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Farm and Vehicle Safety videos -- television program

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions98323
Date Range
1997-1999
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111547
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
"Win with Farm Safety": A contest for the best farm safety video put on by CISA. Mark Campbell explains how school classes can make a video that promotes farm safety and shows examples. Farm safety videos, showing how farmers can make their farms and farming practices safer; hosted by Mark Campbel…
Date Range
1997-1999
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge, CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and broadcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
"Win with Farm Safety": A contest for the best farm safety video put on by CISA. Mark Campbell explains how school classes can make a video that promotes farm safety and shows examples. Farm safety videos, showing how farmers can make their farms and farming practices safer; hosted by Mark Campbell. Various commericials made by local southern Alberta farmers highlight the safety practices they include on their own farms and ranches. "Crimeproofing: Extra-Christmas Shopping": Constable Darcy Murray discusses protecting your car against theft during the Christmas holiday season. "A Pemmican Moment". Views of several dances that took place at the Pemmican Club. "CISA News Bert Canning Award". CISA News is recognized for "Best Newscast (TV) Small Market Reporting". "AgriBusiness" logo and intro plays silently.
Accession No.
20161111547
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Behind the Scenes Video -- Various Lethbridge Scenes -- television program

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions98324
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111548
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
Behind the scenes of a video. Various scenes are filmed at Lethbridge College, Mike Mountain Horse Elementary school, offices, Helen Schuler Nature Centre, and people playing a game of baseball. A film crew direct the actors in various scenes that take place throughout Lethbridge.
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge, CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and broadcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
Behind the scenes of a video. Various scenes are filmed at Lethbridge College, Mike Mountain Horse Elementary school, offices, Helen Schuler Nature Centre, and people playing a game of baseball. A film crew direct the actors in various scenes that take place throughout Lethbridge.
Accession No.
20161111548
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Oliver Irrigation video -- television program

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions98325
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111549
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
A group of men from Oliver Irrigation move heavy construction equipment. The head of the construction company discusses how the construction crew will assemble the irrigation system and the work that goes into creating an irrigation system for local farms. Various close up views of the assembly pr…
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge, CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and broadcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
A group of men from Oliver Irrigation move heavy construction equipment. The head of the construction company discusses how the construction crew will assemble the irrigation system and the work that goes into creating an irrigation system for local farms. Various close up views of the assembly process of the irrigation pipeline. The full process of assembling and completing the irrigation system for a local farm is shown. Oliver Irrigation video. Part 1/2.
Accession No.
20161111549
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Devil's Coulee, The Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions98930
Date Range
ca. 1990
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111864
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
A Royal Tyrrell Museum interpreter, Avis?, gives people a tour of Devil's Coulee, part of the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta. A tour guide leads a group of people near the coulees? Hoodoos, the river, and other views of Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park. People camping. A tour throug…
Date Range
ca. 1990
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge, CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and broadcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
A Royal Tyrrell Museum interpreter, Avis?, gives people a tour of Devil's Coulee, part of the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta. A tour guide leads a group of people near the coulees? Hoodoos, the river, and other views of Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park. People camping. A tour through Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park.
Accession No.
20161111864
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Strengthen the Family videos

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions98931
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111865
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
"Strengthen the Family" videos, Paulette Mathes hosts the educational videos about the importance of family and spending time together.
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge, CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and broadcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
"Strengthen the Family" videos, Paulette Mathes hosts the educational videos about the importance of family and spending time together.
Accession No.
20161111865
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Strengthen the Family videos

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions98932
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111866
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
"Strengthen the Family" educational videos about the importance of family and spending time together, hosted by Paulette Mathes.
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge, CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and broadcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
"Strengthen the Family" educational videos about the importance of family and spending time together, hosted by Paulette Mathes.
Accession No.
20161111866
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Filming of Promotional Videos for CISA TV

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions98933
Date Range
ca. 1990?
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111867
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
Behind the scenes of the CISA TV studio in Lethbridge. Filming of promotional videos for CISA TV and the staff at the studio?
Date Range
ca. 1990?
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge, CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and broadcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
Behind the scenes of the CISA TV studio in Lethbridge. Filming of promotional videos for CISA TV and the staff at the studio?
Accession No.
20161111867
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Elkford Festival and the Dorothy Dalgliesh School in Picture Butte

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions98934
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111868
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
A festival in Elkford, B.C., including a parade. A bicycle event. An individual is interviewed about the Dorothy Dalgliesh School in Picture Butte. Children playing in a gymnasium, students in a classroom, and other views of the Dorothy Dalgliesh School. An individual is interviewed about budge…
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge, CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and broadcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
A festival in Elkford, B.C., including a parade. A bicycle event. An individual is interviewed about the Dorothy Dalgliesh School in Picture Butte. Children playing in a gymnasium, students in a classroom, and other views of the Dorothy Dalgliesh School. An individual is interviewed about budget cuts, and the need for repairs at the Dorothy Dalgliesh School. An alumnus of the Lethbridge Hurricanes discusses playing hockey in Lethbridge in his junior career.
Accession No.
20161111868
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Global News Morning Edition -- 2001 -- television program

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions98935
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111869
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
Global News Morning Edition opening. Top news stories include loss of funding at the Taber & District Family Crisis Society, a car accident, Mayor Carpenter's last council meeting, Brienne Hurlburt reports.
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge, CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and broadcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
Global News Morning Edition opening. Top news stories include loss of funding at the Taber & District Family Crisis Society, a car accident, Mayor Carpenter's last council meeting, Brienne Hurlburt reports.
Accession No.
20161111869
Collection
Archive
Less detail

The Sutter Golf Classic 1989

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions98936
Description Level
Item
Accession No.
20161111870
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
Scope and Content
2 & 7 coverage of the 5th Annual Sutter Golf Classic from 1989. 2 & 7's Pete Curtis reports.
Description Level
Item
Creator
Global Television Lethbridge, CISA
Physical Description
Betamax tape; digital copy available
History / Biographical
"Scene and Heard" (Scene & Heard) is a non-news regional lifestyle show produced by Global Television and broadcasted in Lethbridge region. The show deals mainly with community events, hosted by Mark Campbell.
Scope and Content
2 & 7 coverage of the 5th Annual Sutter Golf Classic from 1989. 2 & 7's Pete Curtis reports.
Accession No.
20161111870
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Other Name
"WHITE TRAPPERS AND BLOOD INDIANS"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
OIL PAINT, WOOD, LINEN
Catalogue Number
P20200007000
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"WHITE TRAPPERS AND BLOOD INDIANS"
Date
1898
Materials
OIL PAINT, WOOD, LINEN
No. Pieces
1
Height
4.5
Length
90.0
Width
123.0
Description
OIL PAINTING IN WOOD FRAME. HORIZONTAL LANDSCAPE SCENE, GREEN GRASSLAND AND BLUE SKY. ACTION SCENE TAKES UP THE FOREGROUND, WITH FOUR HORSES RACING ACROSS. ON THESE HORSES ARE THREE RIDERS, THE RIGHTMOST LOOKING BACK AND SHOOTING A GUN. THE LEFTMOST RIDER CENTERED IN THE PAINTING, WITH HIS HAT FLYING OFF BEHIND HIM AND HIS HORSE PITCHING AT AN ANGLE. LEFT OF THIS CENTER HORSE IS A RABBIT, RUNNING IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION OF THE HORSES. A DUST CLOUD RISES BEHIND THE HORSES, AT THE END OF WHICH, IN THE LEFT BACKGROUND, ARE EIGHT INDIGENOUS RIDERS, CHASING THE CENTER RIDERS WITH WEAPONS ALOFT. IN BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER, IN BLACK PAINT, THE SIGNATURE READS “O SELTZER … 98”. THE PAINTING RESIDES IN A RED WOOD FRAME WITH A BROWN WOOD TRIM AND A WHITE FABRIC MAT. THE FRAME MOUNTS TO THE CANVAS WITH EYELET HOOKS AND SCREWS. TWO OTHER EYELET HOOKS AND STRETCHED WIRE ON BACK OF FRAME SERVE AS HANGING HARDWARE. BACK OF FRAME IS UNFINISHED. BLACK SPECKLING IN THREE PLACES OF MAT; ALONG LEFT SIDE, IN THE CENTER OF BOTTOM, AND IN CENTER OF RIGHT SIDE. BACK OF CANVAS STRETCHERS HAVE HOLES ALONG TOP EDGE. DENTS ALONG ALL EDGES OF THESE STRETCHERS AT SEMI-UNIFORM DISTANCE, LIKELY FROM A DIFFERENT FRAME. BESIDES THESE MAJOR MARKS, STRETCHERS ARE DENTED, WORN AND SCRATCHED ALONG ENTIRE BACK SURFACE. SLIGHT STAINING AND FINGERPRINTS ALONG BACK OF FRAME.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON MARCH 13, 2020, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED BARBARA AND ERIC HILLMAN REGARDING THEIR DONATION OF AN OLAF SELTZER PAINTING. ON HOW SHE ACQUIRED THE PAINTING, BARBARA RECALLED, “MRS. ARMSTRONG GAVE THE PAINTING TO MY FATHER [CLEVE HILL]…DAD WAS A GREAT CHARLIE RUSSELL FAN, AND CHARLIE RUSSELL AND OLAF SELTZER WERE PALS AND COLLEAGUES…DAD HAD A VERY BIG COLLECTION OF CHARLIE RUSSELL PRINTS AND MRS. ARMSTRONG KNEW THIS…DAD DID THINGS FOR HER AS SHE BECAME ELDERLY. JUST LITTLE BANKING THINGS AND HE HELPED WITH HER WILL...SHE DECIDED THAT SHE WOULD LIKE HIM TO HAVE [THE PAINTING] AND SO SHE GAVE IT TO HIM.” “DAD…WAS IN LETHBRIDGE BUT HE INDICATED TO ME…THAT, I SHOULD HAVE THE PAINTING BUT I LIVED IN CALGARY AND I DIDN’T HAVE A PLACE TO PUT IT AND SO HE, KEPT IT THERE IN THE HOUSE ON DIEPPE BOULEVARD AND THEN IT WENT TO SOUTH PARKSIDE DRIVE..., AND THEN LATER IT WENT TO THE ACREAGE JUST OUTSIDE OF COALDALE, WHERE THEY MOVED. …WE TOOK OVER THE ACREAGE AND THE PAINTING BECAME IN MY POSSESSION I GUESS. THEN ERIC AND I ALSO GOT TO THE POINT WHERE WE... MOVED INTO LETHBRIDGE TO THE HOUSE THAT WE’RE AT NOW, AND THAT WAS ABOUT 14 YEARS AGO AND WE BROUGHT THE PAINTING WITH US.” ON WHY HER FATHER GAVE HER THE PAINTING, SHE ADDED, “WELL, I’M AN ONLY CHILD SO THERE WASN’T ANYBODY ELSE IN THE FAMILY AND I WAS THE ONE THAT HE RODE HORSEBACK WITH AND- AND I WANTED IT.” GROWING UP WITH THE PAINTING IN THE FAMILY HOME, BARBARA RECALLED, “WE WERE A HORSE FAMILY AND, SO DAD AND I IN PARTICULAR RODE HORSEBACK ALL THE TIME…WHEN I LOOKED AT THAT PICTURE I WOULD SEE THE HORSES AND IT’S VERY MUCH…SYMBOLIC TO ME BECAUSE OF THE HORSES…I GUESS THE TRAPPERS AND…THE HISTORY THAT GOES ALONG WITH IT. IT’S JUST SOMETHING THAT HAS BEEN IN THE FAMILY FOR YEARS AND YEARS AND YEARS.” “DAD TOOK IT DOWN…TO THE CHARLIE RUSSELL MUSEUM, IN ABOUT MARCH OF 1975. THE MUSEUM IS IN GREAT FALLS, AND THEY HAVE AN OLAF SELTZER ROOM THERE…I THINK [DAD] REALLY LIKED [THE PAINTING] AND SO HE AND HIS FRIEND RUSSELL FAIRHURST TOOK IT DOWN ACROSS THE BORDER…[DAD] WANTED THE CURATOR, OF THE MUSEUM TO LOOK AT THE PICTURE AND SEE…WHAT SHOULD BE DONE WITH IT…THE CURATOR THERE RECOMMENDED THAT THE PAINTING BE CLEANED…THE ONLY PLACE TO HAVE IT CLEANED AT THAT POINT IN TIME WAS IN SAN FRANCISCO APPARENTLY. AND SO IT WENT FROM GREAT FALLS TO SAN FRANCISCO AND…WHEN IT CAME BACK, THE RABBIT THAT’S IN THE BOTTOM LEFT HAND PART OF THE PAINTING HAD TURNED UP…WE REALIZED WHAT HAD HAPPENED WAS THAT THE RABBIT HAD SCARED THE HORSE…AND SO THE HORSE WAS GOING TO GO DOWN. AND THAT MADE A DIFFERENCE IN THE WAY THAT WE SAW THE PAINTING.” IN A LATER EMAIL TO KEVIN MACLEAN DATED AUGUST 28, 2020, BARBARA ADDED, “ONE OF THE REASONS DAD WAS SO FOND OF THAT PAINTING WAS THAT HE WAS A GREAT FRIEND OF MIKE MOUNTAIN HORSE. AS A RESULT, DAD AND I WERE ALLOWED ONCE A YEAR TO RIDE ON HORSEBACK ACROSS THE RIVER TO THE SITE OF WHOOP UP, WHERE THE JAYCEES HAD ERECTED A CAIRN.” ERIC ADDED ABOUT THE PAINTING, “I ALWAYS WAS ATTRACTED TO ARTWORKS THAT TOLD A STORY, OR IMPLIED A STORY AND THAT GAVE MEANING FOR ME. AND THIS WORK CERTAINLY DOES TELL A STORY. ITS TITLE INCLUDES THE NOTION OF AN INDIAN WAR PARTY AND IT INCLUDES THE NOTION OF TRAPPERS BEING CHASED. AND SO QUESTIONS COME TO MY MIND. THE INDIAN TERRITORY WAS OFTEN SORT OF USED BY NON-INDIGENOUS PEOPLE FOR TRAPPING. THERE WERE HORRIBLE STORIES ABOUT THE SLAUGHTER OF BISON BY TRAPPERS SIMPLY FOR THEIR FURS AND SO ON. AND SO, QUESTIONS COME UP AS TO WHETHER THESE TRAPPERS WERE TRAPPING ON INDIAN LAND. QUESTIONS COME UP AS TO WHETHER THEY STOLE THE FURS THAT THEY WERE PACKING. AND SO IT’S UNDERSTANDABLE IF EITHER OF THOSE THINGS HOLD THAT THE INDIANS ARE GOING TO DEFEND THEIR TERRITORY. THEY’RE GOING TO DEFEND THIS AGAINST THEIR NON-INDIGENOUS INTRUDERS. AND THE FACT THAT THEY’RE CHASING BUT STILL IN THE DISTANCE ON A BACKGROUND AND A RABBIT APPEARS AND SPOOKS A HORSE WHICH MAY MEAN THE DOOM OF THESE TRAPPERS IS AN INTERESTING STORY TO ME.” IN A LETTER DATED DECEMBER 30, 1952, TO MRS. ARMSTRONG FROM OLAF SELTZER, GIFTED WITH THE PAINTING TO CLEVE HILL, SELTZER STATES, “I PAINTED ONLY TWO LARGE CANVASES DURING MY STAY IN LETHBRIDGE. THE FIRST AND LARGER ONE FOR MR. DOWNER. THE SECOND ONE SOME-WHAT SMALLER ABOUT 2FT 6IN HIGH BY 3FT 5IN LONG, WHICH MUST BE THE ONE YOU NOW OWN. THIS OIL-PAINTING I PAINTED FOR A YOUNG MAN WHO HAD A STORE CLOSE TO THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL, AND I REMEMBER HIM AS THE SON OF THE YARD-MASTER ON THE NARROWS GAUGE, MR. SEMAN. I THINK WE CALLED THE YOUNG FELLOW –“KID”- SEMAN, AND HIS SMALL STORE WAS A NEWS-STAND WITH CANDY, TOBACCO AND STATIONARY SUPPLIES AND A HANG-OUT FOR US YOUNG FELLOWS WORKING ON THE OLD TURKEY TRAIL. THE –“KID”- BEING A YOUNG FELLOW WANTED ACTION IN HIS PAINTING FOR THE STORE, SO, NO DOUBT, HE HAD ME KILL EVERYBODY OFF IN THIS RUNNING FIGHT BETWEEN THE WHITE TRAPPERS AND THE BLOOD INDIANS.” AN ARTICLE TITLED “OLAF SELTZER: THE ARTIST MONTANA ALMOST FORGOT” DATED MARCH 1970, STATES ON SELTZER’S TIME IN LETHBRIDGE, “[SELTZER] WAS EMPLOYED AS AN APPRENTICE BY THE GREAT NORTHERN. HE WORKED TOO, FOR THE B.A.