUSEUM. I KNOW IT’S NOW IN A SAFE PLACE, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT EVER FALLING INTO THE WRONG HANDS. AND, IF I WANT TO COME AND VISIT IT, I CAN COME AND SEE IT.” ON JUNE 8, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BUCHANAN REGARDING HER FATHER’S CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S HISTORY, “[MY DAD WAS EDWARD BUCHANAN, WHO RETIRED AT THE RANK OF] SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT…HE RETIRED IN 1950 FROM THE [R.C.M.P].” “HE JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL. IN ’21, HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON…BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL AND THEN AFTER, HE GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE. HE WAS GOING TO GO TO GRANDE PRAIRIE BUT THEN IN ’22, THEY GOT MARRIED. A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED…THAT’S WHEN THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD.” “EVEN IN THE A.P.P., TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON…BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN AND THEN MAYBE, AT THE VERY FIRST WINTER AS A ROOKIE, HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. IT WASN’T LONG AND HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE OF THE REAL POLICING.” “WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P. [IN 1932] HE WAS THE TOP CLASS OF [THE] A.P.P. THAT AUTOMATICALLY WERE ACCEPTED INTO THE R.C.M.P. HE WAS PUT IN CHARGE, WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P.—FIRST HE STARTED OUT IN CHARGE OF BRAINARD—HORSE LAKE—A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION. THEY CLOSED THAT DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY, A LITTLE VILLAGE, AND HE WAS THE ONLY ONE IN CHARGE, THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. THAT’S WHEN THAT 1932 [CHANGE] CAME ALONG AND HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P. AND WENT FROM THERE.” “IN ’32, IT WAS R.C.M.P. AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. THEN HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. [THERE] WAS NO DETACHMENT IN BARRHEAD. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO COVER.” “[A.P.P. MEMBERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY HAD THREE CATEGORIES THERE, OF THE A.P.P. MEMBERS…[THERE WERE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE, THAT THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P.; THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEY WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE. THEN THERE [WERE THE ONES THAT] COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY. THEN THERE [WERE] ONES THAT COULD GET IN FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY. THEY’D BE ACCEPTED FOR A YEAR. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE AND [THEY] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE.” “A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING. THESE WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” “ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK KNEW DAD REALLY WELL, HE’D EVEN BEEN IN THE A.P.P. HE CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, “BUCK, [DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’, A LOT] I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT…YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE, I THINK, THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?” “[WE CAME DOWN HERE IN] ’44…I NEVER HAD ANY PROBLEM [WITH THE MOVE]. I WAS ALWAYS ADVENTUROUS. I HAD LOTS OF FRIENDS BUT I WAS ALWAYS HAPPY TO GO.” “WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US AND THEN HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE READY, SO WE CAME DOWN AND STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN, HERE. