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Moriyama and Hattori Families.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96841
Date Range
1916-1944
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191115
Physical Description
.5 cm. textual documents. 1 scrapbook.
Scope and Content
Marriage certificate for Toshiyuki Moriyama and Sakiko Hattori, 1944. Birth certificate for Toshiyulo Moriyama, 1916. Graduation certificate from the Marietta School of Costume Design, Vancouver, B.C., for Sakiko Hattori, 1942. Iwaasa, David B. "The Sugar Beet Fields and Japanese Canadian Internme…
Date Range
1916-1944
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
.5 cm. textual documents. 1 scrapbook.
Scope and Content
Marriage certificate for Toshiyuki Moriyama and Sakiko Hattori, 1944. Birth certificate for Toshiyulo Moriyama, 1916. Graduation certificate from the Marietta School of Costume Design, Vancouver, B.C., for Sakiko Hattori, 1942. Iwaasa, David B. "The Sugar Beet Fields and Japanese Canadian Internment." Nikkei Images, Nikkei National Museum and Cultural Centre, n.d. Scrap book containing sewing patterns.
Accession No.
20191115
Collection
Archive
Less detail

E. Turner & Sons Harvesting Crew, Barons.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95142
Date Range
1900-1915
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191023
Physical Description
8 matted black and white photographs.
Scope and Content
7 matted photographs depicting E. Turner & Sons harvesting crew. 1 matted photograph of the Hotel Lethbridge.
Date Range
1900-1915
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
8 matted black and white photographs.
History / Biographical
A history of the Turner family can be found in "Wheat Heart of the West: a history of Barons and District". A copy is located in the Galt Archives Reference Library under the call number FC 3695 S6 B2w.
Custodial History
The images belonged to the donor's father, Mr. Turner of Barons.
Scope and Content
7 matted photographs depicting E. Turner & Sons harvesting crew. 1 matted photograph of the Hotel Lethbridge.
Accession No.
20191023
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1900-1998
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20181051
Physical Description
Two 20 by 25.5 black and white photographs. One 8 by 13 cm. black and white photograph. Photocopy of a 28 by 22 cm. black and white photograph. Textual documents.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police member Ed E. Buchanan and friend in snowshoes at St. Paul, Alberta. 1921-1922. Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police constable Ed. E. Buchanan, Horse Lake Detachment, 1922-1924. Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police constable Ed. E. Buchanan along the Wa…
Date Range
1900-1998
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
Two 20 by 25.5 black and white photographs. One 8 by 13 cm. black and white photograph. Photocopy of a 28 by 22 cm. black and white photograph. Textual documents.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police member Ed E. Buchanan and friend in snowshoes at St. Paul, Alberta. 1921-1922. Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police constable Ed. E. Buchanan, Horse Lake Detachment, 1922-1924. Photograph of Alberta Provincial Police constable Ed. E. Buchanan along the Wapiti River, circa 1926. Photocopy of a digital black and white photograph of Edward E. Buchanan, Senior Staff Sergeant, 2nd in command, Lethbridge Sub-Division of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), 1944-1950. Program for funeral service, eulogy and memorial pamphlet for Edward Ettershank Buchanan, 1900-1998.
Accession No.
20181051
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Postcards of Lethbridge, Waterton Lakes National Park, etc.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96429
Date Range
1910-1935
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191082
Physical Description
7 postcards of black and white photographic prints. 1 colour postcard. 1 black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
9 postcards: - Bighorn sheep, Waterton Park. - Prince of Wales Hotel, Waterton Park. - Cameron Falls, Waterton Park. - Frank, Alberta. Taken after the Frank Slide. - Union Depot (railway station), Lethbridge, Alberta. - M.V. International, Waterton Park. - CP Rail High Level Bridge, Lethbridge, Al…
Date Range
1910-1935
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
7 postcards of black and white photographic prints. 1 colour postcard. 1 black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
9 postcards: - Bighorn sheep, Waterton Park. - Prince of Wales Hotel, Waterton Park. - Cameron Falls, Waterton Park. - Frank, Alberta. Taken after the Frank Slide. - Union Depot (railway station), Lethbridge, Alberta. - M.V. International, Waterton Park. - CP Rail High Level Bridge, Lethbridge, Alberta. - Royal Bank of Canada, Lethbridge, Alberta. - Officers of Trinity Lodge, A.F. & A.M., No. 98, B.C.R. This Masonic Lodge was located in Vancouver, B.C. Its warrant was surrendered on April 16, 2015, when it consolidated with Grandview Lodge No. 96 on April 16, 2015.
Accession No.
20191082
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
STEEL, IRON
Catalogue Number
P20170034001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1915
Date Range To
1920
Materials
STEEL, IRON
No. Pieces
1
Length
5
Width
4
Description
SILVER HOMEMADE CROSS SOLDERED TOGETHER AT CENTER; CROSS HAS WIDENED, SQUARE NAIL ENDS WITH HEAD AND ARM POINTS ENGRAVED WITH “W” SHAPE. FRONT OF CROSS HAS ADDITIONAL NAIL BENT OUT IN SHAPE OF BODY ON CROSS; SOLDERED UNDER NAIL HEAD AT CROSS CENTER AND AT END OF NAIL AT BASE OF CROSS. BACK OF CROSS HAS LOOP BENT AND SOLDERED AT ENDS TO TOP AND CENTER OF CROSS. CROSS IS RUSTED AND TARNISHED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
CEREMONIAL ARTIFACT
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON NOVEMBER 20, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RITA BERLANDO REGARDING HER DONATION OF A GIFTED RING AND CRUCIFIX. BERLANDO WAS GIFTED THE OBJECTS FROM A PREVIOUS EMPLOYER, GLADSTONE VIRUTE, OF LETHBRIDGE. THE CRUCIFIX WAS HANDMADE, FASHIONED FROM MASS-PRODUCED HORSESHOE NAILS. ON THE CRUCIFIX, BERLANDO RECALLED, “I HAVE NO IDEA…HOW [IT] BECAME IN HIS POSSESSION…WHEN HE GAVE [IT] TO ME, I WAS INTRIGUED TO KNOW MORE ABOUT IT BUT HE DIDN’T HAVE TOO MUCH HISTORY ON THEM. NOT TO ME, ANYWAY.” ON GLADSTONE VIRTUE’S MILITARY SERVICE, BERLANDO NOTED, ““I DON’T THINK HE WANTED TO TALK ABOUT IT. I THINK HE HAD A PAST THAT HE WOULD RATHER NOT DISCUSS. IT WAS ALWAYS STRICTLY BUSINESS. IT WAS NEVER SITTING THERE AND DISCUSSING WHAT HIS LIFE WAS OR ANYTHING OF THAT NATURE.” “I DIDN’T KNOW TOO MUCH ABOUT HIM BUT I KNOW THAT HE WAS A MAN THAT PEOPLE RESPECTED, AND FOR HIM TO RESPECT ME, I THINK THAT WAS AN HONOUR.” “I WOULD LOVE TO KNOW HOW THESE TWO LITTLE ITEMS BECAME IN HIS POSSESSION AND WHERE WAS HE WHEN THEY WERE GIVEN TO HIM AND WAS HE PRESENT AT SOME TIME…I JUST FIND THAT HE MUST HAVE HAD THEM IN HIS POSSESSION FOR SOME TIME.” BERLANDO ELABORATED ON HOW THE CRUCIFIX CAME INTO HER POSSESSION, “[THIS ITEM] MEANS AN AWFUL LOT TO ME BECAUSE IT WAS GIVEN AT THE TIME THAT I WAS EMPLOYED WITH THE LAW FIRM OF VIRTUE AND COMPANY. IT WAS MR. GLADSTONE VIRTUE, SEMI-RETIRED WHEN I WAS EMPLOYED THERE, THAT HAD ASKED THAT I GO INTO HIS ROOM AND TAKE LETTERS [AND] NOTES FOR LETTERS THAT HE WISHED TO HAVE TYPED. I WAS HIRED AS A RECEPTIONIST, NOT FEELING THAT I WOULD HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY AS A SECRETARY, SO I INFORMED HIM THAT I COULD NOT DO THIS DUTY. HE ASKED THAT I GET HIS SECRETARY TO TAKE HIS NOTES. AS THE MONTHS WENT BY, HE BECAME VERY – AND I USE THE WORD ‘ATTACHED’ – BECAUSE HE WOULD ALSO ASK ME TO DO SERVICES FOR HIM, WHICH I WOULD HAVE TO GO TO THE ROYAL BANK TO DO HIS BANKING [AND] HIS INVESTMENTS. WHEN HE WAS NO LONGER TO BE WITH THE FIRM, HE HANDED ME A LITTLE GIFT. THAT GIFT CONSIST[ED] OF A RING AND A CROSS THAT WAS MADE FROM A BELL OF A CHURCH THAT WAS BOMBED IN THE FIRST WAR. THAT MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME SO I HAVE TREASURED IT CONTINUALLY AND [THE GIFTING] HAS TO DATE BACK TO [1965].” “[MR GLADSTONE VIRTURE] MUST HAVE KEPT IT AS A REMEMBRANCE FROM SOMEWHERE IN THE PAST THAT HE HAD THAT HE DID NOT [WANT TO] LEAVE IT TO HIS FAMILY, BUT [WITH] ME. THEREFORE, I DEFINITELY FELT THAT [IT] WAS A GIFT THAT I SHOULD TREASURE AND I HAVE TREASURED, AND I HAVE KEPT IT UNDER LOCK AND KEY. EVEN IN THE TRANSITION OF DOWNSIZING, I LIVED IN FEAR THAT FOR SOME REASON, THERE WERE ITEMS THAT I NO LONGER HAVE. I KEPT THINKING, ‘OH, DEAR LORD, I BETTER MAKE SURE I STILL HAVE THAT GIFT FROM MR. VIRTUE.’ WHEN I FOUND IT, THAT’S WHEN I REALLY SERIOUSLY THOUGHT I HAD TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT THEM.” “AT [THE TIME I WAS HIRED], FINANCES WERE DIFFICULT IN THE FAMILY HOME SO I APPLIED FOR THE POSITION OF RECEPTIONIST. THE POSITION REQUIRED NOT ONLY [WORKING] AS A RECEPTIONIST BUT AS A BOOKKEEPER AND AN OFFICE MANAGER. I HESITATED ONCE I WAS INFORMED OF THIS RESPONSIBILITY, BUT I UNDERTOOK THE POSITION AND DID ALL OF THE REQUIREMENTS THAT WAS EXPECTED OF ME. THE LAW FIRM AT THAT TIME CONSISTED OF CHARLES VIRTUE, WILLIAM RUSSELL, MR. GORDON AND THEN LATER ON, THERE WAS VAUGHN HEMBROFF THAT BECAME PARTNER AND GLENN MORRISON. IT’S ALWAYS MEANT A LOT OF THE PAST HISTORY OF MY LIFE. THINKING HOW I WAS HONOURED TO BE WITH THAT FIRM, THESE LITTLE ITEMS THAT WERE GIVEN TO ME JUST EVEN MEANT ALL THE MORE.” “BUT I REMEMBER DISTINCTLY THAT THEY SAID I COULDN’T LEAVE [IN 1964] UNTIL I HIRED SOMEONE THAT COULD REPLACE ME. THEY GAVE ME THE RESPONSIBILITY OF FINDING SOMEONE. MY INTENTION AT THAT TIME WAS TO LEAVE AND MOVE TO MONTREAL. I WAS LIMITED IN THE TIME THAT THIS RESPONSIBILITY WAS GIVEN, AND I DID SUGGEST A PARTICULAR PERSON BUT SHE ONLY WORKED THERE FOR A SHORT TIME AND THEY DIDN’T FEEL THAT SHE QUALIFIED AND COULD HANDLE THE WORK THAT I HAD TAKEN ON. THEN I HAD TO CONTINUE TO STAY UNTIL THEY FELT COMFORTABLE THAT THERE WAS SOMEONE THAT COULD REPLACE ME AND IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1965 [THAT I LEFT].” “EACH ONE OF THE LAWYERS HAD THEIR OWN PRIVATE SECRETARIES. ONE WOMAN IN PARTICULAR…MARY, WAS EXCELLENT IN TAKING LETTERS AND WAS AN EXCELLENT LAW SECRETARY, BUT COULD NOT DO THE BOOKKEEPING. I UNDERTOOK TO DO THE BOOKKEEPING FOR THE SECRETARIES AND THEREFORE, THERE HAD TO BE, AT LEAST FOUR EXTRA GIRLS AS SECRETARIES THERE. AS THEY INCREASED WITH STAFF, THEY WOULD ALSO HIRE MORE SECRETARIES.” ON MR. GLADSTONE VIRTUE, BERLANDO STATED, “I ADMIRED HIM BECAUSE HE DEMANDED RESPECT, HE DEMANDED PROFESSIONALISM. HE WAS VERY SERIOUS ABOUT HIS CLIENTS AND THEY HAD TO BE TREATED LIKE IT WAS AN HONOUR TO HAVE HIM AS THEIR LAWYER. HE WAS NOT A TALL MAN IN STATURE BUT HE STOOD OUT AS A SPECIAL PERSON…BUT HIS CLIENTS CAME FIRST. HE WOULD NEVER HESITATE TO MAKE SURE THAT IF HE HAD A CLIENT OR HAD AN APPOINTMENT THAT I HAD TO MAKE SURE THEY WERE TAKEN CARE OF. HE USED TO INVEST THROUGH THE ROYAL BANK AND HE WOULD HAVE ME GO DOWN AND MEET WITH THE MANAGER. [I WOULD] LET THEM KNOW THAT I WAS THERE ON BEHALF OF MR. VIRTUE AND PRESENT THEM WITH WHATEVER INFORMATION HE GAVE ME…THEY WERE TO TAKE CARE OF THAT. SO HE REALLY MADE ME HIS PERSONAL PERSON TO LOOK AFTER ALL OF HIS PRIVATE AFFAIRS, WHICH TO ME WAS AN HONOUR…EVEN THE LAWYERS HAD SO MUCH RESPECT FOR HIM. WHEN HE MADE A STATEMENT OR A COMMAND OR MADE INSTRUCTIONS FOR CHANGES, THEY WERE MADE AND THEY HAD TO BE ABIDED.” BERLANDO SPOKE ABOUT HER SENTIMENTS ON DONATING THE CRUCIFIX TO THE MUSEUM, NOTING, “AT THE AGE OF NINETY-ONE, WHICH I HAVE BEEN VERY FORTUNATE TO LIVE THIS LENGTH OF TIME, I HAVE TO TAKE INTO CONSIDERATION MANY ITEMS THAT I FEEL SHOULD BE INHERITED BY MY FAMILY…BUT NOT KNOWING THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS GIFT…[I WISH TO] LEAVE IT TO NO ONE OTHER THAN I FEEL THAT DESERVES TO HAVE IT, [WHICH] WOULD BE THE GALT MUSEUM. I DO WISH TO LEAVE IT TO SOMEONE THAT I THINK MAYBE COULD CARRY ON A LITTLE IMPORTANCE OF THE GIFT THAT WAS HANDED TO ME.” “I THINK THAT IT PUTS SUCH A TRUST IN ME, THAT I FEEL NOW, EVEN IN THE YEARS GONE BY, HOW I’VE ALWAYS WANTED SOMEONE, OR ANYONE THAT HAD ANY CONNECTIONS WITH ME, THAT THEY COULD TRUST ME. THAT I WOULD NEVER WANT TO HURT ANYONE AND I WOULD WANT TO CONTINUE TO HELP PEOPLE. WHEN I HEAR PEOPLE IN DISCUSSION OR IN COMMENTS THAT THEY CAN RECALL THINGS THAT I HAVE DONE FOR THEM THAT I CAN’T REMEMBER…I GUESS IT’S JUST MY NATURE TO BE THAT TYPE OF PERSON. [BUT] IF SOMEONE LIKE MR. VIRTUE COULD TRUST ME, AND THEN CLIENTS CAN TRUST ME, I THINK IT INSTILLED [A] TRUST THAT I’LL CARRY TO MY GRAVE.” ABNER GLADSTONE VIRTUE GRADUATED FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA IN 1913 AND BEGAN HIS CAREER IN LAW SHORTLY BEFORE THE START OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1915, VIRTUE ENLISTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE MILITIA UNIT, THE 25TH FIELD ARTILLERY. UPON ITS FORMATION, VIRTUE ENLISTED AS A LIEUTENANT WITH THE LETHBRIDGE 61ST BATTERY THAT JOINED FRONT LINES IN FRANCE IN 1917. VIRTUE RESUMED HIS LAW PRACTICE IN LETHBRIDGE FOLLOWING HIS RETUN FROM THE WAR, AND BECAME A SENIOR PARTNER IN THE FIRM OF VIRTUE, RUSSELL, MORGAN AND VIRTUE. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES ON THE BELL AND VIRTUE’S INVOLVEMENT FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170034001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170034001
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1920
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
IRON, STEEL
Catalogue Number
P20170034002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1916
Date Range To
1920
Materials
IRON, STEEL
No. Pieces
1
Height
1.3
Diameter
2
Description
IRON RING WITH WIDE BLANK SQUARE FRONT. RING HAS NO MARKING ON FRONT OR INSIDE. RING BAND WIDENS AT SQUARE FRONT AND NARROWS INTO BAND. RING IS TARNISHED ON INSIDE AND OUTSIDE OF BAND; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADORNMENT
Historical Association
MILITARY
PERSONAL CARE
History
ON NOVEMBER 20, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED RITA BERLANDO REGARDING HER DONATION OF A GIFTED RING AND CRUCIFIX. BERLANDO WAS GIFTED THE OBJECTS FROM A PREVIOUS EMPLOYER, GLADSTONE VIRUTE, OF LETHBRIDGE. ON THE RING, BERLANDO RECALLED, “[THEY WERE FASHIONED FROM A BELL IN FRANCE OR BELGIUM] I HAVE NO IDEA…HOW THEY BECAME IN HIS POSSESSION. BUT TO HIM, HE MUST HAVE TREASURED THEM BECAUSE HE KNEW OF THE CHURCH THAT WAS BOMBED AND THE BELL THAT IT CAME FROM…WHEN HE GAVE THEM TO ME, I WAS INTRIGUED TO KNOW MORE ABOUT IT BUT HE DIDN’T HAVE TOO MUCH HISTORY ON THEM. NOT TO ME, ANYWAY.” ON GLADSTONE VIRTUE’S MILITARY SERVICE, BERLANDO NOTED, ““I DON’T THINK HE WANTED TO TALK ABOUT IT. I THINK HE HAD A PAST THAT HE WOULD RATHER NOT DISCUSS. IT WAS ALWAYS STRICTLY BUSINESS. IT WAS NEVER SITTING THERE AND DISCUSSING WHAT HIS LIFE WAS OR ANYTHING OF THAT NATURE.” “I DIDN’T KNOW TOO MUCH ABOUT HIM BUT I KNOW THAT HE WAS A MAN THAT PEOPLE RESPECTED, AND FOR HIM TO RESPECT ME, I THINK THAT WAS AN HONOUR.” “I WOULD LOVE TO KNOW HOW THESE TWO LITTLE ITEMS BECAME IN HIS POSSESSION AND WHERE WAS HE WHEN THEY WERE GIVEN TO HIM AND WAS HE PRESENT AT SOME TIME…I JUST FIND THAT HE MUST HAVE HAD THEM IN HIS POSSESSION FOR SOME TIME.” BERLANDO ELABORATED ON HOW THE RING CAME INTO HER