&P. RAILROAD BETWEEN ANACONDA AND BUTTE IN WESTERN MONTANA, AND ON THE OLD NARROW GAUGE OUT OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, CANADA...ACCORDING TO JAMES FORREST, FRED DOWNER…WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN GETTING SELTZER TO EMBARK IN PAINTING. INSISTED FOREST: ‘IN 1897, SELTZER RODE OVER THE NARROW GAUGE RAIL LINE FROM GREAT FALLS TO LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, WHERE HE WAS ENCOURAGED BY FRED DOWNER, WHO HAD ADMIRED HIS SKETCHES, TO TRY PAINTING IN OILS. A KIT OF PAINTS AND MATERIALS WAS IN TIME SHIPPED UP THE LINE FROM GREAT FALLS AND OLAF MADE HIS FIRST OIL PAINTING- AN INDIAN WAR PARTY ON THE TRAIL IN THE SUN RIVER VALLEY. FROM THIS FIRST EFFORT, SELTZER PROVED TO BE AT HOME IN OILS AS WELL AS IN WATERCOLORS…’” THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, OLAF SELTZER, HAS BEEN COMPILED WITH THE ARTICLE “OLAF SELTZER: THE ARTIST MONTANA ALMOST FORGOT” AND “OLAF AND HIS ATTIC STUDIO: A FRONTIER PAINTING THAT CHANGED A LIFE” FROM THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD DECEMBER 14, 1948, AS REFERENCE. OLAF C. SELTZER WAS BORN IN COPENHAGEN, DENMARK, IN 1877. HE ENROLLED IN THE INSTITUTE OF ART & TECHNOLOGY AT COPENHAGEN BEFORE HIS FATHERS DEATH ENDED HIS EDUCATION THERE. INSTEAD, SELTZER AND HIS MOTHER MOVED TO AMERICA TO JOIN HIS UNCLE IN MONTANA, WHERE HE WOULD LIVE FOR THE MAJORITY OF HIS LIFE. AFTER SPENDING HIS EARLY YEARS WORKING FOR LIVESTOCK OUTFITS, HE TURNED TO WORK AS A MACHINIST FOR THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY. THROUGHOUT THIS TIME SELTZER CREATED ART, THOUGH HE WOULD NOT TURN TO FULL-TIME PAINTING UNTIL 1926. HE BEGAN PAINTING IN EARNEST IN 1897, ALONGSIDE CHARLES M. RUSSELL, ANOTHER PROLIFIC MONTANA ARTIST, BEFORE GOING IT ALONE FROM 1921 ONWARD. ALSO IN 1897, SELTZER CAME TO LETHBRIDGE TO WORK ON THE NARROW GAUGE RAILWAY, STAYING IN AN ATTIC ROOM AT THE LETHBRIDGE HOTEL, OWNED AT THE TIME BY FRED DOWNER. HE SOLD SKETCHES AT THE HOTEL FOR 50 CENTS EACH AND TRIED OIL PAINTING, GIFTING HIS FIRST OIL PAINTING TO MR. DOWNER AND LEAVING SHORTLY AFTER. THROUGHOUT HIS CAREER SELTZER CREATED BOTH WATERCOLOUR AND OIL PAINTINGS, MOST FAMOUSLY DEPICTING LIFE AND PEOPLE IN THE AMERICAN WEST. HE IS FAMOUS FOR HIS MINIATURE WORKS AND HAS OVER 2,500 PAINTINGS CREDITED TO HIM. HE DIED IN GREAT FALLS, MONTANA, IN DECEMBER OF 1957 AT THE AGE OF 81. BARBARA’S FATHER, RICHARD CLEVELAND "CLEVE" HILL PASSED AWAY IN 2009. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE DONATION INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION, COPIES OF THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, AND OTHER QUOTED REFERENCES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20200007000-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20200007000
Acquisition Date
2020-03
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
PORTRAIT, WILLIAM ALDOUS
Date Range From
1954
Date Range To
1954
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL
Catalogue Number
P20200019001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
PORTRAIT, WILLIAM ALDOUS
Date Range From
1954
Date Range To
1954
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
35.6
Width
24.9
Description
CHARCOAL DRAWING OF A MAN SMOKING A PIPE, RIGHT PROFILE, ON BEIGE, TEXTURED PAPER. PROFILE DRAWING FOCUSES ON THE HEAD, ONLY IMPLYING SHOULDERS AND SHIRT COLLAR. UNDER THE DRAWING, LEFT SIDE, IS THE SIGNATURE “EER”. ON THE BACKSIDE OF THE PAPER, WRITTEN UP AT THE TOP IN BLUE PEN, “TO W. ALDOUS. HAPPY BIRTHDAY AND MANY MORE, E E RIETHMAN”. PAPER IS SLIGHTLY WARPED, WITH MINUTE WAVES OVER SURFACE. SMALL BLUE MARK IN EMPTY SPACE BESIDE THE FOREHEAD. BACKSIDE OF PAPER HAS TAPE MARKS ALONG EDGES, SHOWING LIGHTER PATCHES OF PAPER WHERE TOP LAYER IS TORN AWAY.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON JUNE 10, 2020, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DARLENE ALDOUS REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REITHMAN SKETCH AND A CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CAN OF WATER. ON HER ACQUISITION OF THE REITHMAN SKETCH, DARLENE EXPLAINED, “IT'S A BEAUTIFUL PICTURE AND [THE PORTRAIT'S SUBJECT] WAS MY HUSBAND’S GRANDFATHER. ...I HAVE HAD IT PROBABLY ABOUT TEN OR FIFTEEN YEARS…[BETTY, MY MOTHER-IN-LAW] CAME AND LIVED AT OUR HOUSE FOR QUITE A WHILE. SO, SHE WAS DOWNSIZING AND STUFF AND SHE DIDN'T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH SOME STUFF. AND I REALLY LIKE THIS PICTURE SO, SHE LET ME HAVE IT, AND I HUNG IT UP IN MY HOUSE...I WAS QUITE HAPPY WITH IT.” ON WHY DARLENE DECIDED TO KEEP THE DRAWING, SHE ADDED, “I AM ATTACHED TO OLD THINGS AND BEAUTIFUL THINGS. MR. REITHMAN PUT A LOT OF EFFORT AND THOUGHT INTO THAT. AND IT IS SUCH A NICE A PICTURE OF- [MY HUSBAND] BILL’S GRANDFATHER LOOKS SO INTROSPECTIVE, AND I JUST LIKE THINGS LIKE THAT.” ON HOW HER HUSBAND’S GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM ALDOUS, GOT HIS PICTURE SKETCHED BY ERNEST REITHMAN, DARLENE STATES, “MR. REITHMAN AND MR. ALDOUS, WERE IN A SKETCH CLASS TOGETHER. THEN WHILE GRANDFATHER WAS DOING HIS SKETCHING- HE DIDN'T REALIZE IT BUT MR. REITHMAN WAS SKETCHING HIM. WHEN THEY WERE DONE, MR. REITHMAN PRESENTED THE PICTURE TO GRANDFATHER, AND IT'S BEEN IN THE FAMILY EVER SINCE.” A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE PUBLISHED ON FEBRUARY 27, 1954, DISCUSSES AN UPCOMING LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB SHOW AND AMONG THE LIST OF ARTISTS PARTICIPATING IS ERNEST REITHMAN AND WILLIAM ALDOUS. BORN IN ENGLAND IN 1884, WILLIAM GEORGE ALDOUS AND HIS WIFE EDITH LEFT FOR CANADA, ARRIVING IN CALGARY, 1913, AND COMING TO LETHBRIDGE IN THE 1920S. IN 1930 HE OPENED THE ALDOUS AGENCY AND FINANCE CO. IN LETHBRIDGE. THE COUPLE HAD THREE CHILDREN INCLUDING ROY A. ALDOUS WHO CONTINUED THE FAMILY BUSINESS IN LETHBRIDGE. EDITH PASSED IN 1970 AT 80 YEARS, AND WILLIAM PASSED IN 1971 AT 87 YEARS. BETTY MARRIED ROY ALDOUS AND HAD FOUR CHILDREN, INCLUDING WILLIAM “BILL” ALDOUS, MARRIED TO DARLENE. ROY PASSED ON APRIL 27, 1993, AT 64 YEARS, AND BETTY PASSED ON DECEMBER 12, 2015, AT THE AGE OF 85 YEARS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHY OF THE ARTIST, ERNEST EDWARD RIETHMAN, WAS DEVELOPED BY JANE EDMUNDSON IN 2014, USING A LETHBRIDGE HERALD TRIBUTE ARTICLE FROM DECEMBER 24, 1964, AND RECORD P20120030007. ERNEST RIETHMAN WAS BORN IN 1895 IN SWITZERLAND AND STUDIED ART AT AN ACADEMY IN BASEL, THEN AT THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF INTERIOR DECORATING AND PAINTING. IN 1919 HE CAME TO CANADA AND SETTLED IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1947. A PARTNER IN THE FIRM OF RIETHMAN AND HUDSON DECORATING LTD, RIETHMAN WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB FOR MANY YEARS AND TAUGHT ART CLASSES THROUGHOUT SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE PAINTED IN OILS AND WATERCOLOURS AND ONE OF HIS WORKS WAS SELECTED FOR THE CANADIAN NATIONAL EXHIBITION IN TORONTO, LATER TRAVELLING TO MUNICH AND OTHER EUROPEAN VENUES. RIETHMAN PASSED AWAY SUDDENLY ON DECEMBER 23, 1964. THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB HELD THEIR FIRST MEETING AT THE HOME OF MISS ANNA MACKENZIE ON OCTOBER 7, 1936. EDITH FANNY KIRK WAS THE FIRST ART TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. SHE CAME FROM BRITAIN WITH CLASSICAL TRAINING AND IT WAS KIRK WHO SET THE STAGE FOR THE SKETCH CLUB TO COME INTO BEING. THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS ALSO PLAYED A ROLE IN THE FORMATION BY PROVIDING RECOGNITION OF ARTISTIC MERIT THROUGH DISTRICT SCHOLARSHIPS. ANNA MACKENZIE AND P.J. COLLINS CONCEIVED OF THE CLUB AFTER THEIR EXPERIENCE IN BANFF. THE GROUP WAS FORMED OUT OF AN ENTHUSIASTIC INTEREST IN ART AND SOON AFTER THE GROUP BEGAN MEETING, THERE WERE REGULAR EXHIBITIONS. THE GROUP WAS PRIVY TO THE ATTENTION OF GROUP OF SEVEN ARTIST A.Y.JACKSON WHEN HE MADE HIS FREQUENT SKETCHING TRIPS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE REGULARLY ACCOMPANIED THE SKETCH CLUB AND HIS INFLUENCE CAN BE SEEN IN MUCH OF THEIR WORK. ANOTHER GUEST OF THE GROUP WAS ANNORA BROWN WHO WAS AN ARTIST WHO HAD TRAINED IN TORONTO, BUT RESIDED IN FORT MACLEOD AND BEGAN SPENDING TIME WITH THE GROUP IN 1939. HER INTEREST IN FLOWER STUDIES IS SUSPECTED TO HAVE INSPIRED MANY OF THE WORKS BY CLUB MEMBERS. DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, THE GROUP ORGANIZED SUMMER CLASSES TAUGHT BY OUT OF TOWN ARTISTS SUCH AS: H.G.GLYDE, WALTER J. PHILIPS AND A.C. LEIGHTON. ACCORDING TO A HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB WRITTEN BY JOAN STEBBINS IN JUNE, 1985, “THE PAINTINGS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB PORTRAY FAVOURITE SKETCHING AREAS IN THE REGION – THE COULEES PROVIDED ENDLESS MATERIAL, THE RIVERBOTTOM, THE OLD R.C.M.P. BARRACKS, THE WHITNEY FARM, HENDERSON LAKE, THE FELGER HUTTERITE COLONY, THE FOOTHILLS AND WATERTON LAKE WERE OFTEN REPEATED SUBJECTS.” ON OCTOBER 24, 2019, ERNEST E. RIETHMAN’S GRANDDAUGHTER LINDA BAINES SHARED A “PERSONAL RECORD” WITH MUSEUM STAFF. THE LATTER DAY SAINT DOCUMENT WAS COMPLETED BY HER GRANDMOTHER CLARA S. RIETHMAN--ERNEST’S WIFE. IT IS A HANDWRITTEN CHRONOLOGY OF CLARA’S LIFE IN SWITZERLAND AND ALBERTA. PERSONAL INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN THE DOCUMENT EXTENDS TO ERNEST’S LIFE. TO SEE THIS RECORD, PLEASE SEE P19705197000’S PERMANENT FILE. FOR PREVIOUS DONATIONS OF RIETHMAN’S WORK, SEE P19705197000, P20120030007, P20150024000, P20190006002 AND P20190006003. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20200019001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20200019001
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
CAN OF WATER
Date Range From
1978
Date Range To
1981
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
METAL, WATER
Catalogue Number
P20200019002
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
CAN OF WATER
Date Range From
1978
Date Range To
1981
Materials
METAL, WATER
No. Pieces
1
Height
11.8
Diameter
6.3
Description
SILVER METAL BEVERAGE CAN, WITH WIDE, SINGLE-HOLE PULL TAB. UNOPENED AND FULL. PLAIN SILVER EXTERIOR WITH BLACK TEXT. ALONG TOP EDGE OF CAN TEXT READS “CP RAIL” TWICE, EACH BESIDE BLACK, GEOMETRIC LOGO. ENGLISH SIDE OF LABEL READS “DRINKING WATER” “10 FL OZ 284 ML” WHILE FRENCH SIDE READS “EAU POTABLE” “10 OZ FL 284 ML”. RUNNING VERTICAL, NEAR THE FUSED SEAM OF THE CAN, TEXT READS “PACKED BY CAPILANO SPRINGS CO. LIMITED, VANCOUVER B.C., CANADA” TWO VERTICAL BLACK LINES RUN ON EITHER SIDE OF THE SEAM. IMPRINTED ON BOTTOM OF CAN, “100” “336”. IMPRINTED ON TOP OF CAN, “S.V.P. LA CANETTE VIDE A LA POUBELLE” “5IL” “PLEASE DO NOT LITTER”. SURFACE OF CAN HAS MICRO-SCRATCHES ALL OVER, SCUFFING REFLECTIVE SURFACE. MOST SIGNIFICANTLY SCRATCHED AREAS CAN BE FOUND UNDER THE E IN “WATER”, ABOVE THE U IN “EAU”, ALONG THE WORD “PACKED” AND ALONG BOTTOM RIM OF CAN, THE BOTTOM RIM ITSELF BEING MORE DISCOLORED THEN THE REST OF THE CAN. BOTTOM OF CAN IS SIMILARLY TARNISHED IN PLACES. THE CAN’S SEAM HAS DIFFERENT FINISHING THEN REST OF THE CAN.
Subjects
CONTAINER
Historical Association
TRANSPORTATION
History
ON JUNE 10, 2020, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED DARLENE ALDOUS REGARDING HER DONATION OF A REITHMAN SKETCH AND A CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CAN OF WATER. ON HER ACQUISITION OF THE CAN, DARLENE STATED, “MY SON WAS BABYSAT BY A COUPLE, CON AND ETHEL LEINWEBER. CON WORKED ON THE COLD TRAINS...SO WHEN THEY CLOSED DOWN THE MAIN TERMINAL IN LETHBRIDGE HERE AND MOVED IT [TO] KIPP, THEY HAD A BIG PARTY AND ALL THE FAMILY OF ALL OF THE WORKERS GOT TO COME. WE GOT TO GO ON THE TRAIN, AND WE WENT ON A RIDE ON THE TRAIN ACROSS THE HIGH LEVEL AND BACK. EVERYBODY WAS GIVEN THIS CAN OF WATER AND EVERYBODY DRANK IT AS THEY WERE GOING ACROSS. BUT I WAS JUST SO AMAZED AT IT, THAT I JUST HUNG ONTO IT AND I HAVEN'T GOTTEN RID OF IT ALL OF THESE YEARS. IT'S GONE FROM ONE PANTRY TO ANOTHER- WHATEVER HOUSE I WAS IN, IT WENT IN THE PANTRY.” ON THE EVENT ITSELF, DARLENE ADDS, “OH IT'S A VERY GOOD MEMORY. THAT'S THE FIRST TIME I HAD EVER BEEN ON A TRAIN AND THEN TO GO ACROSS THE HIGH LEVEL ALSO...I DON'T LIKE HEIGHTS BUT IT WAS FANTASTIC...WE GOT TO GO INTO THE TOP OF THE CABOOSE. IT WAS A LOT OF FUN AND MY SON WAS ONLY THREE OF FOUR AT THE TIME. SO HE JUST HAD THE TIME OF HIS LIFE…[WE GOT ON THE TRAIN] AT THE OLD TERMINAL DOWNTOWN, WHERE THE HEALTH UNIT IS NOW…WE JUST DID A ROUND TRIP- WE WENT ALL THE WAY OUT OF TOWN AND THEN THEY BACKED UP AND CAME BACK.” “IT WAS BECAUSE THEY WERE CLOSING DOWN THE HEAD STATION HERE IN LETHBRIDGE. I REMEMBER THE STATION HERE IN LETHBRIDGE WHEN I WAS KID. WE USED TO GO AND MEET OUR GRANDFATHER, ON THE TRAIN AND PICK HIM UP, FROM THE PASSENGER... BUT I'D NEVER BEEN ON A TRAIN BEFORE. SO THAT WAS WHEN THEY MOVED THE STATION FROM DOWNTOWN LETHBRIDGE TO THE KIPP YARD.” ON THE LEINWEBER’S, DARLENE EXPLAINED, “CON AND ETHEL WERE REALLY FANTASTIC PEOPLE. THEY WEREN'T MY SON'S GRANDPARENTS BUT HE CALLED THEM GRANDMA AND GRANDPA AND TO HIM THEY WERE GRANDMA AND GRANDPA. IT WAS AN HONOR FOR THEM TO HAVE TAKEN US AS THEIR FAMILY TO GO ON THAT.” EXPLAINING HER ATTACHMENT FOR THE CAN, “FOR YEARS I'VE HAD IT FLOATING AROUND ALL OF MY HOMES…IT'S BEEN SITTING IN MY PANTRY, FOR YEARS AND, I JUST KEEP LOOKING AT IT AND THINKING- IT'S DIFFERENT. IT WAS BEFORE THERE WAS CANNED WATER OR BOTTLED WATER OR EVEN ACTUALLY CANNED POP. WHEN I GOT [THE CAN], IT WAS SOMETHING THAT WAS AMAZING TO ALL OF US WHEN WE WERE ON THE TRAIN GOING ACROSS THE HIGH LEVEL.” “IT MEANT SOMETHING. IT WAS A SPECIAL MOMENT IN MY LIFE, MY SON’S LIFE- CON AND ETHEL, THEY SHARED IT WITH US. AND IT WAS A SPECIAL MOMENT FOR LETHBRIDGE AND FOR THE RAIL. AND SO I KEPT IT. I'VE HAD PEOPLE ASK ME 'WHY DON’T YOU TURF IT', BUT I JUST COULDN'T DO THAT.” DARLENE ESTIMATED THE DATE OF THE EVENT AROUND 1978-1980. A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, PUBLISHED JUNE 29, 1981, RECORDS A SIMILARLY DESCRIBED PARTY CELEBRATING THE CPR’S 100TH ANNIVERSARY ON SUNDAY, JUNE 28, 1981. THE EVENT WAS ATTENDED BY 2,000 CPR EMPLOYEES, PENSIONERS AND THEIR FAMILIES, AND INCLUDED PASSENGER COACH TRAIN RIDES OVER THE HIGH-LEVEL BRIDGE, SPIKE DRIVING, HAND-CAR RACES, HORSESHOES AND A BARBECUE. LETHBRIDGE MAYOR ANDY ANDERSON ATTENDED, CONGRATULATING CPR FOR 100 YEARS AND THANKING CPR FOR LETHBRIDGE’S RAIL RELOCATION PROGRAM. CONRAD “CON” LEINWEBER PASSED AWAY ON APRIL 11, 1999, AT 78 YEARS. ETHEL LEINWEBER PASSED AWAY ON JUNE 23, 2008, AT 80. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20200019001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20200019002
