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Sakamoto Family Photographs

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96026
Date Range
1950-2004
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20181077
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records; 17 photographs; 203- 35mm slides; 7- 8mm films
Scope and Content
2018.1077/001: Sakamoto Family Photographs Part 1/2, 14 photographs, 1950-2004? 2018.1077/002: Sakamoto Family Photographs Part 2/2, 3 photographs, 1 information booklet on Shin Buddhism, 1952-1960. Folder. 2018.1077/003-203: Sakamoto Family Slides, 203 slides, 1967-1981. 2018.1077/204-210: 8mm fil…
Date Range
1950-2004
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Sakamoto Family
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records; 17 photographs; 203- 35mm slides; 7- 8mm films
History / Biographical
Masahiro Sakamoto was born in Ruskin, B.C. in 1914, where his family farmed his entire life. He met Asaye Goto while living in the area, and they married in 1936. They eventually moved to Taber, Alberta where Masahiro Sakamoto worked in construction. In 1957, they moved to Lethbridge where he continued to work until his retirement in 1979. Both Masahiro and Asaye Sakamoto were strong in their faith, and attended the Buddhist Temple of Southern Alberta in Lethbridge. They had six children, 8 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren. Their family was always their highest priority.
Scope and Content
2018.1077/001: Sakamoto Family Photographs Part 1/2, 14 photographs, 1950-2004? 2018.1077/002: Sakamoto Family Photographs Part 2/2, 3 photographs, 1 information booklet on Shin Buddhism, 1952-1960. Folder. 2018.1077/003-203: Sakamoto Family Slides, 203 slides, 1967-1981. 2018.1077/204-210: 8mm film on the Sakamoto family.
Accession No.
20181077
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Dr. Menno Boldt: Papers on Suicide Prevention

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions96017
Date Range
1973-2000
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20191004
Physical Description
0.25 m of textual records
Scope and Content
2019.1004/001: Correspondence, Meeting Minutes for the Task Force, Task Force Agendas and Reports Part 1/2, 1973-1977. 2019.1004/002: Correspondence, Meeting Minutes for the Task Force, Task Force Agendas and Reports Part 2/2, 1976-1977. 2019.1004/003: Newspaper Articles re: Task Force, 1973-1981. …
Date Range
1973-2000
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Menno Boldt
Physical Description
0.25 m of textual records
History / Biographical
Dr. Menno Boldt (d. January 4, 2019) was a faculty member of the University of Lethbridge, Department of Sociology, specializing in suicide prevention. He work on the topic of suicide, particularly in the Southern Alberta region, fueled Dr. Boldt to actively pursue awareness, preventative, and rehabilitation options for individuals throughout Alberta. This passion for better treatment, care, compassion, and understanding from the Alberta Government and general population led Dr. Boldt to become involved in multiple organizations and committees throughout his life. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, following the work of Dr. Boldt (specifically, the Boldt Report), Lethbridge became a leader in the research and implementation of comprehensive and innovative suicide prevention programs and services in Alberta, which had national and international significance. As an academic, he used his influence as part of the University of Lethbridge faculty to gain public and private funding for the implementation of various suicide prevention and awareness organizations and facilities. Throughout his career, Dr. Boldt collaborated with multiple organizations such as The Just Group on the Alberta Suicide Prevention History Project, the Task Force on Suicide which was founded by multiple community members including Dr. Boldt in 1976, and many other groups and individuals. Dr. Boldt was dedicated to the prevention and awareness of suicide among individuals, and how it affects the greater Alberta population.