POSSESSION, “[THIS ITEM] MEANS AN AWFUL LOT TO ME BECAUSE IT WAS GIVEN AT THE TIME THAT I WAS EMPLOYED WITH THE LAW FIRM OF VIRTUE AND COMPANY. IT WAS MR. GLADSTONE VIRTUE, SEMI-RETIRED WHEN I WAS EMPLOYED THERE, THAT HAD ASKED THAT I GO INTO HIS ROOM AND TAKE LETTERS [AND] NOTES FOR LETTERS THAT HE WISHED TO HAVE TYPED. I WAS HIRED AS A RECEPTIONIST, NOT FEELING THAT I WOULD HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY AS A SECRETARY, SO I INFORMED HIM THAT I COULD NOT DO THIS DUTY. HE ASKED THAT I GET HIS SECRETARY TO TAKE HIS NOTES. AS THE MONTHS WENT BY, HE BECAME VERY – AND I USE THE WORD ‘ATTACHED’ – BECAUSE HE WOULD ALSO ASK ME TO DO SERVICES FOR HIM, WHICH I WOULD HAVE TO GO TO THE ROYAL BANK TO DO HIS BANKING [AND] HIS INVESTMENTS. WHEN HE WAS NO LONGER TO BE WITH THE FIRM, HE HANDED ME A LITTLE GIFT. THAT GIFT CONSIST[ED] OF A RING AND A CROSS THAT WAS MADE FROM A BELL OF A CHURCH THAT WAS BOMBED IN THE FIRST WAR. THAT MEANT AN AWFUL LOT TO ME SO I HAVE TREASURED IT CONTINUALLY AND [THE GIFTING] HAS TO DATE BACK TO [1965].” “[MR GLADSTONE VIRTURE] MUST HAVE KEPT IT AS A REMEMBRANCE FROM SOMEWHERE IN THE PAST THAT HE HAD THAT HE DID NOT [WANT TO] LEAVE IT TO HIS FAMILY, BUT [WITH] ME. THEREFORE, I DEFINITELY FELT THAT [IT] WAS A GIFT THAT I SHOULD TREASURE AND I HAVE TREASURED, AND I HAVE KEPT IT UNDER LOCK AND KEY. EVEN IN THE TRANSITION OF DOWNSIZING, I LIVED IN FEAR THAT FOR SOME REASON, THERE WERE ITEMS THAT I NO LONGER HAVE. I KEPT THINKING, ‘OH, DEAR LORD, I BETTER MAKE SURE I STILL HAVE THAT GIFT FROM MR. VIRTUE.’ WHEN I FOUND IT, THAT’S WHEN I REALLY SERIOUSLY THOUGHT I HAD TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT THEM.” “AT [THE TIME I WAS HIRED], FINANCES WERE DIFFICULT IN THE FAMILY HOME SO I APPLIED FOR THE POSITION OF RECEPTIONIST. THE POSITION REQUIRED NOT ONLY [WORKING] AS A RECEPTIONIST BUT AS A BOOKKEEPER AND AN OFFICE MANAGER. I HESITATED ONCE I WAS INFORMED OF THIS RESPONSIBILITY, BUT I UNDERTOOK THE POSITION AND DID ALL OF THE REQUIREMENTS THAT WAS EXPECTED OF ME. THE LAW FIRM AT THAT TIME CONSISTED OF CHARLES VIRTUE, WILLIAM RUSSELL, MR. GORDON AND THEN LATER ON, THERE WAS VAUGHN HEMBROFF THAT BECAME PARTNER AND GLENN MORRISON. IT’S ALWAYS MEANT A LOT OF THE PAST HISTORY OF MY LIFE. THINKING HOW I WAS HONOURED TO BE WITH THAT FIRM, THESE LITTLE ITEMS THAT WERE GIVEN TO ME JUST EVEN MEANT ALL THE MORE.” “BUT I REMEMBER DISTINCTLY THAT THEY SAID I COULDN’T LEAVE [IN 1964] UNTIL I HIRED SOMEONE THAT COULD REPLACE ME. THEY GAVE ME THE RESPONSIBILITY OF FINDING SOMEONE. MY INTENTION AT THAT TIME WAS TO LEAVE AND MOVE TO MONTREAL. I WAS LIMITED IN THE TIME THAT THIS RESPONSIBILITY WAS GIVEN, AND I DID SUGGEST A PARTICULAR PERSON BUT SHE ONLY WORKED THERE FOR A SHORT TIME AND THEY DIDN’T FEEL THAT SHE QUALIFIED AND COULD HANDLE THE WORK THAT I HAD TAKEN ON. THEN I HAD TO CONTINUE TO STAY UNTIL THEY FELT COMFORTABLE THAT THERE WAS SOMEONE THAT COULD REPLACE ME AND IT MUST HAVE BEEN 1965 [THAT I LEFT].” “EACH ONE OF THE LAWYERS HAD THEIR OWN PRIVATE SECRETARIES. ONE WOMAN IN PARTICULAR…MARY, WAS EXCELLENT IN TAKING LETTERS AND WAS AN EXCELLENT LAW SECRETARY, BUT COULD NOT DO THE BOOKKEEPING. I UNDERTOOK TO DO THE BOOKKEEPING FOR THE SECRETARIES AND THEREFORE, THERE HAD TO BE, AT LEAST FOUR EXTRA GIRLS AS SECRETARIES THERE. AS THEY INCREASED WITH STAFF, THEY WOULD ALSO HIRE MORE SECRETARIES.” ON MR. GLADSTONE VIRTUE, BERLANDO STATED, “I ADMIRED HIM BECAUSE HE DEMANDED RESPECT, HE DEMANDED PROFESSIONALISM. HE WAS VERY SERIOUS ABOUT HIS CLIENTS AND THEY HAD TO BE TREATED LIKE IT WAS AN HONOUR TO HAVE HIM AS THEIR LAWYER. HE WAS NOT A TALL MAN IN STATURE BUT HE STOOD OUT AS A SPECIAL PERSON…BUT HIS CLIENTS CAME FIRST. HE WOULD NEVER HESITATE TO MAKE SURE THAT IF HE HAD A CLIENT OR HAD AN APPOINTMENT THAT I HAD TO MAKE SURE THEY WERE TAKEN CARE OF. HE USED TO INVEST THROUGH THE ROYAL BANK AND HE WOULD HAVE ME GO DOWN AND MEET WITH THE MANAGER. [I WOULD] LET THEM KNOW THAT I WAS THERE ON BEHALF OF MR. VIRTUE AND PRESENT THEM WITH WHATEVER INFORMATION HE GAVE ME…THEY WERE TO TAKE CARE OF THAT. SO HE REALLY MADE ME HIS PERSONAL PERSON TO LOOK AFTER ALL OF HIS PRIVATE AFFAIRS, WHICH TO ME WAS AN HONOUR…EVEN THE LAWYERS HAD SO MUCH RESPECT FOR HIM. WHEN HE MADE A STATEMENT OR A COMMAND OR MADE INSTRUCTIONS FOR CHANGES, THEY WERE MADE AND THEY HAD TO BE ABIDED.” BERLANDO SPOKE ABOUT HER SENTIMENTS ON DONATING THE RING TO THE MUSEUM, NOTING, “AT THE AGE OF NINETY-ONE, WHICH I HAVE BEEN VERY FORTUNATE TO LIVE THIS LENGTH OF TIME, I HAVE TO TAKE INTO CONSIDERATION MANY ITEMS THAT I FEEL SHOULD BE INHERITED BY MY FAMILY…BUT NOT KNOWING THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS GIFT…[I WISH TO] LEAVE IT TO NO ONE OTHER THAN I FEEL THAT DESERVES TO HAVE IT, [WHICH] WOULD BE THE GALT MUSEUM. I DO WISH TO LEAVE IT TO SOMEONE THAT I THINK MAYBE COULD CARRY ON A LITTLE IMPORTANCE OF THE GIFT THAT WAS HANDED TO ME.” “I THINK THAT IT PUTS SUCH A TRUST IN ME, THAT I FEEL NOW, EVEN IN THE YEARS GONE BY, HOW I’VE ALWAYS WANTED SOMEONE, OR ANYONE THAT HAD ANY CONNECTIONS WITH ME, THAT THEY COULD TRUST ME. THAT I WOULD NEVER WANT TO HURT ANYONE AND I WOULD WANT TO CONTINUE TO HELP PEOPLE. WHEN I HEAR PEOPLE IN DISCUSSION OR IN COMMENTS THAT THEY CAN RECALL THINGS THAT I HAVE DONE FOR THEM THAT I CAN’T REMEMBER…I GUESS IT’S JUST MY NATURE TO BE THAT TYPE OF PERSON. [BUT] IF SOMEONE LIKE MR. VIRTUE COULD TRUST ME, AND THEN CLIENTS CAN TRUST ME, I THINK IT INSTILLED [A] TRUST THAT I’LL CARRY TO MY GRAVE.” ABNER GLADSTONE VIRTUE GRADUATED FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA IN 1913 AND BEGAN HIS CAREER IN LAW SHORTLY BEFORE THE START OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR. IN 1915, VIRTUE ENLISTED IN THE LETHBRIDGE MILITIA UNIT, THE 25TH FIELD ARTILLERY. UPON ITS FORMATION, VIRTUE ENLISTED AS A LIEUTENANT WITH THE LETHBRIDGE 61ST BATTERY THAT JOINED FRONT LINES IN FRANCE IN 1917. IN 1916, THE CARENCY CHURCH’S STEEPLE FELL FROM GERMAN GUN-FIRE. THE BELL FROM THE STEEPLE WAS RELATIVELY UNDAMAGED, AND MOVED TO BE BURIED IN VILLERS A ROIS FOR SAFETY. THE ARTILLERY BRIGADE OF THE 61ST BATTERY ARRIVED IN CARENCY, WHERE AMONGST THE CHURCH DEBRIS FRAGMENTS OF THE BELL WERE RETRIVED BY LETHBRIDGE FORCES. THE BATTERY FARRIER FASHIONED THE FRAGMENTS INTO SOUVENIRS THAT SOLDIERS RETURNED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH, INCLUDING GLADSTONE VIRTUE, WHO RETURNED TO LETHBRIDGE WITH A RING. AN ARTICLE FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PUBLISHED MARCH 24, 1931 ON THE FRONT PAGE REFERENCED "LIEUT. A.G. VIRTUE, WHO WAS IN CHARGE OF THE 61ST [ALBERTA BATTALION] WHEN IT WAS DEMOBILIZED, HAS ONE OF THE RINGS MADE FROM FRAGMENTS OF THE FAMOUS [CARENCY] BELL, SHOT FROM THE STEEPLE OF THE CHURCH BY GERMAN SHELL FIRE AND SHATTERED." VIRTUE RESUMED HIS LAW PRACTICE IN LETHBRIDGE FOLLOWING HIS RETUN FROM WAR, AND BECAME A SENIOR PARTNER IN THE FIRM OF VIRTUE, RUSSELL, MORGAN AND VIRTUE. THE BELL OF CARENCY CHURCH WAS RETRIEVED BY THE PARIS MUNICIPAL COUNCIL IN 1931, AND RETURNED TO THE CARENCY CHURCH. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING ARTICLES ON THE BELL AND VIRTUE’S INVOLVEMENT FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170034001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170034002
Acquisition Date
2017-11
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

Margaret Shippobotham and sons, Frank and Douglas

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96945
Date Range
1916 - 1917
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191128007
Physical Description
bw photo
Scope and Content
Margaret (Campbell) Shippobotham and her sons, Frank on the left and Douglas on the right posing in a garden.
