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6899 records – page 1 of 345.

Date Range
1961
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
201810350502
Physical Description
Color Slide
Scope and Content
View of the rivervalley. The Oldman River is snaking through it.
  1 image  
Date Range
1961
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
Color Slide
History / Biographical
William Hasulak was a resident of Lethbridge all his life. He worked for Eaton's and retired in 1987. His passion was the outdoors and animals. He served in the Royal Canadian Air Force in World War II. He did much travelling throughout his life taking picutres of the places he'd visited in Canada, and the United States. His hobbies included photography, collecting musical records and stamps. He passed away in 1990.
Scope and Content
View of the rivervalley. The Oldman River is snaking through it.
Accession No.
201810350502
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Prince of Wales Hotel (Waterton): Historical Handbook

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96514
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161106
Physical Description
1 cm manuscript (paper copy and electronic PDF format)
Scope and Content
A Historical Handbook for the Employees of PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL The handbook contains a brief history of the Prince of Wales Hotel, a discussion of its architectural style and elements, personalities and historical timeline (20 pages)
Description Level
Item
Creator
Glacier Park Foundation
Physical Description
1 cm manuscript (paper copy and electronic PDF format)
History / Biographical
The idea of a resort hotel in Waterton was conceived by Louis Warren Hill Sr., then chairman of the Great Northern Railway, and finally realized in 1926 after the end of Prohibition in Alberta. This was part of the plan to lure American tourists to Glacier and then north across the U.S.-Canada border to Alberta. The hotel was opened on July 25, 1927 and was promoted as epitome of luxury in the wilderness with steam-heated rooms, hot and cold running water, electricity, a full service dining room, an elevator, laundry, beauty parlor and barber shop, all overseen by professional and uniformed staff and a tavern to serve beer to thirsty Americans. The bustling community of Waterton Park got a shock when the Great Northern didn’t open the Prince of Wales Hotel in 1933, with the railway citing the downturn in economic conditions caused by the Great Depression. The railway said it would not reopen the hotel until a more direct route was built between Waterton and Glacier, versus all bus traffic having to go via Cardston. Construction of Chief Mountain International Highway was undertaken as a work relief project and completed in 1936, when the railway kept its promise and reopened the hotel. The new route between the parks was shorter and more scenic. The hotel would again be closed, from 1942 to 1945, due to the Second World War. In December 1960, the Prince of Wales Hotel was sold by the Great Northern Railway to Glacier Park, Inc., headed by Don Hummel of Tucson, Arizona. GPI also acquired all the other railway hotel assets in Glacier. The Great Northern had long ago lost interest in the money-losing hotel chain as train passenger ridership declined in the wake of rising auto travel and tour bus trips. To make the operations profitable, Hummel severely reduced staff, became very deliberate in building maintenance, and changed services. Hummel was barely into his fourth summer of operations in 1964 when heavy rain and rapid snowmelt through Waterton and Glacier caused some of the most severe flooding in memory. The road into Waterton was under water, as was much of the commercial district of town. Waterton residents who hadn’t fled earlier were sheltered at the Prince of Wales Hotel, which had its own water and electrical supply, as well as full heating capability. The scene would be repeated in 1975 when the townsite flooded, again. Major changes would come to the Prince of Wales Hotel in 1981 when Hummel’s Glacier Park, Inc. was sold to Greyhound Food Management. GPI would be reconstituted as a new entity and after a series of shuffles, is today a division of Phoenix-based Viad Corporation. After years of delayed maintenance, GPI began a series of upgrades to the hotel. In 1996, GPI president Dale Scott, working with Calgary architect Ron Goodfellow, attempted to persuade Parks Canada to permit a major expansion of the Prince of Wales Hotel. A series of drafts were created, some looking very much like plans the Great Northern Railway had considered and then shelved in 1928. Scott presented his proposals at public and private hearings. They were rejected, in part on the basis that the view of the hotel and Upper Waterton Lake presented such an iconic image that it should not be tampered with.
Scope and Content
A Historical Handbook for the Employees of PRINCE OF WALES HOTEL The handbook contains a brief history of the Prince of Wales Hotel, a discussion of its architectural style and elements, personalities and historical timeline (20 pages)
Accession No.
20161106
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20180022000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
175
Width
61.5
Description
GOBELIN TAPESTRY, MACHINE-STITCHED AND WOVEN; SCENE WOVEN DEPICTS FOUR FIGURES IN A HOUSE AROUND A TABLE, THREE ADULTS AND A CHILD; INTERIOR OF HOUSE DEPICTED SHOWS CABINET AND VASES ON CARPET IN FOREGROUND ON LEFT SIDE; BACKGROUND HAS TWO CHAIRS AND A LANDSCAPE PAINTING ON WALL AT LEFT, CENTER OF ROOM HAS A FIREPLACE AND COOKING POT WITH SIX PLATES ON MATLEPIECE, RIGHT SIDE OF FIREPLACE SHOWS PODIUM WITH BOOKS STACKED AND CABINET; RIGHT SIDE SHOWS FIGURES IN FOREGROUND AROUND A TABLE SEWING, AND WINDOW ON RIGHT WALL OPEN. SCENE IS WOVEN USING GOLD AND BROWN HUES PRIMARILY, WITH PINK AND GOLD FOR FLOOR. FRONT HAS ORANGE STAINING ALONG UPPER EDGE ON RIGHT, CENTER, AND LEFT SIDES; TAPESTRY SHOWS SIGNS OF FADING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED MARY WITDOUCK REGARDING HER DONATION OF A GOBELIN TAPESTRY. WITDOUCK IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM HOLLAND IN 1955 WITH HER FAMILY, THE BOUWS, AND HAD BEEN GIFTED THE TAPESTRY BY HER MOTHER PRIOR TO IMMIGRATING, HAVING PURCHASED THE TAPESTRY FROM A BELGIAN SALESMAN. ON THE TAPESTRY, WITDOUCK ELABORATED, “THERE WERE A FEW TAPESTRIES [IN THE FAMILY] BUT THEY WERE NOT GOLDEN. THEY WERE TAPESTRIES [OF] TULIP FIELDS AND THEY WERE MORE VELVETY TYPES WITH BRIGHT COLOURED TULIP FIELDS…IN DIFFERENT COLOURS HERE, DIFFERENT COLOURS THERE. TO ME, THEY WERE NICE AT THE TIME BUT THEY FADED MORE AND THEY WERE JUST NOT LIKE THIS ONE.” WITDOUCK TOLD THE STORY OF HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE TAPESTRY, RECALLING, “IT WAS AROUND THE END OF FEBRUARY IN 1955. I WAS SEVENTEEN YEARS OLD AND WORKED ON MY FATHER’S FARM. OUR FARM WAS SITUATED NEAR THE SMALL TOWN OF ERP IN THE PROVINCE OF NORTH BRABANT, NETHERLANDS. THE ECONOMY IN EUROPE AT THE TIME, DUE TO THE AFTERMATH OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR WAS NOT GOOD AND THAT WAS EXPECTED TO LAST FOR MANY MORE YEARS. LIFE FOR US, MYSELF AND OUR WHOLE FAMILY, WAS ABOUT TO CHANGE IN A BIG WAY AS MY PARENTS HAD MADE PLANS TO IMMIGRATE TO CANADA. THE DAY THAT WE WOULD LEAVE WAS ONLY ABOUT THREE WEEKS AWAY ON MARCH 25TH TO BE EXACT AND LOTS HAD TO BE DONE TO PREPARE FOR THAT DAY. JUST AROUND THAT TIME, A MAN RIDING A TRANSPORT BICYCLE STOPPED BY OUR HOUSE. THE MAN SAID THAT HE WAS SELLING TAPESTRIES AND ASKED MY MOTHER IF HE COULD SHOW THEM TO HER. THE TAPESTRIES WERE GOBELINS AND WERE MADE IN BELGIUM. SEVERAL OF US GIRLS, ALONG WITH MY MOTHER STOOD AROUND THE SALESMAN AS HE SHOWED US THE DIFFERENT ONES. MY MOTHER THEN SAID TO US OLDER GIRLS, 'IF YOU LIKE TO HAVE ONE YOU MAY ALL PICK ONE.' WE WERE HAPPY WITH THAT TO GET THESE TAPESTRIES. I DON’T KNOW WHAT MY MOM PAID FOR THEM. WE CAREFULLY WRAPPED THEM AS SOON THESE TAPESTRIES WOULD COME ALONG TO CANADA. AFTER ARRIVING IN CANADA, I WAS NOT ABLE TO SHOW OFF MY TAPESTRY ON THE WALL UNTIL 1965 ABOUT 10 YEARS LATER. RALPH [WITDOUCK] AND I MET AND MARRIED IN 1960, AND CAME TO LIVE ON A FARM IN A SMALL TWO-ROOM HOUSE. [WE] DID NOT HAVE A WALL LARGE ENOUGH TO HANG THIS BEAUTIFUL TAPESTRY. OUR FAMILY GREW AND FIVE YEARS AND THREE LITTLE ONES LATER, WE MOVED INTO A MUCH LARGER HOME. EVER SINCE THEN, NEARLY FIFTY YEARS, WE HAVE BEEN ABLE TO SHOW OFF THIS BEAUTIFUL TAPESTRY. THE REASON WHY THE TAPESTRY ALSO MEANT A LOT TO US IS BECAUSE BELGIUM WAS THE PLACE WHERE RALPH WAS BORN…I STILL REMEMBER MANY OF THE OLDER HOMES IN HOLLAND, THAT HAD THE SAME TYPE OF FURNITURE, FIREPLACE WITH PLATES ON TOP, WINDOWS THAT OPENED FROM THE TOP…AND A DOOR WHERE YOU COULD LEAVE THE TOP HALF OPEN, AND ALSO A BIBLE STAND WITH BIBLE. I ALSO REMEMBER MY GRANDMOTHER BEING DRESSED LIKE THE MOTHER IN THE TAPESTRY. ALSO SEWING AND KNITTING WAS ALL DONE BY HAND.” “IT’S IMPORTANT BECAUSE I’VE ALWAYS LIKED OLD PLACES IN EARLIER DAYS. I REALLY LIKED GOING TO MY GRANDPARENTS BECAUSE THINGS WERE SO DIFFERENT THEN. ALREADY [BEFORE 1955]…OUR PLACE WAS A BIT MORE MODERN. I CAN CONNECT WITH LOTS OF THOSE THINGS [IN THE TAPESTRY] BECAUSE I SAT ON THOSE CHAIRS AND I KNOW MY GRANDMA WAS DRESSED SOMETHING LIKE THE LADY IN THERE.” “BELGIUM WOULD HAVE HAD THOSE SAME SCENES IN THOSE DAYS. THEY WERE OLD FARM HOMES…THEY WERE AN AWFUL LOT ALIKE.” “I’VE ALWAYS ENJOYED HAVING THIS ON THE WALL. MOST OF THE TIME IT WAS EITHER IN THE DINING ROOM OR IN THE LIVING ROOM, EITHER ABOVE THE CHESTERFIELD OR [IN FAIRMONT SUBDIVISION] WE HAD IT IN THE DINING ROOM, THERE WAS A NICE BIG WALL THERE.” “THE FARM THAT WE WERE LIVING ON WHEN I LIVED IN THE TWO-ROOMED HOUSE WAS SE 10-11-20. THEN WE MOVED TO SW 15-11-20 AND THERE WAS A TWO-STORY HOUSE ON THERE THAT WAS BUILT IN 1906. IT WAS OLD AND IT WAS COLD. IT WAS ONLY INSULATED WITH NEWSPAPERS BUT WE HAD MUCH MORE ROOM...WE LIVED THERE UNTIL WE WERE ABLE TO BUILD A NEW HOME ON THAT PLACE [IN 1975]. BUT AS SOON AS WE MOVED TO SW 15-11-20, I WAS ABLE TO PUT [THE TAPESTRY] UP.” “AT THAT TIME, IT WAS HANGING ON A ROD. THERE WERE ALSO TASSELS ON THERE…I THINK MY KIDS HAD PROBABLY PULLED ON IT TOO MUCH. THEY WERE ALL LITTLE ONES [AND] BECAUSE IT WAS ALWAYS HANGING ABOVE THE CHESTERFIELD AND THE KIDS ARE ON THE CHESTERFIELD [IT WAS DAMAGED]. AFTER THAT, PROBABLY TWENTY YEARS AFTER THAT, WE DECIDED TO FRAME IT. I HAD IT, WE LIVED IN FAIRMONT FOR ABOUT TWELVE YEARS…MAYBE FIFTEEN YEARS…I HAD IT HANGING IN THE DINING ROOM ON A NICE BIG WALL. IT’S ALWAYS BEEN ON THE WALL UNTIL WE GOT [IN THIS LETHBRIDGE HOUSE], BECAUSE I KNEW THAT THIS WAS THE LAST PLACE UNTIL WE HAVE TO GO TO…ONE OF THOSE PLACES [SENIORS’ HOMES]. YOU DON’T KNOW WHERE YOU’LL END