Scope and Content
2019.1004/001: Correspondence, Meeting Minutes for the Task Force, Task Force Agendas and Reports Part 1/2, 1973-1977. 2019.1004/002: Correspondence, Meeting Minutes for the Task Force, Task Force Agendas and Reports Part 2/2, 1976-1977. 2019.1004/003: Newspaper Articles re: Task Force, 1973-1981. 2019.1004/004: Dr. Menno Boldt Sole and Collaborative Papers re: Suicide, 1980-2000. 2019.1004/005: Handwritten Notes and Public Outreach pamphlets, 1976-1983. 2019.1004/006: Miscellaneous Correspondence and replies- Menno Boldt, 1976-1987. 2019.1004/007: Media Reports on Suicide Prevention Newspaper and Magazine Articles, 1975-1993. 2019.1004/008: Canadian Suicide Prevention Foundation Founding records, Correspondence, 1983-1987. 2019.1004/009: Public Presentation on Suicide, 1975-1983. 2019.1004/010: Notes and Ideas on Suicide Prevention Outline for Book References, Tentative Outline for a Book Draft, 1984. 2019.1004/011: Papers Presented at Various Seminars and Symposiums, 1976-1986. 2019.1004/012: Alberta Model-Towards the Development of a Systematic Approach to Suicide Prevention, History of Development, New Concept papers and Notes, 1984. 2019.1004/013: Consultation Correspondences, includes correspondences with the Attorney General, University of Manitoba, University of Lethbridge, ICSPNC, etc., 1976-1993. 2019.1004/014: Steering Committee Correspondences, Notes, Job Descriptions, and Resignation Letter, 1976-1978. 2019.1004/015: Suicide Prevention Provincial Advisory Committee (SPPAC) Correspondence, Ministerial Order, Budgets, and Newspaper Articles, 1980-1985. 2019.1004/016: Research Data/Papers re: Native Despair, Self-Destructive Behavior and Suicides Part 1/2, Case Studies, Emma Warrior class paper, 198-? 2019.1004/017: Research Data/Papers re: Native Despair, Self-Destructive Behavior and Suicides Part 2/2, Handwritten Notes, 1976-1986. 2019.1004/018: Reports of Task Force on Highway Accidents and Suicides Years 1 and 2, 1975-1976.
Accession No.
20191004
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
2007
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20071019
Physical Description
Over 400 digital photographs
Date Range
2007
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Geoge Kuhl
Physical Description
Over 400 digital photographs
History / Biographical
The donor, a Senior Planner with the City of Lethbridge, oversaw the demolition of the Bridge Inn. He took these photographs on the day of the demolition. Mr. Kuhl is also the Project Manager for the Heart of Our City master plan for Lethbridge's downtown core. The Bridge Inn was originally opened as the Queen's Hotel at what would become 316 1 Avenue South, in 1898. It replaced a building known as Roberge Hall, also called Alphonse's Hall, that stood on the same site from about 1885 or 1886. In 1902 T. Rooney bought the hotel and changes its name to the Arlington Hotel. A new mahogney bar was added, accented by carved oak around a central panel of plate glass. In 1904 a 30 foot x 40 foot frame addition with iron siding was built, and in 1910 the entire building was replaced by a three storey brick structure. An adjoining older building was acquired and renovated, bringing the capacity of the Arlington Hotel to 117 rooms. It was the largest hotel in the city. Much later the Arlington was remodelled and renamed the Plainsmen Hotel. Finally, in 1976 the hotel was given the name Bridge Inn. It's condition deteriorated over the years. The City of Lethbridge evenutally bought the hotel and tried to interest prospective buyers in it. When that failed, the building was demolished on 24 May 2007. Source: Dogertom, Irma. Where Was It? A Guide To Early Lethbridge Buildings (Lethbridge Historical Society, 2001)
Accession No.