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"SETTLER HOMESTEAD & GRAIN SILO"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL, INK
Catalogue Number
P20200016001
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"SETTLER HOMESTEAD & GRAIN SILO"
Date
1986
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL, INK
No. Pieces
2
Length
28.6
Width
40.5
Description
A. DRAWING. L: 28.6 CM. W: 40.5 CM. A BLACK AND WHITE LANDSCAPE FARMYARD SCENE ON BEIGE PAPER, SHOWING TIED HAYSTACKS IN THE FOREGROUND, FOUR BUILDINGS, GRAIN SILO, AND TWO TREES IN THE BACKGROUND, WITH A ROAD AND FENCE RUNNING HORIZONTALLY ACROSS THE SCENE. HANDWRITTEN TEXT IN THE SKY ABOVE THE SCENE READS, “THIS IS NOT GOOD COMPOSITION.TONE VALUES INCORRECT. ROAD LEADS OUT OF PICTURE, OBJECTS LEAN OUT OF PICTURE, NOTHING IS OVERLAPPING. CREATE YOUR OWN COMPOSITION USING SUBJECT MATERIAL IN SKETCH, ALSO YOUR OWN COLOR SCHEME, STRIVE FOR PERSONAL ARRANGEMENT AND STYLE, NO SMALLER THAN 12” X16” FOR FIRST MEETING IN FALL.” “DELETE ANYTHING YOU WISH OR ADD HUMAN FIGURES, ANIMALS CHICKENS BIRDS IF YOU DESIRE.” “MAR.13/86”. AT THE VERY BOTTOM OF THE DRAWING, IN THE CENTER IS THE SIGNATURE “M. PISKO”. VG. TEAR SHAPED BLACK STAIN, WITH ORANGE-ISH BLEED FROM IT IN BOTTOM LEFT-HAND CORNER. TWO PINHOLES IN EACH TOP CORNER, ONE PINHOLE IN EACH BOTTOM CORNER. B. COPY. L: 28 CM. W: 40.5 CM. PRINTED COPY OF A, EXCEPT ON WHITE PAPER. HANDWRITTEN IN PENCIL BENEATH THE DATE IN THE TOP CORNER IS “MRS HORNSBY”. VG. EDGES AND CORNERS OF PAGE ARE EVER SO SLIGHTLY BENT. VERTICAL FOLD LINE THROUGH THE CENTER.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
EDUCATION
History
ON OCTOBER 8, 2020, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LYLE PENNINGTON REGARDING ANY MEMORIES OF HIS UNCLE “MIKE” MICHAEL PISKO (1913-1999), ABOUT THE DONATED DRAWINGS AND ART MATERIALS. ON SEEING HIS UNCLE PAINT, LYLE RECALLS, “WELL, I CAN REMEMBER MY UNCLE USING THIS WOODEN [EASEL] (P20200016007) BECAUSE WHEN I WAS ABOUT SIX YEARS OLD, HE SET THIS WOODEN EASEL UP. HE WAS BABYSITTING ME THAT ONE DAY...I WAS YOUNG AND HE SET THIS STAND UP AND HE SAID, 'WE’RE GOING TO PAINT A PAINTING TOGETHER.' HE GOT A PALETTE OUT AND HE PUT ALL THESE OIL PAINTS ON AND SHOWED ME HOW TO PUT THEM ALL ON AND THEN GOT THIS KNIFE THING OUT, IT’S A PALETTE KNIFE- IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG ONE AND IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG…PAINTING. IT WAS MAYBE 2 FEET WIDE AND 3 FEET HIGH AND I ASKED HIM WHAT HE WAS GOING TO PAINT AND HE SAID, 'I DON’T KNOW'. THEN HE STARTED SHOWING ME HOW TO MIX THE PAINTS AND PUTTING THEM ON, HE JUST SLOPPED THEM ON AND I KEPT ASKING, 'WHAT IS IT?' AND HE SAYS, 'I HAVEN’T DECIDED.' AND THERE WAS GREENS AND REDS AND YELLOWS. AND I'M WAITING AND WAITING AND I KEPT ASKING WHAT HE WAS PAINTING AND I COULDN’T MAKE HEAD OR TAILS OF IT BECAUSE HE DIDN’T START ANYWHERE. HE WAS PUTTING IT EVERYWHERE AND THEN FINALLY, JUST IN ONE MAGIC STROKE, THERE WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS AND I WAS SHOCKED. AND I SAID, 'UNCLE MIKE, THEY’RE FLOWERS.' AND THEN HE CONTINUED ON AND THEN HE SAYS, 'WHAT DO YOU THINK?' AND I SAYS, 'THEY LOOK REAL.' THEN HE SAYS, 'YEAH, I THINK THIS ONE’S GOOD.' AND THEN HE SHOWED ME HOW TO SIGN THE PAINTING- HE TOOK SOME RED PAINT AND THEN HE THINNED IT WITH SOME TURPENTINE AND HE TOOK THIS LITTLE TINY BRUSH AND HE ROLLED IT IN THE RED PAINT AND THEN HE SIGNED HIS NAME ON THE BOTTOM LEFTSIDE…I REMEMBER IT VIVIDLY BECAUSE I COULDN’T BELIEVE THE PAINTING SUDDENLY IN ONE STROKE MADE SENSE, IT WAS LIKE MAGIC. HE KNEW WHAT HE WAS PAINTING BUT I DIDN'T. I HAD NO CLUE. HE JUST GRINNED AT ME WHEN I SAID, 'IT’S FLOWERS.' YEAH, IT WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE.” “THAT WAS THE ONE TIME THAT I GOT TO SEE HIM ACTUALLY PAINT A PAINTING. THAT WAS THE ONLY PAINTING I SAW HIM PAINT. I DON’T THINK MANY OTHERS SAW HIM PAINT THE MANY PAINTINGS THAT HE DID. HE DID IT SORT OF PRIVATELY I THINK. I DON’T THINK MY DAD EVER SAW HIM PAINT A PAINTING. BUT HE DID COME OVER ONE TIME – WE HAD A DOOR - IT WAS A METAL DOOR LIKE A SCREEN DOOR AND IT HAD A PHEASANT ON IT AND ALL THE PAINT HAD COME OFF. HE CAME OVER AND REPAINTED THAT PHEASANT. HE PAINTED IT FREEHAND AND IT LOOKED REAL. IT WAS AMAZING. THE ONLY OTHER TIME HE CAME OVER WAS TO HELP PAINT OUR HOUSE, AND HE COULD PAINT WITH A BRUSH FASTER THAN A PERSON COULD PAINT WITH A ROLLER AND IT WAS PERFECT. THOSE ARE THE TIMES I SAW HIM ACTUALLY PAINTING OTHER THAN WHEN I WENT TO HIS SHOP.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, DATED OCTOBER 6, 1996, BEFORE MICHAEL FINISHED HIGH SCHOOL HE HAD BEGUN WORKING PART-TIME FOR ROBERT BARROWMAN, AN EARLY CITY MAYOR AND OWNER OF CITY SIGN WORKS. 15 YEARS LATER WHEN BARROWMEN SOLD THE COMPANY, MICHAEL AND HIS FELLOW EMPLOYEE NIGEL HILL BOUGHT THE BUSINESS AND RENAMED IT CITY SIGN CO. THIS BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP LASTED UNTIL 1970. ON HIS TIME AT CITY SIGN CO. WITH HIS UNCLE, LYLE ADDED, “…I’D GO IN EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE JUST TO VISIT AND I REMEMBER CARS COMING IN AND HE WOULD DRAW WHATEVER THEY WANTED. THEN HE WOULD TAKE THIS – IT LOOKED LIKE A PIZZA CUTTER WITH A WHEEL ON IT AND HE WOULD RUN IT ALONG THE LINES AND PUNCH LITTLE HOLES IN IT. HE WOULD TAPE THE LOGO ON TO THE CAR, A BRAND NEW CAR OR TRUCK OR WHATEVER. AND THEN HE WOULD PUT CHALK ON IT AND PULL THAT PAPER OFF. THEN HE WOULD PAINT THE LOGO OR SIGN FREE HAND WITH A BRUSH AND OIL PAINTS. AND IT WAS AS GOOD AS ANY SIGN YOU SEE TODAY MADE WITH A MACHINE. YEAH, IT WAS ASTONISHING.” “AND THE ONE DAY WHEN I WAS IN THERE AND I ASKED HIM HOW HE DID THE LETTERING AND HE SAYS, “I’LL SHOW YOU.” HE HAD ALL THIS PAINT ON THE SHELF AND THIS BIG TABLE WHERE HE PUT STUFF AND HE GRABBED A PIECE OF PAPER. HE TOOK A PENCIL AND DREW TWO LINES AND THEY WERE PARALLEL. AND YOU PROBABLY COULD HAVE MEASURED THEM AND THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN EXACTLY PARALLEL, AND THEN HE TOOK HIS BRUSH AND SAYS, “OKAY, I’LL PAINT YOUR NAME, I’LL PAINT LYLE.” AND HE TOOK THIS LONG – JUST A REGULAR BRUSH THAT WAS A KIND OF FLOPPY BRUSH AND HE DIPPED IT INTO SOME OIL PAINT AND HE JUST PAINTED MY NAME JUST L-Y-L-E LIKE THAT IN BLOCK LETTERS, IN A MATTER OF SECONDS AND IT WAS PERFECT. AND HE EXPLAINED THAT WHEN YOU PUT THE LETTERS TOGETHER, SOME LETTERS ARE CLOSER THAN OTHER LETTERS TO MATCH, AND HE EXPLAINED ALL THAT TO ME, HOW YOU WOULD DO THAT. THEN HE TOOK IT AND SAID 'YOU CAN DO ITALICS' AND HE MADE THEM ALL SLOPED EVENLY. AND HE SAID, 'I CAN DO IT LIKE IN A JAPANESE STYLE WHERE THE LETTERS ARE BIG ON THE TOP.' AND HE DID THAT ALL IN OIL AND IT WAS LIKE ANY PRINTER THAT YOU SEE TODAY AND ABOUT THE SPEED OF SLOW WRITING. I WAS ASTONISHED.” “SO I USED TO GO IN ONCE IN A WHILE AND VISIT HIM IN THE SHOP AT THAT TIME AND I REMEMBER ONE TIME I – HE ACTUALLY ENCOURAGED ME TO START PAINTING. I STARTED DOING THAT AND HE GAVE ME SOME HINTS, LITTLE THINGS LIKE PERSPECTIVE, VANISHING POINTS, WHAT WERE THE OTHER THINGS, OH, HOW THICK PAINT DOESN’T STICK TO THIN PAINT AND VICE VERSA, AND WHEN YOU USE OIL PAINTS YOU PAINT FROM THE BACK TO THE FRONT. WHEN YOU USE WATERCOLORS, YOU PAINT LIGHT TO DARK, USUALLY – THAT KIND OF THING. HE HELPED ME WITH THAT KIND OF STUFF. HE WAS SHOWING ME.” REMEMBERING HIS UNCLE, LYLE STATES, ”MY UNCLE WAS A VERY NICE MAN. I NEVER SAW HIM EVER ANGRY, EVER. I NEVER HEARD ANYONE EVER SAY THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONLY ONCE. ONLY ONE TIME THAT I EVEN HEARD THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONE TIME HE HAD A PAINTING AND MY AUNT DIDN’T LIKE IT SO SHE TOOK OUT SOME PAINTS AND FIXED IT FOR HIM. AND THAT WAS THE ONLY TIME THAT HE WAS ANGRY, THAT I HAVE EVER KNOWN. I THINK HE FORGAVE HER BUT I DON’T THINK SHE TOUCHED HIS PAINTINGS AFTER THAT. SO BASICALLY MY AUNT AND MY UNCLE WERE NICE AND IT WAS A PLEASURE TO GO OVER AND VISIT HIM. HE WAS SO NICE. AND I’M NOT SAYING THAT BECAUSE HE’S MY UNCLE OR ANYTHING- HE JUST WAS A NICE MAN.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHAT HE KNEW AT THE TIME OF HIS UNCLE'S ART CAREER, LYLE ADDS, “I DIDN’T REALLY KNOW [ABOUT IT]. I HAD NO CLUE WHAT HE DID. I DIDN’T KNOW HE WAS A FRIEND OF A.Y. JACKSON AND ALL OF THAT…I GUESS HE SOLD THE PAINTINGS BUT I SAW IT MORE OF A HOBBY BECAUSE HE WOULD PAINT A PAINTING AND THEN RE-PAINT IT, LIKE, IF HE DIDN’T LIKE IT HE WOULD JUST PAINT OVER IT. AND BECAUSE HE WAS A SIGN PAINTER. HE WAS ACTUALLY AN ELECTRICIAN BY TRADE. HE WENT TO SAIT AND BECAME AN ELECTRICIAN BUT COULDN’T GET ANY WORK AND STARTED A SIGN BUSINESS AND [IT], TO ME AS A KID, IT WAS JUST A JOB, LIKE DAD’S JOB THAT KIND OF THING, SO YOU HAVE A JOB [AND] YOU GO TO WORK [AND] SO I DIDN’T THINK IT WAS ANYTHING SPECIAL…I DIDN’T UNDERSTAND, AS A KID,... I WENT OFF DOING MY OWN THING. YEAH…HE WAS CLOSE TO FINISHING [HIS CAREER], BY THE TIME I WAS AN ADULT, HE WAS JUST NEAR DONE.” IN 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON MICHAEL PISKO WAS FOUND IN A PRESS RELEASE ANNOUNCING THE 'MICHAEL PISKO MEMORIAL AWARD', WHICH WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE ARTIST'S WIDOW AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS IN 2000, TO BE AWARDED TO A GRADUATING BFA DEGREE PAINTER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE: "MICHAEL PISKO WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1913. HE MADE HIS LIVING AS A SUCCESSFUL SIGN PAINTER THROUGH HIS BUSINESS, CITY SIGN COMPANY, BUT LANDSCAPE PAINTING WAS HIS LIFE'S FULFILLMENT. TO HONE HIS SKILLS, HE STUDIED THREE SUMMERS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND SOUGHT INSTRUCTION FROM SENIOR VISITING ARTISTS WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON INVITATION OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, OF WHICH HE, IN 1937, WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS. PISKO GREATLY ADMIRED A.Y. JACKSON, THE GROUP OF SEVEN MASTER, WITH WHOM HE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SKETCH AND PAINT AROUND LETHBRIDGE WHENEVER JACKSON CAME TO TOWN TO VISIT HIS BROTHER. HE WAS ALSO DEEPLY INFLUENCED BY H.G. GLYDE, WHO TAUGHT AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART IN CALGARY AND AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND WHO VISITED LETHBRIDGE TO TEACH ART CLASSES AT THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN 1947 PISKO WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HE WAS A PROLIFIC PAINTER, WHO EXHIBITED REGULARLY WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HIS WORK IS REPRESENTED IN MANY PRIVATE, CORPORATE AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, AMONG THEM THE ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. MICHAEL PISKO PASSED AWAY IN 1999." THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB HELD THEIR FIRST MEETING AT THE HOME OF MISS ANNA MACKENZIE ON OCTOBER 7, 1936. EDITH FANNY KIRK WAS THE FIRST ART TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. SHE CAME FROM BRITAIN WITH CLASSICAL TRAINING AND IT WAS KIRK WHO SET THE STAGE FOR THE SKETCH CLUB TO COME INTO BEING. THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS ALSO PLAYED A ROLE IN THE FORMATION BY PROVIDING RECOGNITION OF ARTISTIC MERIT THROUGH DISTRICT SCHOLARSHIPS. ANNA MACKENZIE AND P.J. COLLINS CONCEIVED OF THE CLUB AFTER THEIR EXPERIENCE IN BANFF. THE GROUP WAS FORMED OUT OF AN ENTHUSIASTIC INTEREST IN ART AND SOON AFTER THE GROUP BEGAN MEETING, THERE WERE REGULAR EXHIBITIONS. THE GROUP WAS PRIVY TO THE ATTENTION OF GROUP OF SEVEN ARTIST A.Y.JACKSON WHEN HE MADE HIS FREQUENT SKETCHING TRIPS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE REGULARLY ACCOMPANIED THE SKETCH CLUB AND HIS INFLUENCE CAN BE SEEN IN MUCH OF THEIR WORK. ANOTHER GUEST OF THE GROUP WAS ANNORA BROWN WHO WAS AN ARTIST WHO HAD TRAINED IN TORONTO, BUT RESIDED IN FORT MACLEOD AND BEGAN SPENDING TIME WITH THE GROUP IN 1939. HER INTEREST IN FLOWER STUDIES IS SUSPECTED TO HAVE INSPIRED MANY OF THE WORKS BY CLUB MEMBERS. DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, THE GROUP ORGANIZED SUMMER CLASSES TAUGHT BY OUT OF TOWN ARTISTS SUCH AS: H.G.GLYDE, WALTER J. PHILIPS AND A.C. LEIGHTON. ACCORDING TO A HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB WRITTEN BY JOAN STEBBINS IN JUNE, 1985, “THE PAINTINGS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB PORTRAY FAVOURITE SKETCHING AREAS IN THE REGION – THE COULEES PROVIDED ENDLESS MATERIAL, THE RIVERBOTTOM, THE OLD R.C.M.P. BARRACKS, THE WHITNEY FARM, HENDERSON LAKE, THE FELGER HUTTERITE COLONY, THE FOOTHILLS AND WATERTON LAKE WERE OFTEN REPEATED SUBJECTS.” FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON PISKO AND HIS CAREER, AS WELL AS PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS FOR THE 1995 ARTWALK DEDICATED TO HIM, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19920009001-GA. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20200016001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20200016001
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"WHEAT FIELD, ELEVATORS UNDER EASTERN SLOPES"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1989
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL, CHALK
Catalogue Number
P20200016002
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"WHEAT FIELD, ELEVATORS UNDER EASTERN SLOPES"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1989
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL, CHALK
No. Pieces
1
Length
30.7
Width
40.7
Description
BLACK AND WHITE LANDSCAPE DRAWING OF A FARM FIELD WITH THREE GRAIN ELEVATORS ON THE RIGHT SIDE AND MOUNTAINS ON THE LEFT SIDE IN THE BACKGROUND. FOREGROUND IS TAKEN UP WITH GRASS, BARBED WIRE FENCE, AND TIED HAY BALES LEADING OUT INTO THE FIELD. UNSIGNED AND UN-DATED. 3-4 PINHOLES IN ALL FOUR CORNERS, AND TWO MORE IN CENTER TOP EDGE. SLIGHT SMUDGES ON BACK OF PAPER. SLIGHTEST OF WAVE TO THE PAPER.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
EDUCATION
History