UP, BUT NOW WE DECIDED THAT WE SHOULD DECIDE WHAT TO DO WITH IT.” WITDOUCK RECALLED THE MOVE HER FAMILY MADE TO CANADA IN 1955, STATING, “WE [THE BOUW FAMILY] LEFT MARCH 25TH, AND WE ARRIVED IN CANADA…AT PIER 21 IN HALIFAX ON APRIL 2ND. WE ENDED UP IN LETHBRIDGE ON APRIL 6TH. MY BIRTHDAY WAS ON JULY 6TH SO I WAS NEARLY 18.” “[MY PARENTS] THOUGHT, WELL ‘MAYBE THIS [TAPESTRY] IS A NICE MEMORY’ AND [MY MOTHER] WANTED TO MAKE US HAPPY BECAUSE WE WERE IMMIGRATING AND WE LEFT OUR FRIENDS BEHIND, FAMILY. MY OLDER SISTER WAS ALREADY IN CANADA BECAUSE SHE GOT MARRIED THE YEAR BEFORE. [THAT WAS] ONE MORE REASON WHY MY PARENTS WANTED TO IMMIGRATE TOO, BECAUSE THEY KNEW THAT THE FAMILY WOULD BE DIVIDED FOREVER IF WE DIDN’T GO. LOTS OF TIMES WITH FAMILIES, SOME WOULD LIKE TO GET MARRIED BUT THERE WAS NO CHANCE IN HOLLAND. AFTER THE WAR, THE ECONOMY WAS REALLY BAD AND PEOPLE COULD NOT BUILD ANY HOMES FOR THEIR CHILDREN WHO [GOT] MARRIED.” “THERE WERE NINE CHILDREN, TEN WITH THE ONE THAT IMMIGRATED TO [CANADA] BEFORE…THE YOUNGEST ONE WAS FIVE, AND MY SISTER WAS 22 BY THEN AND THE NEXT ONE WAS 21. WE SLEPT WITH THREE IN A BED. ON THE FARM, WHEN WE ARRIVED, [THERE WAS] NO RUNNING WATER AND THAT WAS THE NORM FOR ALL NEW IMMIGRANTS.” “MY OLDER SISTER ENDED UP IN SPRING COULEE [WITH] HER HUSBAND, AND NATURALLY WE WANTED TO BE IN SOUTHERN ALBERTA TOO. BUT IN SPRING COULEE THERE’S NO SUGAR BEETS [AND] WE WANTED TO BE SOMEWHERE WHERE A FARMER WAS GOING TO GIVE US A JOB. THAT’S THE ONLY WAY YOU COULD COME IS IF YOU HAD A JOB LINED UP FOR A FAMILY LIKE THAT.” “I MISSED MY FRIENDS THE MOST BUT, IN THE MEANTIME, YOU END UP WITH NEW FRIENDS, SLOWLY…WE WERE ONLY [HERE] FOUR DAYS AND I HAD A JOB IN MILK RIVER ALREADY. IN THE MEANTIME, I GOT TO KNOW RALPH. I ONLY GOT TO COME HOME ONCE IN TWO WEEKS FROM MILK RIVER TO PICTURE BUTTE AND WE WENT TO CHURCH. RALPH WAS CATHOLIC TOO AND THIS IS HOW WE GOT TO SEE EACH OTHER AND HE FLIPPED MY HAT OFF. HE WAS KIND OF A FUNNY GUY. WE BECAME FRIENDS AND THEN IF YOU HAVE FRIENDS HERE, YOU DON’T REALLY FORGET THE ONES IN HOLLAND BUT IT BECOMES EASIER.” “I WAS NEVER AGAINST [IMMIGRATING]…WE [SAW] THAT THERE WAS GOING TO BE A FUTURE HERE IN CANADA FOR US. WHEN WE FIRST ARRIVED IN CANADA WE COULD SEE THAT ALL THE FARMERS WERE NOT ALL THAT RICH EITHER. THEY WERE WILLING TO GIVE US A JOB BECAUSE THEY NEEDED PEOPLE TO HELP IN THE SUGAR BEETS AND THAT. BUT AT THE SAME TIME WE COULD SEE THAT THEY WERE NOT ALL THAT RICH YET EITHER. THERE WAS THE ODD ONE THAT WAS VERY WELL OFF BUT LOTS OF THEM WERE NOT. BUT THEY WERE WILLING TO GIVE US A JOB. WE ARRIVED IN APRIL [WITH] THE FARMER, BUT WHEN THE BEETS WERE READY TO BE THINNED AND HOED AND HARVESTED…[AFTER THAT] MY DAD WAS OUT OF A JOB. WE COULD STILL LIVE IN THE HOUSE AS LONG AS WE WANTED BUT OF COURSE MY DAD WANTED A JOB AND HE LOOKED AROUND. HE ENDED UP [AT LOURDES FARM].” [MY DAD] WORKED THERE FOR TWO YEARS, BUT HE WANTED TO FARM FOR HIMSELF. THEN HE CAME AND WORKED FOR TIFFIN BUT NOT ON THE DAIRY. HE HAD ANOTHER PLACE, AND TIFFINS WERE VERY GOOD FOR US. THEY GAVE US A MILK COW AND THAT MEANT A LOT. WE HAD A YARD AND A LITTLE GARDEN, AND MY DAD RENTED LAND FOR SUGAR BEETS FROM TIFFIN FOR A FEW YEARS THEN HE BOUGHT A FARM IN BOW ISLAND. MY PARENTS MOVED TO BOW ISLAND BUT I NEVER MOVED WITH THEM BECAUSE I HAD A GOOD JOB HERE. THEN RALPH AND I WERE GOING TOGETHER ALREADY AND HE WAS TALKING SOMETIMES ABOUT GETTING MARRIED.” “I THINK [IMMIGRATING] WAS HARDEST ON MY MOTHER, YET SHE WAS THE BIGGEST PUSH BEHIND IMMIGRATING. I THINK IT WAS THE HARDEST ON HER MAINLY BECAUSE, DURING THE DAY WE WERE ALL OUT WORKING IN THE BEETS. IF WE WEREN’T WORKING IN THE BEETS, THE CHILDREN WERE GOING TO SCHOOL. LUCKILY THE YOUNGEST ONE WAS NOT IN SCHOOL YET AND THAT HELPED MY MOM. BUT SHE DIDN’T KNOW MUCH ENGLISH YET, MAYBE A LITTLE BIT, BUT NOT ENOUGH TO UNDERSTAND WHAT THE RADIO WAS SAYING. THEN HER PARENTS IN HOLLAND HAD A GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY...SHE WENT BACK. THAT WAS TWO AND A HALF YEARS AFTER SHE WAS HERE, SHE WENT BACK TO CELEBRATE HER PARENTS’ ANNIVERSARY. MY DAD DIDN’T GO, MAINLY BECAUSE IT WAS EXPENSIVE AND HE PROBABLY NEEDED THE MONEY HERE TO KEEP GOING. WHEN SHE CAME BACK SHE WAS A DIFFERENT PERSON. SHE WAS SO HAPPY TO BE BACK.” ON HER MOTIVES FOR DONATING THE TAPESTRY, WITDOUCK NOTED, “I WANT TO SCALE DOWN. I’M 81 NOW, YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN SUDDENLY YOUR LIFE TAKES A TURN...THIS IS WHY I WANT TO TAKE CARE OF [THE TAPESTRY] NOW BEFORE IT HAS TO BE DONE IN A HURRY.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INLCUDING MARY WITDOUCK’S TYPED STORY, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180022000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180022000
Acquisition Date
2018-09
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"CANADA 150 QUILT"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20180018000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"CANADA 150 QUILT"
Date
2017
Materials
COTTON, WOOL, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
239
Width
216
Description
QUILT WITH BACKGROUND PRINTED WITH RED NAMES OF CANADIAN TOWNS AND CITIES ON WHITE, AND WITH RED TRIM AROUND EDGES PRINTED WITH WHITE MAPLE LEAVES. QUILT HAS INNER BORDER ON FRONT ALONG LEFT, RIGHT, AND LOWER EDGES; INNER BORDER HAS 13 FABRIC BLOCKS TRANSFER PRINTED ON WHITE WITH THE FLAGS OF ALL CANADIAN PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES, THE NAME OF THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY, THE FLOWER OF THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY, AND THE DATE THE PROVINCE/TERRITORY JOINED CONFEDERATION; TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS ARE ARRANGED GOING DOWN THE LEFT SIDE: QUEBEC, ONTARIO, NORTHWEST TERRITORIES, BRITISH COLUMBIA; TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS ARE ARRANGED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ALONG BOTTOM EDGE: YUKON, NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR, NUNAVUT, ALBERTA, SASKATCHEWAN; TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS ARE ARRANGED GOING DOWN THE RIGHT SIDE: NEW BRUNSWICK, NOVE SCOTIA, MANITOBA, PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. CORNERS OF INNER BORDER HAVE TRANSFER PRINTED FABRIC BLOCKS HAVE BROWN, WHITE AND BLUE BACKGROUNDS WITH YELLOW TEXT “DISCOVER” AND RED TEXT “CANADA” WITH BLACK SILHOUETTES OF BEAR AND CARIBOU ON SIDES OF TEXT, WITH RED MAPLE LEAF BELOW TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCKS. CENTER OF QUILT HAS RED FABRIC BLOCK WITH APPLIQUED WHITE MAPLE LEAVES IN UPPER CORNERS, AND WHITE APPLIQUED TEXT IN CENTER “CANADA 150, 1867, 2017”. ABOVE CENTER BLOCK IS SEWN RED AND WHITE CANADA FLAG; LEFT OF FLAG HAS TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCK DEPICTING POSTER OF ORANGE, RED, AND BLACK CITYSCAPE WITH RED TEXT “OTTAWA”, AND TRANSFER PRINTED BLOCK OF BILINGUAL [ENGLISH AND FRENCH] ”ELIZABETH THE SECOND…A PROCLAMATION…” ON THE ADOPTION OF THE 1965 CANADIAN RED AND WHITE MAPLE LEAF FLAG; RIGHT OF CANADA FLAG SHOWS FOUR TRANSFER PRINTED FABRIC BLOCKS OF ITIERATIONS OF THE CANADIAN FLAG, STARTING FROM TOP: ROYAL UNION FLAG “USED PRIOR TO 1801”, RED ENSIGN “1871-1921”, CANADIAN RED ENSIGN “1921-1957”, AND CANADIAN RED ENSIGN “1957-1965”. BELOW CENTER “CANADA 150” BLOCK IS MAP OF CANADA WITH APPLIQUED PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES IN ORANGE, YELLOW, BLUE, AND RED FABRIC WITH WHITE PRINTED TEXT LABELLING THE PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES, WHITE STITCHED EDGES AROUND PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES, AND WHITE PRINTED IMAGES OF: ORCA AND FISH BESIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA; MOOSE AND TOTEM POLE ON BRITISH COLUMBIA; PUMPJACK AND SKIER ON ALBERTA; WHEAT HEAD ON SASKATCHEWAN; BEAR ON MANITOBA; BEAVER, LEGISLATURE BUILDING, AND CN TOWER ON ONTARIO; FLEUR-DI-LIES AND “SKIDOO” ON QUEBEC; LIGHTHOUSE AND FISH ON NOVA SCOTIA; FISH ON NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR; WHALES BESIDE NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR; HAWK ON YUKON; DIAMOND ON NORTHWEST TERRITORIES; CARIBOU, BEAR, AND INUKSHUK ON NUNAVUT. PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES HAVE CAPITAL CITIES INDICATED WITH BLACK STARS AND CITY NAMES IN WHITE. UPPER LEFT CORNER OF MAP HAS RED MAPLE LEAF AND YELLOW TEXT “DISCOVER” AND RED TEXT “CANADA”; UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF MAP HAS RED MAPLE LEAF AND BLUE TEXT “FROM SEA TO SEA” AND RED AND WHITE CANADIAN FLAG; LOWER LEFT CORNER OF MAP HAS RED, WHITE, AND BLUE ROUND COMPASS ROSE WITH “N” LABELLED AT TOP OF COMPASS IN BLACK. CENTER BLOCKS HAVE BORDERS AROUND THEIR PERIMETERS OF CREAM FABRIC PRINTED WITH RED REPEATING TEXT “CANADA 1867-2017”. BACK OF QUILT HAS WHITE LABEL ON TRANSFER PRINTED FABRIC IN UPPER LEFT CORNER WITH RED TEXT “SYDNEY FISHER; LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA; 403-327-5838; QUILT FOR CANADA’S 150TH; 1867 – 2017.” BACK HAS MINOR STAIN AT LOWER EDGE; OVERALL EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
DECORATIVE ARTS
History
ON JULY 26, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED SYDNEY AND FRANK FISHER REGARDING SYDNEY FISHER’S CREATION OF THE CANADA 150 QUILT DONATED BY VERN NEUFELD. NEUFELD WON THE QUILT IN A RAFFLE AS A FUNDRAISER FOR THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN. ACCORDING TO A LETTER SENT TO THE GALT MUSEUM, NEUFELD INDICATED THAT HE AND HIS WIFE HAD NO NEED TO KEEP THE QUILT, AND HAD OFFERED THE QUILT BACK TO THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN FOR ANOTHER RAFFLE. BILL GINTHER, CEO OF THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN, DIRECTED THE QUILT TO THE GALT MUSEUM & ARCHIVES, WITH THE DONATION COMPLETED BY NEUFELD. ON THE CREATION OF THE QUILT, SYDNEY FISHER RECALLED, “AS FAR AS I KNOW, IT’S THE ONLY ONE WITH THAT LAY-OUT THAT I’VE SEEN, ANYWHERE. IT WAS MY ORIGINAL IDEA. I LIKE TO MAKE THEME QUILTS. THE 150TH BIRTHDAY WAS THE IDEAL TIME TO DO IT. SO, I WENT ABOUT COLLECTING ALL THE PIECES, FROM THE INTERNET, AND THE MIDDLE PIECE IS TOTALLY MY OWN. THIS WAS FROM FABRIC STORES…THE MAP.” “I MADE THAT [CENTER PIECE], TOTALLY FROM SCRATCH. I BOUGHT THE TEMPLATES, CUT IT OUT, AND APPLIQUED IT ON. THESE LITTLE THINGS, I MADE UP OUT OF THREE MAPLE LEAFS, JUST STUCK TOGETHER, UP IN THE CORNER. I MADE THE FLAG, AT THE TOP. THIS PIECE [THAT READS “OTTAWA”] WAS FROM A PANEL [OF] MATERIAL.” “[I INCLUDED IT BECAUSE] IT’S THE CAPITAL. BELOW THAT IS THE DECLARATION FROM THE QUEEN THAT SAYS THAT THE MAPLE LEAF BECAME OUR FLAG IN 1965. THAT, WE GOT OFF THE INTERNET ALSO. AND, SOMEBODY SAID TO ME, 'YOU CAN’T DO THAT. THAT’S --' I SAID, 'IT’S ON THE INTERNET. I CAN SO.' THEN WE ALSO GOT, ON THE UPPER