20071019
Collection
Archive
Less detail
Date Range
1889-1964
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20181046
Physical Description
1.1 m of textual records, 5 photographs
Scope and Content
001: Financial log book (1889-1908) 002: Work day planner for Drumheller Rosedeer Mine (1916-1917) 003: Work day planner for Drumheller Stirling Mine (1917-1918) 004: Work day planner for Drumheller unidentified mine (1918-1919) 005: Work day planner for Drumheller unidentified mine & office (1921)…
Date Range
1889-1964
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Hans Enoch Wight
Physical Description
1.1 m of textual records, 5 photographs
History / Biographical
Hans Enoch Nielson Wight was born July 29, 1889, in Hyrum, Utah, USA. His father was Joseph Moroni Wight, and his mother’s maiden name was Cynthia Elnora Nielson. Joseph was born in 1844 in Hume, New York, and as a seven-year-old travelled west in the year 1851 with his LDS (Mormon) pioneer family. In line with LDS teachings of the time, Joseph became a polygamist and had two wives. Cynthia was his second wife. She was born in Weber County, Utah, in 1860. Hans was the sixth child born to Joseph and Cynthia, but only the second to live past infancy. After his birth, his parents were more successful and brought eight more children into the world, all but one of whom lived to adulthood. In the late 1880s, the LDS Church was sending members north to colonize Southern Alberta, and on June 8, 1891, when Hans was not yet two years old, his parents took their two living children and moved to the brand new community of Cardston, Alberta, snuggled on the edge of the vast, untamed, Canadian prairie. Hans learned to fish and hunt, and even before his teenage years he was an expert marksman. During the day in his father’s blacksmith shop, he learned to be a blacksmith, a wheelwright, and a carpenter, and in the evening he studied books. While finishing high school, he learned to play several instruments. He was a member of the Cardston Military Band. He became a certified machinist, a master electrician, and a licensed plumber. Because he drove a tractor, aborigine friends on the Blood reservation next to Cardston called him Iron Horse. Some remained life-long friends. On August 1, 1908, when nineteen years old, Hans went to Utah to attend Brigham Young College in Logan. He also studied through correspondence courses at the Armour Institute of Technology in Chicago, Illinois, the University of Missouri, and the Alberta Institute of Technology and Art, obtaining degrees in mechanical and electrical engineering. For the first six years of his professional career, he worked for the US Reclamation Service on the St. Mary’s River project in Montana, but he still spent his weekends in Cardston, which was only twenty miles away. On one of these weekends, he met a young lady named Alice McClung from northern Ireland who was a recent convert to the LDS Church. On January 11, 1911, Alice became Mrs. Hans E. Wight. He was not quite 22 years old and she was 20. An aside: Five years later, Hans’s younger brother Eugene married Alice’s younger sister Jenny, and their two families generated double cousins who grew up very close. At that time the LDS Church was constructing a temple in Cardston; it was to be used to perform certain sacred ceremonies, and Hans was offered a job as construction engineer, thus beginning his professional life in Canada. When the main part of the construction was finished, he accepted a position in Drumheller, Alberta, where, as a mine surveyor and master mechanic, he was instrumental in the development of its huge coal resources. He remained in Drumheller ten years. In addition to his mining duties he also taught night classes in mechanical, electrical, and steam engineering. When his family finally left Drumheller, he had three children: Elizabeth (Bessie) who was 14, Marjorie (Marge) who was 7, and Eileen who was 5. To be nearer to the LDS community, he moved his family to Taber, Alberta, in 1926. He had obtained the position of Chief Engineer and Master Mechanic for the Leland Coal Company based in Chicago. He was responsible for all mine maintenance both above and below ground. In addition to its large land holdings and mining operations, Leland Coal supplied the district with electricity. Their electric system was later purchased by the Calgary Power Company, and Hans became involved in extending power lines throughout Southern Alberta as well as in building power and light systems for its towns. Soon he relocated to