ON OCTOBER 8, 2020, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LYLE PENNINGTON REGARDING ANY MEMORIES OF HIS UNCLE “MIKE” MICHAEL PISKO (1913-1999), ABOUT THE DONATED DRAWINGS AND ART MATERIALS. ON SEEING HIS UNCLE PAINT, LYLE RECALLS, “WELL, I CAN REMEMBER MY UNCLE USING THIS WOODEN [EASEL] (P20200016007) BECAUSE WHEN I WAS ABOUT SIX YEARS OLD, HE SET THIS WOODEN EASEL UP. HE WAS BABYSITTING ME THAT ONE DAY...I WAS YOUNG AND HE SET THIS STAND UP AND HE SAID, 'WE’RE GOING TO PAINT A PAINTING TOGETHER.' HE GOT A PALETTE OUT AND HE PUT ALL THESE OIL PAINTS ON AND SHOWED ME HOW TO PUT THEM ALL ON AND THEN GOT THIS KNIFE THING OUT, IT’S A PALETTE KNIFE- IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG ONE AND IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG…PAINTING. IT WAS MAYBE 2 FEET WIDE AND 3 FEET HIGH AND I ASKED HIM WHAT HE WAS GOING TO PAINT AND HE SAID, 'I DON’T KNOW'. THEN HE STARTED SHOWING ME HOW TO MIX THE PAINTS AND PUTTING THEM ON, HE JUST SLOPPED THEM ON AND I KEPT ASKING, 'WHAT IS IT?' AND HE SAYS, 'I HAVEN’T DECIDED.' AND THERE WAS GREENS AND REDS AND YELLOWS. AND I'M WAITING AND WAITING AND I KEPT ASKING WHAT HE WAS PAINTING AND I COULDN’T MAKE HEAD OR TAILS OF IT BECAUSE HE DIDN’T START ANYWHERE. HE WAS PUTTING IT EVERYWHERE AND THEN FINALLY, JUST IN ONE MAGIC STROKE, THERE WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS AND I WAS SHOCKED. AND I SAID, 'UNCLE MIKE, THEY’RE FLOWERS.' AND THEN HE CONTINUED ON AND THEN HE SAYS, 'WHAT DO YOU THINK?' AND I SAYS, 'THEY LOOK REAL.' THEN HE SAYS, 'YEAH, I THINK THIS ONE’S GOOD.' AND THEN HE SHOWED ME HOW TO SIGN THE PAINTING- HE TOOK SOME RED PAINT AND THEN HE THINNED IT WITH SOME TURPENTINE AND HE TOOK THIS LITTLE TINY BRUSH AND HE ROLLED IT IN THE RED PAINT AND THEN HE SIGNED HIS NAME ON THE BOTTOM LEFTSIDE…I REMEMBER IT VIVIDLY BECAUSE I COULDN’T BELIEVE THE PAINTING SUDDENLY IN ONE STROKE MADE SENSE, IT WAS LIKE MAGIC. HE KNEW WHAT HE WAS PAINTING BUT I DIDN'T. I HAD NO CLUE. HE JUST GRINNED AT ME WHEN I SAID, 'IT’S FLOWERS.' YEAH, IT WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE.” “THAT WAS THE ONE TIME THAT I GOT TO SEE HIM ACTUALLY PAINT A PAINTING. THAT WAS THE ONLY PAINTING I SAW HIM PAINT. I DON’T THINK MANY OTHERS SAW HIM PAINT THE MANY PAINTINGS THAT HE DID. HE DID IT SORT OF PRIVATELY I THINK. I DON’T THINK MY DAD EVER SAW HIM PAINT A PAINTING. BUT HE DID COME OVER ONE TIME – WE HAD A DOOR - IT WAS A METAL DOOR LIKE A SCREEN DOOR AND IT HAD A PHEASANT ON IT AND ALL THE PAINT HAD COME OFF. HE CAME OVER AND REPAINTED THAT PHEASANT. HE PAINTED IT FREEHAND AND IT LOOKED REAL. IT WAS AMAZING. THE ONLY OTHER TIME HE CAME OVER WAS TO HELP PAINT OUR HOUSE, AND HE COULD PAINT WITH A BRUSH FASTER THAN A PERSON COULD PAINT WITH A ROLLER AND IT WAS PERFECT. THOSE ARE THE TIMES I SAW HIM ACTUALLY PAINTING OTHER THAN WHEN I WENT TO HIS SHOP.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, DATED OCTOBER 6, 1996, BEFORE MICHAEL FINISHED HIGH SCHOOL HE HAD BEGUN WORKING PART-TIME FOR ROBERT BARROWMAN, AN EARLY CITY MAYOR AND OWNER OF CITY SIGN WORKS. 15 YEARS LATER WHEN BARROWMEN SOLD THE COMPANY, MICHAEL AND HIS FELLOW EMPLOYEE NIGEL HILL BOUGHT THE BUSINESS AND RENAMED IT CITY SIGN CO. THIS BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP LASTED UNTIL 1970. ON HIS TIME AT CITY SIGN CO. WITH HIS UNCLE, LYLE ADDED, “…I’D GO IN EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE JUST TO VISIT AND I REMEMBER CARS COMING IN AND HE WOULD DRAW WHATEVER THEY WANTED. THEN HE WOULD TAKE THIS – IT LOOKED LIKE A PIZZA CUTTER WITH A WHEEL ON IT AND HE WOULD RUN IT ALONG THE LINES AND PUNCH LITTLE HOLES IN IT. HE WOULD TAPE THE LOGO ON TO THE CAR, A BRAND NEW CAR OR TRUCK OR WHATEVER. AND THEN HE WOULD PUT CHALK ON IT AND PULL THAT PAPER OFF. THEN HE WOULD PAINT THE LOGO OR SIGN FREE HAND WITH A BRUSH AND OIL PAINTS. AND IT WAS AS GOOD AS ANY SIGN YOU SEE TODAY MADE WITH A MACHINE. YEAH, IT WAS ASTONISHING.” “AND THE ONE DAY WHEN I WAS IN THERE AND I ASKED HIM HOW HE DID THE LETTERING AND HE SAYS, “I’LL SHOW YOU.” HE HAD ALL THIS PAINT ON THE SHELF AND THIS BIG TABLE WHERE HE PUT STUFF AND HE GRABBED A PIECE OF PAPER. HE TOOK A PENCIL AND DREW TWO LINES AND THEY WERE PARALLEL. AND YOU PROBABLY COULD HAVE MEASURED THEM AND THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN EXACTLY PARALLEL, AND THEN HE TOOK HIS BRUSH AND SAYS, “OKAY, I’LL PAINT YOUR NAME, I’LL PAINT LYLE.” AND HE TOOK THIS LONG – JUST A REGULAR BRUSH THAT WAS A KIND OF FLOPPY BRUSH AND HE DIPPED IT INTO SOME OIL PAINT AND HE JUST PAINTED MY NAME JUST L-Y-L-E LIKE THAT IN BLOCK LETTERS, IN A MATTER OF SECONDS AND IT WAS PERFECT. AND HE EXPLAINED THAT WHEN YOU PUT THE LETTERS TOGETHER, SOME LETTERS ARE CLOSER THAN OTHER LETTERS TO MATCH, AND HE EXPLAINED ALL THAT TO ME, HOW YOU WOULD DO THAT. THEN HE TOOK IT AND SAID 'YOU CAN DO ITALICS' AND HE MADE THEM ALL SLOPED EVENLY. AND HE SAID, 'I CAN DO IT LIKE IN A JAPANESE STYLE WHERE THE LETTERS ARE BIG ON THE TOP.' AND HE DID THAT ALL IN OIL AND IT WAS LIKE ANY PRINTER THAT YOU SEE TODAY AND ABOUT THE SPEED OF SLOW WRITING. I WAS ASTONISHED.” “SO I USED TO GO IN ONCE IN A WHILE AND VISIT HIM IN THE SHOP AT THAT TIME AND I REMEMBER ONE TIME I – HE ACTUALLY ENCOURAGED ME TO START PAINTING. I STARTED DOING THAT AND HE GAVE ME SOME HINTS, LITTLE THINGS LIKE PERSPECTIVE, VANISHING POINTS, WHAT WERE THE OTHER THINGS, OH, HOW THICK PAINT DOESN’T STICK TO THIN PAINT AND VICE VERSA, AND WHEN YOU USE OIL PAINTS YOU PAINT FROM THE BACK TO THE FRONT. WHEN YOU USE WATERCOLORS, YOU PAINT LIGHT TO DARK, USUALLY – THAT KIND OF THING. HE HELPED ME WITH THAT KIND OF STUFF. HE WAS SHOWING ME.” REMEMBERING HIS UNCLE, LYLE STATES, ”MY UNCLE WAS A VERY NICE MAN. I NEVER SAW HIM EVER ANGRY, EVER. I NEVER HEARD ANYONE EVER SAY THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONLY ONCE. ONLY ONE TIME THAT I EVEN HEARD THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONE TIME HE HAD A PAINTING AND MY AUNT DIDN’T LIKE IT SO SHE TOOK OUT SOME PAINTS AND FIXED IT FOR HIM. AND THAT WAS THE ONLY TIME THAT HE WAS ANGRY, THAT I HAVE EVER KNOWN. I THINK HE FORGAVE HER BUT I DON’T THINK SHE TOUCHED HIS PAINTINGS AFTER THAT. SO BASICALLY MY AUNT AND MY UNCLE WERE NICE AND IT WAS A PLEASURE TO GO OVER AND VISIT HIM. HE WAS SO NICE. AND I’M NOT SAYING THAT BECAUSE HE’S MY UNCLE OR ANYTHING- HE JUST WAS A NICE MAN.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHAT HE KNEW AT THE TIME OF HIS UNCLE'S ART CAREER, LYLE ADDS, “I DIDN’T REALLY KNOW [ABOUT IT]. I HAD NO CLUE WHAT HE DID. I DIDN’T KNOW HE WAS A FRIEND OF A.Y. JACKSON AND ALL OF THAT…I GUESS HE SOLD THE PAINTINGS BUT I SAW IT MORE OF A HOBBY BECAUSE HE WOULD PAINT A PAINTING AND THEN RE-PAINT IT, LIKE, IF HE DIDN’T LIKE IT HE WOULD JUST PAINT OVER IT. AND BECAUSE HE WAS A SIGN PAINTER. HE WAS ACTUALLY AN ELECTRICIAN BY TRADE. HE WENT TO SAIT AND BECAME AN ELECTRICIAN BUT COULDN’T GET ANY WORK AND STARTED A SIGN BUSINESS AND [IT], TO ME AS A KID, IT WAS JUST A JOB, LIKE DAD’S JOB THAT KIND OF THING, SO YOU HAVE A JOB [AND] YOU GO TO WORK [AND] SO I DIDN’T THINK IT WAS ANYTHING SPECIAL…I DIDN’T UNDERSTAND, AS A KID,... I WENT OFF DOING MY OWN THING. YEAH…HE WAS CLOSE TO FINISHING [HIS CAREER], BY THE TIME I WAS AN ADULT, HE WAS JUST NEAR DONE.” IN 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON MICHAEL PISKO WAS FOUND IN A PRESS RELEASE ANNOUNCING THE 'MICHAEL PISKO MEMORIAL AWARD', WHICH WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE ARTIST'S WIDOW AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS IN 2000, TO BE AWARDED TO A GRADUATING BFA DEGREE PAINTER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE: "MICHAEL PISKO WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1913. HE MADE HIS LIVING AS A SUCCESSFUL SIGN PAINTER THROUGH HIS BUSINESS, CITY SIGN COMPANY, BUT LANDSCAPE PAINTING WAS HIS LIFE'S FULFILLMENT. TO HONE HIS SKILLS, HE STUDIED THREE SUMMERS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND SOUGHT INSTRUCTION FROM SENIOR VISITING ARTISTS WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON INVITATION OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, OF WHICH HE, IN 1937, WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS. PISKO GREATLY ADMIRED A.Y. JACKSON, THE GROUP OF SEVEN MASTER, WITH WHOM HE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SKETCH AND PAINT AROUND LETHBRIDGE WHENEVER JACKSON CAME TO TOWN TO VISIT HIS BROTHER. HE WAS ALSO DEEPLY INFLUENCED BY H.G. GLYDE, WHO TAUGHT AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART IN CALGARY AND AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND WHO VISITED LETHBRIDGE TO TEACH ART CLASSES AT THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN 1947 PISKO WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HE WAS A PROLIFIC PAINTER, WHO EXHIBITED REGULARLY WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HIS WORK IS REPRESENTED IN MANY PRIVATE, CORPORATE AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, AMONG THEM THE ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. MICHAEL PISKO PASSED AWAY IN 1999." THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB HELD THEIR FIRST MEETING AT THE HOME OF MISS ANNA MACKENZIE ON OCTOBER 7, 1936. EDITH FANNY KIRK WAS THE FIRST ART TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. SHE CAME FROM BRITAIN WITH CLASSICAL TRAINING AND IT WAS KIRK WHO SET THE STAGE FOR THE SKETCH CLUB TO COME INTO BEING. THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS ALSO PLAYED A ROLE IN THE FORMATION BY PROVIDING RECOGNITION OF ARTISTIC MERIT THROUGH DISTRICT SCHOLARSHIPS. ANNA MACKENZIE AND P.J. COLLINS CONCEIVED OF THE CLUB AFTER THEIR EXPERIENCE IN BANFF. THE GROUP WAS FORMED OUT OF AN ENTHUSIASTIC INTEREST IN ART AND SOON AFTER THE GROUP BEGAN MEETING, THERE WERE REGULAR EXHIBITIONS. THE GROUP WAS PRIVY TO THE ATTENTION OF GROUP OF SEVEN ARTIST A.Y.JACKSON WHEN HE MADE HIS FREQUENT SKETCHING TRIPS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE REGULARLY ACCOMPANIED THE SKETCH CLUB AND HIS INFLUENCE CAN BE SEEN IN MUCH OF THEIR WORK. ANOTHER GUEST OF THE GROUP WAS ANNORA BROWN WHO WAS AN ARTIST WHO HAD TRAINED IN TORONTO, BUT RESIDED IN FORT MACLEOD AND BEGAN SPENDING TIME WITH THE GROUP IN 1939. HER INTEREST IN FLOWER STUDIES IS SUSPECTED TO HAVE INSPIRED MANY OF THE WORKS BY CLUB MEMBERS. DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, THE GROUP ORGANIZED SUMMER CLASSES TAUGHT BY OUT OF TOWN ARTISTS SUCH AS: H.G.GLYDE, WALTER J. PHILIPS AND A.C. LEIGHTON. ACCORDING TO A HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB WRITTEN BY JOAN STEBBINS IN JUNE, 1985, “THE PAINTINGS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB PORTRAY FAVOURITE SKETCHING AREAS IN THE REGION – THE COULEES PROVIDED ENDLESS MATERIAL, THE RIVERBOTTOM, THE OLD R.C.M.P. BARRACKS, THE WHITNEY FARM, HENDERSON LAKE, THE FELGER HUTTERITE COLONY, THE FOOTHILLS AND WATERTON LAKE WERE OFTEN REPEATED SUBJECTS.” FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON PISKO AND HIS CAREER, AS WELL AS PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS FOR THE 1995 ARTWALK DEDICATED TO HIM, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19920009001-GA. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20200016001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20200016002
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"WHEAT FIELD, ELEVATORS UNDER EASTERN SLOPES"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1989
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL, CHALK
Catalogue Number
P20200016003
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"WHEAT FIELD, ELEVATORS UNDER EASTERN SLOPES"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1989
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL, CHALK
No. Pieces
1
Length
30.5
Width
40.8
Description
BLACK AND WHITE LANDSCAPE DRAWING OF A FARM FIELD WITH FOUR GRAIN ELEVATORS ON THE RIGHT SIDE AND MOUNTAINS ON THE LEFT SIDE IN THE BACKGROUND. FOREGROUND IS TAKEN UP WITH GRASS, BARBED WIRE FENCE, AND TIED HAY BALES LEADING OUT INTO THE FIELD. UNSIGNED AND UN-DATED. 3-4 PINHOLES IN ALL FOUR CORNERS, AND ONE MORE IN CENTER TOP EDGE. O.5 CM TEAR ON BOTTOM LEFT EDGE OF THE DRAWING. SLIGHTEST BENDS ON CORNERS.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
EDUCATION
History
ON OCTOBER 8, 2020, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LYLE PENNINGTON REGARDING ANY MEMORIES OF HIS UNCLE “MIKE” MICHAEL PISKO (1913-1999), ABOUT THE DONATED DRAWINGS AND ART MATERIALS. ON SEEING HIS UNCLE PAINT, LYLE RECALLS, “WELL, I CAN REMEMBER MY UNCLE USING THIS WOODEN [EASEL] (P20200016007) BECAUSE WHEN I WAS ABOUT SIX YEARS OLD, HE SET THIS WOODEN EASEL UP. HE WAS BABYSITTING ME THAT ONE DAY...I WAS YOUNG AND HE SET THIS STAND UP AND HE SAID, 'WE’RE GOING TO PAINT A PAINTING TOGETHER.' HE GOT A PALETTE OUT AND HE PUT ALL THESE OIL PAINTS ON AND SHOWED ME HOW TO PUT THEM ALL ON AND THEN GOT THIS KNIFE THING OUT, IT’S A PALETTE KNIFE- IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG ONE AND IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG…PAINTING. IT WAS MAYBE 2 FEET WIDE AND 3 FEET HIGH AND I ASKED HIM WHAT HE WAS GOING TO PAINT AND HE SAID, 'I DON’T KNOW'. THEN HE STARTED SHOWING ME HOW TO MIX THE PAINTS AND PUTTING THEM ON, HE JUST SLOPPED THEM ON AND I KEPT ASKING, 'WHAT IS IT?' AND HE SAYS, 'I HAVEN’T DECIDED.' AND THERE WAS GREENS AND REDS AND YELLOWS. AND I'M WAITING AND WAITING AND I KEPT ASKING WHAT HE WAS PAINTING AND I COULDN’T MAKE HEAD OR TAILS OF IT BECAUSE HE DIDN’T START ANYWHERE. HE WAS PUTTING IT EVERYWHERE AND THEN FINALLY, JUST IN ONE MAGIC STROKE, THERE WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS AND I WAS SHOCKED. AND I SAID, 'UNCLE MIKE, THEY’RE FLOWERS.' AND THEN HE CONTINUED ON AND THEN HE SAYS, 'WHAT DO YOU THINK?' AND I SAYS, 'THEY LOOK REAL.' THEN HE SAYS, 'YEAH, I THINK THIS ONE’S GOOD.' AND THEN HE SHOWED ME HOW TO SIGN THE PAINTING- HE TOOK SOME RED PAINT AND THEN HE THINNED IT WITH SOME TURPENTINE AND HE TOOK THIS LITTLE TINY BRUSH AND HE ROLLED IT IN THE RED PAINT AND THEN HE SIGNED HIS NAME ON THE BOTTOM LEFTSIDE…I REMEMBER IT VIVIDLY BECAUSE I COULDN’T BELIEVE THE PAINTING SUDDENLY IN ONE STROKE MADE SENSE, IT WAS LIKE MAGIC. HE KNEW WHAT HE WAS PAINTING BUT I DIDN'T. I HAD NO CLUE. HE JUST GRINNED AT ME WHEN I SAID, 'IT’S FLOWERS.' YEAH, IT WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE.” “THAT WAS THE ONE TIME THAT I GOT TO SEE HIM ACTUALLY PAINT A PAINTING. THAT WAS THE ONLY PAINTING I SAW HIM PAINT. I DON’T THINK MANY OTHERS SAW HIM PAINT THE MANY PAINTINGS THAT HE DID. HE DID IT SORT OF PRIVATELY I THINK. I DON’T THINK MY DAD EVER SAW HIM PAINT A PAINTING. BUT HE DID COME OVER ONE TIME – WE HAD A DOOR - IT WAS A METAL DOOR LIKE A SCREEN DOOR AND IT HAD A PHEASANT ON IT AND ALL THE PAINT HAD COME OFF. HE CAME OVER AND REPAINTED THAT PHEASANT. HE PAINTED IT FREEHAND AND IT LOOKED REAL. IT WAS AMAZING. THE ONLY OTHER TIME HE CAME OVER WAS TO HELP PAINT OUR HOUSE, AND HE COULD PAINT WITH A BRUSH FASTER THAN A PERSON COULD PAINT WITH A ROLLER AND IT WAS PERFECT. THOSE ARE THE TIMES I SAW HIM ACTUALLY PAINTING OTHER THAN WHEN I WENT TO HIS SHOP.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, DATED OCTOBER 6, 1996, BEFORE MICHAEL FINISHED HIGH SCHOOL HE HAD BEGUN WORKING PART-TIME FOR ROBERT BARROWMAN, AN EARLY CITY MAYOR AND OWNER OF CITY SIGN WORKS. 