  1 image  
Date Range
1916 - 1917
Description Level
Item
Creator
Frank Shippobotham
Physical Description
bw photo
History / Biographical
Douglas Campbell Shippobotham was born in 1909 in Belfast, Ireland to C.C.R and Margaret Shippobotham. He immigrated to Lethbridge with his mother in 1910. He was the oldest of 3 brothers. He passed away in 1996 in Calgary, Alberta. Frank Shippobotham was born on October 31, 1914 in Lethbridge Alberta to C.C.R. Shippobotham and Margaret (nee Campbell) Shippobotham. Frank was the second son of three. He had an Older brother Douglas and a younger brother, Victor. He was an amateur photographer, a member of the Orange Lodge and Scouts Canada, as well as St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church. Shippobotham enlisted with the 2- 20th Antitank Battery in 1928/1929 and served with them during the interwar years through into the Second World War. Unfortunately a bout of polio as a child left him with a weakened left arm and leg. This affected his ability to serve actively overseas during the war. During his military career he served at Camp Shilo in Manitoba, Camp Sarcee in Calgary and here in Lethbridge at the barracks training new officers and gunners for service overseas and working in Stores. He attained the rank of Quartermaster Sargeant. In June of 1942, Frank married Garnette Lillian Gamble and the couple had one son, Robert Howard, born to them on March 18, 1943. Polio also affected his employment options after his military career. He ended up working various odd jobs like Canadian Western Hardware and St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church. Frank Shippobotham died on September 12, 1979 of a heart attack at the age of 66 and is buried in Mountainview Cemetery in the field of honour.
Custodial History
Photographed by C.C.R. Shippobotham and kept in the Shippobotham Family.
Scope and Content
Margaret (Campbell) Shippobotham and her sons, Frank on the left and Douglas on the right posing in a garden.
Accession No.
20191128007
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail
Date Range
1873-1925
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20181007
Physical Description
Matted 23.5 by 18.5 cm black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
Matted photographic print depicting a hoodoo rock with "NWMP" carved into it.
Date Range
1873-1925
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
Matted 23.5 by 18.5 cm black and white photographic print.
Scope and Content
Matted photographic print depicting a hoodoo rock with "NWMP" carved into it.
Accession No.
20181007
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range From
1880
Date Range To
1890
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
Catalogue Number
P20170002000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1880
Date Range To
1890
Materials
COTTON, LEATHER, GLASS
No. Pieces
1
Length
103.2
Width
5
Description
BEADED BELT WITH A GEOMETRIC PATTERN SET AGAINST A GREEN BEADED BACKGROUND. PATTERN ALTERNATES BETWEEN TWO MIRRORED BLACK, YELLOW, BLUE TRIANGLES WITH THEIR BASES AT EITHER WIDTH END OF THE BELT MEETING IN THE CENTER AT THEIR POINTS AND LARGE RED AND BLUE WITH A GREEN CENTERED TRIANGLES WITH THEIR BASE AT ONE WIDTH END AND THEIR POINTS EXTENDED TO THE OPPOSING END. BEADS ARE SEWN INTO A COTTON, CANVAS FABRIC. TWO ANIMAL HIDE TIES (EACH A DIFFERENT LENGTH FROM 6.2 TO 11.8) ON EACH END AT EACH CORNER OF BELT. BACK SIDE IS RAW FABRIC WITH SEAM AT CENTER CONNECTING THE TWO HALVES. ENDS ARE HEMMED WITH TIES SEWN TO THE OUTSIDE. CONDITION: SEVERE DISCOLOURATION TO FABRIC BACKING AND SEVERE WEAR TO ANIMAL HIDE TIES. MANY LOSS THREADS OVER ENTIRE SURFACE OF BACK. BEADS AND BEADING IN EXCELLENT CONDITION OVERALL.
Subjects
INDIGENOUS
Historical Association
ETHNOGRAPHIC
History
UPON THE DONATION OF THIS BELT TO THE GALT MUSEUM, THE DONOR – PATRICIA LYNCH-STAUNTON – EXPLAINED THAT THIS BELT BELONGED TO ALFRED HARDWICH LYNCH-STAUNTON, WHO SERVED IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN FORT MACLEOD. HE RANCHED IN THE LUNDBRECK AREA AND SUPPLIED HORSES TO THE MOUNTIES. THE DONOR SAID THAT SHE HAD “NO KNOWLEDGE OF HOW [ALFRED HARDWICK] CAME INTO POSSESSION OF THE BELT. A NOTE ON THE INITIAL DOCUMENTATION ATTRIBUTES THE DATE OF THIS BELT TO CA. 1880-1890. THE ACTING CURATOR OF THE NATIVE NORTH AMERICAN DEPARTMENT OF THE GLENBOW, JOANNE SCHMIDT, AGREED WITH THE DONOR’S BELIEF THAT THE BELT WAS BLACKFOOT. THROUGH THE COMPARISON OF THE BEADED MOCCASINS AND BELTS IN THE GLENBOW’S COLLECTION WITH THIS BELT, SCHMIDT EXPLAINED THAT THE DESIGN ON THE BELT WAS MOSTLY FOUND ON THOSE FROM SIKSIKA, BUT SHE HAS ALSO SEEN THE DESIGN IN PIIKANI AND KAINAI BEADWORK THOUGH THERE ARE NOT MANY EXAMPLES IN THE COLLECTION. ALSO BY USING THE GLENBOW’S COLLECTION AS A POINT OF REFERENCE, THE CURATOR BELIEVES THAT THE BELT IS SIMILAR IN APPEARANCE TO THOSE OF THE 19TH CENTURY TO EARLY 20TH-CENTURY MUSEUM HOLDINGS. SCHMIDT ALSO PROVIDED AN EXPLANATION OF THE DESIGN FROM THE CANADIAN MUSEUM OF HISTORY. IT STATES, “ONE OF THE EARLIEST DESIGNS USED WAS ‘MIISTA-TSIKA-TUKSIIN,’ OR MOUNTAIN DESIGN. OTHER DESIGNS INCLUDED SQUARES, DIAMONDS, BARS, SLOTTED BARS AND STRIPES… TODAY SUCH DESIGNS ARE CALLED ‘MAAH-TOOHM-MOOWA-KA-NA-SKSIN,’ OR FIRST DESIGNS.” IT WAS FURTHER EXPLAINED THAT A COMPLICATING FACTOR IN IDENTIFYING THE BELT’S ORIGINS IS THE FACT THAT THE BLACKFOOT TENDED TO USE WHITE OR BLUE AS THE BACKGROUND COLOUR, NOT GREEN AS IS PRESENTED IN THE LYNCH-STAUNTON DONATION. ON 19 JANUARY 2017, MUSEUM STAFF FURTHER CONSULTED WITH RYAN HEAVY HEAD, FORMER DIRECTOR OF KAINAI STUDIES AT RED CROW COMMUNITY COLLEGE, REGARDING THE BELT’S DESIGN. HE EXPLAINED, “THE GREEN BACKGROUND IS ATYPICAL OF BLACKFOOT BEADWORK, WHICH IS NORMALLY BLUE. THE ‘MOUNTAIN DESIGN’ [DISPLAYED ON THE BELT] IS A COMMON MOTIF IN BLACKFOOT BEADWORK, BUT AGAIN THE COLOURS ARE NOT TYPICAL IN THIS EXAMPLE.” RYAN SPECULATED THAT DURING THE TIME OF DISEASE (WHEN THIS BELT APPEARS TO HAVE ORIGINATED) THERE WAS SOME DISRUPTION IN TRADITIONAL LIFE AND THAT COULD BE REFLECTED IN THE COLOUR CHOICES. ALTERNATIVELY, THE BELT MAY HAVE BEEN MADE BY THE GROS VENTRES FROM NORTHEAST MONTANA. THE DONOR, PATRICIA LYNCH-STAUNTON, IS THE GREAT-GRANDDAUGHTER OF ALFRED HARDWICK LYNCH-STAUNTON. THIS BELT WAS PASSED DOWN THROUGH THE FAMILY, FIRST FROM A. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON, THEN TO THE DONOR’S GRANDFATHER, F. C. LYNCH-STAUNTON, THEN TO HER FATHER, A. G. LYNCH-STAUNTON, FINALLY TO THE DONOR WHO BROUGHT IT TO THE MUSEUM. THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION COMES FROM THE “A. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON FAMILY HISTORY” WRITTEN FOR THE MUSEUM USING ONLINE SOURCES, THE GLENBOW ARCHIVES, AND THE BOOK TITLED “HISTORY OF THE EARLY DAYS OF PINCHER CREEK AND SOUTHERN MOUNTAINS OF ALBERTA.” “ALFRED HARDWICK LYNCH-STAUNTON (1860-1932) WAS BORN IN HAMILTON, ON AND CAME TO FORT MACLEOD IN 1877 TO JOIN THE NWMP. ACCORDING TO THE PINCHER CREEK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, HE WAS SENT TO ESTABLISH A HORSE BREEDING FARM AT PINCHER CREEK IN 1878. AFTER RETIRING FROM THE NWMP IN 1880, LYNCH-STAUNTON STATED THE FIRST CATTLE RANCH IN THE PINCHER CREEK AREA WITH JAMES BRUNEAU AND ISSAC MAY, AND LATER HOMESTEADED WEST OF TOWN. ALONG WITH HIS RANCH, LYNCH-STAUNTON MARRIED SARAH MARY BLAKE (1864-1933) IN 1890 AND THEY HAVE FIVE CHILDREN: VICTORIA, FRANDA, FRANCIS, JOHN, AND D’ARCY… A.H.’S BROTHER RICHARD LYNCH-STAUNTON (1867-1961) CAME AS FAR WEST AS MEDICINE HAT IN 1883 WITH HIS FATHER, F. H. LYNCH-STAUNTON, WHO WAS IN CHARGE OF THE SURVEY PARTY. RICHARD CAME WEST AGAIN, TO PINCHER CREEK, IN 1885 OR 1886. IN ABOUT 1900, HE ACQUIRED LAND NORTH OF LUNDBRECK, ON TODD CREEEK, WHICH BECAME THE ANTELOPE BUTTE RANCH. RICHARD AND A. H. WERE IN PARTNERSHIP FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS IN CATTLE-RANCHING AND, ACCORDING TO THE DONOR, WITH THE BUTCHER SHOP. IN 1901, RICHARD MARRIED ISABELLE MARY WILSON (1868-1971), AND THEIR SON FRANK LYNCH-STAUNTON (1905-1990), ALBERTA’S 11TH LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR FROM 1979 TO 1985. LYNCH-STAUNTON DESCENDANTS CONTINUE TO RANCH IN THE LUNDBRECK/PINCHER CREEK AREA.” PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING CORRESPONDENCE WITH DONOR AND PEOPLE CITED IN ABOVE HISTORY.