Lethbridge, Alberta. However, his Calgary Power Company job required that he be away from home too much, so he resigned and accepted a position at the newly constructed Lethbridge Government Grain and Storage Elevator. In 1935, Hans campaigned for the new Social Credit Party and was elected Member of the Alberta legislative assembly (MLA) for Lethbridge by a landslide. In 1937, he resigned under pressure. Someone was leaking sensitive political information to the Lethbridge Herald, and Social Credit leadership suspected him (probably correctly). He moved to Calgary and became Chief Engineer of the Hudson’s Bay Company’s Calgary department store where he remained until World War II. In 1941 Hans left the Hudson’s Bay Company and enlisted at the rank of Pilot Officer in the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). He had hoped to work on the Alaskan Highway as an engineer, but was instead deployed to air bases across the Prairie Provinces and Newfoundland where he was charged with maintaining and constructing airbase facilities. At the same time, he was often assigned to organize recreation and entertainment for the airmen. He was released from active duty with the rank of Flight Lieutenant in February, 1945, and moved to Bremerton, Washington, where he was hired as an electrical engineer repairing American ships, mostly destroyers, damaged in Pacific Ocean warfare. He performed this work until the Japanese surrender. Then he moved to Salt Lake City, Utah. Hans was 55 years old when he returned to the USA, and he remained there the remainder of his life working as surveyor, city engineer, construction engineer, and city manager in cities throughout northern Utah. He also lived in Los Angeles where he was employed in the development of the San Clemente Island Missile Base for the US military. He died in Salt lake City, Utah on October 12, 1965, at 76 years of age, leaving behind his wife Alice and their three daughters. Although only the oldest daughter married, she had seven children, and those children now have over one hundred descendants. The biography is compiled by Howard Shafer, Grandson based on the following sources EXPERIENCES OF CYNTHIA ELNORA NIELSEN WIGHT from her diaries and journals: 1890 to 1943, edited by Alice W. Terry; A LIFE OF SERVICE: HANS ENOCH NIELSON WIGHT as revealed through his diaries and by his family, edited by Marjorie Wight and Eileen Wight; BACKWARD GLANCES: Stories of and by our Wight ancestors, compiled by Eileen Wight and Marjorie Wight A more detailed biography is found in file 20181046052
Scope and Content
001: Financial log book (1889-1908) 002: Work day planner for Drumheller Rosedeer Mine (1916-1917) 003: Work day planner for Drumheller Stirling Mine (1917-1918) 004: Work day planner for Drumheller unidentified mine (1918-1919) 005: Work day planner for Drumheller unidentified mine & office (1921) 006: Day planner in Drumheller (1921-1922) 007: Day planner in Drumheller (1922-1923) 008: Day planner in Drumheller (1923) 009: Day planner in Drumheller but planner days are not all filled in (1924) 010: Bundle of daily calendar pages (1924-1925) 011: Bundle of daily calendar pages (1925-1926) 012: Bundle of daily calendar pages (1926-1927) 013: Journal with daily entries (1927-1930) 014: Scrapbook of newspaper cutouts talking about the Social Credit party during Wright’s time as MLA till the fall of the Social Credit party (1935-1938) 015: Diary (1931) 016: Handmade diary and a handmade planner (1932) 017: Handmade diary (1933) 018: Diary (1934) 019: Diary (1935) 020: Diary (1936) 021: Diary (1937) 022: Diary with a couple pages torn from the front (1937-1938) 023: Diary (1939) 024: Travel Journal: Journal written till page 45 then it goes blank and then writing on page 194-195 (1939-1942) 025: Diary (1940) 026: Diary (1941) 027: Diary (1942) 028: Diary (1943) 029: Diary (1944) 030: Diary (1945) 031: Diary (1946) 032: Diary with Utah stamp (1947) 033: Diary with Utah stamp (1948) 034: Diary with Utah stamp (1949) 035: Diary with Utah stamp (1950-1952) 036: Diary with Utah stamp (1952) 037: Day Planner not that much is written in the entries (1953) 038: Diary (1953) 039: Account book (1954-1957) 040: Diary four stamps on the first page from Utah, Alberta, Washington, and Oregon (1954) 041: Diary (1955) 042: Diary (1956) 043: Diary (1957) 044: Diary (1958) 045: Diary (1959) 046: Diary (1960) 047: Diary (1961) 048: Diary (1962) 049: Diary (1963) 050: Diary stops writing on May 6 (1964) 051: 5 photographs of H.E. Wight and family 052: Biography of H.E. Wight
Accession No.