RIGHT-HAND CORNER, ARE THE FOUR FLAGS THAT [WERE] USED FROM 1867 TO 1965, AND IT’S GOT THE DATES UNDERNEATH EACH ONE OF THEM.” “[THERE ARE] THE FLAGS AND THE FLOWERS, AND THEN THERE’S ALSO THE DATES THAT THEY JOINED CONFEDERATION, WHICH BRINGS THEM DOWN THE QUILT FROM BOTH SIDES. THERE’S THE FOUR ORIGINALS, AND THEN AS THEY JOIN, THEY COME [AROUND THE EDGE], AND NUNAVUT IS RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE, BECAUSE IT WAS THE LAST ONE IN 1999.” “THAT CAME RIGHT OUT OF MY HEAD. IT’S JUST SOMETHING I LIKE TO DO. I LIKE THEME QUILTS, AND IF I HAVE A THEME, I RUN WITH IT. [THE QUILT] HAS MORE MEANING BECAUSE IT IS CANADA. SOMEBODY SAID TO ME, 'WELL, IT SHOULD HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH MILITARY.' NO, IT’S CANADA’S BIRTHDAY, IT’S NOT MILITARY! THAT ONE IS A CANADA QUILT…THIS ONE WAS SPECIFICALLY FOR CANADA.” “IT WOULD BE ABOUT MARCH OF 2017 [WHEN I STARTED THIS QUILT]. WHEN I START A QUILT, I FOCUS ON NOTHING ELSE. I HAVE THIS BEAUTIFUL PICTURE IN MY HEAD, AND IT’S GOT TO TURN OUT THAT WAY, OR I DON’T LIKE IT. I JUST KEEP GOING. THE FIRST ONE ENDED UP KING-SIZE BECAUSE I HAD ALL THIS STUFF I WANTED TO GET ON IT…THEN I STARTED NARROWING IT UP A BIT, SO THAT IT WOULD BE A QUEEN-SIZE INSTEAD.” “[THE FIRST QUILT] TOOK ABOUT 120 HOURS, BECAUSE I HAD TO GATHER ALL THE STUFF FOR [IT]. I [HAD] ALL THE PATTERNS FOR THIS, AND THE DOWN-SIZED ONE, SO I CAN PUT IT TOGETHER [FASTER]…BECAUSE I HAVE ALL THE PATTERNS…I WORK USUALLY FROM 7:00 IN THE MORNING TILL 4:00 IN THE AFTERNOON.” “THIS ONE WAS THE SECOND [QUILT] MADE TO SHOW OFF, BECAUSE [THE FIRST] ONE WENT TO ENGLAND. MY PLAN WAS TO MAKE ONE, AND I MADE THE ONE AND HUNG IT IN THE [ROYAL BANK ON MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE]. IT WENT OVER SO WELL, I MADE TWO MORE. QUEEN-SIZE. THEN SOMEBODY SAID, “BUT THAT’S SO BIG.” THEN I MADE [ABOUT SIX]…WALL-HANGINGS.” “[THIS QUILT] WENT OVER WELL, EVEN IF THE BIRTHDAY IS OVER. PEOPLE WANT IT. THERE WAS A FELLOW AT THE BANK, HE WANTED THE QUILT BECAUSE HE’S SETTING UP, OUT IN STIRLING THEY HAVE A CP RAIL [MUSEUM], BUT THE QUILT WAS TOO BIG. HE ORDERED TWO—ONE FOR HIS HOUSE, AND ONE FOR STIRLING, BUT HE WANTED THE CP RAIL ACROSS CANADA, SO THAT ONE HAS THE CP RAIL ACROSS THE BOTTOM.” SYDNEY FISHER ELABORATED ON THE DONATION OF THE QUILT TO THE LETHBRIDGE SOUP KITCHEN FUNDRAISER, NOTING, “[THIS KING-SIZED VERSION ENDED UP] IN THE ROYAL BANK ON MAYOR MCGRATH. THAT IS MY BANKING BANK, AND I SAID, 'WOULD YOU CONSIDER HANGING IT THERE?' BECAUSE THAT WAS THE END OF JUNE…THEY HUNG IT THERE SO THAT THEY COULD HAVE IT THERE FOR THE FIRST OF JULY. [THIS QUEEN-SIZED VERSION] WENT TO THE EXHIBITION WHEN THEY HAD…A CANADA DAY PAVILION, OR CANADA’S 150TH BIRTHDAY. I HUNG ONE OF THE WALL HANGINGS ALONGSIDE OF IT.” “[THE KING-SIZED VERSION] WENT TO ENGLAND…THERE WAS AN ENGLISHMAN CAME INTO THE BANK, AND HE GAVE THE GIRLS HIS PHONE NUMBER, AND SAID, 'GET HER TO PHONE ME.' I PHONED HIM, AND HE SAID, 'I WANT ONE.' I SAID, 'EXCUSE ME?' WELL, HE SAID, 'THAT QUILT AT THE BANK…I WANT ONE.' I SAID, 'WELL, IT’S A KING-SIZE (IT’S 100X104, OR 108), IT’S $1000.00.' 'I’LL TAKE IT.'” “THAT’S WHEN I MADE TWO QUEEN-SIZED ONES. I DONATED [THE QUILT FROM THE PAVILLION] TO THE SOUP KITCHEN. I PUT [THE QUEEN-SIZED QUILTS] ON KIJIJI, AND GOT NO RESPONSE WHATSOEVER. I WOULDN’T PAY $800.00 FOR A QUILT, BECAUSE I COULD MAKE THEM. I BROUGHT THEM BACK HOME, AND I SAID, 'YOU KNOW, WE DONATE TO THE SOUP KITCHEN. THEY’RE DOING A BREAKFAST PROGRAM. THEY CAN TAKE IT, AND RAFFLE IT OFF FOR THEIR BREAKFAST PROGRAM.' I [DONATED ONE QUILT TO] NOR-BRIDGE. THEY RAFFLED IT OFF, FOR WHATEVER PROGRAMS THEY NEED.” “WE STARTED TALKING ABOUT IT, AND [THE SOUP KITCHEN STAFF] ALL SAID TO ME, 'OH, THAT WOULD BE NICE FOR US TO RAFFLE OFF.' I THOUGHT (THIS WAS BEFORE I PUT THEM ON KIJIJI), 'I DON’T KNOW.' WHEN THEY DIDN’T SELL ON KIJIJI, I TOOK IT TO BILL, AND I SAID, 'DO YOU STILL WANT IT?' WELL, HE HUNG IT ON THE WALL, AND STARTED SELLING TICKETS…I THINK THESE GUYS GOT $1500.00. I DON’T KNOW ABOUT NOR-BRIDGE…$1500.00 IS WHAT BILL SAID THEY MADE ON THAT QUILT. [TICKETS] WERE $5.00.” “THIS ONE HAD GONE TO SASKATCHEWAN…TO [THE KELVINGTON HERITAGE SHOW]. THE LEGION LADIES SAW IT, AND ASKED MY SISTER HOW MUCH I WANTED FOR IT. OF COURSE, THE LEGION ISN’T AS FLUID AS A LOT OF THINGS, AND $800.00 WAS TOO MUCH. I SAID, 'WELL, YOU ASK THEM IF THEY WOULD LIKE A WALL-HANGING.' THE WALL-HANGINGS ARE ONLY $150.00. THAT’S HOW THEY STARTED. THAT, AND LARRY AT THE ROYAL BANK, WHO WANTED A SMALLER ONE FOR STIRLING.” ON HER INTEREST IN QUILTING, SYDNEY FISHER RECALLED, “MY MOTHER [FRANCES DICKS, NEE FENNELL] SEWED EVERYTHING, FROM HER OWN BRAS ON UP, AND SHE SEWED FOR EVERYBODY. I WENT HOME TO HER HOUSE, WHEN I WAS IN NURSING, AND SHE SAID, 'WELL, DON’T TOUCH THAT.' THERE’S A SHEET IN THE MIDDLE OF THE LIVING ROOM FLOOR; THERE’S ANOTHER ONE OVER HERE; THERE’S ANOTHER ONE OVER HERE. I SAID, 'WHAT HAVE YOU GOT IN -?' “WELL, THAT’S THE WEDDING DRESS, AND THESE ARE THE BRIDESMAID DRESSES.” THAT’S HOW SHE SEWED! ON AN OLD TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “PROBABLY ABOUT 10 YEARS AGO I STARTED QUILTING. I WAS PAST DOING CLOTHING, AND TO DO THESE SILLY LITTLE THINGS THAT ARE OF NO USE, OTHER THAN TO COLLECT DUST, I CAN’T BE BOTHERED WITH THAT. I NEED TO HAVE SOMETHING I CAN KIND OF SET MY TEETH IN.” “QUILTING HAS MADE ME EVEN A WORSE HOUSEKEEPER THAN I ALREADY WAS, BECAUSE, WHEN I GET UP IN THE MORNING, AND I HAVE AN IDEA, WELL, 'IF YOU DON’T DO THE DISHES, FRANK, THEY AREN’T GOING TO GET DONE, BECAUSE I’M DOING SOMETHING.' I’M NOT A SUPER HOUSEKEEPER, AS IT IS, AND WHEN I HAVE SOMETHING LIKE THIS, EVERYTHING ELSE TAKES A BACK-BURNER.” SYDNEY FISHER NOTED HER THOUGHTS ON THE DONATION OF THE QUILT TO THE MUSEUM, “IT MEANS EVERYTHING TO ME, BECAUSE I AM A CANADIAN. I WAS BORN IN SASKATCHEWAN, AND THE FURTHEST I’VE GONE IS TO LETHBRIDGE. I’VE BEEN TO TORONTO ONCE, AND WE WENT TO NOVA SCOTIA ONCE. I’VE BEEN TO B.C. ONCE. I LIVED IN WINNIPEG FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS. BUT, YOU’RE STILL IN CANADA, AND, AS FAR AS I’M CONCERNED, THERE ISN’T ANY PLACE LIKE IT, EVEN IF IT IS THE DUST BOWL OF THE WORLD…I’M QUITE PROUD THAT IT’S AT THE MUSEUM. I DIDN’T THINK THEY’D EVER GET THAT FAR.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETTER FROM VERN NEUFELD, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180018000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180018000
Acquisition Date
2018-07
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
FELT, PAINT, WOOD
Catalogue Number
P20170038000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1990
Date Range To
2000
Materials
FELT, PAINT, WOOD
No. Pieces
1
Length
41.5
Width
88
Description
BLUE FELT BANNER WITH WOOD DOWEL POLE AT END, DOWEL WIDTH 88CM, BANNER WIDTH 74 CM. DOWEL ENDS ARE ROUNDED WITH SCREWS IN ENDS; RIGHT END OF DOWEL AS BLUE LINE AROUND POLE. BANNER IS FELT WITH WHITE FELT SEWN ON IN LETTERS “CFUW”, ROUND FELT MOSAIC OF COULEES UNDER A BLUE SKY BELOW, AND WHITE FELT SEWN TEXT “LETHBRIDGE & REGION”. LOWER EDGE OF BANNER HAS BLUE COTTON STRING TASSELS. BACK OF BANNER HAS WHITE OUTLINES OF LETTERS IN THREAD FROM STITCHING ON FRONT. LOOSE THREAD ON LETTER “G” IN “REGION” TEXT; LETTERS HAVE RED STAINING ON LOWER TEXT; WRINKILING OF FELT ON RIGHT SIDE OF BANNER; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORY
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
ASSOCIATIONS
History
ON APRIL 16, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED KATHYRN YOSHIDA AND ROSE JURISICH REGARDING THE DONATION OF A WALL BANNER FROM THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN [CFUW]. YOSHIDA AND JURISICH WERE MEMBERS OF THE LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER OF THE CFUW WHEN THE HANGING WAS MADE IN THE 1990S. ON THE WALL BANNER, JURISICH RECALLED, “I THINK THAT [LAURIE] KAMINSKI MADE IT…SHE HASN’T BEEN A MEMBER FOR A LONG TIME… LAURIE MADE IT I THINK IN [PROBABLY THE ‘90S]. WE HAVE A NEW BANNER NOW THAT’S CURRENT. I DON’T REMEMBER WHO ELSE LAURIE DID IT [WITH]. SHE DIDN’T DO IT HERSELF, SHE DID IT WITH A COMMITTEE. BUT I DON’T REMEMBER WHO IT WAS.” “[WE USED THIS AT] PRAIRIE MEETINGS, WHERE WE ALL MET, AND THEY THOUGHT THAT EACH CLUB SHOULD HAVE A BANNER. THAT’S WHY WE GOT IT, AND THEN WE DIDN’T USE IT, I GUESS, BECAUSE IT’S HERE. I DON’T THINK [THE BANNER WAS IN USE] UP UNTIL 2010.” YOSHIDA ADDED, “I THINK [WE USED THE BANNER AT] MORE PROVINCIAL MEETINGS, NOT FOR THE GENERAL MONTHLY MEETINGS, BUT FOR ANYTHING A LITTLE BIT MORE SPECIAL.” “I REALLY LIKE [THE BANNER]…THE PRAIRIE AND THE COULEES. THERE’S A DIFFERENT…GRAPHIC ON THE NEW [BANNER]. THE NEW ONE WAS JUST UNVEILED A COUPLE YEARS AGO.” MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BARBARA DOYLE ON DECEMEBER 22, 2017 REGARDING HER TIME WITH THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN AND ON THE WALL BANNER. ON THE BANNER, DOYLE NOTED, “WE [USED] IT WHEN WE [WERE HAVING] A GATHERING OF PEOPLE FOR ONE THING—[THE] AGM. SOMETIMES, WE HOST [THE AGM], JUST THE ALBERTA ONE. IT GOES TO DIFFERENT CITIES, SO WE PUT [THE BANNER] UP THERE, WHEN SOMETHING LIKE THAT [HAPPENS].” “I THINK THIS IS JUST THE ‘HOME’ THING, AND THEY ALL HAVE A ‘HOME’ PLACE THERE, TOO. WHEREVER THEY ARE GOING, THERE IS PROBABLY SOMETHING LIKE [THIS BANNER DISPLAYED] TOO.” “I THINK I DO [REMEMBER THE BANNER BEING ON DISPLAY], BECAUSE I THINK [THE] NEW ONE HAS BEEN IN THE WORKS IN THE LAST FIVE YEARS.” “[WHEN I FIRST STARTED, THE BANNER] WOULD JUST HANG IT IN THE HOUSE, WHEN THERE WAS A MEETING… IT WOULD BE FOLDED UP AND PUT IN THE CLOSET.” YOSHIDA ELABORATED ON THE HISTORY OF THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN IN LETHBRIDGE, NOTING, “WE USED TO MEET AT THE [ATCO] GAS COMPANY [BUILDING]…IN THE 70S AND 80S…WE HAD TO GO DOWN STAIRS, AND I THINK THE STAIRS BECAME A PROBLEM FOR SOME OF OUR WOMEN. FROM THE GAS COMPANY [WE WENT] TO THE BULLMAN.” JURISICH ADDED, “WE WERE ALSO AT SAVE-ON-FOODS. [ATCO HAD] AN AUDITORIUM DOWNSTAIRS. THAT WAS QUITE LARGE. THEY [HAD] A VERY LARGE ROOM DOWNSTAIRS WITH A KITCHEN. IT WAS ACTUALLY VERY NICE EXCEPT THAT THE STAIRS WERE LIKE GOING INTO THE DEPTHS. THE STEPS WERE VERY STEEP AND VERY LONG. AND NO ELEVATOR.” DOYLE NOTED, “WE DON’T HAVE A BUILDING. BOOK CLUB IS AT PEOPLE’S HOUSES. WE ROTATE, AND WE HAVE A LITTLE, NOT A LUNCH, BUT NIBBLEY’S, (THAT’S FINGER FOOD), THERE. I DON’T KNOW WHERE THE BRIDGE GOES – THE BRIDGE PEOPLE. I THINK MAYBE TO THE SENIOR’S, ON THE SOUTH SIDE…WE USED TO GO TO THE POLICE STATION, BECAUSE THEY HAD A ROOM THERE, AND THEY LET US HAVE OUR MEETINGS THERE. I THINK IT WAS USUALLY MONTHLY THAT WE WERE DOING SOMETHING THERE.” “THAT SPACE [AT THE POLICE STATION] IS GONE, AND I WAS TOTALLY OUT OF IT THIS PAST SEMESTER, BECAUSE I WAS SO BUSY…I