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE, LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS.” “[DAD] HAD TO OVERSEE THE POW CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POW’S IN THIS RESPECT, THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. [THEY] WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY…THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY, THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. HE RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT AND HELPED THEM, [GAVE] THEM ADVICE, “YOU KNOW, YOU GOTTA GO BACK TO GERMANY AND THEN APPLY TO COME BACK.” THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK…‘CAUSE THERE [WAS] A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS AND THEY NEEDED THAT HELP. SOME OF THOSE FARMERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET SOME OF THESE GERMANS, AND SOME OF THE FARMERS’ DAUGHTERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET THAT, TOO. THEN THERE’S SOME LATER MARRIAGES AFTER THAT. IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO CONDEMN ALL THOSE POW’S BECAUSE A LOT OF THEM WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD, MORAL FELLOWS THAT DIDN’T WANT TO BE INVOLVED WITH ANY KILLING.” “HE WAS A PLAIN STAFF SERGEANT, NCO, SECOND IN CHARGE OF THE SUBDIVISION.” “[THEN HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON [TO RETIRE IN 1950], HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS. HE JOINED THE R.C.M. P. VETS BUT WITH HIS RECORD, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE. THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA WHICH, AT THAT TIME, THERE WERE ONLY TWO: LETHBRIDGE AND FORT SASKATCHEWAN. [THE] ONLY PLACE IN FORT SASKATCHEWAN WAS FOR WOMEN, SO [WOMEN] HAD TO GO ALL THE WAY TO FORT SASKATCHEWAN, EVEN IF [THEY] WAS FROM LETHBRIDGE. THAT WASN’T A VERY GOOD DEAL, SO DAD COULD SEE A REAL NEED [FOR WORK]. IT WAS A REAL MESS WHEN HE LOOKED AT THE PRISONS.” “HE REALIZED, BEING AN R.C.M.P., THAT MANY OF THE YOUNG CITY POLICE, TOWN SHERIFFS, SOME OF THESE MAGISTRATES, THEY MESSED THINGS UP. HE STARTED A TRAINING SCHOOL FOR THESE MUNICIPAL POLICE AND THAT JUST WENT TERRIFICALLY. THEY HAD [THE SCHOOLS] IN CALGARY AND IN EDMONTON TWICE A YEAR. THEY HAD A BIG GROUP FROM MEDICINE HAT COME UP AND [TAKE] THE SCHOOLING, LETHBRIDGE CAME UP, AND SOME OF THE PRISON GUARDS TOOK [THE TRAINING], TOO.” “[HE] WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN/SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, HE WAS SO BUSY THAT THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS BECAUSE…THE FIRST THING HE HAD TO DO WAS TO DEVELOP THE PRISONS FOR ALBERTA. TWO WAS NOT SUFFICIENT.” “[DAD’S] PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, HUMOROUS, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, AND VERY FIRMLY. THE STAFF…ALL LOVED HIM. I [HAVE] LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON…“YOU’RE THE BEST BOSS WE EVER HAD.” ALL HE HAD WAS A VISION OF WHAT NEEDED TO BE DONE…HE COULD GO AND EXPLAIN THE NEED FOR THE JAILS, WHAT IT WOULD COST AND WHAT IT NEEDED TO FIX THE PROBLEM. HE NEVER HAD PROBLEM GETTING EXACTLY WHAT HE NEEDED FROM THEM.” ON THE DONATION OF THE REVOLVER AND AMMUNITION, BUCHANAN NOTED, “MY DAD KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER [HIS BELONGINGS] AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM. [DAD KNEW] THAT I WASN’T ONE TO PUT IT IN MY BASEMENT TO HAVE GOODNESS-KNOWS-WHAT-HAPPEN TO IT. HE HAD LEFT ALL OF THAT IN CHARGE OF ME. I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE.” “I AM NOW AT THE YOUNG AGE OF 88; I’M NOT WORRIED ABOUT LIVING ANOTHER 10 YEARS. I DIDN’T WANT THE CHANCE OF ANYBODY STEALING IT, OR GETTING THEIR HANDS ON IT, SO I WANTED TO MAKE SURE YOU GOT IT. AND, I DON’T NEED IT, SO WHY KEEP IT? IF I GET LONESOME, AND WANT TO SEE IT, I’LL COME TO THE MUSEUM AND LOOK AT IT.” “I’LL FEEL HAPPY, TO KNOW IT’S GOT A GOOD HOME. I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL TRANSCRIPTIONS FROM INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190002001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190002003
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20190002004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Materials
COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
45.8
Width
27.7
Description