15 YEARS LATER WHEN BARROWMEN SOLD THE COMPANY, MICHAEL AND HIS FELLOW EMPLOYEE NIGEL HILL BOUGHT THE BUSINESS AND RENAMED IT CITY SIGN CO. THIS BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP LASTED UNTIL 1970. ON HIS TIME AT CITY SIGN CO. WITH HIS UNCLE, LYLE ADDED, “…I’D GO IN EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE JUST TO VISIT AND I REMEMBER CARS COMING IN AND HE WOULD DRAW WHATEVER THEY WANTED. THEN HE WOULD TAKE THIS – IT LOOKED LIKE A PIZZA CUTTER WITH A WHEEL ON IT AND HE WOULD RUN IT ALONG THE LINES AND PUNCH LITTLE HOLES IN IT. HE WOULD TAPE THE LOGO ON TO THE CAR, A BRAND NEW CAR OR TRUCK OR WHATEVER. AND THEN HE WOULD PUT CHALK ON IT AND PULL THAT PAPER OFF. THEN HE WOULD PAINT THE LOGO OR SIGN FREE HAND WITH A BRUSH AND OIL PAINTS. AND IT WAS AS GOOD AS ANY SIGN YOU SEE TODAY MADE WITH A MACHINE. YEAH, IT WAS ASTONISHING.” “AND THE ONE DAY WHEN I WAS IN THERE AND I ASKED HIM HOW HE DID THE LETTERING AND HE SAYS, “I’LL SHOW YOU.” HE HAD ALL THIS PAINT ON THE SHELF AND THIS BIG TABLE WHERE HE PUT STUFF AND HE GRABBED A PIECE OF PAPER. HE TOOK A PENCIL AND DREW TWO LINES AND THEY WERE PARALLEL. AND YOU PROBABLY COULD HAVE MEASURED THEM AND THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN EXACTLY PARALLEL, AND THEN HE TOOK HIS BRUSH AND SAYS, “OKAY, I’LL PAINT YOUR NAME, I’LL PAINT LYLE.” AND HE TOOK THIS LONG – JUST A REGULAR BRUSH THAT WAS A KIND OF FLOPPY BRUSH AND HE DIPPED IT INTO SOME OIL PAINT AND HE JUST PAINTED MY NAME JUST L-Y-L-E LIKE THAT IN BLOCK LETTERS, IN A MATTER OF SECONDS AND IT WAS PERFECT. AND HE EXPLAINED THAT WHEN YOU PUT THE LETTERS TOGETHER, SOME LETTERS ARE CLOSER THAN OTHER LETTERS TO MATCH, AND HE EXPLAINED ALL THAT TO ME, HOW YOU WOULD DO THAT. THEN HE TOOK IT AND SAID 'YOU CAN DO ITALICS' AND HE MADE THEM ALL SLOPED EVENLY. AND HE SAID, 'I CAN DO IT LIKE IN A JAPANESE STYLE WHERE THE LETTERS ARE BIG ON THE TOP.' AND HE DID THAT ALL IN OIL AND IT WAS LIKE ANY PRINTER THAT YOU SEE TODAY AND ABOUT THE SPEED OF SLOW WRITING. I WAS ASTONISHED.” “SO I USED TO GO IN ONCE IN A WHILE AND VISIT HIM IN THE SHOP AT THAT TIME AND I REMEMBER ONE TIME I – HE ACTUALLY ENCOURAGED ME TO START PAINTING. I STARTED DOING THAT AND HE GAVE ME SOME HINTS, LITTLE THINGS LIKE PERSPECTIVE, VANISHING POINTS, WHAT WERE THE OTHER THINGS, OH, HOW THICK PAINT DOESN’T STICK TO THIN PAINT AND VICE VERSA, AND WHEN YOU USE OIL PAINTS YOU PAINT FROM THE BACK TO THE FRONT. WHEN YOU USE WATERCOLORS, YOU PAINT LIGHT TO DARK, USUALLY – THAT KIND OF THING. HE HELPED ME WITH THAT KIND OF STUFF. HE WAS SHOWING ME.” REMEMBERING HIS UNCLE, LYLE STATES, ”MY UNCLE WAS A VERY NICE MAN. I NEVER SAW HIM EVER ANGRY, EVER. I NEVER HEARD ANYONE EVER SAY THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONLY ONCE. ONLY ONE TIME THAT I EVEN HEARD THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONE TIME HE HAD A PAINTING AND MY AUNT DIDN’T LIKE IT SO SHE TOOK OUT SOME PAINTS AND FIXED IT FOR HIM. AND THAT WAS THE ONLY TIME THAT HE WAS ANGRY, THAT I HAVE EVER KNOWN. I THINK HE FORGAVE HER BUT I DON’T THINK SHE TOUCHED HIS PAINTINGS AFTER THAT. SO BASICALLY MY AUNT AND MY UNCLE WERE NICE AND IT WAS A PLEASURE TO GO OVER AND VISIT HIM. HE WAS SO NICE. AND I’M NOT SAYING THAT BECAUSE HE’S MY UNCLE OR ANYTHING- HE JUST WAS A NICE MAN.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHAT HE KNEW AT THE TIME OF HIS UNCLE'S ART CAREER, LYLE ADDS, “I DIDN’T REALLY KNOW [ABOUT IT]. I HAD NO CLUE WHAT HE DID. I DIDN’T KNOW HE WAS A FRIEND OF A.Y. JACKSON AND ALL OF THAT…I GUESS HE SOLD THE PAINTINGS BUT I SAW IT MORE OF A HOBBY BECAUSE HE WOULD PAINT A PAINTING AND THEN RE-PAINT IT, LIKE, IF HE DIDN’T LIKE IT HE WOULD JUST PAINT OVER IT. AND BECAUSE HE WAS A SIGN PAINTER. HE WAS ACTUALLY AN ELECTRICIAN BY TRADE. HE WENT TO SAIT AND BECAME AN ELECTRICIAN BUT COULDN’T GET ANY WORK AND STARTED A SIGN BUSINESS AND [IT], TO ME AS A KID, IT WAS JUST A JOB, LIKE DAD’S JOB THAT KIND OF THING, SO YOU HAVE A JOB [AND] YOU GO TO WORK [AND] SO I DIDN’T THINK IT WAS ANYTHING SPECIAL…I DIDN’T UNDERSTAND, AS A KID,... I WENT OFF DOING MY OWN THING. YEAH…HE WAS CLOSE TO FINISHING [HIS CAREER], BY THE TIME I WAS AN ADULT, HE WAS JUST NEAR DONE.” IN 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON MICHAEL PISKO WAS FOUND IN A PRESS RELEASE ANNOUNCING THE 'MICHAEL PISKO MEMORIAL AWARD', WHICH WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE ARTIST'S WIDOW AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS IN 2000, TO BE AWARDED TO A GRADUATING BFA DEGREE PAINTER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE: "MICHAEL PISKO WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1913. HE MADE HIS LIVING AS A SUCCESSFUL SIGN PAINTER THROUGH HIS BUSINESS, CITY SIGN COMPANY, BUT LANDSCAPE PAINTING WAS HIS LIFE'S FULFILLMENT. TO HONE HIS SKILLS, HE STUDIED THREE SUMMERS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND SOUGHT INSTRUCTION FROM SENIOR VISITING ARTISTS WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON INVITATION OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, OF WHICH HE, IN 1937, WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS. PISKO GREATLY ADMIRED A.Y. JACKSON, THE GROUP OF SEVEN MASTER, WITH WHOM HE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SKETCH AND PAINT AROUND LETHBRIDGE WHENEVER JACKSON CAME TO TOWN TO VISIT HIS BROTHER. HE WAS ALSO DEEPLY INFLUENCED BY H.G. GLYDE, WHO TAUGHT AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART IN CALGARY AND AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND WHO VISITED LETHBRIDGE TO TEACH ART CLASSES AT THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN 1947 PISKO WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HE WAS A PROLIFIC PAINTER, WHO EXHIBITED REGULARLY WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HIS WORK IS REPRESENTED IN MANY PRIVATE, CORPORATE AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, AMONG THEM THE ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. MICHAEL PISKO PASSED AWAY IN 1999." THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB HELD THEIR FIRST MEETING AT THE HOME OF MISS ANNA MACKENZIE ON OCTOBER 7, 1936. EDITH FANNY KIRK WAS THE FIRST ART TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. SHE CAME FROM BRITAIN WITH CLASSICAL TRAINING AND IT WAS KIRK WHO SET THE STAGE FOR THE SKETCH CLUB TO COME INTO BEING. THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS ALSO PLAYED A ROLE IN THE FORMATION BY PROVIDING RECOGNITION OF ARTISTIC MERIT THROUGH DISTRICT SCHOLARSHIPS. ANNA MACKENZIE AND P.J. COLLINS CONCEIVED OF THE CLUB AFTER THEIR EXPERIENCE IN BANFF. THE GROUP WAS FORMED OUT OF AN ENTHUSIASTIC INTEREST IN ART AND SOON AFTER THE GROUP BEGAN MEETING, THERE WERE REGULAR EXHIBITIONS. THE GROUP WAS PRIVY TO THE ATTENTION OF GROUP OF SEVEN ARTIST A.Y.JACKSON WHEN HE MADE HIS FREQUENT SKETCHING TRIPS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE REGULARLY ACCOMPANIED THE SKETCH CLUB AND HIS INFLUENCE CAN BE SEEN IN MUCH OF THEIR WORK. ANOTHER GUEST OF THE GROUP WAS ANNORA BROWN WHO WAS AN ARTIST WHO HAD TRAINED IN TORONTO, BUT RESIDED IN FORT MACLEOD AND BEGAN SPENDING TIME WITH THE GROUP IN 1939. HER INTEREST IN FLOWER STUDIES IS SUSPECTED TO HAVE INSPIRED MANY OF THE WORKS BY CLUB MEMBERS. DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, THE GROUP ORGANIZED SUMMER CLASSES TAUGHT BY OUT OF TOWN ARTISTS SUCH AS: H.G.GLYDE, WALTER J. PHILIPS AND A.C. LEIGHTON. ACCORDING TO A HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB WRITTEN BY JOAN STEBBINS IN JUNE, 1985, “THE PAINTINGS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB PORTRAY FAVOURITE SKETCHING AREAS IN THE REGION – THE COULEES PROVIDED ENDLESS MATERIAL, THE RIVERBOTTOM, THE OLD R.C.M.P. BARRACKS, THE WHITNEY FARM, HENDERSON LAKE, THE FELGER HUTTERITE COLONY, THE FOOTHILLS AND WATERTON LAKE WERE OFTEN REPEATED SUBJECTS.” FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON PISKO AND HIS CAREER, AS WELL AS PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS FOR THE 1995 ARTWALK DEDICATED TO HIM, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19920009001-GA. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20200016001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20200016003
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"OLD HOMESTEAD"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1989
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL, PENCIL
Catalogue Number
P20200016004
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"OLD HOMESTEAD"
Date Range From
1980
Date Range To
1989
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL, PENCIL
No. Pieces
1
Length
30.5
Width
40.7
Description
BLACK AND WHITE LANDSCAPE DRAWING, THE FOREGROUND FILLED WITH A BARBED WIRE FENCE, A ROAD LEADING INTO THE BACKGROUND WHERE A SMALL HOUSE STANDS NEXT TO A TREE. UNSIGNED AND UN-DATED, BUT TITLED IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER “OLD HOMESTEAD”. TEN PINHOLES IN TOP RIGHT CORNER, SEVEN PINHOLES IN TOP LEFT, AND ONE IN BOTTOM LEFT CORNER. SLIGHTEST SMUDGING ON BACK OF PAPER.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON OCTOBER 8, 2020, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LYLE PENNINGTON REGARDING ANY MEMORIES OF HIS UNCLE “MIKE” MICHAEL PISKO (1913-1999), ABOUT THE DONATED DRAWINGS AND ART MATERIALS. ON SEEING HIS UNCLE PAINT, LYLE RECALLS, “WELL, I CAN REMEMBER MY UNCLE USING THIS WOODEN [EASEL] (P20200016007) BECAUSE WHEN I WAS ABOUT SIX YEARS OLD, HE SET THIS WOODEN EASEL UP. HE WAS BABYSITTING ME THAT ONE DAY...I WAS YOUNG AND HE SET THIS STAND UP AND HE SAID, 'WE’RE GOING TO PAINT A PAINTING TOGETHER.' HE GOT A PALETTE OUT AND HE PUT ALL THESE OIL PAINTS ON AND SHOWED ME HOW TO PUT THEM ALL ON AND THEN GOT THIS KNIFE THING OUT, IT’S A PALETTE KNIFE- IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG ONE AND IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG…PAINTING. IT WAS MAYBE 2 FEET WIDE AND 3 FEET HIGH AND I ASKED HIM WHAT HE WAS GOING TO PAINT AND HE SAID, 'I DON’T KNOW'. THEN HE STARTED SHOWING ME HOW TO MIX THE PAINTS AND PUTTING THEM ON, HE JUST SLOPPED THEM ON AND I KEPT ASKING, 'WHAT IS IT?' AND HE SAYS, 'I HAVEN’T DECIDED.' AND THERE WAS GREENS AND REDS AND YELLOWS. AND I'M WAITING AND WAITING AND I KEPT ASKING WHAT HE WAS PAINTING AND I COULDN’T MAKE HEAD OR TAILS OF IT BECAUSE HE DIDN’T START ANYWHERE. HE WAS PUTTING IT EVERYWHERE AND THEN FINALLY, JUST IN ONE MAGIC STROKE, THERE WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS AND I WAS SHOCKED. AND I SAID, 'UNCLE MIKE, THEY’RE FLOWERS.' AND THEN HE CONTINUED ON AND THEN HE SAYS, 'WHAT DO YOU THINK?' AND I SAYS, 'THEY LOOK REAL.' THEN HE SAYS, 'YEAH, I THINK THIS ONE’S GOOD.' AND THEN HE SHOWED ME HOW TO SIGN THE PAINTING- HE TOOK SOME RED PAINT AND THEN HE THINNED IT WITH SOME TURPENTINE AND HE TOOK THIS LITTLE TINY BRUSH AND HE ROLLED IT IN THE RED PAINT AND THEN HE SIGNED HIS NAME ON THE BOTTOM LEFTSIDE…I REMEMBER IT VIVIDLY BECAUSE I COULDN’T BELIEVE THE PAINTING SUDDENLY IN ONE STROKE MADE SENSE, IT WAS LIKE MAGIC. HE KNEW WHAT HE WAS PAINTING BUT I DIDN'T. I HAD NO CLUE. HE JUST GRINNED AT ME WHEN I SAID, 'IT’S FLOWERS.' YEAH, IT WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE.” “THAT WAS THE ONE TIME THAT I GOT TO SEE HIM ACTUALLY PAINT A PAINTING. THAT WAS THE ONLY PAINTING I SAW HIM PAINT. I DON’T THINK MANY OTHERS SAW HIM PAINT THE MANY PAINTINGS THAT HE DID. HE DID IT SORT OF PRIVATELY I THINK. I DON’T THINK MY DAD EVER SAW HIM PAINT A PAINTING. BUT HE DID COME OVER ONE TIME – WE HAD A DOOR - IT WAS A METAL DOOR LIKE A SCREEN DOOR AND IT HAD A PHEASANT ON IT AND ALL THE PAINT HAD COME OFF. HE CAME OVER AND REPAINTED THAT PHEASANT. HE PAINTED IT FREEHAND AND IT LOOKED REAL. IT WAS AMAZING. THE ONLY OTHER TIME HE CAME OVER WAS TO HELP PAINT OUR HOUSE, AND HE COULD PAINT WITH A BRUSH FASTER THAN A PERSON COULD PAINT WITH A ROLLER AND IT WAS PERFECT. THOSE ARE THE TIMES I SAW HIM ACTUALLY PAINTING OTHER THAN WHEN I WENT TO HIS SHOP.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, DATED OCTOBER 6, 1996, BEFORE MICHAEL FINISHED HIGH SCHOOL HE HAD BEGUN WORKING PART-TIME FOR ROBERT BARROWMAN, AN EARLY CITY MAYOR AND OWNER OF CITY SIGN WORKS. 15 YEARS LATER WHEN BARROWMEN SOLD THE COMPANY, MICHAEL AND HIS FELLOW EMPLOYEE NIGEL HILL BOUGHT THE BUSINESS AND RENAMED IT CITY SIGN CO. THIS BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP LASTED UNTIL 1970. ON HIS TIME AT CITY SIGN CO. WITH HIS UNCLE, LYLE ADDED, “…I’D GO IN EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE JUST TO VISIT AND I REMEMBER CARS COMING IN AND HE WOULD DRAW WHATEVER THEY WANTED. THEN HE WOULD TAKE THIS – IT LOOKED LIKE A PIZZA CUTTER WITH A WHEEL ON IT AND HE WOULD RUN IT ALONG THE LINES AND PUNCH LITTLE HOLES IN IT. HE WOULD TAPE THE LOGO ON TO THE CAR, A BRAND NEW CAR OR TRUCK OR WHATEVER. AND THEN HE WOULD PUT CHALK ON IT AND PULL THAT PAPER OFF. THEN HE WOULD PAINT THE LOGO OR SIGN FREE HAND WITH A BRUSH AND OIL PAINTS. AND IT WAS AS GOOD AS ANY SIGN YOU SEE TODAY MADE WITH A MACHINE. YEAH, IT WAS ASTONISHING.” “AND THE ONE DAY WHEN I WAS IN THERE AND I ASKED HIM HOW HE DID THE LETTERING AND HE SAYS, “I’LL SHOW YOU.” HE HAD ALL THIS PAINT ON THE SHELF AND THIS BIG TABLE WHERE HE PUT STUFF AND HE GRABBED A PIECE OF PAPER. HE TOOK A PENCIL AND DREW TWO LINES AND THEY WERE PARALLEL. AND YOU PROBABLY COULD HAVE MEASURED THEM AND THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN EXACTLY PARALLEL, AND THEN HE TOOK HIS BRUSH AND SAYS, “OKAY, I’LL PAINT YOUR NAME, I’LL PAINT LYLE.” AND HE TOOK THIS LONG – JUST A REGULAR BRUSH THAT WAS A KIND OF FLOPPY BRUSH AND HE DIPPED IT INTO SOME OIL PAINT AND HE JUST PAINTED MY NAME JUST L-Y-L-E LIKE THAT IN BLOCK LETTERS, IN A MATTER OF SECONDS AND IT WAS PERFECT. AND HE EXPLAINED THAT WHEN YOU PUT THE LETTERS TOGETHER, SOME LETTERS ARE CLOSER THAN OTHER LETTERS TO MATCH, AND HE EXPLAINED ALL THAT TO ME, HOW YOU WOULD DO THAT. THEN HE TOOK IT AND SAID 'YOU CAN DO ITALICS' AND HE MADE THEM ALL SLOPED EVENLY. AND HE SAID, 'I CAN DO IT LIKE IN A JAPANESE STYLE WHERE THE LETTERS ARE BIG ON THE TOP.' AND HE DID THAT ALL IN OIL AND IT WAS LIKE ANY PRINTER THAT YOU SEE TODAY AND ABOUT THE SPEED OF SLOW WRITING. I WAS ASTONISHED.” “SO I USED TO GO IN ONCE IN A WHILE AND VISIT HIM IN THE SHOP AT THAT TIME AND I REMEMBER ONE TIME I – HE ACTUALLY ENCOURAGED ME TO START PAINTING. I STARTED DOING THAT AND HE GAVE ME SOME HINTS, LITTLE THINGS LIKE PERSPECTIVE, VANISHING POINTS, WHAT WERE THE OTHER THINGS, OH, HOW THICK PAINT DOESN’T STICK TO THIN PAINT AND VICE VERSA, AND WHEN YOU USE OIL PAINTS YOU PAINT FROM THE BACK TO THE FRONT. WHEN YOU USE WATERCOLORS, YOU PAINT LIGHT TO DARK, USUALLY – THAT KIND OF THING. HE HELPED ME WITH THAT KIND OF STUFF. HE WAS SHOWING ME.” REMEMBERING HIS UNCLE, LYLE STATES, ”MY UNCLE WAS A VERY NICE MAN. I NEVER SAW HIM EVER ANGRY, EVER. I NEVER HEARD ANYONE EVER SAY THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONLY ONCE. ONLY ONE TIME THAT I EVEN HEARD THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONE TIME HE HAD A PAINTING AND MY AUNT DIDN’T LIKE IT SO SHE TOOK OUT SOME PAINTS AND FIXED IT FOR HIM. AND THAT WAS THE ONLY TIME THAT HE WAS ANGRY, THAT I HAVE EVER KNOWN. I THINK HE FORGAVE HER BUT I DON’T THINK SHE TOUCHED HIS PAINTINGS AFTER THAT. SO BASICALLY MY AUNT AND MY UNCLE WERE NICE AND IT WAS A PLEASURE TO GO OVER AND VISIT HIM. HE WAS SO NICE. AND I’M NOT SAYING THAT BECAUSE HE’S MY UNCLE OR ANYTHING- HE JUST WAS A NICE MAN.