DON’T KNOW WHERE THEY WENT.” ON HER TIME WITH THE GROUP, JURISICH RECALLED, “I MOVED HERE IN 1971 AND A FRIEND BROUGHT ME TO THE ORGANIZATION. SHE THOUGHT I WOULD BE INTERESTED IN A MEMBERSHIP. IT WAS LIKE-MINDED WOMEN AND WE HAD A LOT OF DISCUSSIONS ABOUT WHITE PAPERS AND [OTHER TOPICS].” “AN UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE WAS FINE [TO BE A MEMBER], JUST SO LONG AS YOU HAD A DEGREE. THEY DIDN’T HAVE NURSING DEGREES AT ONE TIME, IT WAS JUST REGISTERED NURSE WHICH WASN’T CONSIDERED A DEGREE. NOW THEY HAVE NURSING DEGREES. BUT IF YOU HAD THAT KIND OF EDUCATION, THEN YOU WERE AN ASSOCIATE MEMBER…THEY ALSO WERE QUITE RESTRICTIVE AS TO LEGITIMATE UNIVERSITIES, AND THEY DON’T HAVE ANY OF THAT ANYMORE.” “I REMEMBER WHEN WE STUDIED THE WHITE PAPER ON THE MURDOCH CASE, WHERE THAT WOMAN WAS MARRIED FOR…FORTY YEARS OR SOMETHING AND THEY LIVED ON A FARM. HE LEFT SO THEY CHANGED THE LAWS ABOUT WOMEN CONTRIBUTING TO LIFE AND I THINK THE CHANGE WAS IN THE ‘70S OR ‘80S.” “THE SCHOOL SYSTEM [WAS AN IMPORTANT TOPIC] WHEN THEY WERE INTRODUCING THE GIFTED PROGRAM. I REMEMBER GOING TO MEETINGS ABOUT THAT AND REPORTING BACK.” “[OUR ACTIVISM] VARIES [BY] THE ISSUE, WE WERE VERY ACTIVE WITH THE ANTI-FRACKING. WE WERE DEMONSTRATING ON THE STREETS FOR THAT…I THINK WE WERE MORE INVOLVED WITH DISCUSSING THINGS. I DON’T THINK THE ADVOCACY WAS GREATER [THEN]. I THINK IT’S GREATER NOW.” “I REMEMBER THAT WE USED TO WRITE LETTERS AND THINGS, I THINK AT THE TIME. WE STILL DO THAT ACTUALLY.” “THE MEETINGS ARE ON SATURDAY, THAT’S TO ACCOMMODATE ANYBODY THAT’S WORKING THAT CAN COME. OTHERWISE THEY WOULD PROBABLY BE WORKING OTHER DAYS. THAT WAS PROBABLY WHY, ORIGINALLY, IT WAS DECIDED TO HAVE IT ON THE SATURDAY. SATURDAY AT NOON ACTUALLY. IT USED TO BE IN THE EVENING ALL THE TIME, THIRD MONDAY OF THE MONTH.” “FOR ME IT WAS THE FIRST ORGANIZATION THAT I WAS INTRODUCED TO AND I WAS WORKING. I HAD A WORKING LIFE AND A HOME LIFE WHERE I HAD CHILDREN. I DID BELONG TO SOMETHING ELSE AT ONE TIME, I THINK THE HOME EC ASSOCIATION. I ENJOYED THE PEOPLE IN IT AND IT WAS INTERESTING FOR ME. IT WAS DIFFERENT THAN ANYTHING I HAD DONE, SO THAT’S WHY I CONTINUED.” YOSHIDA ADDED, “I BECAME A MEMBER IN 1968, THE YEAR THAT WE CAME TO LETHBRIDGE, AND I WAS BROUGHT TO THE MEETING BY ANOTHER FACULTY MEMBER’S WIFE, JENNIFER BUTTERFIELD. I THINK SHE KNEW THAT WE WERE NEW TO TOWN AND WE DIDN’T REALLY KNOW ANYBODY. SHE REALLY DID A VERY NICE JOB OF INTRODUCING ME TO LETHBRIDGE AND WHERE THE MEAT MARKET AND VALUE VILLAGE [WERE], PLACES TO SHOP AND PLACES TO GO. CFUW WAS ONE PLACE THAT SHE BROUGHT ME TO. AT THE TIME, I WAS NOT ONLY NEW TO TOWN, BUT I WAS A STAY-AT-HOME WITH A BABY AND DIDN’T HAVE MUCH SOCIAL EXPERIENCES. THIS GROUP MET ONCE A MONTH AND IT WAS MY EVENING OUT AND, AS ROSE SAID, THEY HAD EXCELLENT SPEAKERS ABOUT [TOPICS], PEOPLE FROM THE COMMUNITY WHO WOULD COME AND TALK. IT WAS MY INTELLECTUAL EVENING, IT WAS AWAY FROM DIAPERS AND BABIES AND A CHANCE TO BE WITH ADULTS. THAT, FOR ME, REALLY SERVED A VERY IMPORTANT PURPOSE. AT THAT TIME I DIDN’T REALLY KNOW WHAT IT STOOD FOR AND THE PROVINCIAL OR NATIONAL AGENDAS, IT WAS JUST THAT IT WAS NICE.” “MANY WERE [IN THE] UNIVERSITY WOMEN’S CLUB. AT THE TIME, YOU HAD TO BE A GRADUATE OF A UNIVERSITY OR HAVE A DIPLOMA[TO BE A] FULL-FLEDGED MEMBER. I THINK THEY’RE DESPERATE FOR MEMBERS, BECAUSE I THINK THIS GROUP, AS OTHER GROUPS/CLUBS ARE NOTICING A DECLINE IN INTEREST THAT THEY HAVE TAKEN THAT [REQUIREMENT] AWAY. WHEN ROSE SAYS LIKE-MINDED PEOPLE, THE WOMEN WERE EDUCATED, THEY WERE KEEN, AT THAT TIME IT WAS THE WOMEN’S MOVEMENT, MS MAGAZINE WAS BIG, THE PLACE OF WOMEN AND EQUAL MEMBERS. WE’RE STILL WORKING ON IT…I REMEMBER WHEN IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT…ALL ALONG IT HAS ALWAYS BEEN [ABOUT] THE STATUS OF WOMEN.” “DAYCARE WAS [AN] IMPORTANT [TOPIC] AT ONE TIME… SOMETIMES THE WOMEN IN OUR GROUP ARE INVOLVED IN OTHER AGENCIES OR GROUPS, SO IT KIND OF MESHES, AND I’M NOT SURE WHERE ONE BEGINS AND THE OTHER ENDS.” “[I JOINED THE GROUP BECAUSE] I GUESS NOBODY ELSE ASKED ME TO JOIN ANYTHING. ALTHOUGH, WHEN YOU ARE A ONE-CAR FAMILY AND YOU HAVE A BABY AND YOU ARE…TRADING, LIKE, I’LL LOOK AFTER YOUR CHILD THIS AFTERNOON SO THAT YOU CAN DO THIS AND THEN IT’S MY TURN, I WAS IN THAT SORT OF SITUATION. I GUESS I WASN’T INTERESTED IN PURSUING OTHER THINGS LIKE KINETTES, THE ‘Y’.” DOYLE ELABORATED ON HER TIME WITH THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN, STATING, “I WAS ASKED TO JOIN [THE GROUP BY A FRIEND, PATTY JOHNSON, ABOUT 2008], AND I ENJOY IT VERY MUCH. IT’S A WOMEN’S GROUP, AND WE COLLECT MONEY, FOR A [SCHOLARSHIP]…WE DO TWO SCHOLARSHIPS A YEAR, AND IT’S ALSO A FRIENDSHIP GET-TOGETHER, AND A LEARNING PROCESS. WE HAVE PEOPLE COME IN, AND [TELL] US WHAT’S GOING ON, AND WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE CITY…IT’S REALLY QUITE ENJOYABLE.” “I HAVE TWO DEGREES, SO I ENJOY THE COMPANY OF PEOPLE, THAT WE HAVE A LOT TO TALK ABOUT. I LIKE THE FACT THAT WE ARE GIVING BACK, TO THE KNOWLEDGE THAT WE LEARNED, IN THE FORM OF SCHOLARSHIPS.” “WHEN THIS STARTED, AND IT’S BEEN GOING IN LETHBRIDGE UNDER A DIFFERENT NAME, THE WIVES OF THE PROFESSORS THAT MOVED INTO TOWN, AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE WAS FORMED. THEY WERE THE ONES THAT STARTED THIS CHAPTER.” “I THINK MOST OF THE WOMEN THAT MARRIED WERE HOUSEWIVES, AFTER THEY WERE MARRIED, AND HAVING CHILDREN, BUT THEY HAVE DEGREES. THAT WAS THE REQUIREMENT FOR BELONGING – THAT YOU HAD A DEGREE, BUT JUST IN THE NEAR PAST NOW [ABOUT 2 – 3 - 4 YEARS], THE DOORS ARE OPEN TO ALL WOMEN NOW. THERE ARE A FEW PROFESSIONALS IN OTHER AREAS, AND SOME, WE DON’T ASK. IF THEY WANT TO JOIN, THAT’S FINE.” “THEY HAVE A PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT, SECRETARY. I’M FINDING, AS WE ARE ALL FINDING, AS WE ARE AGING, WE HAVE VERY FEW YOUNGER PEOPLE, BECAUSE THEY ARE ALL AT UNIVERSITY, AND VERY BUSY. THE ONES THAT HAVE JOBS, THEY ARE VERY BUSY TOO. AS WE AGE, WE ARE ALL ACTIVE, AND IT KEEPS US REALLY ACTIVE. IT’S GOOD TO GET OUT, AND BE WITH OTHER PEOPLE.” “WE DO HAVE PEOPLE IN THE GROUP THAT GO TO OTHER THINGS THAT ARE GOING ON, IN DIFFERENT PROVINCES. THEY SOMETIMES DO THE NATIONAL ONE, EVEN, AND FLY SOMEWHERE, AND THAT GOES ON ONCE A YEAR. IT’S CERTAINLY A WORTHWHILE GROUP, AND REALLY QUITE ACTIVE. WE HAVE A YOUNG PRESIDENT NOW, SHE IS DOING HER PHD, AND HER MOTHER IS A PROF [AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE].” “I THINK [THE GROUP IS RAISING AWARENESS] THAT TIMES ARE CHANGING. IT HAS BEEN, IN THE PAST, KIND OF SNOBBISH, HAVING TO BE VETTED IN, SO THIS IS REALLY GOOD, AND IT’S WORKED WELL. WE HAVE GOT SOME WONDERFUL PEOPLE WORKING IN [THE GROUP]…WHEN THEY HAD THE WOMEN’S PARADE, THE WOMEN’S PROTEST…THERE WAS A NUMBER OF US THAT PARTICIPATED IN THAT, AND THEY MADE THE HATS FOR IT. WE ARE ACTIVE IN THINGS LIKE THAT, THAT PERTAIN TO WOMEN.” “IT’S LIKE WOMEN ARE RISING, AND THAT SEEMS QUITE APPARENT. I AM IN THE UNIVERSITY BUILDING ENOUGH THAT I SEE IT AMONG THE YOUNG WOMEN. BOY, THEY DON’T LET ANYTHING GO BY. THEY’RE ACTUALLY REALLY QUITE GOOD, I THINK…[SEEING THAT MAKES ME FEEL] REALLY GOOD. IT’S ABOUT TIME. WE HAVE LOTS OF ENGAGEMENT WITH WOMEN—THE PEOPLE AROUND TOWN, WHO ARE THE ‘SHAKERS’ HERE, AND THEY SHAKE THINGS UP. THAT’S REALLY GOOD.” ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN FORMED A CHAPTER IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1944. DR. URSILLA MACDONNELL, DEAN OF WOMEN AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA, SPOKE TO A GROUP OF LETHBRIDGE WOMEN ON FORMING A CHAPTER. BY 1958, THE LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER WAS SENDING REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN’S NATIONAL CONVENTION. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES AND THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170038000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170038000
Acquisition Date
2017-12
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
RETRACTABLE BANNER
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
VINYL, COTTON
Catalogue Number
P20180006007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
RETRACTABLE BANNER
Date
2017
Materials
VINYL, COTTON
No. Pieces
1
Length
199.6
Width
83.6
Description
WHITE VINYL VERTICAL BANNER. MULTICOLOUR BORDER AROUND TEXT, WITH RED MAPLE LEAF AND GREEN BANNER IN UPPER LEFT CORNER WITH WHITE TEXT “2017; LETHBRIDGE CELEBRATES CANADA 150; WWW.LETHBRIDGE.CA/CANADA150”. BANNER BACKGROUND HIS WHITE AND PRINTED WITH LIGHT GREY ENTERTAINMENT SYMBOLS, INCLUDING GUITAR, KITE, GOLF TEE, SKATER, ETC. UPPER RIGHT CORNER HAS BLUE TEXT “#CANADA150YQL, #GETMOVINGYQL”. TOP OF BANNER HAS MULTICOLOURED CANADA 150 MAPLE LEAF, WITH BLUE TEXT “CANADA 150, LETHBRIDGE CELEBRATES THE SESQUICENTENNIAL!” BANNER HAS IMAGES OF CHILDREN PLAYING IN SPLASH PARK AND SKATING, WITH PINK TEXT ON GREEN TRIANGLE “FREE SWIM”, AND YELLOW TEXT ON BLUE TRIANGLE “FREE SKATE”. BANNER HAS BLUE TEXT BELOW IMAGES “FREE SESQUI SWIMS & SKATES ALL YEAR LONG!” RED TEXT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE BANNER READS “CANADA 150, SATURDAY JULY, 1, 2017; HENDERSON LAKE – LETHBRIDGE; 2 STAGES / FOOD VENDOR HUB/ KIDZONE” WITH RED, WHITE AND BLUE SPEAKER IMAGES ON SIDES OF TEXT. BLUE TEXT BELOW READS “CHECK ONLINE FOR SPECIAL CANADA 150 EVENTS HAPPENING ALL YEAR LONG! WWW.LETHBRIDGE.CA/CANADA150”. LOWER LEFT CORNER OF BANNER HAS IMAGE OF GREEN MOOSE WITH BLUE OUTLINE AND PINK SUNGLASSES, WITH ORANGE TEXT BUBBLE EXTENDED FROM MOOSE WITH BLUE BORDERS AND BLUE TEXT “FOR SO MUCH MORE!” BOTTOM EDGE HAS CITY OF LETHBRIDGE SEAL AND RECREATION AND CULTURE LOGO. RIGHT EDGE HAS TEAR IN VINYL; VINYL IS CREASED FROM FOLDING; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
ADVERTISING MEDIUM
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
LEISURE
History