COTTON CLEANING CLOTH, WHITE WITH RED STRIPES DOWN AND ACROSS. BOTTOM OF CLOTH HAS SECTION CUT OUT OF FRONT LEFT SIDE. FRONT IS HEAVILY STAINED WITH BLACK AND BROWN RESIDUE; RESIDUE HAS WORN THROUGH CLOTH TO BACK. RED EDGING IS FRAYED. CLOTH IS HEAVILY CREASED DOWN AND ACROSS MIDDLE. OVERALL GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JANUARY 10, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JEAN BUCHANAN REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REVOLVER AND FIREARM ACCESSORIES. THE FIREARM WAS USED BY BUCHANAN’S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, DURING HIS CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON THE USE OF THE CLEANING CLOTH, NOTING, “[DAD HAD A BAG] BECAUSE, IN HIS YOUNGER DAYS, HE OFTEN HAD TO GO OUT ON HORSEBACK. HE’D BE GONE, HUNTING DOWN A MURDERER, AND HE MIGHT HAVE HAD A GUIDE WITH HIM. HE TOOK SOME OF HIS CLEANING EQUIPMENT FOR THE REVOLVER, AND HIS RIFLE, TOO…HE COULD PACK HIS LUNCH…KNIVES, SURVIVAL, AND HIS DIRTY OLD CLEANING CLOTH THAT HE USED, AND AN OLD BOTTLE OF GUN OIL, SO HE COULD CLEAN THE GUN IN CASE HE HAPPENED TO DROP IT IN SOME MUD. YOU NEVER KNOW [WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN] WHEN YOU’RE OUT…YOU HAVE TO KEEP YOUR GUN VERY CLEAN. HE KEPT EVERYTHING VERY CLEAN…YOU HAVE TO KEEP THE GUN CLEAN IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE IT, BECAUSE YOU COULD DAMAGE IT IF YOU HAVE ANY DIRT IN THE BARREL.” “[THE GUNS] WERE A TOOL OF HIS JOB, BUT HE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE THAT WANTED TO EVER USE IT, BUT IF HE HAD IT, HE HAD TO, OR TO JUST MAINTAIN THE PEACE.” ON HER FATHER’S REVOLVER, BUCHANAN RECALLED, “[MY DAD] USED [THE SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVER]…STARTING IN 1932, WITH THE RCMP, MAY BE WHEN HE GOT THAT GUN. HE HAD IT REGISTERED IN 1940, AND GETTING ANOTHER 5 YEARS REGISTRATION IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1935. [THE GUN] WAS HIS SIDEARM…HIS SERVICE WEAPON…HE HAD THAT ALL THE TIME…IT WOULD GO RIGHT ON HIS BELT THERE.” “[DAD KEPT THE GUN] IN [MY PARENTS’] BEDROOM. RIGHT ON THE BEDROOM CLOSET DOOR, RIGHT OPEN. I NEVER TOUCHED IT, BECAUSE HE HAD GIVEN ME MY TRAINING AND LET ME USE IT WHEN I WAS YOUNG. I HAD RESPECT FOR IT, AND I HAD NO SPECIAL CURIOSITY, WHICH IS A GOOD THING. [DAD KNEW I WAS] AN ADVENTUROUS PERSON, BUT I NEVER EVER TOUCHED IT, OUT OF COMPLETE RESPECT FOR DAD AND WHAT HE HAD THERE.” “ALL I CAN REMEMBER [IS HE HAD TWO HANDGUNS OR SIDEARMS]…HE DIDN’T GO OUT PRACTICING VERY MUCH; HE DIDN’T HAVE TO. HE COULD PASS HIS MARKSMANSHIP, AND THEN, EVERY TIME THERE WERE THINGS AT REGINA DEPOT TRAINING COURSES (UPGRADING, REFRESHER COURSES) THEY DID THEIR MARKSMANSHIP THERE, TOO. THEY WERE ALWAYS TESTED ON THEIR MARKSMANSHIP, AT REGINA DEPOT.” “I THINK [THE REVOLVER HAD] QUITE A BIT [OF MEANING TO MY DAD], BECAUSE HE HAD IT IN HIS HOUSE. IT WAS REALLY STRANGE BECAUSE I ASKED HIM WHERE IT WAS, WHEN HE SHOWED ME THE PAPERS, AND HE HAD IT IN A SHOE BOX IN HIS BEDROOM CLOSET. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE GREAT [HIDING] PLACES FOR IT IN THOSE DAYS, BUT THAT’S WHERE HE KEPT IT. HE MADE SURE IT WAS THERE, AND HE KNEW WHERE IT WAS.” “[I HAVE NO] KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HIM HAVING TO FIRE THIS WEAPON…AT ANYONE. IF HE WOULD HAVE, HE WOULD HAVE FIRED TO MISS SOMEONE, JUST AS A WARNING SHOT. HE DEFINITELY WENT FOR WARNING SHOTS, BUT HE NEVER SHOT ANYBODY WITH IT." “[HE WOULD HAVE STOPPED CARRYING THE GUN] AT THE VERY END OF 1950, WHEN HE RETIRED FROM THE R.C.M.P.” “[I’VE HAD THE REVOLVER] SINCE 1998—THE PASSING OF MY FATHER, BECAUSE I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTRIX. IT WAS AUTOMATICALLY MY RESPONSIBILITY TO TAKE ALL OF HIS FIREARMS, IN MY POSSESSION.” “I WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR [THE CARE OF] IT, AND IT WAS A REAL KEEPSAKE. [THE GUN WAS] WAS VERY PERSONAL, BECAUSE I’M SURE [MY DAD] OWNED THAT EVEN BY BACK IN 1935, [WHEN] HE WAS IN WESTLOCK, IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT THERE FOR 10 YEARS. IT WAS OF SENTIMENTAL VALUE BECAUSE HE TOOK ME OUT (I’M PRETTY SURE I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, WHEN HE HAD ME IN THE BACKYARD)—WE HAD FARMLAND AND FOREST—AND HE HAD A TARGET PRACTICE OUT THERE. HE HAD ME USE THAT FIREARM. HE SHOWED ME HOW TO USE IT, HOW TO AIM, AND HOW TO HANDLE IT SAFELY. I ALWAYS RESPECTED THAT, AND THAT WAS GOOD. THAT’S THE ORIGINAL HOLSTER FOR THAT GUN, WHICH YOU CAN SEE IS LOOPED, TO PUT ON HIS BELT. HE ALSO CARRIED A .32 COLT SEMI-AUTOMATIC.” “I’VE ALWAYS APPRECIATED REVOLVERS, AND RIFLES. IT’S NEVER BEEN ANYTHING THAT I THOUGHT ANY DANGER OF. YOU LEARN THE SAFETY, AND YOU TAKE YOUR COURSE. I HAVE MY COURSE DONE, AND I PASSED IT WITH FLYING COLORS. I HAD MY PERMIT TO HAVE IT. I HAVE TAKEN IT OUT, ON MY OWN ACREAGE, AND FIRED IT A BIT, BUT IT ISN’T SOMETHING I WANT TO DO. IT’S A SENTIMENTAL THING THAT I CAN NOW FEEL I’D LIKE TO HAVE IT IN YOUR MUSEUM. I KNOW IT’S NOW IN A SAFE PLACE, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT EVER FALLING INTO THE WRONG HANDS. AND, IF I WANT TO COME AND VISIT IT, I CAN COME AND SEE IT.” ON JUNE 8, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BUCHANAN REGARDING HER FATHER’S CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S HISTORY, “[MY DAD WAS EDWARD BUCHANAN, WHO RETIRED AT THE RANK OF] SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT…HE RETIRED IN 1950 FROM THE [R.C.M.P].” “HE JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL. IN ’21, HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON…BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL AND THEN AFTER, HE GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE. HE WAS GOING TO GO TO GRANDE PRAIRIE BUT THEN IN ’22, THEY GOT MARRIED. A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED…THAT’S WHEN THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD.” “EVEN IN THE A.P.P., TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON…BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN AND THEN MAYBE, AT THE VERY FIRST WINTER AS A ROOKIE, HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. IT WASN’T LONG AND HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE OF THE REAL POLICING.” “WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P. [IN 1932] HE WAS THE TOP CLASS OF [THE] A.P.P. THAT AUTOMATICALLY WERE ACCEPTED INTO THE R.C.M.P. HE WAS PUT IN CHARGE, WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P.—FIRST HE STARTED OUT IN CHARGE OF BRAINARD—HORSE LAKE—A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION. THEY CLOSED THAT DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY, A LITTLE VILLAGE, AND HE WAS THE ONLY ONE IN CHARGE, THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. THAT’S WHEN THAT 1932 [CHANGE] CAME ALONG AND HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P. AND WENT FROM THERE.” “IN ’32, IT WAS R.C.M.P. AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. THEN HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. [THERE] WAS NO DETACHMENT IN BARRHEAD. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO COVER.” “[A.P.P. MEMBERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY HAD THREE CATEGORIES THERE, OF THE A.P.P. MEMBERS…[THERE WERE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE, THAT THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P.; THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEY WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE. THEN THERE [WERE THE ONES THAT] COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY. THEN THERE [WERE] ONES THAT COULD GET IN FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY. THEY’D BE ACCEPTED FOR A YEAR. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE AND [THEY] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE.” “A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING. THESE WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” “ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK KNEW DAD REALLY WELL, HE’D EVEN BEEN IN THE A.P.P. HE CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, “BUCK, [DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’, A LOT] I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT…YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE, I THINK, THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?” “[WE CAME DOWN HERE IN] ’44…I NEVER HAD ANY PROBLEM [WITH THE MOVE]. I WAS ALWAYS ADVENTUROUS. I HAD LOTS OF FRIENDS BUT I WAS ALWAYS HAPPY TO GO.” “WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US AND THEN HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE READY, SO WE CAME DOWN AND STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN, HERE. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE, LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS.” “[DAD] HAD TO OVERSEE THE POW CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POW’S IN THIS RESPECT, THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. [THEY] WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY…THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY, THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. HE RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT AND HELPED THEM, [GAVE] THEM ADVICE, “YOU KNOW, YOU GOTTA GO BACK TO GERMANY AND THEN APPLY TO COME BACK.” THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK…‘CAUSE