Catalogue Number
P20170002000
Acquisition Date
2016-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
A. P. P SHOULDER TITLE
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
ALUMINUM, BRASS
Catalogue Number
P20180014001
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
A. P. P SHOULDER TITLE
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Materials
ALUMINUM, BRASS
No. Pieces
1
Height
0.9
Length
6.0
Width
2.6
Description
SILVER SHOULDER TITLE. HAS THE LETTERS "A.P." CENTERED ABOVE THE WORD "POLICE". BACK OF TITLE HAS 2 BRASS LOOPS FOR HOLDING BRASS SPLIT PIN. THERE IS NO PIN.
Subjects
PERSONAL SYMBOL
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS BADGE BELONGED TO THE DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN. ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY PROVIDED WITH A BUCHANAN A. P. P.-RELATED DONATION MADE BY JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN 2002 (P20020090). IT STATES, "BORN IN GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, WHERE BUCHANAN BEGAN REGULAR SCHOOLING AT THE AGE OF 4, WHICH ENABLED HIM TO COMPLETE HIS HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HIS PARENTS MOVED THE FAMILY TO CANADA IN MAY 1914. THE FAMILY SETTLED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WHERE EDWARD FOUND A JOB PLUS ENROLLED IN NIGHT CLASSES AT THE EDMONTON TECHNICAL SCHOOL TAKING ENGLISH, CANADIAN HISTORY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MANUAL TRAINING IN WOODWORKING. IN FEBRUARY 1917, THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS ORGANIZED. ED JOINED IN MAY OF 1920." THESE BADGES WERE A PART OF HIS UNIFORM IN THIS ROLE. AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. DESCRIBING HER FATHER’S CAREER, BUCHANAN BEGAN, “[MY DAD] JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL…AS A ROOKIE – RIGHT AT THE START – HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. AND IT WASN’T LONG UNTIL HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE REAL POLICING. WHEN THE CRAZY PROHIBITION WAS BROUGHT IN, THAT WAS A REAL PAIN FOR THE POLICE. IT WAS [A MOVEMENT] PUSHED BY THESE DO-GOODERS, WHO DIDN’T REALIZE WHAT THEY WERE DOING. DAD WAS VERY UPSET TALKING ABOUT THAT. EVEN WHEN HE WAS JUST A YOUNG FELLOW, [HE WAS] FINDING YOUNG, GOOD FARM BOYS BLIND OR DEAD OVER A FENCE, BECAUSE THEY HAD A PROBLEM WITH THE PROHIBITION AND GETTING MOONSHINE THAT WASN’T MATURE OR SOMETHING, [WHICH] WAS POISONOUS.” “IN 1921 HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON,” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL. HE THEN GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE AND HE WAS GOING TO GO THERE, BUT THEN IN 1922 THEY GOT MARRIED [SO HE DID NOT GO TO GRAND PRAIRIE] FORTUNATELY, THE A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. DID, SO HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED. [AFTER MY PARENTS’ MARRIAGE] THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD, WHERE HE WAS ON HIS OWN [AT THE POSTING]. FROM THERE, HE DID A LOT OF WORK GOING BACK AND FORTH.” “BRAINARD [WAS] A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION… THEY BUILT DAD A LOG CABIN DOWN THERE FOR THE HOUSE WITH HIS NEW WIFE AND [SOON AFTER THEY WERE] EXPECTING THEIR FIRST CHILD. [THE CABIN HAD] ONE BIG ROOM WITH CURTAINS HERE AND THERE, AND HE DIDN’T HAVE A PRISON THERE. WHEN HE TOOK IN A PRISONER, THAT’S WHEN HE NEEDED THE OREGON BOOT AND THE BALL AND CHAIN BECAUSE HE HAD A BIG BOLT ON THE FLOOR NEAR HIS OFFICE. THAT’S WHERE THE GUY HAD TO SIT, CHAINED, UNTIL [MY FATHER] COULD TAKE HIM ON INTO EDMONTON…EVEN IN THE A.P.P. TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON. [HE WOULD BE] BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE],” BUCHANAN EXPLAINED EXPANDING ON HOW HER FATHER’S WORK TOOK HIM “BACK AND FORTH.” “THEN THEY CLOSED THAT [BRAINAR POST] DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY – A LITTLE VILLAGE – AND HE WAS THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. [HE WAS THERE] WHEN 1932 CAME ALONG AND THEN HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P… AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. [FROM THERE] HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT, WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO [COVER]. AND THERE AGAIN, WE HAD A NICE, BIG WHITE HOUSE AND A JAIL THIS TIME… THE JAIL OFFICE AND THE COURTROOM AND EVERYTHING WAS CONNECTED [TO THE HOUSE]. YOU JUST GO DOWN THE HALL AND OPEN THE DOOR AND THERE YOU GO, AND THERE’S TWO JAILS IN THERE. [THERE] HE WAS GETTING ROOKIES COMING OUT FROM EDMONTON TO TRAIN UNDER HIM… [I WAS BORN IN] ’30 [AND] NOW IN ’34, I REMEMBER GOING THERE [TO WESTLOCK].” SPEAKING ABOUT THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P. IN 1932 AND THE ABSORPTION OF SOME OF ITS MEMBERS INTO THE R. C. M P., BUCHANAN EXPLAINED, “[A. P. P. OFFICERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY [WERE RANKED] INTO THREE CATEGORIES. [FIRST, THERE WERE THE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE; THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P. THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEN THERE WERE THE ONES THAT COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY [INTO THE FORCE FOR THE TRIAL PERIOD]. THEY COULD [BE ACCEPTED] FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY AGAIN [FOR FULL-TIME]. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE, [WHO] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE…IT IS IMPORTANT [TO REMEMBER], THOSE A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT. THEY WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” WHEN ANSWERING HOW HER FATHER ENDED UP WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE, BUCHANAN SAID, “[AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P.], ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER [OF THE R. C. M. P.] HANCOCK (WILLIAM FREDERICK WATKINS “BILL” HANCOCK) KNEW DAD REALLY WELL. [PREVIOUSLY, HANCOCK] WAS THE [ACTING COMMISSIONER] FOR THE ALBERTA [PROVINCIAL POLICE]. [HANCOCK] CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, ‘BUCK – DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’A LOT – I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT, BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT. YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?’” AS A RESULT, EDWARD BUCHANAN WAS RELOCATED TO THE R. C. M. P.’S LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT IN 1944. JEAN BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “DAD’S PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, VERY FIRMLY. AND THE STAFF [IN LETHBRIDGE] ENDED UP LOVING HIM. THE SECRETARIES AND EVERYTHING, THEY WERE CRYING WHEN HE LEFT. AND I GOT LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON… BUT [IN TERMS OF] THE SITUATION [WHICH ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK WAS REFERRING TO], NO, HE WAS FINE. HE NEVER HAD ANY TROUBLE. HE JUST FIRMLY, QUIETLY DEALT WITH EVERYTHING AND EVERYTHING WAS FINE. I NEVER SAW HIM STRESSED OUT. ALWAYS COOL, LAID BACK.” “[WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE], WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET SOUTH. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. BUT WE HAD [SOME] TROUBLE BECAUSE DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US. HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE [THAT WAS] READY, SO WHEN WE CAME DOWN [WE] STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. AND THEN I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE – LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS. ANYWAY, I GOT THROUGH GRADE TWELVE AND THAT’S ALRIGHT.” “[ANOTHER THING HE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR HERE IN LETHBRIDGE] WAS TO OVERSEE THE PRISONER OF WAR (POW) CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POWS IN THE RESPECT THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. THEY WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY, BUT THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY. THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. [MY DAD] RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT… AND THEN THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK ON THE [FARMS], BECAUSE THERE WAS A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS… BUT, OF COURSE, I KNEW ABOUT THE CRUELTY OF SOME OF THE HARD-CORE NAZIS THAT WERE IN THERE. THE TROUBLE WAS THERE WASN’T ENOUGH FORCE POLICE TO GO IN THERE SAFELY. THEY COULDN’T EVEN GET IN THE POW CAMP AND THE CIVIL GUARDS WERE THE ONLY ONES THAT WERE AVAILABLE, BUT THEY DIDN’T EVEN DARE GO IN HALF THE TIME. IT WAS REALLY SOMETHING. THERE WERE SOME GUYS IN THERE THAT WERE REALLY, REALLY MEAN…” “AND OH YES, A FEW [MEN DID TRY TO ESCAPE THE CAMP],” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT THEY DIDN’T GET VERY FAR. THEY NEVER GOT AWAY. I’VE GOT RECORDS OF ONES THAT WERE CAUGHT. THEY STOLE SOMEBODY’S CAR. SOME OF THEM GOT A REGULAR SENTENCE FOR BREAKING ONE OF OUR LAWS.” BUCHANAN CONFIRMS THAT HER FATHER RETIRED FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN 1950 WHILE IN LETHBRIDGE. AFTER RETIREMENT, SHE EXPLAINED, “[HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON, HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS… BUT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE WITH HIS RECORD, SO THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA…HE THEN WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN OR SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS…” EDWARD BUCHANAN “SORT OF” RETIRED FROM THAT ROLE IN THE 1970S, HIS DAUGHTER EXPLAINED. HE CONTINUED WORKING IN SOME CAPACITIES UNTIL HIS PASSING IN 1998. “[I RECEIVED MY DAD’S R. C. M. P. POSSESSIONS, BECAUSE HE] KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER IT AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM… HE LIVED TO BE NINETY-EIGHT AND I DON’T THINK HE EVER THREW ANYTHING OUT SINCE HE WAS IN HIS TWENTIES.” ACCORDING TO EDWARD E. “BUCK” BUCHANAN’S OBITUARY, HE PASSED AWAY IN IN EDMONTON IN 1998. HIS WIFE’S NAME WAS CHRISTENE BUCHANAN AND TOGETHER THEY HAD FIVE CHILDREN – EDWARD, ROBERT, JEAN, WILLIAM, AND ROSE-MARIE. THE OBITUARY STATES HE SERVED 31 YEARS IN THE R.C.M.P, AND 15 YEARS AS THE SUPERINTENDENT OF CORRECTIONS FOR ALBERTA. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20180014001
Acquisition Date
2018-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BUTTON
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL
Catalogue Number
P20180014002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE BUTTON
Date Range From
1919
Date Range To
1932
Materials
METAL
No. Pieces
1
Diameter
2.7
Description
A: SILVER-COLOURED METAL BUTTON. SHIELD OF ALBERTA EMBOSSED ON THE CENTER OF THE BUTTON. “ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE” EMBOSSED AROUND THE CREST. SHINY FINISH. THE BACK OF THE BUTTON IS BRASS IN COLOUR. AROUND THE CENTRE OF THE BACK “W. SCULLY MONTREAL” IS MACHINE ENGRAVED. THERE IS A LOOP FOR A PIN FASTENER LOOSELY ATTACHED TO THE BACK B: TWO-PRONGED BRASS PIN WITH A CIRCULAR LOOP ON ONE END AND THE TWO ENDS ON THE PIN EXTENDING OUT INTO A V-SHAPE ON THE OTHER. PIN IS 3.2 CM IN LENGTH AND AT THE WIDEST POINT THE PRONGS ARE 1.1 CM APART. CONDITION: SLIGHT SCRATCHING ON THE FRONT AND BACK SURFACES OF THE BUTTON. BRASS BACK IS SLIGHTLY TARNISHED. METAL OF PIN IN SLIGHTLY DISCOLOURED.
Subjects
CLOTHING-ACCESSORY
Historical Association
SAFETY SERVICES
History
THIS BUTTON BELONGED TO DONOR'S FATHER, EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN. ACCORDING TO THE BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY PROVIDED WITH A BUCHANAN A. P. P.-RELATED DONATION MADE BY JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN 2002 (P20020090). IT STATES, "BORN IN GLASGOW, SCOTLAND, WHERE BUCHANAN BEGAN REGULAR SCHOOLING AT THE AGE OF 4, WHICH ENABLED HIM TO COMPLETE HIS HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HIS PARENTS MOVED THE FAMILY TO CANADA IN MAY 1914. THE FAMILY SETTLED IN EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WHERE EDWARD FOUND A JOB PLUS ENROLLED IN NIGHT CLASSES AT THE EDMONTON TECHNICAL SCHOOL TAKING ENGLISH, CANADIAN HISTORY, TRIGONOMETRY AND MANUAL TRAINING IN WOODWORKING. IN FEBRUARY 1917, THE ALBERTA PROVINCIAL POLICE WAS ORGANIZED. ED JOINED IN MAY OF 1920." AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. AN INTERVIEW WAS CONDUCTED BY GALT’S COLLECTION TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN ON JUNE 8, 2018 WITH THE DONOR JEAN I. BUCHANAN IN REGARDS TO A NEW ARTIFACT OFFER SHE WAS MAKING TO THE MUSEUM (P20180014001-2). THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAREER OF SENIOR STAFF SERGEANT EDWARD ETTERSHANK “BUCK” BUCHANAN – THE DONOR’S FATHER – HAS BEEN EXTRACTED FROM THAT INTERVIEW. DESCRIBING HER FATHER’S CAREER, BUCHANAN BEGAN, “[MY DAD] JOINED THE A.P.P. WHEN HE WAS TWENTY AND HE WAS STATIONED OUT NEAR ST. PAUL…AS A ROOKIE – RIGHT AT THE START – HE WAS ON JOB TO BE ON GUARD AT THE STATION. AND IT WASN’T LONG UNTIL HE WAS SENT OUT TO ST. PAUL AND INTO MORE REAL POLICING. WHEN THE CRAZY PROHIBITION WAS BROUGHT IN, THAT WAS A REAL PAIN FOR THE POLICE. IT WAS [A MOVEMENT] PUSHED BY THESE DO-GOODERS, WHO DIDN’T REALIZE WHAT THEY WERE DOING. DAD WAS VERY UPSET TALKING ABOUT THAT. EVEN WHEN HE WAS JUST A YOUNG FELLOW, [HE WAS] FINDING YOUNG, GOOD FARM BOYS BLIND OR DEAD OVER A FENCE, BECAUSE THEY HAD A PROBLEM WITH THE PROHIBITION AND GETTING MOONSHINE THAT WASN’T MATURE OR SOMETHING, [WHICH] WAS POISONOUS.” “IN 1921 HE MET MY MOTHER IN EDMONTON,” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT HE STAYED AT ST. PAUL. HE THEN GOT POSTED TO GRANDE PRAIRIE AND HE WAS GOING TO GO THERE, BUT THEN IN 1922 THEY GOT MARRIED [SO HE DID NOT GO TO GRAND PRAIRIE] FORTUNATELY, THE A.P.P. HAD NO RESTRICTIONS ON THEIR MEMBERS GETTING MARRIED, LIKE THE R.C.M.P. DID, SO HE DIDN’T HAVE TO WAIT TO GET MARRIED. [AFTER MY PARENTS’ MARRIAGE] THEY WENT OUT TO BRAINARD, WHERE HE WAS ON HIS OWN [AT THE POSTING]. FROM THERE, HE DID A LOT OF WORK GOING BACK AND FORTH.” “BRAINARD [WAS] A LITTLE PLACE