ON MARCH 29, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LORI HARASEM AND JENNIE SUDO REGARDING THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE DONATION OF CANADA 150 MEMORABILIA. HARASEM AND SUDO WERE INVOLVED WITH ORGANIZING THE JULY 1, 2017 EVENTS FOR CANADA 150, WITH SUDO ACTING AS CHAIR FOR THE LETHBRIDGE CANADA DAY COMMITTEE WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE AND HARASEM AS A MEMBER OF THE COMMITTEE. ON THE BANNER, HARASEM ELABORATED, “THIS WAS A BANNER THAT WE HAD TO PROMOTE, OBVIOUSLY CANADA DAY, BUT WE ALSO HAD IT AT OTHER EVENTS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR TO PROMOTE CANADA DAY. AT THE TOP, IT MENTIONS THE FREE SWIM AND SKATING AS WELL. THE BIGGEST THING FOR US WAS AT THE BOTTOM, THE URL WHERE WE HAD ALL THE INFORMATION, YEAR-ROUND ABOUT WHAT WAS GOING ON WHICH WAS THE LETHBRIDGE.CA/CANADA150. THIS WAS OUR BANNER THAT WENT TO MANY PLACES THROUGHOUT THE YEAR; ANY TRADE SHOWS WE WENT TO, SO THAT PEOPLE WOULD BE AWARE WHERE TO FIND OUT INFORMATION ABOUT CANADA DAY AND OTHER ACTIVITIES THAT WERE GOING ON.” “IT WAS…A POP-UP BANNER THING THAT…YOU JUST PULL UP AND DOWN AS WE NEEDED AND TRANSPORTED AS ONE, ROLLED-UP PIECE AT EVENTS.” “WE MADE THE [ONLY] ONE BUT WE DO HAVE TWO [OTHER BANNERS]. ONE’S THE FREE SWIM AND ONE’S THE FREE SKATE. THESE WERE THE ONES THAT WOULD BE PUT OUT AT THE POOL OR AT THE ARENA THAT WAS HOSTING THAT DAY TO SAY, 'TODAY, FREE SWIM. CANADA 150 CELEBRATION.' THOSE TWO BANNERS WERE EXCLUSIVE JUST TO SWIMMING AND SKATING. THIS ONE WENT TO ALL ACROSS THE COMMUNITY, ALL YEAR-LONG.” “ERIC SHARP…DESIGNED ALL OF THE BANNERS, ALL THREE.” “THEY WERE ALL DONE LOCALLY, AND WE USE THEM A LOT BECAUSE THEY LET US TRANSITION OUT THE BASE, SO WE CAN RE-USE BASES AND WE NEED TO SAVE MONEY…SIGN SUPERSTORE…CREATED ALL THREE.” HARASEM AND SUDO RECALLED THEIR TIME PLANNING AND ORGANIZING THE 2017 EVENTS, WITH SUDO NOTING ABOUT THE PLANNING COMMITTEE, “THE LETHBRIDGE CANADA-DAY COMMITTEE IS A COMMITTEE THAT’S MADE UP OF CITY OF LETHBRIDGE EMPLOYEES IN PART WITH COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS. MY POSITION AS THE COORDINATOR OF RECREATION AND CULTURE, I AM AUTOMATICALLY VOLUNTEERED FOR THIS COMMITTEE ALONG WITH OUR RECREATION AND CULTURE TEAM. THE CHAIRING RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THAT COMMITTEE GET ROTATED BETWEEN OUR TEAM MEMBERS EVERY TWO YEARS AND MY YEAR JUST SO HAPPENED TO FALL ON THIS VERY IMPORTANT, NOSTALGIC YEAR FOR CANADA’S 150.” “[THE COMMITTEE IS] ALWAYS IN EXISTENCE. I THINK [THERE] WAS A LOT OF PRESSURE, BUT REALLY GREAT PRESSURE. I WAS VERY PROUD TO BE ABLE TO BE PART OF THE COMMITTEE. AND BEING ABLE TO LEAD THE TEAM FOR MY VERY FIRST TURN AT CHAIRING THE COMMITTEE. I FELT A LOT OF PRIDE TO BE ABLE TO SHOW THAT OUR COMMUNITY CAN COME TOGETHER AND CELEBRATE CANADA’S 150.” “[THE] COMMITTEE [WAS] COMPRISED OF THE RECREATION AND CULTURE TEAM, WHICH WAS TWO MANAGERS, LORI HARASEM AND JASON FREUND, MYSELF AS THE CHAIR FOR [2017]. WE ALSO [HAD] MARLENE LAPOINTE, SARAH BURTON, SCOTT CARPENTER AND ONE OF OUR TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES, ERIC SHARP, [AS] PART OF THE COMMITTEE AS FAR AS THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE SIDE GOES. WE ALSO HAD THREE PUBLIC VOLUNTEERS FROM THE COMMUNITY. WE HAD ADELLE HARRINGTON, BOBBY MCCALLUM AND DAVID FRITZ WHO ALSO PLAYED A HUGE ROLE IN HELPING COORDINATE SOME OF THE ACTIVITIES THERE.” “AS SOON AS CANADA DAY 2016 ENDED, WE WERE ALREADY THINKING ABOUT WHAT WE WERE GOING TO BRING BACK, WHAT KIND OF BUDGET WE WERE GOING TO NEED, WHAT KIND OF ACTIVITIES WE WERE GOING TO HAVE, HOW WE WERE GOING TO MAKE IT SPECIAL, AND MAKE IT STAND OUT THE NEXT YEAR…FOR THE REST OF THE CANADA DAY [EVENTS], THE ONES THAT AREN’T CANADA 150 OR STAND-OUT, WE WOULD PROBABLY ONLY START [PLANNING] ABOUT SIX MONTHS IN ADVANCE. BUT, THE PLANNING PROCESS FOR CANADA DAY, PERIOD, IS QUITE LONG AND STRENUOUS. WE HAVE TO THINK ABOUT SOME PRETTY TIGHT TIMELINES WHEN WE’RE TALKING ABOUT PLANNING AN EVENT THAT BIG. WE DEFINITELY NEEDED THE FULL YEAR TO PLAN CANADA 150.” “CURRENTLY, THE ONLY SPECIAL EVENT THAT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE REALLY HOSTS, AS A CORPORATION, IS THE CANADA DAY EVENT. WE RELY ON OUR COMMUNITY GROUPS TO DO MOST OF OUR OTHER SPECIAL EVENTS." ON THE EVENTS PLANNED, HARASEM RECALLED, “IN ALL HONESTY, FOR THE CANADA DAY ACTIVITIES ITSELF, THOUGH I’M ON THE COMMITTEE, I’M NOT AS INVOLVED WITH THAT AS OTHER THINGS THAT I OVERSAW THAT LASTED FROM JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 31ST. SEEING JENNIE AND THE TEAM AND HOW MUCH THEY WORKED…THEY EVEN CHANGED THE LAYOUT AT HENDERSON LAKE THAT HAD BEEN THE SAME WAY FOREVER AND WE HAD TO GO TO SENIOR LEADERS OF THE CITY AND ASK FOR EXTRA MONEY BECAUSE THE BUDGET FOR CANADA DAY HASN’T CHANGED FOR TWELVE OR FIFTEEN YEARS. TO PUT ON SOMETHING THAT WE KNEW THE PUBLIC EXPECTED A LOT [FROM]…[WAS] MY BIGGEST ROLE WITH THE CANADA DAY. IT WAS A HUGE AMOUNT OF WORK AND IT WAS SO SUCCESSFUL, ESPECIALLY ON THE SOCIAL MEDIA SIDE. AT THE CITY, WE’RE USED TO SEEING A LOT OF NEGATIVE COMMENTS. OUR COMMUNICATIONS TEAM HAS SAID THAT THE MOST POSITIVE COMMENTS THEY’VE EVER HAD ON ANYTHING THAT THEY’VE EVER POSTED ON THEIR FACEBOOK WAS AFTER THE CANADA DAY. I THINK THAT THEIR TEAM, JENNIE’S TEAM, DID AMAZING AT MEETING THE EXPECTATIONS OF THE PUBLIC WHICH WERE VERY HIGH.” “I CAME IN [WITH THE COMMUNITY GROUPS ORGANIZING]. WE HAD A GRANT, ‘CANADA 150’. WE HAD EXTRA FUNDING INJECTED INTO OUR BUDGET FOR 2017 [AT] OUR REQUEST, SO THAT WE COULD HELP LOCAL GROUPS THAT WERE ALREADY DOING EVENTS TO THEME IT AROUND CANADA 150. NORMALLY, THE CITY’S RULES IS YOU CAN ONLY GET ONE GRANT FOR ANY EVENT, EVEN THOUGH THERE’S MULTIPLE GRANTS AVAILABLE. BUT, FOR CANADA 150, WE ALLOWED GROUPS TO GET THEIR NORMAL GRANT, AND WE ALLOWED THEM TO ASK FOR UP TO $750 EXTRA, AND THAT WOULD ALLOW THEM TO THEN THEME THEIR EVENT. WE DIDN’T CARE HOW THEY DID THAT. IF THEY WANTED TO USE $750 TO BUY RED AND WHITE CUPCAKES AND BALLOONS [THEY COULD]. WE HAD [AT THE] JAPANESE GARDEN A HUNDRED AND FIFTY JAPANESE DANCERS PERFORMING AND THEY BOUGHT SPECIAL RED MATCHING JACKETS WITH THE MONEY THEY GOT. IT WAS OUR WAY OF ENCOURAGING THE COMMUNITY TO CELEBRATE CANADA 150 ALL YEAR-ROUND. BECAUSE ALL WE DO IS CANADA DAY, WE HAD TO FIND A WAY TO HELP THE COMMUNITY CELEBRATE CANADA 150 AND TO PUT IT IN THE PUBLIC’S EYES ALL YEAR-ROUND IN ANY WAY WE COULD. WE HAD A LOT OF GROUPS AND A LOT OF EVENTS. THERE WAS THIRTY-EIGHT EVENTS THAT RECEIVED FUNDING OVER THE COURSE OF THE YEAR, SO THERE WAS SOMETHING EVERY MONTH OF THE YEAR.” “DURING 'PRETTY, WITTY AND GAY', WHICH IS AN EVENT THE LGBTQ COMMUNITY PUTS ON IN FEBRUARY/MARCH, THEY USED THEIR FUNDING TO [HAVE] A BIG BULLETIN BOARD WHERE PEOPLE [COULD] WRITE DOWN THEIR THOUGHTS ABOUT WHAT IT WAS LIKE TO BE GAY IN CANADA. AND TO SHARE THEIR FEELINGS ON [BEING GAY IN CANADA] TO CONNECT BECAUSE, OBVIOUSLY, WE’RE A MORE OPEN-MINDED COUNTRY AROUND THAT THAN MOST OF THE WORLD. THAT, TO ME, WAS A REALLY UNIQUE WAY TO CELEBRATE CANADA’S 150TH.” “WE ALSO HAD A SMALL THEATRE GROUP COME TOGETHER, A COLLECTIVE THAT HAD NEVER EXISTED BEFORE. THEY PUT ON A VERY CONTROVERSIAL PLAY ABOUT FORMER PRIME MINISTER STEPHEN HARPER WHICH I WENT TO SEE AND IT WAS PRETTY SMALL. IT WASN’T THIS HUGE PLAY WHICH IS DONE IN CASA IN THE BLACK BOX [THE COMMUNITY ATB ROOM] BUT IT WAS FUNNY. IT WAS VERY CONTROVERSIAL AND WE DID PUT SOME MONEY BEHIND THAT.” “[THERE WAS] UPPER VICTORIA PARK NEIGHBOURS. I HAD SO MANY NEIGHBOUR DAYS. BUT WITH NEIGHBOUR DAY BEING A VERY POPULAR EVENT IN JUNE, AND WE’VE GOT MORE NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATIONS FORMING, WE REALLY ENCOURAGED THE NEIGHBOURHOODS TO APPLY FOR THE GRANT. MOST OF THE NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATIONS, AT THIS POINT, THEIR NEIGHBOUR DAY EVENTS ARE PRETTY SMALL, UNDER A HUNDRED PEOPLE. BUT IT’S THE PERFECT PLACE TO CELEBRATE CANADA DAY AND CELEBRATE YOUR NEIGHBOURS. OF COURSE, UPPER VICTORIA PARK IS THE ‘GO BIG OR GO HOME’ NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATION FOR NEIGHBOUR DAY. IT’S EXCITING WHENEVER WE’RE ABLE TO SUPPORT THE THEME OF THE EVENT IN ANY WAY BECAUSE WE KNOW THAT PEOPLE FROM EVEN OUTSIDE LETHBRIDGE ATTEND THAT EVENT. WE’RE NOT JUST SUPPORTING THE MEMBERS OF UPPER VICTORIA PARK NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATION WHEN WE SUPPORT SOMETHING, SO IT WAS NEAT TO BE ABLE TO PUT SOME MONEY THERE.” “OF COURSE, WINTER LIGHTS FESTIVAL AT JAPANESE GARDEN IS A VERY NEW EVENT. THIS WAS ONLY ITS SECOND YEAR, EVER. THOUGH IT IS A TRADITIONAL, JAPANESE, CULTURAL WINTER EVENT, WE WERE ABLE TO GIVE THEM SOME FUNDING, TOO, BECAUSE THEY ACTUALLY [HAD] THE FIRST EVENT IN 2017 BECAUSE THEY START IN EARLY DECEMBER AND GO TILL FEBRUARY. THEY WERE THE LAST EVENT, ‘CAUSE THEY WERE ON NEW YEAR’S EVE IN 2017. THAT FESTIVAL, THE FIRST TWO YEARS OF IT, KICKED OFF THE BEGINNING OF CANADA 150 AND ENDED CANADA 150 FOR US. IT WAS NEAT TO HAVE SUCH AN IMPORTANT CULTURAL GROUP AND ATTRACTION IN LETHBRIDGE…BE THE FOCUS OF THAT. THERE WERE EVENTS OF ALL SIZES. WE EVEN HAD THE DOGS THAT [ON] THE LAST DAY OF OPERATIONS [AT WESTMINSTER POOL] IS JUST FOR DOGS. EVEN THE HUMANE SOCIETY GOT MONEY TO [HAVE] DOG CANDIES THAT WERE RED AND WHITE…DOG TREATS DECORATED WITH RED AND WHITE BALLOONS AND RIBBONS. I WENT TO IT AND IT WAS HILARIOUS. THE DOGS [TOOK] OVER THE POOL AND THEY’RE SO HAPPY, IN CELEBRATION OF CANADA’S 150TH.” “WE ALSO HAD FREE SWIMMING AND SKATING THROUGHOUT THE YEAR THAT THE CITY SPONSORED AS A CELEBRATION. THAT WAS BECAUSE WE OBVIOUSLY WANT PEOPLE TO BE ACTIVE AND WE WANT PEOPLE TO USE OUR FACILITIES, AND WE KNOW THAT COSTS CAN BE A BARRIER. EVERY MONTH WE HAD AT LEAST ONE FREE SWIMMING WHERE THE FIRST HUNDRED AND FIFTY PEOPLE WERE FREE. IN THE SUMMER THAT INCLUDED BOTH OF THE OUTDOOR POOLS, HENDERSON AND WESTMINSTER. HENDERSON WAS REALLY POPULAR ‘CAUSE IT’S ONLY SECOND YEAR OF OPERATIONS…IT’S STILL [A] VERY POPULAR PLACE TO GO. THEN, WE HAD FREE SKATING AT ALL OUR ARENAS, INCLUDING THE NEW ATB CENTRE AND WE HAD THOSE AT LEAST [ONCE] A WEEK THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE YEAR. THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE IN LETHBRIDGE GOT TO PARTICIPATE IN SWIMMING OR SKATING FOR FREE AS [PART OF THE] CELEBRATION. AT SOME OF THOSE, WE HANDED OUT LITTLE CANADA FLAGS OR CANADA TATTOOS OR HAD BALLOONS.” ON THE DONATION OF CANADA 150 MATERIALS TO THE MUSEUM, HARASEM NOTED, “I BELIEVE THAT THIS IS IMPORTANT TO GO TO THE GALT BECAUSE I KNOW THAT WHEN WE FIRST REALIZED WE NEEDED TO DO SOMETHING TO CELEBRATE THE 150TH, THE FIRST THING WE DID WAS LOOK BACK TO SEE WHAT HAPPENED AT THE 100TH AND WHAT WE HAD IN THE MUSEUM AND ELSEWHERE IN LETHBRIDGE FOR CELEBRATIONS THAT OCCURRED AT THAT TIME. [WE WERE LOOKING TO] SEE IF THERE WERE THINGS THAT WE COULD MIMIC OR SHOULD KNOW ABOUT. WE USED A LOT OF PHOTOS THROUGH OUR REC AND CULTURE GUIDE FOR THAT YEAR TO REMIND PEOPLE THAT, FIFTY YEARS AGO WAS THE BIG CENTENNIAL. WE THOUGHT THAT WHEN THE 200TH COMES, THAT PEOPLE WOULD PROBABLY BE WANTING TO LOOK BACK TO 2017 TO SEE WHAT HAD HAPPENED.” SUDO ADDED, “I THINK CANADA’S SESQUICENTENNIAL [150TH ANNIVERSARY] WAS VERY IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER BECAUSE FIFTY YEARS IS A LONG TIME AND A LOT HAPPENS IN FIFTY YEARS. IT’S GREAT TO BE ABLE TO LOOK BACK AT ALL OF THE THINGS THAT WE DID FOR CANADA’S SESQUICENTENNIAL AND REMEMBER ALL OF THE HARD WORK, AND THE COMMUNITY COMING TOGETHER AND SHOWING THEIR CANADIAN PRIDE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180006007-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180006007
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