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHAT HE KNEW AT THE TIME OF HIS UNCLE'S ART CAREER, LYLE ADDS, “I DIDN’T REALLY KNOW [ABOUT IT]. I HAD NO CLUE WHAT HE DID. I DIDN’T KNOW HE WAS A FRIEND OF A.Y. JACKSON AND ALL OF THAT…I GUESS HE SOLD THE PAINTINGS BUT I SAW IT MORE OF A HOBBY BECAUSE HE WOULD PAINT A PAINTING AND THEN RE-PAINT IT, LIKE, IF HE DIDN’T LIKE IT HE WOULD JUST PAINT OVER IT. AND BECAUSE HE WAS A SIGN PAINTER. HE WAS ACTUALLY AN ELECTRICIAN BY TRADE. HE WENT TO SAIT AND BECAME AN ELECTRICIAN BUT COULDN’T GET ANY WORK AND STARTED A SIGN BUSINESS AND [IT], TO ME AS A KID, IT WAS JUST A JOB, LIKE DAD’S JOB THAT KIND OF THING, SO YOU HAVE A JOB [AND] YOU GO TO WORK [AND] SO I DIDN’T THINK IT WAS ANYTHING SPECIAL…I DIDN’T UNDERSTAND, AS A KID,... I WENT OFF DOING MY OWN THING. YEAH…HE WAS CLOSE TO FINISHING [HIS CAREER], BY THE TIME I WAS AN ADULT, HE WAS JUST NEAR DONE.” IN 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON MICHAEL PISKO WAS FOUND IN A PRESS RELEASE ANNOUNCING THE 'MICHAEL PISKO MEMORIAL AWARD', WHICH WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE ARTIST'S WIDOW AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS IN 2000, TO BE AWARDED TO A GRADUATING BFA DEGREE PAINTER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE: "MICHAEL PISKO WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1913. HE MADE HIS LIVING AS A SUCCESSFUL SIGN PAINTER THROUGH HIS BUSINESS, CITY SIGN COMPANY, BUT LANDSCAPE PAINTING WAS HIS LIFE'S FULFILLMENT. TO HONE HIS SKILLS, HE STUDIED THREE SUMMERS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND SOUGHT INSTRUCTION FROM SENIOR VISITING ARTISTS WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON INVITATION OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, OF WHICH HE, IN 1937, WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS. PISKO GREATLY ADMIRED A.Y. JACKSON, THE GROUP OF SEVEN MASTER, WITH WHOM HE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SKETCH AND PAINT AROUND LETHBRIDGE WHENEVER JACKSON CAME TO TOWN TO VISIT HIS BROTHER. HE WAS ALSO DEEPLY INFLUENCED BY H.G. GLYDE, WHO TAUGHT AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART IN CALGARY AND AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND WHO VISITED LETHBRIDGE TO TEACH ART CLASSES AT THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN 1947 PISKO WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HE WAS A PROLIFIC PAINTER, WHO EXHIBITED REGULARLY WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HIS WORK IS REPRESENTED IN MANY PRIVATE, CORPORATE AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, AMONG THEM THE ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. MICHAEL PISKO PASSED AWAY IN 1999." THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB HELD THEIR FIRST MEETING AT THE HOME OF MISS ANNA MACKENZIE ON OCTOBER 7, 1936. EDITH FANNY KIRK WAS THE FIRST ART TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. SHE CAME FROM BRITAIN WITH CLASSICAL TRAINING AND IT WAS KIRK WHO SET THE STAGE FOR THE SKETCH CLUB TO COME INTO BEING. THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS ALSO PLAYED A ROLE IN THE FORMATION BY PROVIDING RECOGNITION OF ARTISTIC MERIT THROUGH DISTRICT SCHOLARSHIPS. ANNA MACKENZIE AND P.J. COLLINS CONCEIVED OF THE CLUB AFTER THEIR EXPERIENCE IN BANFF. THE GROUP WAS FORMED OUT OF AN ENTHUSIASTIC INTEREST IN ART AND SOON AFTER THE GROUP BEGAN MEETING, THERE WERE REGULAR EXHIBITIONS. THE GROUP WAS PRIVY TO THE ATTENTION OF GROUP OF SEVEN ARTIST A.Y.JACKSON WHEN HE MADE HIS FREQUENT SKETCHING TRIPS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE REGULARLY ACCOMPANIED THE SKETCH CLUB AND HIS INFLUENCE CAN BE SEEN IN MUCH OF THEIR WORK. ANOTHER GUEST OF THE GROUP WAS ANNORA BROWN WHO WAS AN ARTIST WHO HAD TRAINED IN TORONTO, BUT RESIDED IN FORT MACLEOD AND BEGAN SPENDING TIME WITH THE GROUP IN 1939. HER INTEREST IN FLOWER STUDIES IS SUSPECTED TO HAVE INSPIRED MANY OF THE WORKS BY CLUB MEMBERS. DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, THE GROUP ORGANIZED SUMMER CLASSES TAUGHT BY OUT OF TOWN ARTISTS SUCH AS: H.G.GLYDE, WALTER J. PHILIPS AND A.C. LEIGHTON. ACCORDING TO A HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB WRITTEN BY JOAN STEBBINS IN JUNE, 1985, “THE PAINTINGS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB PORTRAY FAVOURITE SKETCHING AREAS IN THE REGION – THE COULEES PROVIDED ENDLESS MATERIAL, THE RIVERBOTTOM, THE OLD R.C.M.P. BARRACKS, THE WHITNEY FARM, HENDERSON LAKE, THE FELGER HUTTERITE COLONY, THE FOOTHILLS AND WATERTON LAKE WERE OFTEN REPEATED SUBJECTS.” FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON PISKO AND HIS CAREER, AS WELL AS PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS FOR THE 1995 ARTWALK DEDICATED TO HIM, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19920009001-GA. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20200016001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20200016004
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
ARTIST M. PISKO SELF-PORTRAIT
Date Range From
1936
Date Range To
1999
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL
Catalogue Number
P20200016005
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
ARTIST M. PISKO SELF-PORTRAIT
Date Range From
1936
Date Range To
1999
Materials
PAPER, CHARCOAL
No. Pieces
1
Length
35.8
Width
28.2
Description
CHARCOAL DRAWING OF A M. PISKO, RIGHT PROFILE, ON BEIGE, TEXTURED PAPER. PROFILE DRAWING FOCUSES ON THE HEAD, ONLY IMPLYING SHOULDERS AND SHIRT COLLAR. UNSIGNED AND UN-DATED. PAPER IS DISCOLORED, DARKER AROUND EDGES. WATER STAIN FROM TO LEFT CORNER, TO HALF-WAY DOWN THE LEFT EDGE. SLIGHT CREASING AND BENDING IN BOTTOM LEFT CORNER AND LEFT EDGE.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON OCTOBER 8, 2020, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LYLE PENNINGTON REGARDING ANY MEMORIES OF HIS UNCLE “MIKE” MICHAEL PISKO (1913-1999), ABOUT THE DONATED DRAWINGS AND ART MATERIALS. ON SEEING HIS UNCLE PAINT, LYLE RECALLS, “WELL, I CAN REMEMBER MY UNCLE USING THIS WOODEN [EASEL] (P20200016007) BECAUSE WHEN I WAS ABOUT SIX YEARS OLD, HE SET THIS WOODEN EASEL UP. HE WAS BABYSITTING ME THAT ONE DAY...I WAS YOUNG AND HE SET THIS STAND UP AND HE SAID, 'WE’RE GOING TO PAINT A PAINTING TOGETHER.' HE GOT A PALETTE OUT AND HE PUT ALL THESE OIL PAINTS ON AND SHOWED ME HOW TO PUT THEM ALL ON AND THEN GOT THIS KNIFE THING OUT, IT’S A PALETTE KNIFE- IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG ONE AND IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG…PAINTING. IT WAS MAYBE 2 FEET WIDE AND 3 FEET HIGH AND I ASKED HIM WHAT HE WAS GOING TO PAINT AND HE SAID, 'I DON’T KNOW'. THEN HE STARTED SHOWING ME HOW TO MIX THE PAINTS AND PUTTING THEM ON, HE JUST SLOPPED THEM ON AND I KEPT ASKING, 'WHAT IS IT?' AND HE SAYS, 'I HAVEN’T DECIDED.' AND THERE WAS GREENS AND REDS AND YELLOWS. AND I'M WAITING AND WAITING AND I KEPT ASKING WHAT HE WAS PAINTING AND I COULDN’T MAKE HEAD OR TAILS OF IT BECAUSE HE DIDN’T START ANYWHERE. HE WAS PUTTING IT EVERYWHERE AND THEN FINALLY, JUST IN ONE MAGIC STROKE, THERE WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS AND I WAS SHOCKED. AND I SAID, 'UNCLE MIKE, THEY’RE FLOWERS.' AND THEN HE CONTINUED ON AND THEN HE SAYS, 'WHAT DO YOU THINK?' AND I SAYS, 'THEY LOOK REAL.' THEN HE SAYS, 'YEAH, I THINK THIS ONE’S GOOD.' AND THEN HE SHOWED ME HOW TO SIGN THE PAINTING- HE TOOK SOME RED PAINT AND THEN HE THINNED IT WITH SOME TURPENTINE AND HE TOOK THIS LITTLE TINY BRUSH AND HE ROLLED IT IN THE RED PAINT AND THEN HE SIGNED HIS NAME ON THE BOTTOM LEFTSIDE…I REMEMBER IT VIVIDLY BECAUSE I COULDN’T BELIEVE THE PAINTING SUDDENLY IN ONE STROKE MADE SENSE, IT WAS LIKE MAGIC. HE KNEW WHAT HE WAS PAINTING BUT I DIDN'T. I HAD NO CLUE. HE JUST GRINNED AT ME WHEN I SAID, 'IT’S FLOWERS.' YEAH, IT WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE.” “THAT WAS THE ONE TIME THAT I GOT TO SEE HIM ACTUALLY PAINT A PAINTING. THAT WAS THE ONLY PAINTING I SAW HIM PAINT. I DON’T THINK MANY OTHERS SAW HIM PAINT THE MANY PAINTINGS THAT HE DID. HE DID IT SORT OF PRIVATELY I THINK. I DON’T THINK MY DAD EVER SAW HIM PAINT A PAINTING. BUT HE DID COME OVER ONE TIME – WE HAD A DOOR - IT WAS A METAL DOOR LIKE A SCREEN DOOR AND IT HAD A PHEASANT ON IT AND ALL THE PAINT HAD COME OFF. HE CAME OVER AND REPAINTED THAT PHEASANT. HE PAINTED IT FREEHAND AND IT LOOKED REAL. IT WAS AMAZING. THE ONLY OTHER TIME HE CAME OVER WAS TO HELP PAINT OUR HOUSE, AND HE COULD PAINT WITH A BRUSH FASTER THAN A PERSON COULD PAINT WITH A ROLLER AND IT WAS PERFECT. THOSE ARE THE TIMES I SAW HIM ACTUALLY PAINTING OTHER THAN WHEN I WENT TO HIS SHOP.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, DATED OCTOBER 6, 1996, BEFORE MICHAEL FINISHED HIGH SCHOOL HE HAD BEGUN WORKING PART-TIME FOR ROBERT BARROWMAN, AN EARLY CITY MAYOR AND OWNER OF CITY SIGN WORKS. 15 YEARS LATER WHEN BARROWMEN SOLD THE COMPANY, MICHAEL AND HIS FELLOW EMPLOYEE NIGEL HILL BOUGHT THE BUSINESS AND RENAMED IT CITY SIGN CO. THIS BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP LASTED UNTIL 1970. ON HIS TIME AT CITY SIGN CO. WITH HIS UNCLE, LYLE ADDED, “…I’D GO IN EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE JUST TO VISIT AND I REMEMBER CARS COMING IN AND HE WOULD DRAW WHATEVER THEY WANTED. THEN HE WOULD TAKE THIS – IT LOOKED LIKE A PIZZA CUTTER WITH A WHEEL ON IT AND HE WOULD RUN IT ALONG THE LINES AND PUNCH LITTLE HOLES IN IT. HE WOULD TAPE THE LOGO ON TO THE CAR, A BRAND NEW CAR OR TRUCK OR WHATEVER. AND THEN HE WOULD PUT CHALK ON IT AND PULL THAT PAPER OFF. THEN HE WOULD PAINT THE LOGO OR SIGN FREE HAND WITH A BRUSH AND OIL PAINTS. AND IT WAS AS GOOD AS ANY SIGN YOU SEE TODAY MADE WITH A MACHINE. YEAH, IT WAS ASTONISHING.” “AND THE ONE DAY WHEN I WAS IN THERE AND I ASKED HIM HOW HE DID THE LETTERING AND HE SAYS, “I’LL SHOW YOU.” HE HAD ALL THIS PAINT ON THE SHELF AND THIS BIG TABLE WHERE HE PUT STUFF AND HE GRABBED A PIECE OF PAPER. HE TOOK A PENCIL AND DREW TWO LINES AND THEY WERE PARALLEL. AND YOU PROBABLY COULD HAVE MEASURED THEM AND THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN EXACTLY PARALLEL, AND THEN HE TOOK HIS BRUSH AND SAYS, “OKAY, I’LL PAINT YOUR NAME, I’LL PAINT LYLE.” AND HE TOOK THIS LONG – JUST A REGULAR BRUSH THAT WAS A KIND OF FLOPPY BRUSH AND HE DIPPED IT INTO SOME OIL PAINT AND HE JUST PAINTED MY NAME JUST L-Y-L-E LIKE THAT IN BLOCK LETTERS, IN A MATTER OF SECONDS AND IT WAS PERFECT. AND HE EXPLAINED THAT WHEN YOU PUT THE LETTERS TOGETHER, SOME LETTERS ARE CLOSER THAN OTHER LETTERS TO MATCH, AND HE EXPLAINED ALL THAT TO ME, HOW YOU WOULD DO THAT. THEN HE TOOK IT AND SAID 'YOU CAN DO ITALICS' AND HE MADE THEM ALL SLOPED EVENLY. AND HE SAID, 'I CAN DO IT LIKE IN A JAPANESE STYLE WHERE THE LETTERS ARE BIG ON THE TOP.' AND HE DID THAT ALL IN OIL AND IT WAS LIKE ANY PRINTER THAT YOU SEE TODAY AND ABOUT THE SPEED OF SLOW WRITING. I WAS ASTONISHED.” “SO I USED TO GO IN ONCE IN A WHILE AND VISIT HIM IN THE SHOP AT THAT TIME AND I REMEMBER ONE TIME I – HE ACTUALLY ENCOURAGED ME TO START PAINTING. I STARTED DOING THAT AND HE GAVE ME SOME HINTS, LITTLE THINGS LIKE PERSPECTIVE, VANISHING POINTS, WHAT WERE THE OTHER THINGS, OH, HOW THICK PAINT DOESN’T STICK TO THIN PAINT AND VICE VERSA, AND WHEN YOU USE OIL PAINTS YOU PAINT FROM THE BACK TO THE FRONT. WHEN YOU USE WATERCOLORS, YOU PAINT LIGHT TO DARK, USUALLY – THAT KIND OF THING. HE HELPED ME WITH THAT KIND OF STUFF. HE WAS SHOWING ME.” REMEMBERING HIS UNCLE, LYLE STATES, ”MY UNCLE WAS A VERY NICE MAN. I NEVER SAW HIM EVER ANGRY, EVER. I NEVER HEARD ANYONE EVER SAY THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONLY ONCE. ONLY ONE TIME THAT I EVEN HEARD THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONE TIME HE HAD A PAINTING AND MY AUNT DIDN’T LIKE IT SO SHE TOOK OUT SOME PAINTS AND FIXED IT FOR HIM. AND THAT WAS THE ONLY TIME THAT HE WAS ANGRY, THAT I HAVE EVER KNOWN. I THINK HE FORGAVE HER BUT I DON’T THINK SHE TOUCHED HIS PAINTINGS AFTER THAT. SO BASICALLY MY AUNT AND MY UNCLE WERE NICE AND IT WAS A PLEASURE TO GO OVER AND VISIT HIM. HE WAS SO NICE. AND I’M NOT SAYING THAT BECAUSE HE’S MY UNCLE OR ANYTHING- HE JUST WAS A NICE MAN.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHAT HE KNEW AT THE TIME OF HIS UNCLE'S ART CAREER, LYLE ADDS, “I DIDN’T REALLY KNOW [ABOUT IT]. I HAD NO CLUE WHAT HE DID. I DIDN’T KNOW HE WAS A FRIEND OF A.Y. JACKSON AND ALL OF THAT…I GUESS HE SOLD THE PAINTINGS BUT I SAW IT MORE OF A HOBBY BECAUSE HE WOULD PAINT A PAINTING AND THEN RE-PAINT IT, LIKE, IF HE DIDN’T LIKE IT HE WOULD JUST PAINT OVER IT. AND BECAUSE HE WAS A SIGN PAINTER. HE WAS ACTUALLY AN ELECTRICIAN BY TRADE. HE WENT TO SAIT AND BECAME AN ELECTRICIAN BUT COULDN’T GET ANY WORK AND STARTED A SIGN BUSINESS AND [IT], TO ME AS A KID, IT WAS JUST A JOB, LIKE DAD’S JOB THAT KIND OF THING, SO YOU HAVE A JOB [AND] YOU GO TO WORK [AND] SO I DIDN’T THINK IT WAS ANYTHING SPECIAL…I DIDN’T UNDERSTAND, AS A KID,... I WENT OFF DOING MY OWN THING. YEAH…HE WAS CLOSE TO FINISHING [HIS CAREER], BY THE TIME I WAS AN ADULT, HE WAS JUST NEAR DONE.” IN 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON MICHAEL PISKO WAS FOUND IN A PRESS RELEASE ANNOUNCING THE 'MICHAEL PISKO MEMORIAL AWARD', WHICH WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE ARTIST'S WIDOW AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS IN 2000, TO BE AWARDED TO A GRADUATING BFA DEGREE PAINTER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE: "MICHAEL PISKO WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1913. HE MADE HIS LIVING AS A SUCCESSFUL SIGN PAINTER THROUGH HIS BUSINESS, CITY SIGN COMPANY, BUT LANDSCAPE PAINTING WAS HIS LIFE'S FULFILLMENT. TO HONE HIS SKILLS, HE STUDIED THREE SUMMERS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND SOUGHT INSTRUCTION FROM SENIOR VISITING ARTISTS WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON INVITATION OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, OF WHICH HE, IN 1937, WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS. PISKO GREATLY ADMIRED A.Y. JACKSON, THE GROUP OF SEVEN MASTER, WITH WHOM HE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SKETCH AND PAINT AROUND LETHBRIDGE WHENEVER JACKSON CAME TO TOWN TO VISIT HIS BROTHER. HE WAS ALSO DEEPLY INFLUENCED BY H.G. GLYDE, WHO TAUGHT AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART IN CALGARY AND AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND WHO VISITED LETHBRIDGE TO TEACH ART CLASSES AT THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN 1947 PISKO WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HE WAS A PROLIFIC PAINTER, WHO EXHIBITED REGULARLY WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HIS WORK IS REPRESENTED IN MANY PRIVATE, CORPORATE AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, AMONG THEM THE ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. MICHAEL PISKO PASSED AWAY IN 1999." THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB HELD THEIR FIRST MEETING AT THE HOME OF MISS ANNA MACKENZIE ON OCTOBER 7, 1936. EDITH FANNY KIRK WAS THE FIRST ART TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. SHE CAME FROM BRITAIN WITH CLASSICAL TRAINING AND IT WAS KIRK WHO SET THE STAGE FOR THE SKETCH CLUB TO COME INTO BEING. THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS ALSO PLAYED A ROLE IN THE FORMATION BY PROVIDING RECOGNITION OF ARTISTIC MERIT THROUGH DISTRICT SCHOLARSHIPS. ANNA MACKENZIE AND P.J. COLLINS CONCEIVED OF THE CLUB AFTER THEIR EXPERIENCE IN BANFF. THE GROUP WAS FORMED OUT OF AN ENTHUSIASTIC INTEREST IN ART AND SOON AFTER THE GROUP BEGAN MEETING, THERE WERE REGULAR EXHIBITIONS. THE GROUP WAS PRIVY TO THE ATTENTION OF GROUP OF SEVEN ARTIST A.Y.JACKSON WHEN HE MADE HIS FREQUENT SKETCHING TRIPS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE REGULARLY ACCOMPANIED THE SKETCH CLUB AND HIS INFLUENCE CAN BE SEEN IN MUCH OF THEIR WORK. ANOTHER GUEST OF THE GROUP WAS ANNORA BROWN WHO WAS AN ARTIST WHO HAD TRAINED IN TORONTO, BUT RESIDED IN FORT MACLEOD AND BEGAN SPENDING TIME WITH THE GROUP IN 1939. HER INTEREST IN FLOWER STUDIES IS SUSPECTED TO HAVE INSPIRED MANY OF THE WORKS BY CLUB MEMBERS. DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, THE GROUP ORGANIZED SUMMER CLASSES TAUGHT BY OUT OF TOWN ARTISTS SUCH AS: H.G.GLYDE, WALTER J. PHILIPS AND A.C. LEIGHTON. ACCORDING TO A HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB WRITTEN BY JOAN STEBBINS IN JUNE, 1985, “THE PAINTINGS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB PORTRAY FAVOURITE SKETCHING AREAS IN THE REGION – THE COULEES PROVIDED ENDLESS MATERIAL, THE RIVERBOTTOM, THE OLD R.C.M.P. BARRACKS, THE WHITNEY FARM, HENDERSON LAKE, THE FELGER HUTTERITE COLONY, THE FOOTHILLS AND WATERTON LAKE WERE OFTEN REPEATED SUBJECTS.” FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON PISKO AND HIS CAREER, AS WELL AS PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS FOR THE 1995 ARTWALK DEDICATED TO HIM, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19920009001-GA. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20200016001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20200016005