NEAR THE HORSE LAKE INDIAN RESERVATION… THEY BUILT DAD A LOG CABIN DOWN THERE FOR THE HOUSE WITH HIS NEW WIFE AND [SOON AFTER THEY WERE] EXPECTING THEIR FIRST CHILD. [THE CABIN HAD] ONE BIG ROOM WITH CURTAINS HERE AND THERE, AND HE DIDN’T HAVE A PRISON THERE. WHEN HE TOOK IN A PRISONER, THAT’S WHEN HE NEEDED THE OREGON BOOT AND THE BALL AND CHAIN BECAUSE HE HAD A BIG BOLT ON THE FLOOR NEAR HIS OFFICE. THAT’S WHERE THE GUY HAD TO SIT, CHAINED, UNTIL [MY FATHER] COULD TAKE HIM ON INTO EDMONTON…EVEN IN THE A.P.P. TO START WITH, HE HAD SOME SERVICE DOWN HERE AT THE LETHBRIDGE PRISON. [HE WOULD BE] BRINGING PRISONERS DOWN [TO LETHBRIDGE],” BUCHANAN EXPLAINED EXPANDING ON HOW HER FATHER’S WORK TOOK HIM “BACK AND FORTH.” “THEN THEY CLOSED THAT [BRAINAR POST] DOWN AND TRANSFERRED HIM TO WEMBLEY – A LITTLE VILLAGE – AND HE WAS THE ONLY OFFICER IN CHARGE OF WEMBLEY. [HE WAS THERE] WHEN 1932 CAME ALONG AND THEN HE JUST CHANGED THE SIGN UP THERE FROM A.P.P. TO R.C.M.P… AND THAT STAYED R.C.M.P. UNTIL ’34. [FROM THERE] HE WAS TRANSFERRED TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE WESTLOCK DETACHMENT, WHICH WAS A BIG AREA. HE HAD A HUGE AREA THERE TO [COVER]. AND THERE AGAIN, WE HAD A NICE, BIG WHITE HOUSE AND A JAIL THIS TIME… THE JAIL OFFICE AND THE COURTROOM AND EVERYTHING WAS CONNECTED [TO THE HOUSE]. YOU JUST GO DOWN THE HALL AND OPEN THE DOOR AND THERE YOU GO, AND THERE’S TWO JAILS IN THERE. [THERE] HE WAS GETTING ROOKIES COMING OUT FROM EDMONTON TO TRAIN UNDER HIM… [I WAS BORN IN] ’30 [AND] NOW IN ’34, I REMEMBER GOING THERE [TO WESTLOCK].” SPEAKING ABOUT THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P. IN 1932 AND THE ABSORPTION OF SOME OF ITS MEMBERS INTO THE R. C. M P., BUCHANAN EXPLAINED, “[A. P. P. OFFICERS] WERE NOT AUTOMATICALLY TAKEN INTO THE R.C.M.P. THEY [WERE RANKED] INTO THREE CATEGORIES. [FIRST, THERE WERE THE] ONES THAT WERE NOT ACCEPTABLE; THEY HADN’T DONE A VERY GOOD JOB IN THE A.P.P. THEY SHOWED UP, GOOFIN’ AROUND, DOING THINGS THEY SHOULDN’T BE DOING. THEN THERE WERE THE ONES THAT COULD BE GIVEN A LITTLE TRIAL RUN. THEY COULD APPLY [INTO THE FORCE FOR THE TRIAL PERIOD]. THEY COULD [BE ACCEPTED] FOR A FULL YEAR AND THEN RE-APPLY AGAIN [FOR FULL-TIME]. THEN THERE’S THE TOP GRADE, [WHO] WERE AUTOMATICALLY ACCEPTABLE. DAD WAS RIGHT UP THERE IN THAT TOP GRADE…IT IS IMPORTANT [TO REMEMBER], THOSE A.P.P. MEMBERS WERE TRAINED BY THE NORTHWEST MOUNTED POLICE, NOT SOME GOOFBALLS THAT DIDN’T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT. THEY WERE TRAINED BY THE BEST-TRAINED POLICE OFFICERS.” WHEN ANSWERING HOW HER FATHER ENDED UP WORKING IN LETHBRIDGE, BUCHANAN SAID, “[AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE A. P. P.], ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER [OF THE R. C. M. P.] HANCOCK (WILLIAM FREDERICK WATKINS “BILL” HANCOCK) KNEW DAD REALLY WELL. [PREVIOUSLY, HANCOCK] WAS THE [ACTING COMMISSIONER] FOR THE ALBERTA [PROVINCIAL POLICE]. [HANCOCK] CALLED DAD INTO THE OFFICE AND HE SAID, ‘BUCK – DAD WAS EDWARD ETTERSHANK BUCHANAN, BUT THEY CALLED HIM ‘BUCK’A LOT – I WAS GOING TO SEND YOU DOWN TO TAKE CHARGE OF THE RED DEER DETACHMENT, BUT I’VE HAD SO MUCH PROBLEM GETTING SOMEBODY TO GO DOWN TO TAKE THE LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT. YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE THE SITUATION WE’VE GOT DOWN THERE. THERE’S A LOT OF PROBLEMS AND I’M SURE YOU’RE THE ONLY ONE THAT CAN HANDLE IT. WILL YOU GO?’” AS A RESULT, EDWARD BUCHANAN WAS RELOCATED TO THE R. C. M. P.’S LETHBRIDGE DETACHMENT IN 1944. JEAN BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “DAD’S PERSONALITY WAS ALWAYS QUIET, FIRM, NO-NONSENSE, BUT HE WAS NEVER ARROGANT. I NEVER HEARD HIM SWEAR OR GET MAD AT ANYBODY, NOT EVEN PRISONERS. HE HANDLED THEM VERY QUIETLY, VERY FIRMLY. AND THE STAFF [IN LETHBRIDGE] ENDED UP LOVING HIM. THE SECRETARIES AND EVERYTHING, THEY WERE CRYING WHEN HE LEFT. AND I GOT LETTERS AND THEY CAME ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR ANNIVERSARIES LATER IN EDMONTON… BUT [IN TERMS OF] THE SITUATION [WHICH ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER HANCOCK WAS REFERRING TO], NO, HE WAS FINE. HE NEVER HAD ANY TROUBLE. HE JUST FIRMLY, QUIETLY DEALT WITH EVERYTHING AND EVERYTHING WAS FINE. I NEVER SAW HIM STRESSED OUT. ALWAYS COOL, LAID BACK.” “[WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE], WE RENTED A HOUSE ON 538 – 7TH STREET SOUTH. IT’S ALL TORN DOWN NOW. BUT WE HAD [SOME] TROUBLE BECAUSE DAD HAD TO COME DOWN A MONTH OR SO AHEAD OF US. HE COULDN’T FIND A HOUSE [THAT WAS] READY, SO WHEN WE CAME DOWN [WE] STAYED IN A HOTEL FOR ABOUT TWO MONTHS. AND THEN I HAD TO START GRADE TEN; I WAS ONLY FOURTEEN. THAT WAS, TO ME, THE ONLY SAD PART OF MY LIFE – LEAVING THE WESTLOCK SCHOOL AND STARTING LCI. THE PERSONALIZATION WAS GONE WITH THE TEACHERS. ANYWAY, I GOT THROUGH GRADE TWELVE AND THAT’S ALRIGHT.” “[ANOTHER THING HE WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR HERE IN LETHBRIDGE] WAS TO OVERSEE THE PRISONER OF WAR (POW) CAMPS…HE TALKED ABOUT THE POWS IN THE RESPECT THAT THERE WAS A LOT OF VERY GOOD GERMANS THAT WERE IN THERE. THEY WOULDN’T HAVE CHOSEN TO EVEN BE IN THE GERMAN ARMY, BUT THEY WERE CONSCRIPTED OVER IN GERMANY. THEY DIDN’T HAVE ANY CHOICE, AND THEY WERE VERY DECENT, GOOD GUYS. [MY DAD] RESPECTED THEM FOR THAT… AND THEN THERE WAS A TRUST THERE TO LET SOME OF THEM OUT TO WORK ON THE [FARMS], BECAUSE THERE WAS A LABOUR SHORTAGE FOR THE FARMERS… BUT, OF COURSE, I KNEW ABOUT THE CRUELTY OF SOME OF THE HARD-CORE NAZIS THAT WERE IN THERE. THE TROUBLE WAS THERE WASN’T ENOUGH FORCE POLICE TO GO IN THERE SAFELY. THEY COULDN’T EVEN GET IN THE POW CAMP AND THE CIVIL GUARDS WERE THE ONLY ONES THAT WERE AVAILABLE, BUT THEY DIDN’T EVEN DARE GO IN HALF THE TIME. IT WAS REALLY SOMETHING. THERE WERE SOME GUYS IN THERE THAT WERE REALLY, REALLY MEAN…” “AND OH YES, A FEW [MEN DID TRY TO ESCAPE THE CAMP],” BUCHANAN CONTINUED, “BUT THEY DIDN’T GET VERY FAR. THEY NEVER GOT AWAY. I’VE GOT RECORDS OF ONES THAT WERE CAUGHT. THEY STOLE SOMEBODY’S CAR. SOME OF THEM GOT A REGULAR SENTENCE FOR BREAKING ONE OF OUR LAWS.” BUCHANAN CONFIRMS THAT HER FATHER RETIRED FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE IN 1950 WHILE IN LETHBRIDGE. AFTER RETIREMENT, SHE EXPLAINED, “[HE] WENT BACK TO EDMONTON, HIS HOME CITY WHERE HIS PARENTS WERE AND A LOT OF FRIENDS… BUT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S DEPARTMENT WERE NOT GOING TO LET HIM LOOSE WITH HIS RECORD, SO THEY MADE IT A FIRST APPOINTMENT OF AN INSPECTOR OF JAILS FOR THE PRISONS OF ALBERTA…HE THEN WORKED ON THAT FOR FIFTEEN OR SIXTEEN YEARS. AFTER TWELVE YEARS, THEY MADE HIM SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS…” EDWARD BUCHANAN “SORT OF” RETIRED FROM THAT ROLE IN THE 1970S, HIS DAUGHTER EXPLAINED. HE CONTINUED WORKING IN SOME CAPACITIES UNTIL HIS PASSING IN 1998. “[I RECEIVED MY DAD’S R. C. M. P. POSSESSIONS, BECAUSE HE] KNEW I WOULD LOOK AFTER IT AND WANTED TO GET IT TO A MUSEUM… HE LIVED TO BE NINETY-EIGHT AND I DON’T THINK HE EVER THREW ANYTHING OUT SINCE HE WAS IN HIS TWENTIES.” ACCORDING TO EDWARD E. “BUCK” BUCHANAN’S OBITUARY, HE PASSED AWAY IN IN EDMONTON IN 1998. HIS WIFE’S NAME WAS CHRISTENE BUCHANAN AND TOGETHER THEY HAD FIVE CHILDREN – EDWARD, ROBERT, JEAN, WILLIAM, AND ROSE-MARIE. THE OBITUARY STATES HE SERVED 31 YEARS IN THE R.C.M.P, AND 15 YEARS AS THE SUPERINTENDENT OF CORRECTIONS FOR ALBERTA. PLEASE SEE PERMANENT FILE FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION.