BACKDROP, PHOTOGRAPHIC

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/artifact13460
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, VELCRO, INK
Catalogue Number
P20180006006
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date
2017
Materials
COTTON, VELCRO, INK
No. Pieces
1
Length
211
Width
225.5
Description
WHITE BACKDROP WITH PRINTED FRONT; FRONT HAS MULTICOLOURED BORDER WITH BLUE, ORANGE, GREEN, PURPLE, PINK, AND RED COLOUR BLOCKS; UPPER LEFT CORNER OF BORDER HAS RED MAPLE LEAF ABOVE GREEN BANNER WITH WHITE TEXT “JULY 01, 2017”. CENTER OF BACKDROP HAS MULTICOLOURED CANADA 150 MAPLE LEAF LOGO PRINTED IN RED, ORANGE, YELLOW, GREEN, BLUE, AND PURPLE COLOUR BLOCKS WITH BLUE TEXT BELOW LEAF “CANADA 150”. BACK OF BACKDROP IS WHITE WITH INK FROM FRONT DESIGNS VISIBLE; BACK HAS VELCRO FASTENERS RUNNING ALONG EDGES OF BACKDROP. FRONT HAS STAINING ALONG LOWER EDGES AND CORNERS; VELCRO FASTENERS ON BACK EDGES HAVE DEBRIS CAUGHT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
PHOTOGRAPHIC T&E
Historical Association
COMMEMORATIVE
LEISURE
History
ON MARCH 29, 2018, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LORI HARASEM AND JENNIE SUDO REGARDING THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE DONATION OF CANADA 150 MEMORABILIA. HARASEM AND SUDO WERE INVOLVED WITH ORGANIZING THE JULY 1, 2017 EVENTS FOR CANADA 150, WITH SUDO ACTING AS CHAIR FOR THE LETHBRIDGE CANADA DAY COMMITTEE WITH THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE AND HARASEM AS A MEMBER OF THE COMMITTEE. ON THE BACKDROP, SUDO ELABORATED, “THIS BANNER [WRAPPED] AROUND SCAFFOLDING THAT WE HAD PURCHASED. WE HAD SIGNED A DEAL WITH FOTO HUB, WHICH IS A COMPANY WHO PROVIDES AN APP AND HASHTAG PLATFORM WHERE OUR ATTENDEES WERE ABLE TO TAKE THEIR PICTURE—THEIR SOUVENIR PICTURE—IN FRONT OF THIS LARGE BANNER. THEN THEY WERE ABLE TO PRINT RIGHT THERE AND KEEP A SOUVENIR PHOTO. THEY WERE ALSO ABLE TO TAG THEMSELVES IN IT WITH EITHER A HASHTAG OR POSTING IT ON THEIR TWITTER OR FACEBOOK. THEN THEY WERE ABLE TO SAVE THAT PHOTO FOR AT A LATER TIME.” “THAT WAS ERIC SHARP [WHO HAD THE IDEA]. HE GOT THE CONTACT FOR FOTO HUB AND COORDINATED THAT ROLE, THAT WHOLE THING.” HARASEM NOTED, “THEN WE RE-PURPOSED IT AFTER CANADA DAY. WE HAD IT ON DISPLAY IN CITY HALL, WE TOOK IT TO THE CANADA 150 PAVILION AND WE LET OUTSIDE GROUPS [BORROW IT] THAT WERE DOING CANADA 150 CELEBRATIONS THAT WANTED A BIT OF EXTRA DÉCOR. IT WAS PRETTY LIGHT AND VERY MUCH CAUGHT THE WIND SO OUTDOOR EVENTS IT DIDN’T WORK WELL FOR.” “THE SCAFFOLDING [THAT WENT WITH IT] IS PRETTY LIGHT. SUDO ADDED, “YOU HAVE TO STAKE IT DOWN AND HAVE IT IN A GOOD SPOT WITH LOTS OF WIND BLOCKAGE, ESPECIALLY HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. THIS WAS PRINTED BY A LOCAL COMPANY CALLED…TOTAL IMPACT SIGNS. [FOR THE BACKDROP AND SCAFFOLDING] SEVEN HUNDRED DOLLARS, I THINK WE PAID FOR THAT.” HARASEM AND SUDO RECALLED THEIR TIME PLANNING AND ORGANIZING THE 2017 EVENTS, WITH SUDO NOTING ABOUT THE PLANNING COMMITTEE, “THE LETHBRIDGE CANADA-DAY COMMITTEE IS A COMMITTEE THAT’S MADE UP OF CITY OF LETHBRIDGE EMPLOYEES IN PART WITH COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS. MY POSITION AS THE COORDINATOR OF RECREATION AND CULTURE, I AM AUTOMATICALLY VOLUNTEERED FOR THIS COMMITTEE ALONG WITH OUR RECREATION AND CULTURE TEAM. THE CHAIRING RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THAT COMMITTEE GET ROTATED BETWEEN OUR TEAM MEMBERS EVERY TWO YEARS AND MY YEAR JUST SO HAPPENED TO FALL ON THIS VERY IMPORTANT, NOSTALGIC YEAR FOR CANADA’S 150.” “[THE COMMITTEE IS] ALWAYS IN EXISTENCE. I THINK [THERE] WAS A LOT OF PRESSURE, BUT REALLY GREAT PRESSURE. I WAS VERY PROUD TO BE ABLE TO BE PART OF THE COMMITTEE. AND BEING ABLE TO LEAD THE TEAM FOR MY VERY FIRST TURN AT CHAIRING THE COMMITTEE. I FELT A LOT OF PRIDE TO BE ABLE TO SHOW THAT OUR COMMUNITY CAN COME TOGETHER AND CELEBRATE CANADA’S 150.” “[THE] COMMITTEE [WAS] COMPRISED OF THE RECREATION AND CULTURE TEAM, WHICH WAS TWO MANAGERS, LORI HARASEM AND JASON FREUND, MYSELF AS THE CHAIR FOR [2017]. WE ALSO [HAD] MARLENE LAPOINTE, SARAH BURTON, SCOTT CARPENTER AND ONE OF OUR TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES, ERIC SHARP, [AS] PART OF THE COMMITTEE AS FAR AS THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE SIDE GOES. WE ALSO HAD THREE PUBLIC VOLUNTEERS FROM THE COMMUNITY. WE HAD ADELLE HARRINGTON, BOBBY MCCALLUM AND DAVID FRITZ WHO ALSO PLAYED A HUGE ROLE IN HELPING COORDINATE SOME OF THE ACTIVITIES THERE.” “AS SOON AS CANADA DAY 2016 ENDED, WE WERE ALREADY THINKING ABOUT WHAT WE WERE GOING TO BRING BACK, WHAT KIND OF BUDGET WE WERE GOING TO NEED, WHAT KIND OF ACTIVITIES WE WERE GOING TO HAVE, HOW WE WERE GOING TO MAKE IT SPECIAL, AND MAKE IT STAND OUT THE NEXT YEAR…FOR THE REST OF THE CANADA DAY [EVENTS], THE ONES THAT AREN’T CANADA 150 OR STAND-OUT, WE WOULD PROBABLY ONLY START [PLANNING] ABOUT SIX MONTHS IN ADVANCE. BUT, THE PLANNING PROCESS FOR CANADA DAY, PERIOD, IS QUITE LONG AND STRENUOUS. WE HAVE TO THINK ABOUT SOME PRETTY TIGHT TIMELINES WHEN WE’RE TALKING ABOUT PLANNING AN EVENT THAT BIG. WE DEFINITELY NEEDED THE FULL YEAR TO PLAN CANADA 150.” “CURRENTLY, THE ONLY SPECIAL EVENT THAT THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE REALLY HOSTS, AS A CORPORATION, IS THE CANADA DAY EVENT. WE RELY ON OUR COMMUNITY GROUPS TO DO MOST OF OUR OTHER SPECIAL EVENTS." ON THE EVENTS PLANNED, HARASEM RECALLED, “IN ALL HONESTY, FOR THE CANADA DAY ACTIVITIES ITSELF, THOUGH I’M ON THE COMMITTEE, I’M NOT AS INVOLVED WITH THAT AS OTHER THINGS THAT I OVERSAW THAT LASTED FROM JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 31ST. SEEING JENNIE AND THE TEAM AND HOW MUCH THEY WORKED…THEY EVEN CHANGED THE LAYOUT AT HENDERSON LAKE THAT HAD BEEN THE SAME WAY FOREVER AND WE HAD TO GO TO SENIOR LEADERS OF THE CITY AND ASK FOR EXTRA MONEY BECAUSE THE BUDGET FOR CANADA DAY HASN’T CHANGED FOR TWELVE OR FIFTEEN YEARS. TO PUT ON SOMETHING THAT WE KNEW THE PUBLIC EXPECTED A LOT [FROM]…[WAS] MY BIGGEST ROLE WITH THE CANADA DAY. IT WAS A HUGE AMOUNT OF WORK AND IT WAS SO SUCCESSFUL, ESPECIALLY ON THE SOCIAL MEDIA SIDE. AT THE CITY, WE’RE USED TO SEEING A LOT OF NEGATIVE COMMENTS. OUR COMMUNICATIONS TEAM HAS SAID THAT THE MOST POSITIVE COMMENTS THEY’VE EVER HAD ON ANYTHING THAT THEY’VE EVER POSTED ON THEIR FACEBOOK WAS AFTER THE CANADA DAY. I THINK THAT THEIR TEAM, JENNIE’S TEAM, DID AMAZING AT MEETING THE EXPECTATIONS OF THE PUBLIC WHICH WERE VERY HIGH.” “I CAME IN [WITH THE COMMUNITY GROUPS ORGANIZING]. WE HAD A GRANT, ‘CANADA 150’. WE HAD EXTRA FUNDING INJECTED INTO OUR BUDGET FOR 2017 [AT] OUR REQUEST, SO THAT WE COULD HELP LOCAL GROUPS THAT WERE ALREADY DOING EVENTS TO THEME IT AROUND CANADA 150. NORMALLY, THE CITY’S RULES IS YOU CAN ONLY GET ONE GRANT FOR ANY EVENT, EVEN THOUGH THERE’S MULTIPLE GRANTS AVAILABLE. BUT, FOR CANADA 150, WE ALLOWED GROUPS TO GET THEIR NORMAL GRANT, AND WE ALLOWED THEM TO ASK FOR UP TO $750 EXTRA, AND THAT WOULD ALLOW THEM TO THEN THEME THEIR EVENT. WE DIDN’T CARE HOW THEY DID THAT. IF THEY WANTED TO USE $750 TO BUY RED AND WHITE CUPCAKES AND BALLOONS [THEY COULD]. WE HAD [AT THE] JAPANESE GARDEN A HUNDRED AND FIFTY JAPANESE DANCERS PERFORMING AND THEY BOUGHT SPECIAL RED MATCHING JACKETS WITH THE MONEY THEY GOT. IT WAS OUR WAY OF ENCOURAGING THE COMMUNITY TO CELEBRATE CANADA 150 ALL YEAR-ROUND. BECAUSE ALL WE DO IS CANADA DAY, WE HAD TO FIND A WAY TO HELP THE COMMUNITY CELEBRATE CANADA 150 AND TO PUT IT IN THE PUBLIC’S EYES ALL YEAR-ROUND IN ANY WAY WE COULD. WE HAD A LOT OF GROUPS AND A LOT OF EVENTS. THERE WAS THIRTY-EIGHT EVENTS THAT RECEIVED FUNDING OVER THE COURSE OF THE YEAR, SO THERE WAS SOMETHING EVERY MONTH OF THE YEAR.” “DURING 'PRETTY, WITTY AND GAY', WHICH IS AN EVENT THE LGBTQ COMMUNITY PUTS ON IN FEBRUARY/MARCH, THEY USED THEIR FUNDING TO [HAVE] A BIG BULLETIN BOARD WHERE PEOPLE [COULD] WRITE DOWN THEIR THOUGHTS ABOUT WHAT IT WAS LIKE TO BE GAY IN CANADA. AND TO SHARE THEIR FEELINGS ON [BEING GAY IN CANADA] TO CONNECT BECAUSE, OBVIOUSLY, WE’RE A MORE OPEN-MINDED COUNTRY AROUND THAT THAN MOST OF THE WORLD. THAT, TO ME, WAS A REALLY UNIQUE WAY TO CELEBRATE CANADA’S 150TH.” “WE ALSO HAD A SMALL THEATRE GROUP COME TOGETHER, A COLLECTIVE THAT HAD NEVER EXISTED BEFORE. THEY PUT ON A VERY CONTROVERSIAL PLAY ABOUT FORMER PRIME MINISTER STEPHEN HARPER WHICH I WENT TO SEE AND IT WAS PRETTY SMALL. IT WASN’T THIS HUGE PLAY WHICH IS DONE IN CASA IN THE BLACK BOX [THE COMMUNITY ATB ROOM] BUT IT WAS FUNNY. IT WAS VERY CONTROVERSIAL AND WE DID PUT SOME MONEY BEHIND THAT.” “[THERE WAS] UPPER VICTORIA PARK NEIGHBOURS. I HAD SO MANY NEIGHBOUR DAYS. BUT WITH NEIGHBOUR DAY BEING A VERY POPULAR EVENT IN JUNE, AND WE’VE GOT MORE NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATIONS FORMING, WE REALLY ENCOURAGED THE NEIGHBOURHOODS TO APPLY FOR THE GRANT. MOST OF THE NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATIONS, AT THIS POINT, THEIR NEIGHBOUR DAY EVENTS ARE PRETTY SMALL, UNDER A HUNDRED PEOPLE. BUT IT’S THE PERFECT PLACE TO CELEBRATE CANADA DAY AND CELEBRATE YOUR NEIGHBOURS. OF COURSE, UPPER VICTORIA PARK IS THE ‘GO BIG OR GO HOME’ NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATION FOR NEIGHBOUR DAY. IT’S EXCITING WHENEVER WE’RE ABLE TO SUPPORT THE THEME OF THE EVENT IN ANY WAY BECAUSE WE KNOW THAT PEOPLE FROM EVEN OUTSIDE LETHBRIDGE ATTEND THAT EVENT. WE’RE NOT JUST SUPPORTING THE MEMBERS OF UPPER VICTORIA PARK NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATION WHEN WE SUPPORT SOMETHING, SO IT WAS NEAT TO BE ABLE TO PUT SOME MONEY THERE.” “OF COURSE, WINTER LIGHTS FESTIVAL AT JAPANESE GARDEN IS A VERY NEW EVENT. THIS WAS ONLY ITS SECOND YEAR, EVER. THOUGH IT IS A TRADITIONAL, JAPANESE, CULTURAL WINTER EVENT, WE WERE ABLE TO GIVE THEM SOME FUNDING, TOO, BECAUSE THEY ACTUALLY [HAD] THE FIRST EVENT IN 2017 BECAUSE THEY START IN EARLY DECEMBER AND GO TILL FEBRUARY. THEY WERE THE LAST EVENT, ‘CAUSE THEY WERE ON NEW YEAR’S EVE IN 2017. THAT FESTIVAL, THE FIRST TWO YEARS OF IT, KICKED OFF THE BEGINNING OF CANADA 150 AND ENDED CANADA 150 FOR US. IT WAS NEAT TO HAVE SUCH AN IMPORTANT CULTURAL GROUP AND ATTRACTION IN LETHBRIDGE…BE THE FOCUS OF THAT. THERE WERE EVENTS OF ALL SIZES. WE EVEN HAD THE DOGS THAT [ON] THE LAST DAY OF OPERATIONS [AT WESTMINSTER POOL] IS JUST FOR DOGS. EVEN THE HUMANE SOCIETY GOT MONEY TO [HAVE] DOG CANDIES THAT WERE RED AND WHITE…DOG TREATS DECORATED WITH RED AND WHITE BALLOONS AND RIBBONS. I WENT TO IT AND IT WAS HILARIOUS. THE DOGS [TOOK] OVER THE POOL AND THEY’RE SO HAPPY, IN CELEBRATION OF CANADA’S 150TH.” “WE ALSO HAD FREE SWIMMING AND SKATING THROUGHOUT THE YEAR THAT THE CITY SPONSORED AS A CELEBRATION. THAT WAS BECAUSE WE OBVIOUSLY WANT PEOPLE TO BE ACTIVE AND WE WANT PEOPLE TO USE OUR FACILITIES, AND WE KNOW THAT COSTS CAN BE A BARRIER. EVERY MONTH WE HAD AT LEAST ONE FREE SWIMMING WHERE THE FIRST HUNDRED AND FIFTY PEOPLE WERE FREE. IN THE SUMMER THAT INCLUDED BOTH OF THE OUTDOOR POOLS, HENDERSON AND WESTMINSTER. HENDERSON WAS REALLY POPULAR ‘CAUSE IT’S ONLY SECOND YEAR OF OPERATIONS…IT’S STILL [A] VERY POPULAR PLACE TO GO. THEN, WE HAD FREE SKATING AT ALL OUR ARENAS, INCLUDING THE NEW ATB CENTRE AND WE HAD THOSE AT LEAST [ONCE] A WEEK THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE YEAR. THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE IN LETHBRIDGE GOT TO PARTICIPATE IN SWIMMING OR SKATING FOR FREE AS [PART OF THE] CELEBRATION. AT SOME OF THOSE, WE HANDED OUT LITTLE CANADA FLAGS OR CANADA TATTOOS OR HAD BALLOONS.” ON THE DONATION OF CANADA 150 MATERIALS TO THE MUSEUM, HARASEM NOTED, “I BELIEVE THAT THIS IS IMPORTANT TO GO TO THE GALT BECAUSE I KNOW THAT WHEN WE FIRST REALIZED WE NEEDED TO DO SOMETHING TO CELEBRATE THE 150TH, THE FIRST THING WE DID WAS LOOK BACK TO SEE WHAT HAPPENED AT THE 100TH AND WHAT WE HAD IN THE MUSEUM AND ELSEWHERE IN LETHBRIDGE FOR CELEBRATIONS THAT OCCURRED AT THAT TIME. [WE WERE LOOKING TO] SEE IF THERE WERE THINGS THAT WE COULD MIMIC OR SHOULD KNOW ABOUT. WE USED A LOT OF PHOTOS THROUGH OUR REC AND CULTURE GUIDE FOR THAT YEAR TO REMIND PEOPLE THAT, FIFTY YEARS AGO WAS THE BIG CENTENNIAL. WE THOUGHT THAT WHEN THE 200TH COMES, THAT PEOPLE WOULD PROBABLY BE WANTING TO LOOK BACK TO 2017 TO SEE WHAT HAD HAPPENED.” SUDO ADDED, “I THINK CANADA’S SESQUICENTENNIAL [150TH ANNIVERSARY] WAS VERY IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER BECAUSE FIFTY YEARS IS A LONG TIME AND A LOT HAPPENS IN FIFTY YEARS. IT’S GREAT TO BE ABLE TO LOOK BACK AT ALL OF THE THINGS THAT WE DID FOR CANADA’S SESQUICENTENNIAL AND REMEMBER ALL OF THE HARD WORK, AND THE COMMUNITY COMING TOGETHER AND SHOWING THEIR CANADIAN PRIDE.” FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20180006007-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20180006006
Acquisition Date
2018-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
APPLIQUE QUILT
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
203
Width
262
Description