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Other Name
"ARTIST’S CONCEPTION OF THE EARLY 1900S HOMESTEAD COTTAGE OF MR. & MRS. NEILS NELSON, PIONEER SETTLERS OF THE KIMBALL AREA"
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
PAPER, INK, PENCIL
Catalogue Number
P20200016006
  1 image  
Material Type
Artifact
Other Name
"ARTIST’S CONCEPTION OF THE EARLY 1900S HOMESTEAD COTTAGE OF MR. & MRS. NEILS NELSON, PIONEER SETTLERS OF THE KIMBALL AREA"
Date
1988
Materials
PAPER, INK, PENCIL
No. Pieces
1
Length
27.9
Width
40
Description
PRINTED LANDSCAPE OF A HOMESTEAD, EMBELLISHED WITH PENCIL IN AREAS. CENTER OF THE DRAWING IS TAKEN UP BY TWO BUILDING, ONE IN FRONT OF THE OTHER, WITH TWO LINES OF BARBED WIRE FENCE IN FRONT. FARMER, HORSES AND COWS ARE IN THE SCENE. BACKGROUND IS MOUNTAINS, WITH THE FOREGROUND TAKEN UP BY TWO GRASSY HILLS. TEXT BOX IN THE BOTTOM LEFT CORNER READS, “ARTIST’S CONCEPTION OF THE EARLY 1900’S HOMESTEAD COTTAGE OF MR. & MRS. NEILS NELSON, PIONEER SETTLERS OF THE KIMBALL AREA”. SIGNED AND DATED IN BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER, “M.PISKO ‘88”. BACK OF PAPER HAS PENCIL RUBBING MARKS IN A GENERAL MIRROR SHAPE OF THE SCENE ON THE FRONT OF THE PAPER. TOP RIGHT CORNER OF PAPER IS BENT OVER. SLIGHT CREASING THROUGH PAGE.
Subjects
ART
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
EDUCATION
History
ON OCTOBER 8, 2020, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LYLE PENNINGTON REGARDING ANY MEMORIES OF HIS UNCLE “MIKE” MICHAEL PISKO (1913-1999), ABOUT THE DONATED DRAWINGS AND ART MATERIALS. ON SEEING HIS UNCLE PAINT, LYLE RECALLS, “WELL, I CAN REMEMBER MY UNCLE USING THIS WOODEN [EASEL] (P20200016007) BECAUSE WHEN I WAS ABOUT SIX YEARS OLD, HE SET THIS WOODEN EASEL UP. HE WAS BABYSITTING ME THAT ONE DAY...I WAS YOUNG AND HE SET THIS STAND UP AND HE SAID, 'WE’RE GOING TO PAINT A PAINTING TOGETHER.' HE GOT A PALETTE OUT AND HE PUT ALL THESE OIL PAINTS ON AND SHOWED ME HOW TO PUT THEM ALL ON AND THEN GOT THIS KNIFE THING OUT, IT’S A PALETTE KNIFE- IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG ONE AND IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG…PAINTING. IT WAS MAYBE 2 FEET WIDE AND 3 FEET HIGH AND I ASKED HIM WHAT HE WAS GOING TO PAINT AND HE SAID, 'I DON’T KNOW'. THEN HE STARTED SHOWING ME HOW TO MIX THE PAINTS AND PUTTING THEM ON, HE JUST SLOPPED THEM ON AND I KEPT ASKING, 'WHAT IS IT?' AND HE SAYS, 'I HAVEN’T DECIDED.' AND THERE WAS GREENS AND REDS AND YELLOWS. AND I'M WAITING AND WAITING AND I KEPT ASKING WHAT HE WAS PAINTING AND I COULDN’T MAKE HEAD OR TAILS OF IT BECAUSE HE DIDN’T START ANYWHERE. HE WAS PUTTING IT EVERYWHERE AND THEN FINALLY, JUST IN ONE MAGIC STROKE, THERE WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS AND I WAS SHOCKED. AND I SAID, 'UNCLE MIKE, THEY’RE FLOWERS.' AND THEN HE CONTINUED ON AND THEN HE SAYS, 'WHAT DO YOU THINK?' AND I SAYS, 'THEY LOOK REAL.' THEN HE SAYS, 'YEAH, I THINK THIS ONE’S GOOD.' AND THEN HE SHOWED ME HOW TO SIGN THE PAINTING- HE TOOK SOME RED PAINT AND THEN HE THINNED IT WITH SOME TURPENTINE AND HE TOOK THIS LITTLE TINY BRUSH AND HE ROLLED IT IN THE RED PAINT AND THEN HE SIGNED HIS NAME ON THE BOTTOM LEFTSIDE…I REMEMBER IT VIVIDLY BECAUSE I COULDN’T BELIEVE THE PAINTING SUDDENLY IN ONE STROKE MADE SENSE, IT WAS LIKE MAGIC. HE KNEW WHAT HE WAS PAINTING BUT I DIDN'T. I HAD NO CLUE. HE JUST GRINNED AT ME WHEN I SAID, 'IT’S FLOWERS.' YEAH, IT WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE.” “THAT WAS THE ONE TIME THAT I GOT TO SEE HIM ACTUALLY PAINT A PAINTING. THAT WAS THE ONLY PAINTING I SAW HIM PAINT. I DON’T THINK MANY OTHERS SAW HIM PAINT THE MANY PAINTINGS THAT HE DID. HE DID IT SORT OF PRIVATELY I THINK. I DON’T THINK MY DAD EVER SAW HIM PAINT A PAINTING. BUT HE DID COME OVER ONE TIME – WE HAD A DOOR - IT WAS A METAL DOOR LIKE A SCREEN DOOR AND IT HAD A PHEASANT ON IT AND ALL THE PAINT HAD COME OFF. HE CAME OVER AND REPAINTED THAT PHEASANT. HE PAINTED IT FREEHAND AND IT LOOKED REAL. IT WAS AMAZING. THE ONLY OTHER TIME HE CAME OVER WAS TO HELP PAINT OUR HOUSE, AND HE COULD PAINT WITH A BRUSH FASTER THAN A PERSON COULD PAINT WITH A ROLLER AND IT WAS PERFECT. THOSE ARE THE TIMES I SAW HIM ACTUALLY PAINTING OTHER THAN WHEN I WENT TO HIS SHOP.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, DATED OCTOBER 6, 1996, BEFORE MICHAEL FINISHED HIGH SCHOOL HE HAD BEGUN WORKING PART-TIME FOR ROBERT BARROWMAN, AN EARLY CITY MAYOR AND OWNER OF CITY SIGN WORKS. 15 YEARS LATER WHEN BARROWMEN SOLD THE COMPANY, MICHAEL AND HIS FELLOW EMPLOYEE NIGEL HILL BOUGHT THE BUSINESS AND RENAMED IT CITY SIGN CO. THIS BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP LASTED UNTIL 1970. ON HIS TIME AT CITY SIGN CO. WITH HIS UNCLE, LYLE ADDED, “…I’D GO IN EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE JUST TO VISIT AND I REMEMBER CARS COMING IN AND HE WOULD DRAW WHATEVER THEY WANTED. THEN HE WOULD TAKE THIS – IT LOOKED LIKE A PIZZA CUTTER WITH A WHEEL ON IT AND HE WOULD RUN IT ALONG THE LINES AND PUNCH LITTLE HOLES IN IT. HE WOULD TAPE THE LOGO ON TO THE CAR, A BRAND NEW CAR OR TRUCK OR WHATEVER. AND THEN HE WOULD PUT CHALK ON IT AND PULL THAT PAPER OFF. THEN HE WOULD PAINT THE LOGO OR SIGN FREE HAND WITH A BRUSH AND OIL PAINTS. AND IT WAS AS GOOD AS ANY SIGN YOU SEE TODAY MADE WITH A MACHINE. YEAH, IT WAS ASTONISHING.” “AND THE ONE DAY WHEN I WAS IN THERE AND I ASKED HIM HOW HE DID THE LETTERING AND HE SAYS, “I’LL SHOW YOU.” HE HAD ALL THIS PAINT ON THE SHELF AND THIS BIG TABLE WHERE HE PUT STUFF AND HE GRABBED A PIECE OF PAPER. HE TOOK A PENCIL AND DREW TWO LINES AND THEY WERE PARALLEL. AND YOU PROBABLY COULD HAVE MEASURED THEM AND THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN EXACTLY PARALLEL, AND THEN HE TOOK HIS BRUSH AND SAYS, “OKAY, I’LL PAINT YOUR NAME, I’LL PAINT LYLE.” AND HE TOOK THIS LONG – JUST A REGULAR BRUSH THAT WAS A KIND OF FLOPPY BRUSH AND HE DIPPED IT INTO SOME OIL PAINT AND HE JUST PAINTED MY NAME JUST L-Y-L-E LIKE THAT IN BLOCK LETTERS, IN A MATTER OF SECONDS AND IT WAS PERFECT. AND HE EXPLAINED THAT WHEN YOU PUT THE LETTERS TOGETHER, SOME LETTERS ARE CLOSER THAN OTHER LETTERS TO MATCH, AND HE EXPLAINED ALL THAT TO ME, HOW YOU WOULD DO THAT. THEN HE TOOK IT AND SAID 'YOU CAN DO ITALICS' AND HE MADE THEM ALL SLOPED EVENLY. AND HE SAID, 'I CAN DO IT LIKE IN A JAPANESE STYLE WHERE THE LETTERS ARE BIG ON THE TOP.' AND HE DID THAT ALL IN OIL AND IT WAS LIKE ANY PRINTER THAT YOU SEE TODAY AND ABOUT THE SPEED OF SLOW WRITING. I WAS ASTONISHED.” “SO I USED TO GO IN ONCE IN A WHILE AND VISIT HIM IN THE SHOP AT THAT TIME AND I REMEMBER ONE TIME I – HE ACTUALLY ENCOURAGED ME TO START PAINTING. I STARTED DOING THAT AND HE GAVE ME SOME HINTS, LITTLE THINGS LIKE PERSPECTIVE, VANISHING POINTS, WHAT WERE THE OTHER THINGS, OH, HOW THICK PAINT DOESN’T STICK TO THIN PAINT AND VICE VERSA, AND WHEN YOU USE OIL PAINTS YOU PAINT FROM THE BACK TO THE FRONT. WHEN YOU USE WATERCOLORS, YOU PAINT LIGHT TO DARK, USUALLY – THAT KIND OF THING. HE HELPED ME WITH THAT KIND OF STUFF. HE WAS SHOWING ME.” REMEMBERING HIS UNCLE, LYLE STATES, ”MY UNCLE WAS A VERY NICE MAN. I NEVER SAW HIM EVER ANGRY, EVER. I NEVER HEARD ANYONE EVER SAY THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONLY ONCE. ONLY ONE TIME THAT I EVEN HEARD THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONE TIME HE HAD A PAINTING AND MY AUNT DIDN’T LIKE IT SO SHE TOOK OUT SOME PAINTS AND FIXED IT FOR HIM. AND THAT WAS THE ONLY TIME THAT HE WAS ANGRY, THAT I HAVE EVER KNOWN. I THINK HE FORGAVE HER BUT I DON’T THINK SHE TOUCHED HIS PAINTINGS AFTER THAT. SO BASICALLY MY AUNT AND MY UNCLE WERE NICE AND IT WAS A PLEASURE TO GO OVER AND VISIT HIM. HE WAS SO NICE. AND I’M NOT SAYING THAT BECAUSE HE’S MY UNCLE OR ANYTHING- HE JUST WAS A NICE MAN.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHAT HE KNEW AT THE TIME OF HIS UNCLE'S ART CAREER, LYLE ADDS, “I DIDN’T REALLY KNOW [ABOUT IT]. I HAD NO CLUE WHAT HE DID. I DIDN’T KNOW HE WAS A FRIEND OF A.Y. JACKSON AND ALL OF THAT…I GUESS HE SOLD THE PAINTINGS BUT I SAW IT MORE OF A HOBBY BECAUSE HE WOULD PAINT A PAINTING AND THEN RE-PAINT IT, LIKE, IF HE DIDN’T LIKE IT HE WOULD JUST PAINT OVER IT. AND BECAUSE HE WAS A SIGN PAINTER. HE WAS ACTUALLY AN ELECTRICIAN BY TRADE. HE WENT TO SAIT AND BECAME AN ELECTRICIAN BUT COULDN’T GET ANY WORK AND STARTED A SIGN BUSINESS AND [IT], TO ME AS A KID, IT WAS JUST A JOB, LIKE DAD’S JOB THAT KIND OF THING, SO YOU HAVE A JOB [AND] YOU GO TO WORK [AND] SO I DIDN’T THINK IT WAS ANYTHING SPECIAL…I DIDN’T UNDERSTAND, AS A KID,... I WENT OFF DOING MY OWN THING. YEAH…HE WAS CLOSE TO FINISHING [HIS CAREER], BY THE TIME I WAS AN ADULT, HE WAS JUST NEAR DONE.” IN 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON MICHAEL PISKO WAS FOUND IN A PRESS RELEASE ANNOUNCING THE 'MICHAEL PISKO MEMORIAL AWARD', WHICH WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE ARTIST'S WIDOW AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS IN 2000, TO BE AWARDED TO A GRADUATING BFA DEGREE PAINTER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE: "MICHAEL PISKO WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1913. HE MADE HIS LIVING AS A SUCCESSFUL SIGN PAINTER THROUGH HIS BUSINESS, CITY SIGN COMPANY, BUT LANDSCAPE PAINTING WAS HIS LIFE'S FULFILLMENT. TO HONE HIS SKILLS, HE STUDIED THREE SUMMERS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND SOUGHT INSTRUCTION FROM SENIOR VISITING ARTISTS WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON INVITATION OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, OF WHICH HE, IN 1937, WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS. PISKO GREATLY ADMIRED A.Y. JACKSON, THE GROUP OF SEVEN MASTER, WITH WHOM HE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SKETCH AND PAINT AROUND LETHBRIDGE WHENEVER JACKSON CAME TO TOWN TO VISIT HIS BROTHER. HE WAS ALSO DEEPLY INFLUENCED BY H.G. GLYDE, WHO TAUGHT AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART IN CALGARY AND AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND WHO VISITED LETHBRIDGE TO TEACH ART CLASSES AT THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN 1947 PISKO WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HE WAS A PROLIFIC PAINTER, WHO EXHIBITED REGULARLY WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HIS WORK IS REPRESENTED IN MANY PRIVATE, CORPORATE AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, AMONG THEM THE ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. MICHAEL PISKO PASSED AWAY IN 1999." THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB HELD THEIR FIRST MEETING AT THE HOME OF MISS ANNA MACKENZIE ON OCTOBER 7, 1936. EDITH FANNY KIRK WAS THE FIRST ART TEACHER IN LETHBRIDGE. SHE CAME FROM BRITAIN WITH CLASSICAL TRAINING AND IT WAS KIRK WHO SET THE STAGE FOR THE SKETCH CLUB TO COME INTO BEING. THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS ALSO PLAYED A ROLE IN THE FORMATION BY PROVIDING RECOGNITION OF ARTISTIC MERIT THROUGH DISTRICT SCHOLARSHIPS. ANNA MACKENZIE AND P.J. COLLINS CONCEIVED OF THE CLUB AFTER THEIR EXPERIENCE IN BANFF. THE GROUP WAS FORMED OUT OF AN ENTHUSIASTIC INTEREST IN ART AND SOON AFTER THE GROUP BEGAN MEETING, THERE WERE REGULAR EXHIBITIONS. THE GROUP WAS PRIVY TO THE ATTENTION OF GROUP OF SEVEN ARTIST A.Y.JACKSON WHEN HE MADE HIS FREQUENT SKETCHING TRIPS TO SOUTHERN ALBERTA. HE REGULARLY ACCOMPANIED THE SKETCH CLUB AND HIS INFLUENCE CAN BE SEEN IN MUCH OF THEIR WORK. ANOTHER GUEST OF THE GROUP WAS ANNORA BROWN WHO WAS AN ARTIST WHO HAD TRAINED IN TORONTO, BUT RESIDED IN FORT MACLEOD AND BEGAN SPENDING TIME WITH THE GROUP IN 1939. HER INTEREST IN FLOWER STUDIES IS SUSPECTED TO HAVE INSPIRED MANY OF THE WORKS BY CLUB MEMBERS. DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, THE GROUP ORGANIZED SUMMER CLASSES TAUGHT BY OUT OF TOWN ARTISTS SUCH AS: H.G.GLYDE, WALTER J. PHILIPS AND A.C. LEIGHTON. ACCORDING TO A HISTORY OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB WRITTEN BY JOAN STEBBINS IN JUNE, 1985, “THE PAINTINGS OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB PORTRAY FAVOURITE SKETCHING AREAS IN THE REGION – THE COULEES PROVIDED ENDLESS MATERIAL, THE RIVERBOTTOM, THE OLD R.C.M.P. BARRACKS, THE WHITNEY FARM, HENDERSON LAKE, THE FELGER HUTTERITE COLONY, THE FOOTHILLS AND WATERTON LAKE WERE OFTEN REPEATED SUBJECTS.” FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON PISKO AND HIS CAREER, AS WELL AS PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS FOR THE 1995 ARTWALK DEDICATED TO HIM, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19920009001-GA. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20200016001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20200016006
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1960
Material Type
Artifact
Materials
WOOD, METAL, STRING
Catalogue Number
P20200016007
  2 images  
Material Type
Artifact
Date Range From
1940
Date Range To
1960
Materials
WOOD, METAL, STRING
No. Pieces
1
Length
85.0
Width
9.8
Description
REFINISHED WOOD EASEL, COMPACTLY FOLDED, LAID FLAT AND TIED IN PLACE WITH A WHITE STRING. SLIDING LEGS, CANVAS SHELVES, AND SCREW PINNING ALL THREE LEGS AND CANVAS BACKER ARE HELD IN PLACE AND ADJUSTABLE WITH BUTTERFLY THUMBSCREWS. PAINT SPLATTERS AND DRIPS ARE ALL OVER THE EASEL. WOOD HAS SCRATCHES AND DENTS, ESPECIALLY WHERE THE BUTTERFLY THUMBSCREWS WERE USED.