THERE [WAS] A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS AND THEY NEEDED THAT HELP. SOME OF THOSE FARMERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET SOME OF THESE GERMANS, AND SOME OF THE FARMERS’ DAUGHTERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET THAT, TOO. THEN THERE’S SOME LATER MARRIAGES AFTER THAT. IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO CONDEMN ALL THOSE POW’S BECAUSE A LOT OF THEM WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD, MORAL FELLOWS THAT DIDN’T WANT TO BE INVOLVED WITH ANY KILLING.” “HE WAS A PLAIN STAFF SERGEANT, NCO, SECOND IN CHARGE OF THE SUBDIVISION.” “[THEN HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON [TO RETIRE IN 1950], HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS. HE JOINED THE R.C.M. P. VETS BUT WITH HIS RECORD, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE. THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA WHICH, AT THAT TIME, THERE WERE ONLY TWO: LETHBRIDGE AND FORT SASKATCHEWAN. [THE] ONLY PLACE IN FORT SASKATCHEWAN WAS FOR WOMEN, SO [WOMEN] HAD TO GO ALL THE WAY TO FORT SASKATCHEWAN, EVEN IF [THEY] WAS FROM LETHBRIDGE. THAT WASN’T A VERY GOOD DEAL, SO DAD COULD SEE A REAL NEED [FOR WORK]. IT WAS A REAL MESS WHEN HE LOOKED AT THE PRISONS.” “HE REALIZED, BEING AN R.C.M.P., THAT MANY OF THE YOUNG CITY POLICE, TOWN SHERIFFS, SOME OF THESE MAGISTRATES, THEY MESSED THINGS UP. HE STARTED A TRAINING SCHOOL FOR THESE MUNICIPAL POLICE AND THAT JUST WENT TERRIFICALLY. THEY HAD [THE SCHOOLS] IN CALGARY AND IN EDMONTON TWICE A YEAR. THEY HAD A BIG GROUP FROM MEDICINE HAT COME UP AND [TAKE] THE SCHOOLING, LETHBRIDGE CAME UP, AND SOME OF THE PRISON GUARDS TOOK [THE TRAINING], TOO.” “[HE] WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN/SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, HE WAS SO BUSY THAT THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS BECAUSE…THE FIRST THING HE HAD TO DO WAS TO DEVELOP THE PRISONS FOR ALBERTA. TWO WAS NOT SUFFICIENT.” “[DAD’S] PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, HUMOROUS, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, AND VERY FIRMLY. THE STAFF…ALL LOVED HIM. I [HAVE] LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON…“YOU’RE THE BEST BOSS WE EVER HAD.” ALL HE HAD WAS A VISION OF WHAT NEEDED TO BE DONE…HE COULD GO AND EXPLAIN THE NEED FOR THE JAILS, WHAT IT WOULD COST AND WHAT IT NEEDED TO FIX THE PROBLEM. HE NEVER HAD PROBLEM GETTING EXACTLY WHAT HE NEEDED FROM THEM.” ON THE DONATION OF THE REVOLVER AND AMMUNITION, BUCHANAN NOTED, “MY DAD KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER [HIS BELONGINGS] AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM. [DAD KNEW] THAT I WASN’T ONE TO PUT IT IN MY BASEMENT TO HAVE GOODNESS-KNOWS-WHAT-HAPPEN TO IT. HE HAD LEFT ALL OF THAT IN CHARGE OF ME. I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE.” “I AM NOW AT THE YOUNG AGE OF 88; I’M NOT WORRIED ABOUT LIVING ANOTHER 10 YEARS. I DIDN’T WANT THE CHANCE OF ANYBODY STEALING IT, OR GETTING THEIR HANDS ON IT, SO I WANTED TO MAKE SURE YOU GOT IT. AND, I DON’T NEED IT, SO WHY KEEP IT? IF I GET LONESOME, AND WANT TO SEE IT, I’LL COME TO THE MUSEUM AND LOOK AT IT.” “I’LL FEEL HAPPY, TO KNOW IT’S GOT A GOOD HOME. I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL TRANSCRIPTIONS FROM INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190002001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190002004
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, STEEL, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20190002005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1935
Date Range To
1950
Materials
COTTON, STEEL, BRASS
No. Pieces
2
Length
126.5
Description
A. CLEANING ROD ATTACHED TO STRING AND WEIGHT, 126.5CM LONG. STAINED WHITE CORD WITH BRASS CYLINDRICAL WEIGHT AT ONE END; CORD HAS WIRE BRUSH TIED 13CM DOWN; BRUSH HAS METAL BODY WITH WIRE BRISTLES WRAPPED AROUND IN SPIRAL; BRUSH IS ATTACHED TO CORD WITH METAL LOOPS AT ENDS OF BODY. CORD IS STAINED AND SEVERELY CURLED FROM LOOPING; CORD IS FRAYING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION. B. CLEANING ROD, 7.8CM LONG. BLACK WIRE BRISTLES WRAPPED IN SPIRAL AROUND BRASS BODY; BODY HAS THREADED SCREW FITTING AT ONE END AND HAS WIRES TWISTED TOGETHER ON OTHER END. WIRES OF THE BRUSH ARE FRAYING AND HAVE DEBRIS CAUGHTL OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ARMAMENT-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