FINISHED QUILT WITH BLUE BACKING AND TRIM ALONG EDGES; QUILT TOP HAND-STITCHED, BACKING AND TRIM MACHINE STITCHED. QUILT TOP IS WHITE WITH MULTI-COLOURED FLOWERS ARRANGED IN RINGS; FLOWERS HAVE GREEN LEAVES SURROUNDING PETALS AND LEAVES CONNECT TO FORM THE RINGS. QUILT TOP HAS TWO WHITE FABRICS STITCHED TOGETHER AS BACKGROUND FOR FLOWERS. FRONT HAS MINOR STAINING; BACK HAS SMALL HOLE WITH FRAYED EDGES AND LOSS; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE APPLIQUE QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” “THIS BLUE AND WHITE [APPLIQUE] ONE WAS MADE FOR MY [OLDER] SISTER MARY AND SHE WAS AWAY FROM HOME SO IT NEVER GOT HANDED OFF…THE [APPLIQUE] QUILT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC AND THE REST OF THEM, I THINK, WERE JUST IN STORAGE IN THE [ATTIC].” “[MARY] WAS THE SECOND IN LINE…[SHE WAS BORN] IN 1935. I THINK [MY MOM] THOUGHT THAT MARY WAS ONE OF THE ONES THAT WAS OUT OF THE FAMILY. SHE WAS THE BLACK SHEEP, I THINK.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “MARY HAD GONE TO THE CONVENT AND THAT’S PROBABLY WHILE SHE WAS GONE WHEN IT WAS MADE.” “[MARY WAS BORN IN] ’35, SO IN ‘55 SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN 20 YEARS OLD AND WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE CONVENT. [THE QUILT WAS MADE] PROBABLY MID ‘50S.” ED BETTS NOTED, “IT WAS UP IN THE ATTIC , IT WAS SEWN…HOW THE OLD 100-POUND FLOUR SACKS USED TO COME, WHITE, IT WAS ALL SEWN UP AND HER NAME WAS PUT ON IT IN INDELIBLE PENCIL.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, ON THE QUILT'S INVOLVEMENT IN THE "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT", “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN. I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “[SHE MADE QUILTS THAT] WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED CRAZY [QUILTS] BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. THE BLUE APPLIQUE QUILT WAS DISPLAYED AS PART OF THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM'S "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT" WITH THE NUMBER "AQP 2-0284." THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT DOCUMENTED QUILTS REFLECTING QUILTING TRENDS OF THE 20TH CENTURY IN ALBERTA, ACCORDING TO A CALL FOR QUILTS PUBLISHED BY LUCCIE HEINS, CURATOR FOR THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM MANAGING THE PROJECT. THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT'S SECOND PHASE BEGAN IN 2014 TO EXAMINE QUILTS IN PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, WITH THE EARLIER FIRST PHASE EXAMINING QUILTS PRIVATELY OWNED. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026001
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
DOUBLE WEDDING RING
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
Catalogue Number
P20170026002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
DOUBLE WEDDING RING
Date Range From
1960
Date Range To
1970
Materials
COTTON, WOOL
No. Pieces
1
Length
202
Width
260
Description
PURPLE QUILT WITH DOUBLE WEDDING RING PATTERN ON FRONT; QUILT HAS MACHINE-STITCHED GRID OF 80 SQUARES. RINGS ARE INTERLOCKED AND MULTI-COLOURED AND MULTI-PATTERNED WITH YELLOW, BLUE, PINK, AND RED PRIMARY COLOURS IN RINGS. QUILT TOP IS HAND-STITCHED AND SEAMS ALONG EDGES ARE MACHINE-STITCHED. BACK OF QUILT HAS LIGHTER PURPLE SECTIONS IN LOWER LEFT CORNER. EDGES ARE FRAYED; LOWER RIGHT CORNER HAS LOOSE STUFFING EXPOSED FROM INSIDE, STUFFING IS WOOL. UPPER RIGHT CORNER HAS INTERIOR FABRIC EXPOSED AND IS WORN; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” “[MOM] WAS ALWAYS DOING SOMETHING, ’CAUSE SHE COULDN’T SIT DOWN IDLY. SHE HAD TO BE CROCHETING, OR EMBROIDERING OR MAKING QUILTS.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “[IT WAS MADE IN THE] ‘60S, MAYBE EVEN THE ‘70S.” “WHEN I FIRST MET [KATHERINE], I CAN REMEMBER COMING INTO THE HOUSE AND SHE WAS SITTING AT THE OLD TREADLE SEWING MACHINE. THAT THING WAS JUST [GOING] AND THAT’S WHAT SHE WAS DOING, WAS JUST PIECING PIECES OF MATERIAL TOGETHER.” “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” “I THINK THE REASON [WE CHOSE THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING] IS BECAUSE THE PURPLE DOUBLE WEDDING RING IS PROBABLY NEWER THAN WHAT THE OTHER ONES WERE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026002
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
197
Width
154.5
Description
QUILT TOP WITH MULTI-COLOURED AND MULTI-FABRIC CRAZY QUILT DESIGN IN A TWENTY SQUARE GRID; EACH GRID SQUARE HAS AN EIGHT-POINT STAR SEWN TOGETHER WITH MIXED-PATTERNED FABRICS. GRID SQUARES ARE DIVIDED BY EXTRA FABRIC TO FORM BORDERS. QUILT HAS ONE GRID BORDER OF DENIM EXTENDED PAST QUILT EDGE. QUILT IS HANDSTITCHED WITH STITCHES VISIBLE ON BACK; EDGES ARE UNFINISHED AND FRAYING; SMALL, FRAYED TEAR IN MIDDLE OF QUILT; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE CRAZY QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026003
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026004
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
187.5
Width
147
Description
QUILT TOP WITH GRID OF 20 SQUARES; EACH SQUARE HAS A PATCHWORK FAN BLOCK MADE OF ASSORTED PATTERNED FABRICS. QUILT TOP IS HANDSTICHED WITH UNFINISHED EDGES. QUILT BACKING IS PATCHWORK WITH BLACK AND WHITE SQUARES; BACKING SQUARE IN THE SECOND COLUMN AND THE 12TH SQUARE DOWN HAS BLACK TEXT ON WHITE FABRIC, “CRANE LIMITED; AT POINT OF MAILING; VALVES, FITTINGS, PUMPS, FABRICATED PIPE, HEATING AND PLUMBING MATERIALS”. QUILT HAS MINOR STAINING ON FRONT AND ALONG TOP EGDE; EDGES ARE FRAYING; QUILT HAS RIP BELOW CENTER SQUARE; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’S MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE FAN BLOCK QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “[THE QUILT BACKING IS] FLOUR SACKS…OR SUGAR SACKS, THEY ALL [CAME] IN WHITE SACKS.” GLORIA BETTS ADDED, “[SHE PROBABLY PUT A BACKING ON THIS QUILT TOP] BECAUSE USUALLY, EVEN TODAY IN QUILTING, THE FANS ARE DONE ON A BACKING BECAUSE EVERYTHING ON THE PIECES IS ON A BIAS SO IT STRETCHES. SO IT’S PUT ONTO A BACKING. BUT THE BACKING ON THAT PARTICULAR ONE BEING EITHER THE FLOUR SACKS OR THE SUGAR SACKS, TO ME, MADE IT UNIQUE.” “[FOR THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] WE BROUGHT IN THE BLUE [APPLIQUE] ONE, THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RING] ONE AND THE ONE [QUILT TOP], THE FAN. WE BROUGHT THOSE 3 IN AND [THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] CHOSE THE TWO.” “I THINK THE REASON [WE CHOSE THE DOUBLE WEDDING RING] IS BECAUSE THE PURPLE DOUBLE WEDDING RING IS PROBABLY NEWER THAN WHAT THE OTHER ONES WERE. [WE CHOSE THE FAN QUILT TOP] PROBABLY BECAUSE OF THE BACKING ON IT. A LOT OF THE TIME, IN THE OLD DAYS, THAT’S WHAT THEY DID, THEY PUT [QUILT TOPS] ON A BACKING.” “ON THE FAN [QUILT], [LUCY WITH THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM] IDENTIFIED FABRICS THAT WERE BACK TO THE EARLY 1900S. ONE SHE THINKS MIGHT BE BACK INTO THE LATE 1800S WHICH WAS PROBABLY A DRESS THAT [KATHERINE] GOT SOMEWHERE. THE BLUE BACKED ONE, THEY FOUND THERE WERE STILL PINS LEFT INSIDE THE QUILT AND THEY LEFT THEM THERE BECAUSE THEY SAID TO TAKE THEM OUT WOULD DAMAGE THE FABRIC. THEY WERE IMPRESSED WITH THE WORKMANSHIP ON THAT…ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY FOUND OUT THAT IT WAS PUT TOGETHER FROM A DESIGN DRAWN ON NEWSPAPER.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS' QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” THE BLUE APPLIQUE QUILT WAS DISPLAYED AS PART OF THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM'S "ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT" WITH THE NUMBER "AQP 2-0286." THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT DOCUMENTED QUILTS REFLECTING QUILTING TRENDS OF THE 20TH CENTURY IN ALBERTA, ACCORDING TO A CALL FOR QUILTS PUBLISHED BY LUCCIE HEINS, CURATOR FOR THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM MANAGING THE PROJECT. THE ALBERTA QUILT PROJECT'S SECOND PHASE BEGAN IN 2014 TO EXAMINE QUILTS IN PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, WITH THE EARLIER FIRST PHASE EXAMINING QUILTS PRIVATELY OWNED. KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026004
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
Catalogue Number
P20170026005
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
QUILT TOP
Date Range From
1950
Date Range To
1960
Materials
COTTON, POLYESTER
No. Pieces
1
Length
215.4
Width
165
Description
QUILT TOP WITH EIGHT POINT STAR PATTERN IN 48 SQUARE GRID; QUILT TOP HAS BLUE TRIM ALONG EDGES AND BETWEEN SQUARES; EIGHT POINT STARS FASHIONED FROM MULTICOLOURED AND PATTERNED FABRICS. RIGHT EDGE HAS TWO SQUARES MISSING BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE AND ONE SQUARE WITH RIPPED BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE; LEFT EDGE HAS SQUARE MISSING BLUE TRIM ALONG OUTER EDGE. UPPER LEFT CORNER HAS THREE SEAMS SEWN IN BLUE TRIM. STARS IN SQUARES HANDSTITCHED; SQUARES ATTACHED WITH MACHINE STITCHED SEAMS; MACHINE STITCHED SEAMS ATTACHING SQUARES TO BLUE TRIM AND EDGES. EDGES ARE FRAYING; QUILT TOP HAS NO BACKING AND THREADS ARE EXPOSED; OVERALL VERY GOOD CONDITION.
Subjects
BEDDING
Historical Association
DECORATIVE ARTS
FURNISHINGS
History
ON AUGUST 2, 2017, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED ED AND GLORIA BETTS REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF FIVE HANDMADE QUILTS. THE QUILTS WERE CREATED BY ED BETTS’ MOTHER, KATHERINA BETTS. ON THE EIGHT-POINT STAR QUILT, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “DAD DIED IN ‘69 SO JIM [MY BROTHER] AND I TOOK OVER THE FARM…IN 1970. GLORIA AND I TOOK OVER THE HOME FARM [IN 2010] AND [THE QUILTS WERE] LEFT BY MY MOTHER. [THE FARM WAS] EAST OF COUTTS, NINE MILES…IT BELONGED TO MY MOTHER AND DAD [KATY AND CLARENCE].” “WE FOUND [THE QUILTS] WHEN WE WERE CLEANING EVERYTHING OUT [OF THE ATTIC] WHEN WE MOVED TO LETHBRIDGE. [THE QUILTS WERE IN] AN OLD WOODEN BOX IN THE [ATTIC]…NINE WERE IN A BOX AND [THE BLUE AND WHITE APPLIQUE QUILT] WAS OUT.” ON HIS MOTHER’S HISTORY, ED BETTS RECALLED, “[MY MOM WAS FROM] CZECHOSLOVAKIA ORIGINALLY…SHE GOT ON THE TRAIN IN NOVA SCOTIA AND [CAME] WEST [IN 1930]. SHE HAD A BROTHER IN WETASKIWIN. SHE DIDN’T SPEAK ENGLISH AND WHEN SHE GOT ON THE CPR SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO WETASKIWIN. SHE ENDED UP ON THE DOCK IN COUTTS. SHE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY…THE OSTBY FAMILY TOOK HER HOME AND THERE SHE WORKED FOR HER [ROOM AND BOARD]. FROM THERE SHE WENT TO OUR NEIGHBORS, DICK WOLLERSHEIM. HE WAS A NEIGHBOR TO DAD. SHE BROKE HER LEG, SHE GOT THROWN OFF A HORSE AND SHE HAD NO PLACE TO GO AND I THINK DAD TOOK HER HOME…[MOM] AND DAD WERE MARRIED IN ’32.” “DAD HOMESTEADED IN 1908…DOWN ON THE MILK RIVER…THREE MILES SOUTH OF [THE FARM].” “[MOM CAME TO CANADA] FOR A NEW LIFE. SHE THOUGHT SHE WAS GOING TO HER BROTHER’S PLACE.” ON HIS MOTHER’S QUILTING AND SEWING, ED BETTS ELABORATED, “I THINK [HER SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE OF SEWING CAME] FROM THE OLD COUNTRY BECAUSE THAT’S WHAT WOMEN DID –COOK, AND SEW.” “[MOM WAS SEWING] EVERYTHING. THAT’S THE WHOLE THING. SHE JUST HAD TO HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH HER HANDS…IT WOULD TAKE ONE HELL OF A MAN TO KEEP UP WITH HER…[THE UNFINISHED QUILT TOPS WERE] JUST SOMETHING TO DO.” “I THINK IN THE OLD COUNTRY…THINGS WERE PRETTY TOUGH THERE. SHE HAD QUITE A FEW BROTHERS AND SISTERS OVER THERE TOO AND HER MOTHER DIED QUITE YOUNG. SHE WAS THE CAREGIVER, AND I GUESS WHEN THEY GOT OLD ENOUGH, SHE PULLED THE PLUG.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED, “I THINK THE THING WAS, EVERY LITTLE SCRAP OF MATERIAL HAD TO GO SOMEPLACE. SHE DIDN’T WASTE ANYTHING. SOMEWHERE DOWN STAIRS…THERE’S A BOX THAT HAS OLD BABY BONUS CHEQUES THAT WERE NEVER CASHED. THERE’S RECEIPTS FOR A HUNDRED POUNDS OF FLOUR FOR TEN CENTS. SHE KEPT EVERYTHING. SHE WAS SO AFRAID THAT SHE WOULD DO WITHOUT AGAIN.” “I KNOW WHEN I FIRST MET HER, SHE WOULD SEE A PICTURE IN A NEWSPAPER OR IN THIS OLD CATALOGUE WHICH USED TO COME ALONG. YOU COULD MAIL AWAY IF YOU SENT TEN CENTS BUT SHE WOULDN’T SPEND TEN CENTS. SHE WOULD LOOK AT THE PICTURES AND THEN SHE WOULD DRAW IT ON NEWSPAPER AND THAT’S HOW SHE MADE THE QUILTS. IT’S AMAZING, THE WAY THAT THEY’RE PUT TOGETHER BECAUSE THEY FIT…THERE’S ONE QUILT THERE THAT’S MIS-MATCHED BUT THE REST OF THEM ARE JUST PERFECTLY PUT TOGETHER.” “THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLED A CRAZY QUILT BACK IN THE DAY. YOU CAN SEE IN [ONE OF THE QUILTS] HOW THE PIECES DON’T MATCH COMING TOGETHER. YET YOU CAN TURN AROUND AND THERE’S ANOTHER QUILT…SHE’S PERFECTED [IT] ALMOST DOWN TO AN EXACT MATCH. IT’S AMAZING THAT SHE GOT THEM FROM A PICTURE, THAT SHE’S GOT THEM TOGETHER THE WAY THEY ARE.” “PROBABLY MATERIAL THAT SHE GOT [FOR THE QUILTS WAS FROM] HER CLOTHES. SHE WOULD PROBABLY CUT THEM UP AND MAKE THEM INTO SOMETHING.” ED BETTS RECALLED, “SHE HAD AN ANEURISM AND HAD TO GO TO CALGARY FOR A MONTH [IN THE ‘70S] AND AFTER THAT I DON’T THINK SHE DID MUCH SEWING ANY MORE…IN THE ‘80S SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MY SISTER.” “[THE QUILT INTERIORS ARE] ALL NATURAL WOOL. I CAN REMEMBER HER SITTING FOR HOURS RE-CARDING ALL THIS STUFF TO PUT IN HER QUILT.” ON KATHERINE BETTS’ QUILTS, GLORIA BETTS ELABORATED, “SHE CERTAINLY WASN’T ONE TO SHOW OFF WHAT SHE WAS DOING EITHER. SHE WAS JUST A VERY PRIVATE WOMAN, VERY HUMBLE WOMAN.” “I THINK SOME [OF THE QUILTS] WENT TO BC WHEN SHE WENT TO LIVE WITH MARGE IN BC. I KNOW THAT HER TREADLE SEWING MACHINE WE HAD AT THE HOUSE UNTIL SHE PASSED AWAY AND THEN MARGE TOOK THE TREADLE SEWING MACHINE.” “I’M THINKING THE PURPLE [DOUBLE WEDDING RINGS QUILT] ONE IS THE MOST RECENT, ALTHOUGH I CAN’T REALLY SAY ABOUT THE TOPS…[THE ROYAL] ALBERTA MUSEUM TOLD ME NOT TO FINISH [THE QUILT TOPS], TO LEAVE THEM AS THEY WERE.” “NOBODY SEWED [IN THE FAMILY EXCEPT KATHERINA]. MARGE CROCHETED.” GLORIA BETTS NOTED THEIR MOTIVATION FOR DONATING THE QUILTS, STATING, “WE’RE DOWNSIZING BECAUSE OF AGE AND MOVING. [THE QUILTS] HAVE TO GO SOMEPLACE WHERE THEY ARE GOING TO BE LOOKED AFTER.” KATHERINA BETTS WAS BORN KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA IN 1903 AND IMMIGRATED TO CANADA FROM CZECHOSLOVAKIA IN 1930. A GRAVE RECORD ON FINDAGRAVE.COM LISTS KATHERINA KOVACIKOVA BETTS AS THE WIFE OF CLARENCE BETTS OF COUTTS, ALBERTA. ACCORDING TO 1930 PASSENGER LISTS FOR THE HMS MONTCLARE [ACCESSED THROUGH THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES OF CANADA DIGITIZED MICROFILM RECORDS], KATHARINA [KATHERINA] KOVACIKOVA ARRIVED IN ST. JOHN’S, NEW BRUNSWICK ON MARCH 30, 1930 FROM HAMBURG, GERMANY. KATHERINA WAS LISTED ON THE PASSENGER LISTS AS 26 YEARS OF AGE, SINGLE, BORN IN RADOSINA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA AND ARRIVING IN CANADA TO PURSUE A “DOMESTIC” TRADE. KATHERINA BETTS PASSED AWAY IN VERNON, B.C. ON MAY 20, 1985, ACCORDING TO LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES. KATHERINA’S HUSBAND, CLARENCE, PASSED AWAY ON DECEMBER 4, 1969 IN COUTTS, ALBERTA. FOR MORE INFORMATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND COPIES OF THE GRAVE AND PASSENGER RECORDS, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20170026001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20170026005
Acquisition Date
2017-08
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