Subjects
PAINTING T&E
Historical Association
FINE ARTS
History
ON OCTOBER 8, 2020, COLLECTIONS TECHNICIAN KEVIN MACLEAN INTERVIEWED LYLE PENNINGTON REGARDING ANY MEMORIES OF HIS UNCLE “MIKE” MICHAEL PISKO (1913-1999), ABOUT THE DONATED DRAWINGS AND ART MATERIALS. ON SEEING HIS UNCLE PAINT, LYLE RECALLS, “WELL, I CAN REMEMBER MY UNCLE USING THIS WOODEN [EASEL] BECAUSE WHEN I WAS ABOUT SIX YEARS OLD, HE SET THIS WOODEN EASEL UP. HE WAS BABYSITTING ME THAT ONE DAY...I WAS YOUNG AND HE SET THIS STAND UP AND HE SAID, 'WE’RE GOING TO PAINT A PAINTING TOGETHER.' HE GOT A PALETTE OUT AND HE PUT ALL THESE OIL PAINTS ON AND SHOWED ME HOW TO PUT THEM ALL ON AND THEN GOT THIS KNIFE THING OUT, IT’S A PALETTE KNIFE- IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG ONE AND IT WAS A FAIRLY BIG…PAINTING. IT WAS MAYBE 2 FEET WIDE AND 3 FEET HIGH AND I ASKED HIM WHAT HE WAS GOING TO PAINT AND HE SAID, 'I DON’T KNOW'. THEN HE STARTED SHOWING ME HOW TO MIX THE PAINTS AND PUTTING THEM ON, HE JUST SLOPPED THEM ON AND I KEPT ASKING, 'WHAT IS IT?' AND HE SAYS, 'I HAVEN’T DECIDED.' AND THERE WAS GREENS AND REDS AND YELLOWS. AND I'M WAITING AND WAITING AND I KEPT ASKING WHAT HE WAS PAINTING AND I COULDN’T MAKE HEAD OR TAILS OF IT BECAUSE HE DIDN’T START ANYWHERE. HE WAS PUTTING IT EVERYWHERE AND THEN FINALLY, JUST IN ONE MAGIC STROKE, THERE WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS AND I WAS SHOCKED. AND I SAID, 'UNCLE MIKE, THEY’RE FLOWERS.' AND THEN HE CONTINUED ON AND THEN HE SAYS, 'WHAT DO YOU THINK?' AND I SAYS, 'THEY LOOK REAL.' THEN HE SAYS, 'YEAH, I THINK THIS ONE’S GOOD.' AND THEN HE SHOWED ME HOW TO SIGN THE PAINTING- HE TOOK SOME RED PAINT AND THEN HE THINNED IT WITH SOME TURPENTINE AND HE TOOK THIS LITTLE TINY BRUSH AND HE ROLLED IT IN THE RED PAINT AND THEN HE SIGNED HIS NAME ON THE BOTTOM LEFTSIDE…I REMEMBER IT VIVIDLY BECAUSE I COULDN’T BELIEVE THE PAINTING SUDDENLY IN ONE STROKE MADE SENSE, IT WAS LIKE MAGIC. HE KNEW WHAT HE WAS PAINTING BUT I DIDN'T. I HAD NO CLUE. HE JUST GRINNED AT ME WHEN I SAID, 'IT’S FLOWERS.' YEAH, IT WAS A WHOLE BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE.” “THAT WAS THE ONE TIME THAT I GOT TO SEE HIM ACTUALLY PAINT A PAINTING. THAT WAS THE ONLY PAINTING I SAW HIM PAINT. I DON’T THINK MANY OTHERS SAW HIM PAINT THE MANY PAINTINGS THAT HE DID. HE DID IT SORT OF PRIVATELY I THINK. I DON’T THINK MY DAD EVER SAW HIM PAINT A PAINTING. BUT HE DID COME OVER ONE TIME – WE HAD A DOOR - IT WAS A METAL DOOR LIKE A SCREEN DOOR AND IT HAD A PHEASANT ON IT AND ALL THE PAINT HAD COME OFF. HE CAME OVER AND REPAINTED THAT PHEASANT. HE PAINTED IT FREEHAND AND IT LOOKED REAL. IT WAS AMAZING. THE ONLY OTHER TIME HE CAME OVER WAS TO HELP PAINT OUR HOUSE, AND HE COULD PAINT WITH A BRUSH FASTER THAN A PERSON COULD PAINT WITH A ROLLER AND IT WAS PERFECT. THOSE ARE THE TIMES I SAW HIM ACTUALLY PAINTING OTHER THAN WHEN I WENT TO HIS SHOP.” ACCORDING TO A LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLE, DATED OCTOBER 6, 1996, BEFORE MICHAEL FINISHED HIGH SCHOOL HE HAD BEGUN WORKING PART-TIME FOR ROBERT BARROWMAN, AN EARLY CITY MAYOR AND OWNER OF CITY SIGN WORKS. 15 YEARS LATER WHEN BARROWMEN SOLD THE COMPANY, MICHAEL AND HIS FELLOW EMPLOYEE NIGEL HILL BOUGHT THE BUSINESS AND RENAMED IT CITY SIGN CO. THIS BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP LASTED UNTIL 1970. ON HIS TIME AT CITY SIGN CO. WITH HIS UNCLE, LYLE ADDED, “…I’D GO IN EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE JUST TO VISIT AND I REMEMBER CARS COMING IN AND HE WOULD DRAW WHATEVER THEY WANTED. THEN HE WOULD TAKE THIS – IT LOOKED LIKE A PIZZA CUTTER WITH A WHEEL ON IT AND HE WOULD RUN IT ALONG THE LINES AND PUNCH LITTLE HOLES IN IT. HE WOULD TAPE THE LOGO ON TO THE CAR, A BRAND NEW CAR OR TRUCK OR WHATEVER. AND THEN HE WOULD PUT CHALK ON IT AND PULL THAT PAPER OFF. THEN HE WOULD PAINT THE LOGO OR SIGN FREE HAND WITH A BRUSH AND OIL PAINTS. AND IT WAS AS GOOD AS ANY SIGN YOU SEE TODAY MADE WITH A MACHINE. YEAH, IT WAS ASTONISHING.” “AND THE ONE DAY WHEN I WAS IN THERE AND I ASKED HIM HOW HE DID THE LETTERING AND HE SAYS, “I’LL SHOW YOU.” HE HAD ALL THIS PAINT ON THE SHELF AND THIS BIG TABLE WHERE HE PUT STUFF AND HE GRABBED A PIECE OF PAPER. HE TOOK A PENCIL AND DREW TWO LINES AND THEY WERE PARALLEL. AND YOU PROBABLY COULD HAVE MEASURED THEM AND THEY WOULD HAVE BEEN EXACTLY PARALLEL, AND THEN HE TOOK HIS BRUSH AND SAYS, “OKAY, I’LL PAINT YOUR NAME, I’LL PAINT LYLE.” AND HE TOOK THIS LONG – JUST A REGULAR BRUSH THAT WAS A KIND OF FLOPPY BRUSH AND HE DIPPED IT INTO SOME OIL PAINT AND HE JUST PAINTED MY NAME JUST L-Y-L-E LIKE THAT IN BLOCK LETTERS, IN A MATTER OF SECONDS AND IT WAS PERFECT. AND HE EXPLAINED THAT WHEN YOU PUT THE LETTERS TOGETHER, SOME LETTERS ARE CLOSER THAN OTHER LETTERS TO MATCH, AND HE EXPLAINED ALL THAT TO ME, HOW YOU WOULD DO THAT. THEN HE TOOK IT AND SAID 'YOU CAN DO ITALICS' AND HE MADE THEM ALL SLOPED EVENLY. AND HE SAID, 'I CAN DO IT LIKE IN A JAPANESE STYLE WHERE THE LETTERS ARE BIG ON THE TOP.' AND HE DID THAT ALL IN OIL AND IT WAS LIKE ANY PRINTER THAT YOU SEE TODAY AND ABOUT THE SPEED OF SLOW WRITING. I WAS ASTONISHED.” “SO I USED TO GO IN ONCE IN A WHILE AND VISIT HIM IN THE SHOP AT THAT TIME AND I REMEMBER ONE TIME I – HE ACTUALLY ENCOURAGED ME TO START PAINTING. I STARTED DOING THAT AND HE GAVE ME SOME HINTS, LITTLE THINGS LIKE PERSPECTIVE, VANISHING POINTS, WHAT WERE THE OTHER THINGS, OH, HOW THICK PAINT DOESN’T STICK TO THIN PAINT AND VICE VERSA, AND WHEN YOU USE OIL PAINTS YOU PAINT FROM THE BACK TO THE FRONT. WHEN YOU USE WATERCOLORS, YOU PAINT LIGHT TO DARK, USUALLY – THAT KIND OF THING. HE HELPED ME WITH THAT KIND OF STUFF. HE WAS SHOWING ME.” REMEMBERING HIS UNCLE, LYLE STATES, ”MY UNCLE WAS A VERY NICE MAN. I NEVER SAW HIM EVER ANGRY, EVER. I NEVER HEARD ANYONE EVER SAY THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONLY ONCE. ONLY ONE TIME THAT I EVEN HEARD THAT HE WAS ANGRY. ONE TIME HE HAD A PAINTING AND MY AUNT DIDN’T LIKE IT SO SHE TOOK OUT SOME PAINTS AND FIXED IT FOR HIM. AND THAT WAS THE ONLY TIME THAT HE WAS ANGRY, THAT I HAVE EVER KNOWN. I THINK HE FORGAVE HER BUT I DON’T THINK SHE TOUCHED HIS PAINTINGS AFTER THAT. SO BASICALLY MY AUNT AND MY UNCLE WERE NICE AND IT WAS A PLEASURE TO GO OVER AND VISIT HIM. HE WAS SO NICE. AND I’M NOT SAYING THAT BECAUSE HE’S MY UNCLE OR ANYTHING- HE JUST WAS A NICE MAN.” WHEN ASKED ABOUT WHAT HE KNEW AT THE TIME OF HIS UNCLE'S ART CAREER, LYLE ADDS, “I DIDN’T REALLY KNOW [ABOUT IT]. I HAD NO CLUE WHAT HE DID. I DIDN’T KNOW HE WAS A FRIEND OF A.Y. JACKSON AND ALL OF THAT…I GUESS HE SOLD THE PAINTINGS BUT I SAW IT MORE OF A HOBBY BECAUSE HE WOULD PAINT A PAINTING AND THEN RE-PAINT IT, LIKE, IF HE DIDN’T LIKE IT HE WOULD JUST PAINT OVER IT. AND BECAUSE HE WAS A SIGN PAINTER. HE WAS ACTUALLY AN ELECTRICIAN BY TRADE. HE WENT TO SAIT AND BECAME AN ELECTRICIAN BUT COULDN’T GET ANY WORK AND STARTED A SIGN BUSINESS AND [IT], TO ME AS A KID, IT WAS JUST A JOB, LIKE DAD’S JOB THAT KIND OF THING, SO YOU HAVE A JOB [AND] YOU GO TO WORK [AND] SO I DIDN’T THINK IT WAS ANYTHING SPECIAL…I DIDN’T UNDERSTAND, AS A KID,... I WENT OFF DOING MY OWN THING. YEAH…HE WAS CLOSE TO FINISHING [HIS CAREER], BY THE TIME I WAS AN ADULT, HE WAS JUST NEAR DONE.” IN 2014, COLLECTIONS ASSISTANT JANE EDMUNDSON CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF ART OBJECTS. THE FOLLOWING BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON MICHAEL PISKO WAS FOUND IN A PRESS RELEASE ANNOUNCING THE 'MICHAEL PISKO MEMORIAL AWARD', WHICH WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE ARTIST'S WIDOW AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS IN 2000, TO BE AWARDED TO A GRADUATING BFA DEGREE PAINTER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE: "MICHAEL PISKO WAS BORN IN LETHBRIDGE IN 1913. HE MADE HIS LIVING AS A SUCCESSFUL SIGN PAINTER THROUGH HIS BUSINESS, CITY SIGN COMPANY, BUT LANDSCAPE PAINTING WAS HIS LIFE'S FULFILLMENT. TO HONE HIS SKILLS, HE STUDIED THREE SUMMERS AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND SOUGHT INSTRUCTION FROM SENIOR VISITING ARTISTS WHO CAME TO LETHBRIDGE ON INVITATION OF THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB, OF WHICH HE, IN 1937, WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS. PISKO GREATLY ADMIRED A.Y. JACKSON, THE GROUP OF SEVEN MASTER, WITH WHOM HE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SKETCH AND PAINT AROUND LETHBRIDGE WHENEVER JACKSON CAME TO TOWN TO VISIT HIS BROTHER. HE WAS ALSO DEEPLY INFLUENCED BY H.G. GLYDE, WHO TAUGHT AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART IN CALGARY AND AT THE BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND WHO VISITED LETHBRIDGE TO TEACH ART CLASSES AT THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB. IN 1947 PISKO WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HE WAS A PROLIFIC PAINTER, WHO EXHIBITED REGULARLY WITH THE LETHBRIDGE SKETCH CLUB AND THE ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS. HIS WORK IS REPRESENTED IN MANY PRIVATE, CORPORATE AND PUBLIC COLLECTIONS, AMONG THEM THE ALBERTA FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE. MICHAEL PISKO PASSED AWAY IN 1999." FOR COPIES OF LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES ON PISKO AND HIS CAREER, AS WELL AS PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS FOR THE 1995 ARTWALK DEDICATED TO HIM, SEE PERMANENT FILE P19920009001-GA. FOR MORE INFORMATION, INCLUDING THE FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTION AND LETHBRIDGE HERALD ARTICLES, PLEASE SEE THE PERMANENT FILE P20200016001-GA.
Catalogue Number
P20200016007
Acquisition Date
2020-06
Collection
Museum
Images
Less detail

5018 records – page 1 of 251.