Catalogue Number
P20180014002
Acquisition Date
2018-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range
1911
Material Type
Map
Accession No.
19736214002
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 60 x 87 cm
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report); For numbers 398 to 417, See District No. XA, Chap. III
Material Type
Map
Date Range
1911
Creator
Commission of Conservation Canada
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 60 x 87 cm
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Canadian?
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report); For numbers 398 to 417, See District No. XA, Chap. III
Notes
Scale 1:1,100,000 Base map from plates of Map of Canada, Department of the Interior This map along with 5 other maps is contained within an envelope entitled: Commission of Conservation, 1911. Maps to Accompany Report on the Water-Powers of Canada.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19736214002
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1911
Material Type
Map
Accession No.
19736214003
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 65 x 86 cm
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, See Report; Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, See Report
Material Type
Map
Date Range
1911
Creator
Commission of Conservation Canada
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 65 x 86 cm
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Canadian?
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, See Report; Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, See Report
Notes
Scale 1:1,100,000 Base map from plates of Map of Canada, Department of the Interior This map along with 5 other maps is contained within an envelope entitled: Commission of Conservation, 1911. Maps to Accompany Report on the Water-Powers of Canada.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19736214003
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Water-powers in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and part of North West Territories

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions94124
Date Range
1911
Material Type
Map
Accession No.
19736214004
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 65 x 86 cm
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report)
Material Type
Map
Date Range
1911
Creator
Commission of Conservation Canada
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 65 x 86 cm
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Canadian?
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report)
Notes
Scale 1:1,100,000 Base map from plates of Map of Dominion of Canada, Dept. of Interior This map along with 5 other maps is contained within an envelope entitled: Commission of Conservation, 1911. Maps to Accompany Report on the Water-Powers of Canada.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19736214004
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Water-powers in British Columbia

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions94125
Date Range
1911
Material Type
Map
Accession No.
19736214005
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 74 x 71 cm
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report); The Province contains many Water-Powers that have not been measured
Material Type
Map
Date Range
1911
Creator
Commission of Conservation Canada
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 74 x 71 cm
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Canadian?
Scope and Content
Legend contains: Boundaries of Districts in List of Water Powers, (See Report); Reference numbers in List of Water Powers, (See Report); The Province contains many Water-Powers that have not been measured
Notes
Scale 1:1,100,000 Base map from plates of Map of Dominion of Canada, Dept. of Interior This map along with 5 other maps is contained within an envelope entitled: Commission of Conservation, 1911. Maps to Accompany Report on the Water-Powers of Canada.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19736214005
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Irrigation canals in Southern Alberta

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions94126
Date Range
1911
Material Type
Map
Accession No.
19736214006
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 33 x 38 cm
Scope and Content
Boundaries: 49 to 51 degrees Latitude and 111 to 114 degrees Longitude Shows areas of: Canadian Pacific Railway Irrigation Block, Alberta Railway and Irrigation Co's System, Blackfeet Indian Reserve and Blood I.R. Shows location of cities, towns, lakes, rivers, creeks, hills, mountains, ranges, p…
Material Type
Map
Date Range
1911
Creator
Commission of Conservation
Physical Description
1 map : col. ; 33 x 38 cm
Physical Condition
Excellent
History / Biographical
Canadian?
Scope and Content
Boundaries: 49 to 51 degrees Latitude and 111 to 114 degrees Longitude Shows areas of: Canadian Pacific Railway Irrigation Block, Alberta Railway and Irrigation Co's System, Blackfeet Indian Reserve and Blood I.R. Shows location of cities, towns, lakes, rivers, creeks, hills, mountains, ranges, passes and peaks. Also includes: elevations, township numbers, range numbers Legend contains: Irrigation Canals and Railways
Notes
Scale 1:1,250,000? This map along with 5 other maps is contained within an envelope entitled: Commission of Conservation, 1911. Maps to Accompany Report on the Water-Powers of Canada.
Access Restrictions
Public Access
Accession No.
19736214006
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Farming Photographs. Lethbridge.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95012
Date Range
1912-1913
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191020
Physical Description
15 black and white photographic prints..
Scope and Content
15 photographs depicting various farming activities, i.e., seeding, threshing, etc. Most of the photographs were taken at the Lethbridge Experimental Farm (Agriculture Canada Research Station at Lethbridge.
Date Range
1912-1913
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
15 black and white photographic prints..
Custodial History
Transferred from Reynolds-Alberta Museum, Wetaskiwin, March 2019.
Scope and Content
15 photographs depicting various farming activities, i.e., seeding, threshing, etc. Most of the photographs were taken at the Lethbridge Experimental Farm (Agriculture Canada Research Station at Lethbridge.
Accession No.
20191020
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1896-1916
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20181071
Physical Description
1 cm. textual material
Scope and Content
3 examination booklets from 1896, 1898 (Northwest Territories), and 1916 (Department of Education, Province of Alberta). The examinations from 1896 and 1898 are for teachers. The examination booklet from 1916 is for Grade 8. The student who used the latter booklet was Viva Niven and she wrote th…
Date Range
1896-1916
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 cm. textual material
History / Biographical
Until 1905, Alberta was part of the Northwest Territories.
Scope and Content
3 examination booklets from 1896, 1898 (Northwest Territories), and 1916 (Department of Education, Province of Alberta). The examinations from 1896 and 1898 are for teachers. The examination booklet from 1916 is for Grade 8. The student who used the latter booklet was Viva Niven and she wrote the exam on June 23, 1916.
Accession No.
20181071
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Harvesting on the Noble Foundation Farm.

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96010
Date Range
1916
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191048
Physical Description
Eight 42 x 6.75 cm. black and white photographic prints.
Scope and Content
Eight photographs of the October 1916 World Record Wheat Harvest at the Noble Foundation Farm at Nobleford, Alberta. 54.395 bushels per acre on 1000 measured acres. 49.89 degrees north latitude, 113.03 degrees longitude west of Greenwich.
Date Range
1916
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
Eight 42 x 6.75 cm. black and white photographic prints.
Scope and Content
Eight photographs of the October 1916 World Record Wheat Harvest at the Noble Foundation Farm at Nobleford, Alberta. 54.395 bushels per acre on 1000 measured acres. 49.89 degrees north latitude, 113.03 degrees longitude west of Greenwich.
Accession No.
20191048
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Henderson Lake photographic collection

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96669
Date Range
1912-1946
Description Level
Series
Accession No.
20061004
Physical Description
31 digital photographs
Scope and Content
20061004001 Exhibition Grounds Grand Stand 20061004002 City of Lethbridge garbage truck, Public Works Dept #1, with two workers standing 20061004003 City of Lethbridge GM truck, Public Works Dept #5, 1946 20061004004 Henderson Lake Bridge under construction 20061004005 A man posing by a flume outle…
Date Range
1912-1946
Description Level
Series
Physical Description
31 digital photographs
Scope and Content
20061004001 Exhibition Grounds Grand Stand 20061004002 City of Lethbridge garbage truck, Public Works Dept #1, with two workers standing 20061004003 City of Lethbridge GM truck, Public Works Dept #5, 1946 20061004004 Henderson Lake Bridge under construction 20061004005 A man posing by a flume outlet 20061004006 Henderson Lake week cutter with crew 20061004007 View of Henderson Lake and bridge 20061004008 View of Henderson Lake including Exhibition Pavion, Grand Stand on the background 20061004009 Henderson Lake Bridge 20061004010 A man posing by a flume outlet 20061004011 Henderson Lake grounds grading 20061004012 A car (automobile) with a driver, 1913 20061004013 Henderson Lake Bridge under construction 20061004014 View of Henderson Lake 20061004015 Panaramic view of the Henderson Lake from the waterfront 20061004016 Henderson Lake bear pit 1912 20061004017 View of recreational facilities and people (children) along the shore 20061004018 Henderson Lake Bridge under construction 20061004019 View of recreational facilities and people (children) along the shore 20061004020 Dirt road at Henderson Lake grounds 20061004021 Henderson Lake Bridge under construction 20061004022 Trail, bench, newly planted trees at the shore, Exhibition Pavion on the background 20061004023 People swimming and boating on Henderson Lake 20061004024 View of recreational facilities and people, canoe boating 20061004025 Children on a slide at Henderson lake 20061004026 Dirt road and streetcar by Henderson Lake 20061004027 Henderson Park Eagle Cage and Bear Pit 20061004028 Children swimming at Henderson Lake 20061004029 Bear Pit - visitors and bear cubs 20061004030 Panaramic view of the Henderson Lake from the waterfront 20061004031 Newly graded road and plated trees at Henderson Lake
Accession No.
20061004
Collection
Archive
Less detail

143 records – page 1 of 8.