ON JANUARY 10, 2019, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED JEAN BUCHANAN REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REVOLVER AND FIREARM ACCESSORIES. THE FIREARM WAS USED BY BUCHANAN’S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, DURING HIS CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON THE USE OF THE CLEANING ROD, NOTING, “[DAD HAD A BAG] BECAUSE, IN HIS YOUNGER DAYS, HE OFTEN HAD TO GO OUT ON HORSEBACK. HE’D BE GONE, HUNTING DOWN A MURDERER, AND HE MIGHT HAVE HAD A GUIDE WITH HIM. HE TOOK SOME OF HIS CLEANING EQUIPMENT FOR THE REVOLVER, AND HIS RIFLE, TOO…HE COULD PACK HIS LUNCH…KNIVES, SURVIVAL, AND HIS DIRTY OLD CLEANING CLOTH THAT HE USED, AND AN OLD BOTTLE OF GUN OIL, SO HE COULD CLEAN THE GUN IN CASE HE HAPPENED TO DROP IT IN SOME MUD. YOU NEVER KNOW [WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN] WHEN YOU’RE OUT…YOU HAVE TO KEEP YOUR GUN VERY CLEAN. HE KEPT EVERYTHING VERY CLEAN…YOU HAVE TO KEEP THE GUN CLEAN IF YOU’RE GOING TO USE IT, BECAUSE YOU COULD DAMAGE IT IF YOU HAVE ANY DIRT IN THE BARREL.” “THIS [CLEANING ROD] WAS AN INTERESTING OLD ONE FOR A RIFLE—A PIECE OF STRING THAT HAD A HEAVY WEIGHT AT THE END, SO YOU COULD DROP THE WEIGHT DOWN THE BARREL, AND THEN PULL THIS CLEANING BRASS WIRE THING OUT TO CLEAN THE BARREL. HE MADE IT HIMSELF, I THINK.” “HE HAD A BEAUTIFUL BRASS ONE [FOR HIS REVOLVERS] THAT YOU JUST HAVE THE LITTLE LENGTHS—ABOUT 4 LENGTHS—AND THEN YOU TAKE THE 2, AND UNSCREW IT – AND YOU CAN USE THAT FOR DIFFERENT LENGTHS OF FIREARMS.” “[THE GUNS] WERE A TOOL OF HIS JOB, BUT HE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE THAT WANTED TO EVER USE IT, BUT IF HE HAD IT, HE HAD TO, OR TO JUST MAINTAIN THE PEACE.” ON HER FATHER’S REVOLVER, BUCHANAN RECALLED, “[MY DAD] USED [THE SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVER]…STARTING IN 1932, WITH THE RCMP, MAY BE WHEN HE GOT THAT GUN. HE HAD IT REGISTERED IN 1940, AND GETTING ANOTHER 5 YEARS REGISTRATION IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1935. [THE GUN] WAS HIS SIDEARM…HIS SERVICE WEAPON…HE HAD THAT ALL THE TIME…IT WOULD GO RIGHT ON HIS BELT THERE.” “[DAD KEPT THE GUN] IN [MY PARENTS’] BEDROOM. RIGHT ON THE BEDROOM CLOSET DOOR, RIGHT OPEN. I NEVER TOUCHED IT, BECAUSE HE HAD GIVEN ME MY TRAINING AND LET ME USE IT WHEN I WAS YOUNG. I HAD RESPECT FOR IT, AND I HAD NO SPECIAL CURIOSITY, WHICH IS A GOOD THING. [DAD KNEW I WAS] AN ADVENTUROUS PERSON, BUT I NEVER EVER TOUCHED IT, OUT OF COMPLETE RESPECT FOR DAD AND WHAT HE HAD THERE.” “ALL I CAN REMEMBER [IS HE HAD TWO HANDGUNS OR SIDEARMS]…HE DIDN’T GO OUT PRACTICING VERY MUCH; HE DIDN’T HAVE TO. HE COULD PASS HIS MARKSMANSHIP, AND THEN, EVERY TIME THERE WERE THINGS AT REGINA DEPOT TRAINING COURSES (UPGRADING, REFRESHER COURSES) THEY DID THEIR MARKSMANSHIP THERE, TOO. THEY WERE ALWAYS TESTED ON THEIR MARKSMANSHIP, AT REGINA DEPOT.” “I THINK [THE REVOLVER HAD] QUITE A BIT [OF MEANING TO MY DAD], BECAUSE HE HAD IT IN HIS HOUSE. IT WAS REALLY STRANGE BECAUSE I ASKED HIM WHERE IT WAS, WHEN HE SHOWED ME THE PAPERS, AND HE HAD IT IN A SHOE BOX IN HIS BEDROOM CLOSET. YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO HAVE GREAT [HIDING] PLACES FOR IT IN THOSE DAYS, BUT THAT’S WHERE HE KEPT IT. HE MADE SURE IT WAS THERE, AND HE KNEW WHERE IT WAS.” “[I HAVE NO] KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HIM HAVING TO FIRE THIS WEAPON…AT ANYONE. IF HE WOULD HAVE, HE WOULD HAVE FIRED TO MISS SOMEONE, JUST AS A WARNING SHOT. HE DEFINITELY WENT FOR WARNING SHOTS, BUT HE NEVER SHOT ANYBODY WITH IT.” “[HE WOULD HAVE STOPPED CARRYING THE GUN] AT THE VERY END OF 1950, WHEN HE RETIRED FROM THE R.C.M.P.” “[I’VE HAD THE REVOLVER] SINCE 1998—THE PASSING OF MY FATHER, BECAUSE I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTRIX. IT WAS AUTOMATICALLY MY RESPONSIBILITY TO TAKE ALL OF HIS FIREARMS, IN MY POSSESSION.” “I WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR [THE CARE OF] IT, AND IT WAS A REAL KEEPSAKE. [THE GUN WAS] WAS VERY PERSONAL, BECAUSE I’M SURE [MY DAD] OWNED THAT EVEN BY BACK IN 1935, [WHEN] HE WAS IN WESTLOCK, IN CHARGE OF THE DETACHMENT THERE FOR 10 YEARS. IT WAS OF SENTIMENTAL VALUE BECAUSE HE TOOK ME OUT (I’M PRETTY SURE I WAS 8 YEARS OLD, WHEN HE HAD ME IN THE BACKYARD)—WE HAD FARMLAND AND FOREST—AND HE HAD A TARGET