20181046
Collection
Archive
Less detail

Mark Campbell Greetergram Schedule Books

https://collections.galtmuseum.com/en/permalink/descriptions95932
Date Range
1984-2010
Description Level
Fonds
Accession No.
20191014
Physical Description
52cm of textual records in bound volumes
Scope and Content
2019.1014/001: Schedule Book 1 from 1984, 1 double-sided page details account of the Greetergrammers origins from Mark Campbell. 2019.1014/002: Schedule Book 2 from 1985? 2019.1014/003: Schedule Book 3 from 1985-1986. 2019.1014/004: Schedule Book 4 from 1986-1987. 2019.1014/005: Schedule Book…
Date Range
1984-2010
Description Level
Fonds
Creator
Mark Campbell
Physical Description
52cm of textual records in bound volumes
History / Biographical
Mark Campbell was born and raised in Lethbridge, and he attended the radio arts program at Lethbridge College. Actively engaged in the local fine arts community throughout his life, Campbell worked as a radio broadcaster in the 1970s-1980s. He transitioned to television broadcasting in 1993, working for Global Lethbridge. It was while working at the local radio station 1090 CHEC in the early 1980s that Campbell started the Greetergrammers. The Greetergrammers were a group of friends that could be hired to sing and entertain for scheduled groups around town, and perform to unsuspecting individuals. The group could be hired to perform for birthdays, anniversaries, proposals, going-away parties, or any other special occasion that the client would request. The client would contact Mark Campbell and arrange to have their loved one or friend serenaded by the Greetergrammers at a specific time and place. The group would show up at the arranged location, and surprise the individual, and serenade them with a personalized song based off of a famous tune. As the Greetergram performances started to catch on, Mark Campbell kept schedule books of all of their performances, starting from 1984-2010; however, the Fonds are missing the 2004-2009 schedule books. Information contained in the schedule books include the names of the clients arranging the performances, the unsuspecting individual to be serenated, a few personal characteristics of the individual, and where the performance would take place. The Greetergram performances lasted for approximately 36 years, performing to over 20,000 people. A more detailed account of the Mark Campbell Greetergram Schedule Books to be found in file 2019.1014/001.
Scope and Content
2019.1014/001: Schedule Book 1 from 1984, 1 double-sided page details account of the Greetergrammers origins from Mark Campbell. 2019.1014/002: Schedule Book 2 from 1985? 2019.1014/003: Schedule Book 3 from 1985-1986. 2019.1014/004: Schedule Book 4 from 1986-1987. 2019.1014/005: Schedule Book 5 from 1987-1988. 2019.1014/006: Schedule Book 6 from 1988-1989. 2019.1014/007: Schedule Book 7 from 1989-1990? 2019.1014/008: Schedule Book 8 from 1990-1991? 2019.1014/009: Schedule Book 9 from 1991-1992. 2019.1014/010: Schedule Book 10 from 1992-1993. 2019.1014/011: Schedule Book 11 from 1993-1994. 2019.1014/012: Schedule Book 12 from 1994-1995 2019.1014/013: Schedule Book 13 from 1995. 2019.1014/014: Schedule Book 14 from 1996. 2019.1014/015: Schedule Book 15 from 1997. 2019.1014/016: Schedule Book 16 from 1998. 2019.1014/017: Schedule Book 17 from 1999. 2019.1014/018: Schedule Book 18 from 2000. 2019.1014/019: Schedule Book 19 from 2001. 2019.1014/020: Schedule Book 20 from 2002. 2019.1014/021: Schedule Book 21 from 2003. 2019.1014/022: Schedule Book 22 from 2010.
Accession No.
20191014
Collection
Archive
Less detail