Scene & Heard -- June 2010 -- television program

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions97963
Date Range
2010
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111302
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
Dog Agility Show. Comments by Sarah Novak Golf Tournament for Habitat for Humanity (in memory of Les Higa). Comments by Mary Gordon, Coldwell Banker Silver Community Band Concert. Comments by Karen Christie, Director Pride Festival (LGBTQ+). Comments by Mickey Wilson Stone of Destiny - film pro…
Date Range
2010
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge
CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and prodcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
Dog Agility Show. Comments by Sarah Novak Golf Tournament for Habitat for Humanity (in memory of Les Higa). Comments by Mary Gordon, Coldwell Banker Silver Community Band Concert. Comments by Karen Christie, Director Pride Festival (LGBTQ+). Comments by Mickey Wilson Stone of Destiny - film project. Comments by Amber Ripley, Assistant Director
Accession No.
20161111302
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Scene & Heard -- Mar 2010 -- television program

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions97964
Date Range
2010
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111303
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
Earthquake disaster relief in Chili - Lethbridge Lions Club. Comments by Ricardo Berner and Bob Tarleck Lethbridge Public Library fundraiser for West Side branch in partnership with Kinsman Club. Comments by Jeff McLeary Spring for Life - HIV Connection fundraiser. Comments by Director Charleen D…
Date Range
2010
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge
CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and prodcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
Earthquake disaster relief in Chili - Lethbridge Lions Club. Comments by Ricardo Berner and Bob Tarleck Lethbridge Public Library fundraiser for West Side branch in partnership with Kinsman Club. Comments by Jeff McLeary Spring for Life - HIV Connection fundraiser. Comments by Director Charleen Davidson and Chelsea George Lethbridge Chess Club -- tournament. Comments by Paul Viminitz. Stars Lottery Dream Home. Comments by Steve Meszaros, Avonlea Master Builders Student Exhibit - UofL Art Gallery. Comments by Sandra Dick, guest curator Expressions - Lethbridge College Magazine. Comments by Ryan Agnew and Paige Sawatzky Life is a Dream - UofL Theatre. Comments by Director Richard Epp Movie Reviews by Scott Sakatch, Lethbridge Journal
Accession No.
20161111303
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Parties - 2 Couples Dancing - Eaton's

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96273
Date Range
196-?
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191083223
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Parties - 2 Couples Dancing - Eaton's, Part 39/96. Two unidentified couples dancing at an Eaton's party. The photographic print is believed to have originally been printed in the Eaton's Store Newsletter, "Chinook Winds".
  1 image  
Date Range
196-?
Description Level
Item
Creator
Garry Allison
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Garry Allison was born in Lethbridge in 1940. During his career, he served as the Sports Editor of the Lethbridge Herald, as well as the District Editor, City Editor and finished his journalism career as the Outdoors Editor. He worked fulltime in the Herald's Sports department in 1974 after working in the Printing Department. Allison was an avid rodeo fan and spent much of his career covering local rodeos throughout Southern Alberta, beginning in the mid-1960s until his retirement in 2002. He received numerous awards for his coverage of rodeos, high school sports and the outdoors, including the Max Bell Memorial Award for outstanding coverage of amateur sports in Alberta. Because of his achievements in Southern Alberta sports, he was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame. Allison was heavily involved in the local community, including coaching the high school girls’ basketball in Coalhurst and Winston Churchill for ten years. Family was a central priority to Garry Allison: he and his wife, Mary, were married for 55 years and had cared for foster children for 32 years.
Scope and Content
Parties - 2 Couples Dancing - Eaton's, Part 39/96. Two unidentified couples dancing at an Eaton's party. The photographic print is believed to have originally been printed in the Eaton's Store Newsletter, "Chinook Winds".
Accession No.
20191083223
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Parties - Dancing at Eaton's Anniversary Party - Eaton's

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96274
Date Range
1955-1959?
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191083224
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Parties - Dancing at Eaton's Anniversary Party - Eaton's, Part 40/96. Eaton's staff dancing at an unidentified Eaton's Anniversary party. In the background, Mr. Hegan dances with his wife. The photographic print is believed to have originally been printed in the Eaton's Store Newsletter, "Chinook W…
  1 image  
Date Range
1955-1959?
Description Level
Item
Creator
Garry Allison
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Garry Allison was born in Lethbridge in 1940. During his career, he served as the Sports Editor of the Lethbridge Herald, as well as the District Editor, City Editor and finished his journalism career as the Outdoors Editor. He worked fulltime in the Herald's Sports department in 1974 after working in the Printing Department. Allison was an avid rodeo fan and spent much of his career covering local rodeos throughout Southern Alberta, beginning in the mid-1960s until his retirement in 2002. He received numerous awards for his coverage of rodeos, high school sports and the outdoors, including the Max Bell Memorial Award for outstanding coverage of amateur sports in Alberta. Because of his achievements in Southern Alberta sports, he was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame. Allison was heavily involved in the local community, including coaching the high school girls’ basketball in Coalhurst and Winston Churchill for ten years. Family was a central priority to Garry Allison: he and his wife, Mary, were married for 55 years and had cared for foster children for 32 years.
Scope and Content
Parties - Dancing at Eaton's Anniversary Party - Eaton's, Part 40/96. Eaton's staff dancing at an unidentified Eaton's Anniversary party. In the background, Mr. Hegan dances with his wife. The photographic print is believed to have originally been printed in the Eaton's Store Newsletter, "Chinook Winds".
Accession No.
20191083224
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Parties - Eaton's Staff Enjoying Party - Eaton's

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96275
Date Range
195-?
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191083225
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Parties - Eaton's Staff Enjoying Party - Eaton's, Part 41/96. Unidentified Eaton's staff members talking together and enjoying a party in a gymnasium.
  1 image  
Date Range
195-?
Description Level
Item
Creator
Garry Allison
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Garry Allison was born in Lethbridge in 1940. During his career, he served as the Sports Editor of the Lethbridge Herald, as well as the District Editor, City Editor and finished his journalism career as the Outdoors Editor. He worked fulltime in the Herald's Sports department in 1974 after working in the Printing Department. Allison was an avid rodeo fan and spent much of his career covering local rodeos throughout Southern Alberta, beginning in the mid-1960s until his retirement in 2002. He received numerous awards for his coverage of rodeos, high school sports and the outdoors, including the Max Bell Memorial Award for outstanding coverage of amateur sports in Alberta. Because of his achievements in Southern Alberta sports, he was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame. Allison was heavily involved in the local community, including coaching the high school girls’ basketball in Coalhurst and Winston Churchill for ten years. Family was a central priority to Garry Allison: he and his wife, Mary, were married for 55 years and had cared for foster children for 32 years.
Scope and Content
Parties - Eaton's Staff Enjoying Party - Eaton's, Part 41/96. Unidentified Eaton's staff members talking together and enjoying a party in a gymnasium.
Accession No.
20191083225
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Parties - Unidentified Eaton's Comedy Skit - Eaton's

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96276
Date Range
196-?
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191083226
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Parties - Unidentified Eaton's Comedy Skit - Eaton's, Part 42/96. Four unidentified staff members put on a comedy skit at an Eaton's party. The four unidentified staff are wearing white wigs and dressed in skirts.
  1 image  
Date Range
196-?
Description Level
Item
Creator
Garry Allison
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Garry Allison was born in Lethbridge in 1940. During his career, he served as the Sports Editor of the Lethbridge Herald, as well as the District Editor, City Editor and finished his journalism career as the Outdoors Editor. He worked fulltime in the Herald's Sports department in 1974 after working in the Printing Department. Allison was an avid rodeo fan and spent much of his career covering local rodeos throughout Southern Alberta, beginning in the mid-1960s until his retirement in 2002. He received numerous awards for his coverage of rodeos, high school sports and the outdoors, including the Max Bell Memorial Award for outstanding coverage of amateur sports in Alberta. Because of his achievements in Southern Alberta sports, he was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame. Allison was heavily involved in the local community, including coaching the high school girls’ basketball in Coalhurst and Winston Churchill for ten years. Family was a central priority to Garry Allison: he and his wife, Mary, were married for 55 years and had cared for foster children for 32 years.
Scope and Content
Parties - Unidentified Eaton's Comedy Skit - Eaton's, Part 42/96. Four unidentified staff members put on a comedy skit at an Eaton's party. The four unidentified staff are wearing white wigs and dressed in skirts.
Accession No.
20191083226
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Parties - Young Girl Sings at a Christmas Party - Eaton's

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96277
Date Range
195-?
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191083227
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Parties - Young Girl Sings at a Christmas Party - Eaton's, Part 43/96. An unidentified young girl sings on stage at an Eaton's Christmas party. The photographic print is believed to have originally been printed in the Eaton's Store Newsletter, "Chinook Winds".
  1 image  
Date Range
195-?
Description Level
Item
Creator
Garry Allison
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Garry Allison was born in Lethbridge in 1940. During his career, he served as the Sports Editor of the Lethbridge Herald, as well as the District Editor, City Editor and finished his journalism career as the Outdoors Editor. He worked fulltime in the Herald's Sports department in 1974 after working in the Printing Department. Allison was an avid rodeo fan and spent much of his career covering local rodeos throughout Southern Alberta, beginning in the mid-1960s until his retirement in 2002. He received numerous awards for his coverage of rodeos, high school sports and the outdoors, including the Max Bell Memorial Award for outstanding coverage of amateur sports in Alberta. Because of his achievements in Southern Alberta sports, he was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame. Allison was heavily involved in the local community, including coaching the high school girls’ basketball in Coalhurst and Winston Churchill for ten years. Family was a central priority to Garry Allison: he and his wife, Mary, were married for 55 years and had cared for foster children for 32 years.
Scope and Content
Parties - Young Girl Sings at a Christmas Party - Eaton's, Part 43/96. An unidentified young girl sings on stage at an Eaton's Christmas party. The photographic print is believed to have originally been printed in the Eaton's Store Newsletter, "Chinook Winds".
Accession No.
20191083227
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

Parties - Gymnast Performs at Christmas Party - Eaton's

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96278
Date Range
195-?
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20191083228
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
Scope and Content
Parties - Gymnast Performs at Christmas Party - Eaton's, Part 44/96. An unidentified young gymnast performs on stage at an Eaton's Christmas party. The photographic print is believed to have originally been printed in the Eaton's Store Newsletter, "Chinook Winds".
  1 image  
Date Range
195-?
Description Level
Item
Creator
Garry Allison
Physical Description
1 black and white photographic print
History / Biographical
Garry Allison was born in Lethbridge in 1940. During his career, he served as the Sports Editor of the Lethbridge Herald, as well as the District Editor, City Editor and finished his journalism career as the Outdoors Editor. He worked fulltime in the Herald's Sports department in 1974 after working in the Printing Department. Allison was an avid rodeo fan and spent much of his career covering local rodeos throughout Southern Alberta, beginning in the mid-1960s until his retirement in 2002. He received numerous awards for his coverage of rodeos, high school sports and the outdoors, including the Max Bell Memorial Award for outstanding coverage of amateur sports in Alberta. Because of his achievements in Southern Alberta sports, he was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame. Allison was heavily involved in the local community, including coaching the high school girls’ basketball in Coalhurst and Winston Churchill for ten years. Family was a central priority to Garry Allison: he and his wife, Mary, were married for 55 years and had cared for foster children for 32 years.
Scope and Content
Parties - Gymnast Performs at Christmas Party - Eaton's, Part 44/96. An unidentified young gymnast performs on stage at an Eaton's Christmas party. The photographic print is believed to have originally been printed in the Eaton's Store Newsletter, "Chinook Winds".
Accession No.
20191083228
Collection
Archive
Images
Less detail

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