PRACTICE OUT THERE. HE HAD ME USE THAT FIREARM. HE SHOWED ME HOW TO USE IT, HOW TO AIM, AND HOW TO HANDLE IT SAFELY. I ALWAYS RESPECTED THAT, AND THAT WAS GOOD. THAT’S THE ORIGINAL HOLSTER FOR THAT GUN, WHICH YOU CAN SEE IS LOOPED, TO PUT ON HIS BELT. HE ALSO CARRIED A .32 COLT SEMI-AUTOMATIC.” “I’VE ALWAYS APPRECIATED REVOLVERS, AND RIFLES. IT’S NEVER BEEN ANYTHING THAT I THOUGHT ANY DANGER OF. YOU LEARN THE SAFETY, AND YOU TAKE YOUR COURSE. I HAVE MY COURSE DONE, AND I PASSED IT WITH FLYING COLORS. I HAD MY PERMIT TO HAVE IT. I HAVE TAKEN IT OUT, ON MY OWN ACREAGE, AND FIRED IT A BIT, BUT IT ISN’T SOMETHING I WANT TO DO. IT’S A SENTIMENTAL THING THAT I CAN NOW FEEL I’D LIKE TO HAVE IT IN YOUR MUSEUM. I KNOW IT’S NOW IN A SAFE PLACE, SO I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT EVER FALLING INTO THE WRONG HANDS. AND, IF I WANT TO COME AND VISIT IT, I CAN COME AND SEE IT.” ON JUNE 8, 2018, MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BUCHANAN REGARDING HER FATHER’S CAREER WITH THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE AND ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE. BUCHANAN ELABORATED ON HER FATHER’S HISTORY, “[MY DAD WAS EDWARD BUCHANAN, WHO RETIRED AT THE RANK OF] SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT…HE RETIRED IN 1950 FROM THE [R.C.M.P].” “HE JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL. IN ’21, HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON…BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL AND THEN AFTER, HE GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE. HE WAS GOING TO GO TO GRANDE PRAIRIE BUT THEN IN ’22, THEY GOT MARRIED. A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED…THAT’S WHEN THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD.” “EVEN IN THE A.P.P., TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON…BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN AND THEN MAYBE, AT THE VERY FIRST WINTER AS A ROOKIE, HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. IT WASN’T LONG AND HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE OF THE REAL POLICING.” “WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P. [IN 1932] HE WAS THE TOP CLASS OF [THE] A.P.P. THAT AUTOMATICALLY WERE ACCEPTED INTO THE R.C.M.P. HE WAS PUT IN CHARGE, WHEN HE WAS IN THE A.P.P.—FIRST HE STARTED OUT IN CHARGE OF BRAINARD—HORSE LAKE—A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION. THEY CLOSED THAT DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY, A LITTLE VILLAGE, AND HE WAS THE ONLY ONE IN CHARGE, THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. THAT’S WHEN THAT 1932 [CHANGE] CAME ALONG AND HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P. AND WENT FROM THERE.” “IN ’32, IT WAS R.C.M.P. AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. THEN HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. [THERE] WAS NO DETACHMENT IN BARRHEAD. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO COVER.” “[A.P.P. MEMBERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY HAD THREE CATEGORIES THERE, OF THE A.P.P. MEMBERS…[THERE WERE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE, THAT THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P.; THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEY WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE. THEN THERE [WERE THE ONES THAT] COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY. THEN THERE [WERE] ONES THAT COULD GET IN FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY. THEY’D BE ACCEPTED FOR A YEAR. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE AND [THEY] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE.” “A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING. THESE WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” “ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK KNEW DAD REALLY WELL, HE’D EVEN BEEN IN THE A.P.P. HE CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, “BUCK, [DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’, A LOT] I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT…YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE, I THINK, THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?” “[WE CAME DOWN HERE IN] ’44…I NEVER HAD ANY PROBLEM [WITH THE MOVE]. I WAS ALWAYS ADVENTUROUS. I HAD LOTS OF FRIENDS BUT I WAS ALWAYS HAPPY TO GO.” “WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US AND THEN HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE READY, SO WE CAME DOWN AND STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN, HERE. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE, LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS.” “[DAD] HAD TO OVERSEE THE POW CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POW’S IN THIS RESPECT, THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. [THEY] WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY…THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY, THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. HE RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT AND HELPED THEM, [GAVE] THEM ADVICE, “YOU KNOW, YOU GOTTA GO BACK TO GERMANY AND THEN APPLY TO COME BACK.” THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK…‘CAUSE THERE [WAS] A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS AND THEY NEEDED THAT HELP. SOME OF THOSE FARMERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET SOME OF THESE GERMANS, AND SOME OF THE FARMERS’ DAUGHTERS WERE VERY PLEASED TO GET THAT, TOO. THEN THERE’S SOME LATER MARRIAGES AFTER THAT. IT WOULD BE A SHAME TO CONDEMN ALL THOSE POW’S BECAUSE A LOT OF THEM WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD, MORAL FELLOWS THAT DIDN’T WANT TO BE INVOLVED WITH ANY KILLING.” “HE WAS A PLAIN STAFF SERGEANT, NCO, SECOND IN CHARGE OF THE SUBDIVISION.” “[THEN HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON [TO RETIRE IN 1950], HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS. HE JOINED THE R.C.M. P. VETS BUT WITH HIS RECORD, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE. THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA WHICH, AT THAT TIME, THERE WERE ONLY TWO: LETHBRIDGE AND FORT SASKATCHEWAN. [THE] ONLY PLACE IN FORT SASKATCHEWAN WAS FOR WOMEN, SO [WOMEN] HAD TO GO ALL THE WAY TO FORT SASKATCHEWAN, EVEN IF [THEY] WAS FROM LETHBRIDGE. THAT WASN’T A VERY GOOD DEAL, SO DAD COULD SEE A REAL NEED [FOR WORK]. IT WAS A REAL MESS WHEN HE LOOKED AT THE PRISONS.” “HE REALIZED, BEING AN R.C.M.P., THAT MANY OF THE YOUNG CITY POLICE, TOWN SHERIFFS, SOME OF THESE MAGISTRATES, THEY MESSED THINGS UP. HE STARTED A TRAINING SCHOOL FOR THESE MUNICIPAL POLICE AND THAT JUST WENT TERRIFICALLY. THEY HAD [THE SCHOOLS] IN CALGARY AND IN EDMONTON TWICE A YEAR. THEY HAD A BIG GROUP FROM MEDICINE HAT COME UP AND [TAKE] THE SCHOOLING, LETHBRIDGE CAME UP, AND SOME OF THE PRISON GUARDS TOOK [THE TRAINING], TOO.” “[HE] WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN/SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, HE WAS SO BUSY THAT THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS BECAUSE…THE FIRST THING HE HAD TO DO WAS TO DEVELOP THE PRISONS FOR ALBERTA. TWO WAS NOT SUFFICIENT.” “[DAD’S] PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, HUMOROUS, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, AND VERY FIRMLY. THE STAFF…ALL LOVED HIM. I [HAVE] LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON…“YOU’RE THE BEST BOSS WE EVER HAD.” ALL HE HAD WAS A VISION OF WHAT NEEDED TO BE DONE…HE COULD GO AND EXPLAIN THE NEED FOR THE JAILS, WHAT IT WOULD COST AND WHAT IT NEEDED TO FIX THE PROBLEM. HE NEVER HAD PROBLEM GETTING EXACTLY WHAT HE NEEDED FROM THEM.” ON THE DONATION OF THE REVOLVER AND AMMUNITION, BUCHANAN NOTED, “MY DAD KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER [HIS BELONGINGS] AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM. [DAD KNEW] THAT I WASN’T ONE TO PUT IT IN MY BASEMENT TO HAVE GOODNESS-KNOWS-WHAT-HAPPEN TO IT. HE HAD LEFT ALL OF THAT IN CHARGE OF ME. I WAS THE SOLE EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE.” “I AM NOW AT THE YOUNG AGE OF 88; I’M NOT WORRIED ABOUT LIVING ANOTHER 10 YEARS. I DIDN’T WANT THE CHANCE OF ANYBODY STEALING IT, OR GETTING THEIR HANDS ON IT, SO I WANTED TO MAKE SURE YOU GOT IT. AND, I DON’T NEED IT, SO WHY KEEP IT? IF I GET LONESOME, AND WANT TO SEE IT, I’LL COME TO THE MUSEUM AND LOOK AT IT.” “I’LL FEEL HAPPY, TO KNOW IT’S GOT A GOOD HOME. I DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL TRANSCRIPTIONS FROM INTERVIEWS AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20190002001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20190002005
Acquisition Date
2019-01
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

816 records – page 1 of 41.